Oasena: [oh-se-na] From Oasis, which is Greek/Egyptian for a fertile patch of ground. It refers to plants, which grow in a refuge, relief, or pleasant change from what is the usual. A good example is Mitrasacme oasena which grows in small clearings of more fertile regions in the open or less fertile island clearings in rainforests.

Obconica: [ob-kon-i-kah] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit and Conical, which is Latin for a cone shape. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble an upright or inverted cone. A good example is the gum nuts on Eucalyptus obconica.

Obconical: [ob-kon-i-kal] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit and Conical, which is Latin for a cone shape. It refers to describing an organ that has a cone shape or structure which is inverted.

Obconicum: [ob-kon-i-kum] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit and Conical, which is Latin for a cone shape. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble an upright or inverted cone. A good example is sporangia on the moss Physcomitrium obconicum.

Obcordata: [ob-kor-da-ta] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit and Cordāta which is Latin for heart shape. It refers to describing a petal or leaf that has a heart shape or structure which is inverted. A good example is Zieria obcordata.

Obcordate: [ob-kor-deit] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit and Cordātum which is Latin for heart shape. It usually refers to describing a petal or leaf, which has a heart shape.

Obcordatum: [ob-kor-dei-tum] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit and Cordātum which is Latin for heart shape. It refers to petals or leaves, which are heart. A good example is Spyridium obcordatum.

Obcordatus: [ob-kor-dei-tus] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit and Cordātum which is Latin for heart shape. It refers to petals or leaves, which are heart. A good example is Spyridium obcordatum.

Obcordiform: [ob-kor-di-form] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit, Cordāta which is Latin for heart shape. It refers to petals or leaves, which are heart and Forme which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. A good example is the only non native species of Dodonaaea was Dodonaea obcordiform which is now known as Dodonaea viscosum.

Obcuneata: [ob-kuh-ne-a-ta] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit and Cuneate, which is Latin for to taper down and along the petiole. It refers to leaves, which the apex tapers similar to the base. A good example was Hibbertia obcuneata, which is now known as Hibbertia cuneiformis.

Obdiplostemonous: [ob-di-plo-ste-mon-nos] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit, Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double and Stêma, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower. It refers to Stamens, which are in two whorls,, whereby the outer stamens are attached opposite the petals and the inner stamens are attached opposite the sepals. A good example is Gypsophila parviflora.

Oberonia: [oh-ber-on-ni-a] From Oberon, which is Latinised from Shakespeare’s name for the king of the fairies in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream. It refers to small ground orchids, which are considered the king of the ground orchids. A good example is Oberonia complanata.

Obesa: [o-be-sa] Maybe from Obēsa, which is Latin for eaten away or devoured. It refers to structures or organs, which are generally terete and plump or fat. A good example is Acacia obesa.

Obesum: [o-be-sum] Maybe from Obēsa, which is Latin for eaten away or devoured. It refers to structures or organs, which are generally terete and plump or fat. A good example was Racosperma obesum, which is now known as Acacia obesa.

Obicis: [o-bi-kis] Maybe from Ob which is Latin for contrary to, inverted or inversely and Kōnikós/kōnós which is Ancient Greek for a cone. It may therefore refer to the flowering heads somewhat resembling an inverted cone. A good example is Eleocharis obicis.

Obione: [o-bi-ohn] Maybe from Obiones, which is Latin for being similar to. It refers to plants, which very closely resemble the Atriplex genus. A good example was Obione billardierei, which is now known as Atriplex billardierei.

Obionoides: [o-bi-o-noi-deez] Maybe from Obiones, which is Latin for being similar to and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which very closely resemble the old Obione genus or later the Atriplex genus. A good example is Ceratogyne obionoides.

Oblanceolata: [ob-lan-se-o-lea-ta] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit and Lanceolate, which is Latin for a lance. It refers to leaves, which are widest at a point on the apical half quarte and tapers at the base where as lanceolate leaf tapers at both end from the centre. A good example is Asperula oblanceolata.

Oblanceolate: [ob-lan-se-leit] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit and Lanceolate, which is Latin for a lance. It refers to leaves, which is widest at a point on the apical half quarte and tapers at the base where as lanceolate leaf tapers at both end from the centre. A good example is the leaves on Dampiera diversifolia which range from spathulate to oblanceolate.

Oblanceolatum: [ob-lan-se-lei-tum] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit and Lanceolate, which is Latin for a lance. It refers to leaves which are widest at a point on the apical half quarte and tapers at the base where as lanceolate leaf tapers at both end from the centre. A good example is Conospermum caeruleum subsp. oblanceolatum.

Oblanceolatus: [ob-lan-se-lei-tus] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit and Lanceolate, which is Latin for a lance. It refers to leaves which are widest at a point on the apical half quarte and tapers at the base where as lanceolate leaf tapers at both end from the centre. A good example is Phyllanthus oblanceolatus.

Oblanceoloideus: [ob-lan-se-loi-de-us] From Ob, which is Latin for orbit, Lanceolate which is Latin for a lance and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves, which are widest at a point on the apical half quarte and tapers at the base similar to other plants with oblanceolate leaves. A good example is Pandanus oblanceoloideus.

Oblata: [o-bla-ta] From Oblātus, which is Latin for a shere or global shape that is flattened at the poles. It refers to the dimensions of fruits, which are sphericical with flattenned ends. A good example is Alphitonia oblata.

Oblate: [o-bleit] From Oblātus, which is Latin for a shere or global shape that is flattened at the poles. It refers to the dimensions of fruits, which are sphericical with flattenned ends.

Oblatiapicalis: [o-blah-ti-ei-pi-kah-lis] From Oblātus, which is Latin for a shere or global shape that is flattened at the poles and Pācālis which is Latin for peaceful or tranquil. It refers to the dimensions of fruits which have a greater circumference width than a longitudinal width. A good example was Pandanus oblatiapicalis, which is now known as Pandanus tectorius.

Oblatum: [o-bla-tum] From Oblātus, which is Latin for a Sphaîra, which is Ancient Greek or Sphaera, which is Latin for a shere or global shape that has a greater diameter around the equator than around the poles. It refers to fruits, which have a broader circumference than height. A good example is the sporangium on the fungus Physarum oblatum.

Oblatus: [o-bla-tus] From Oblātus, which is Latin for a Sphaîra, which is Ancient Greek or Sphaera, which is Latin for a shere or global shape that has a greater diameter around the equator than around the poles. It refers to fruits, which have a broader circumference than height. A good example is Pandanus oblatus.

Oligantha: [o-li-gan-tha] From Oligo, which is Ancient Greek for a few and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which have fewer flowers than other species in the genus. A good example is Xyris oligantha.

Oliganthum: [o-li-gan-thum] From Oligo, which is Ancient Greek for a few and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which have very few to few flowers. A good example is Genoplesium oliganthum.

Oliganthus: [o-li-gan-thus] From Oligo, which is Ancient Greek for a few and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which have very few to few flowers. A good example is Ricinocarpos oliganthus, which has fewer flowers than other species in the genus.

Obliqua: [oh-blee-ka] From Obliquus, which is Latin for a slant or to slant. It refers to the angles at the base of leaves, which are different; that is to have the bases either side of the midvein same leaf not the same size. A good example is the leaves on Ficus oblique.

Eucalyptus obliqua – andi Mellis

Oblique: [oh-bleek] From Obliquus, which is Latin for a slant or to slant. It refers to structures or organs, which are set at a definite angle. A good example is the stigma and pollen presenter on Grevillea infundibularis not being perpendicular or lateral.

Obliquiberbe: [oh-bli-kwee-ber-be] From Obliquus, which is Latin for to be at an angle and maybe Berberis, which is Latinized from the Arabic word for the fruit of a shrub found there. It refers to seeds and fruits, which are held at an oblique angle to each other along the stem. A good example was Schizachyrium obliquiberbe, which is now known as Schizachyrium fragile.

Obliquicuspis: [oh-bli-kwee-kup-sis] From Obliquus, which is Latin for to be at an angle and Cusp, which is Latin for a point. It refers to the flowers and fruits, which are at an oblique angle to each other along the stem. A good example is Sclerolaena obliquicuspis.

Obliquifolia: [oh-bli-kwee-foh-li-a] From Obliquus, which is Latin for to be at an angle and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are at an oblique angle to each other along the stem. A good example Jungermannia obliquifolia.

Obliquifolium: [oh-bli-kwee-foh-li-um] From Obliquus, which is Latin for to be at an angle and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are at an oblique angle to each other along the stem. A good example is Dasypogon obliquifolium.

Obliquifolius: [oh-bli-kwee-foh-li-us] From Obliquus, which is Latin for to be at an angle and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are at an oblique angle to each other along the stem. A good example is Dasypogon obliquifolius.

Obliquinervia: [oh-bli-kwee-ner-vi-a] From Obliquus, which is Latin for to be at an angle and Nervia, which is Latin for prominent veins. It refers to the veins on the leaves or phyllodes, which are at a narrow angle. A good example is  the fruit on Acacia obliquinervia.

Obliquinervium: [oh-bli-kwee-ner-vi-um] From Obliquus, which is Latin for to be at an angle and Nervia, which is Latin for prominent veins. It refers to the veins on the leaves or phyllodes, which are at a narrow angle. A good example is  the fruit on Racosperma obliquinervium, which is now known as Acacia obliquinervia.

Obliquisepala: [oh-bli-kwi-se-pa-la] From Obliquus, which is Latin for to be at an angle and Folium, which is Latin for foliage and Sképē which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum, which is Latin for the specialized leaves behind the petals. It refers to sepals, which are set at an oblique angle. A good example is Eremophila obliquisepala.

Obliquistigma: [oh-bli-kwis-stig-ma] From Obliquus, which is Latin for to be at an angle and Stígma/Stízein, which is Ancient Greek for the female reproductive organ upon the style which is receptive to receiving pollen. It refers to stigmas, which are set at an oblique angle to the style. A good example is Grevillea obliquistigma.

Obliquum: [oh-bli-kum] From Obliquus, which is Latin for to be at an angle. A good example was Amyema obliquum, which is now known as Amyema glabra.

Obliterata: [oh-bli-ter-a-ta] From Oblitterāta, which is Latin for to remove all signs or traces of or to do away with. It refers to the old name of plants, which were considered to be a part of the genus for a long time. A good example is  the fruit on Arthropteris obliterata.

Obliteratum: [oh-bli-ter-a-tum] From Oblitterātum, which is Latin for to remove all signs or traces of or to do away with. It refers to the old name in which the plants were considered to be a part of the genus for a long time. A good example is the fruit on Aspidium obliteratum, which is now known as Arthropteris palisotii.

Obloid: [o-bloid] From Oblongitia, which is Latin for an ovate to oval. It usually refers a fruit or seeds, which are 3 dimensional, oblong, solid ,Sphaîra, which is Ancient Greek or Sphaera, which is Latin for a shere or global shape and form. A good example is the fruit on Grevillea miniata.

Oblong: [ob-long] From ObLongitia, which is Latin for an ovate shape. It refers to organs, which are several times longer than they are. A good example is the fruit on Rubus rosifolia.

Oblong fronds on Asplenium australisica – andi Mellis

Oblonga: [ob-long-a] From Oblongitia, which is Latin for an ovate shape. It refers to a leaves, which are several times longer than it is wide where the blades on either side of the midvein are equal in all aspects. A good example is the leaves on Zeuxine oblonga.

Oblongata: [ob-long-ga-ta] From Oblongitia, which is Latin for an ovate shape. It refers to leaves, which are several times longer than it is wide where the blades on either side of the midvein are equal in all aspects. A good example is Persoonia oblongata.

Oblongatum: [ob-long-ga-tum] From Oblongitia, which is Latin for an ovate shape. It refers to leaves, which are several times longer than they are wide where the blades on either side of the midvein are equal in all aspects. A good example is Comesperma oblongatum.

Oblongatus: [ob-long-ga-tus] From Oblongitia, which is Latin for an ovate shape. It refers to leaves, which are several times longer than it is wide where the blades on either side of the midvein are equal in all aspects. A good example is Leucopogon rotundifolius var. oblongatus.

Oblongifolia: [ob-long-i-foh-li-a] From Oblongitia/Longus, which are Latin for an ovate shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are several times longer than it is wide where the blades on either side of the midvein are equal in all aspects. A good example is Acronychia oblongifolia.

Oblongifolium: [ob-long-i-foh-li-um] From Oblongitia/Longus, which are Latin for an ovate shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are several times longer than it is wide where the blades on either side of the midvein are equal in all aspects. A good example is Helichrysum oblongifolium, which is now known as Ozothamnus cuneifolius.

Oblongifolius: [ob-long-i-foh-li-us] From Oblongitia/Longus, which are Latin for an ovate shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are several times longer than it is wide where the blades on either side of the midvein are equal in all aspects. A good example is Ptilotus oblongifolius, which is now known as Ptilotus sessilifolius.

Obovalis: [ob-o-va-lis] From Ob, which is Latin for orbital and Ovatus, which is Latin for an egg shape. It refers to leaves, which are somewhat variable but usually obovate. A good example is Eriostemon obovalis.

Obovata: [ob-o-va-ta] From Ob, which is Latin for orbital and Ovatus which is Latin for an egg shape. It refers to organs, which are somewhat variable but usually takes the shape or form of an egg. A good example is the fruits on Acacia obovata.

Obovate: [ob-o-veit] From Ob, which is Latin for orbital and Ovatus which is Latin for an egg shape. It refers to organs, which are somewhat variable but usually obovate. A good example is the fruits on Acronychia littoralis.

Obovate leaves on Syzygium australe

Obovatifolia: [ob-o-va-ti-foh-li-a] From Ob, which is Latin for orbital and Ovatus, which is Latin for an egg shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves, which are somewhat variable but usually obovate in shape. A good example is the fruits on Philotheca obovatifolia.

Obovatum: [ob-o-va-tum] From Ob, which is Latin for orbital and Ovatus, which is Latin for an egg shape. It refers to organs, which are somewhat variable but usually takes the shape or form of an egg. A good example is the fruits on Racosperma obovatum, which is now known as Acacia obovata.

Obovatus: [ob-o-va-tus] From Ob, which is Latin for orbital and Ovatus which is Latin for an egg shape. It refers to leaves, which are somewhat variable but usually obovate. A good example is Elaeocarpus obovatus.

Obovoidal: [ob-o-voi-dal] From Ob, which is Latin for orbital and Ovatus which is Latin for an egg shape. It refers to organs, which have three dimensional shape like an egg. A good example is the fruits on Toona ciliata.

Obovoidea: [ob-o-voi-dee-a] From Ob, which is Latin for orbital and Ovatus, which is Latin for an egg shape. It refers to organs, which have three dimensional shape like an egg. A good example is the fruits on Planchonella obovoidea, which is now known as Planchonella myrsinodendron.

Obreniform: [ob-bre-ni-form] From Ob, which is Latin for orbital, Reni which is Latin for a kidney shape and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to organs usually the leaves, which have two ovate-kidney shaped halves.

Obscura: [ob-skyoo-ra] From Obscūra, which is Latin for dark. It refers to structures or organs, which are not clearly visible with the naked eye or its characteristics are not well defined. A good example is Aristida obscura.

Obscure: [ob-skyor] From Obscūrum, which is Latin for dark. It refers to structures or organs, which are not clearly visible with the naked eye or its characteristics are not well defined. A good example is Kunzea ambigua.

Obscurum: [ob-skyor-rum] From Obscūrum, which is Latin for dark. It refers to structures or organs, which are not clearly visible with the naked eye or its characteristics are not well defined. A good example is Abrodictyum obscurum.

Obseptum: [ob-sep-tum] From Ob, which is Latin for orbital and Saepīre, which is Latin for a fence. It refers to divisions usually on cells or in various fruits. A good example is Panicum obseptum.

Obsolete: [ob-so-leet] From Obsoletus, which is Latin for to fall into disuse or Obsol, which is Latin for to be accustomed to. It refers to structures or organs, which are not in existance or have a practical use anymore.

Obstans: [ob-stanz] From Ob, which is Latin for orbate and Stans which is Latin for to stand tall. It refers to trunks, which stand tall when compared to other plants in their habitats. A good example is Eucalyptus obstans.

Obstruens: [ob-stroo-enz] From Obstruēns, which is Latin for to obstruct. It refers to trunks, which are like canes that are covered in various size spines and thorns which prevent easy passing. A good example is Calamus obstruens, which is now known as Calamus australis.

Obtecta: [ob-tek-ta] From Obtecta, which is Latin for to be covered over. It refers to the seeds, which are tightly packed into the strongly restricted and constricted pods. A good example is the leaves on Acacia obtecta.

Obtectum: [ob-tek-tum] From Obtectum, which is Latin for to be covered over. It refers to the seeds, which completely surrounded with hairs. A good example is the fungus Cladosporium obtectum.

Obtectus: [ob-tek-tus] From Obtectus, which is Latin for to be covered over. It refers to the seeds, which completely surrounded with hairs. A good example is the leaves on Cymbopogon obtectus.

Obtrullata: [ob-trool-la-ta] From Ob, which is Latin for orbate or reversed and Trullate which is Latin for a trowel. It usually refers to leaves, which are shaped like a trowel including the central raised rib usually with a ratio of between 2:1 and 3:2. A good example is the leaves on Labichea obtrullata.

Obtrullate: [ob-trool-leit] From Ob which is Latin for orbate or reversed and Trullate which is Latin for a trowel. It usually refers to leaves, which are shaped like a trowel including the central raised rib usually with a ratio of between 2:1 and 3:2. A good example is the leaves on Grevillea varifolia.

Obtusa: [ob-tyoos-a] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded. It refers to the apex of the leaves, sepals or petalswhich are round. A good example is Lithomyrtus obtusa.

Obtusangula: [ob-tyoo-san-gyoo-la] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and Angularis which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which have an angle tapering to a rounded apex. A good example is the seeds on Fimbristylis obtusangula, which is now known as Fimbristylis rara.

Obtusangulum: [ob-tyoo-san-gyoo-lum] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and Angularis, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which have an angle tapering to a rounded apex. A good example is the leaves on Platylobium obtusangulum.

Obtusata: [ob-tyoo-sa-ta] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded. It refers to the apex of the leaves, sepals or petals, which are round. A good example is Acacia obtusata.

Obtusatum: [ob-tyoo-sa-tum] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded. It refers to leaves, sepals or petals, which are round. A good example is Rytidosperma racemosum var. obtusatum.

Obtusatus: [ob-tyoo-sa-tus] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded. It refers to leaves, sepals or petals which have  round or obtuse apexes. A good example is Leucopogon obtusatus.

Obtuse: [ob-tyoos] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded. It refers to leaves, sepals or petals which have round or obtuse apexes. A good example is the leaf and petal apexes on Hoya australis.

Obtuse foliage on Breynia cernua – andi Mellis

Obtusibracteata: [ob-toos-i-brak-te-a-ta] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and Bracteus, which is Latin for specialized leaves behind a flower bud or near the leaf axis. It refers to modified leaves or scales which are usually smaller than the calyxes on a flower or flower cluster in its axil, leaf axis or form a protective shield around the developing buds, which are obtuse. A good example is the flower bracts on Hibbertia obtusibracteata.

Obtusifida: [ob-toos-i-fi-da] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and Fīda, which is Latin for a division or to divide. It refers to linear lobes, which have an obtuse apex. A good example is the petals on Petrophile obtusifida.

Obtusiflora: [ob-tyoo-si-flor-a] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is Roman for the goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to sepals, petals or corolla lobes which have round or obtuse apexes. A good example is the petals on Cuscuta obtusiflora var. australis or the buds and seed capsules on Eucalyptus obtusiflora.

Obtusiflorus: [ob-tyoo-si-flor-us] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is Roman for the goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to sepals, petals or corolla lobes which have round or obtuse apexes. A good example is Juncus obtusiflorus.

Obtusifolia: [ob-tyoo-si-foh-li-a] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have round or obtuse apexes. A good example is the leaf apexes on Epacris obtusifolia or Acacia obtusifolia.

Obtusifolium: [ob-too-si-foh-li-um] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers leaves, which have round or obtuse apexes. A good example is the leaf apexes on Santalum obtusifolium.

Obtusifolius: [ob-too-si-foh-li-us] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers leaves, which have round or obtuse apexes. A good example is the leaf apexes on Senecio odoratus var. obtusifolius.

Obtusiloba: [ob-tyoo-si-loh-ba] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and Lobós, which is Ancient Greek or Lobus which is Latin for a lobe. It refers to lobes, which have round or obtuse apexes. A good example is Lepidozia obtusiloba.

Obtusilobus: [ob-tyoo-si-loh-bus] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and Lobós, which is Ancient Greek or Lobus which is Latin for a lobe. It refers to lobes, which have round or obtuse apexes. A good example is Brachychiton obtusilobus.

Obtusisepala: [ob-toos-i-se-pa-la] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and Sepalum, which is Latin for a sepal. It refers to sepals, which have round or obtuse apexes. A good example is Premna dallachyana var. obtusisepala.

Obtusisepalum: [ob-toos-i-se-pa-lum] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and Sepalum, which is Latin for a sepal. It refers to sepals, which have round or obtuse apexes. A good example is Geranium obtusisepalum.

Obtusissima: [ob-tyoo-sis-si-ma] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and -Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or the most. It refers to petals or other organs, which have apexes that more rounded or obtuse than other species in the genus. A good example is Agonis obtusissima.

Obtusum: [ob-tyoo-sum] From Obtūsum, which is Latin for rounded and -Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or the most. It refers to petals or other organs, which have apexes that precisely rounded or obtuse. A good example was Leptospermum obtusum, which is now known as Leptospermum polygalifolium subsp. polygalifolium.

Occidens: [ok-si-denz] From Occident/Occidēns, which is Latin for western. It refers to plants, which originally came from the west as in Europe or the middle east. A good example is Eremophila occidens.

Occidentale: [ok-si-den-teil] From Occident/Occidēns, which are Latin for western. It refers to plants, which originally came from the west as in Europe or the middle east. A good example is Blechnum occidentale which refers to it being discovered in western Asia.

Occidentalis: [ok-si-den-ta-lis] From Occident/Occidēns, which is Latin for western. It refers to plants, which originally came from the west as in Europe or the middle east. A good example is Banksia occidentalis which refers to it being a native to the far west of Western Australia and not eastern Australia.

Occidentissima: [ok-si-den-tis-si-ma] From Occident/Occidēns, which is Latin for western and -Issima, which is Greek/Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to plants, which originally came from the west as in Europe or the middle east. A good example is Olearia occidentissima which refers to its origin which is the extreme westerly province in Western Australia.

Occidua: [ok-si-dyoo-a] From Occiduum, which is Latin for westerly. It refers to plants, which grow on the western slopes and western side of the hills of Sundown National Park north west of Tenterfield in New South Wales. A good example is Macrozamia occidua.

Occluded: [o-kloo-ded] From Occulate, which is Latin for to close off or to have two separate parts which come together. It refers to the margins of the leaves, which are folded together. A good example is the leaf margins on Dianella revoluta.

Occulta: [o-kul-ta] From Occult, which is Latin for a secret. It refers to the sexual organs, which are enclosed within the calyxes. A good example is Gomphrena occulta.

Occultans: [o-kul-tanz] From Occult, which is Latin for a secret. It refers to sexual organs, which are often enclosed within the calyxes or are difficult to find. A good example is Prasophyllum occultans.

Occultiflora: [o-kul-ti-flor-a] From Occult, which is Latin for a secret and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are very tiny and difficult to see. A good example is Rotala occultiflora.

Occultipetala: [o-kul-ti-pe-ta-la] From Occult, which is Latin for a secret and Petalum, which is Ancient Greek for a petal/s. It refers to the petals remaining enclosed within the calyxes. A good example is Bergia occultipetala.

Occultum: [o-kul-tum] From Occult, which is Latin for a secret. It refers to sexual organs, which are enclosed within the glumes which are in return completely covered in floccose hairs. A good example is Schizachyrium occultum.

Oceanicum: [oh-shee-an-i-kum] From ōceanicus/ōceanus, which is Latin from the oceans or seas. It refers to plants, which live in the ocean or around the oceans. A good example is Dracophyllum oceanicum.

Ocellated: [os-se-la-tid] From Occulate, which is Latin for to have a spot. It refers to organs, which have a broad spot of one colour and usually another single spot of a different colour within it. A good example is Thelymitra ixioides, the sun orchids which have several spots of various sizes on the upper petals.

Ocellatus: [os-se-la-tus] From Occulate, which is Latin for to have a spot. It refers to organs, which have various size spots of a colour or have a single spot of a different colour within it. A good example is the welcome but beautiful mould eating slug which often has lines and spots on its back Triboniophorus graeffei.

Ochra: [ok-ra] From Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to colours of flowers or fruits, which are fawnish to dull yellow. A good example is the flowers on Cymbidium madidum or Cymbidium suave.

Ochracea: [o-kra-se-a] From Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to colours of the flowers or fruits, which are fawnish to dull yellow. A good example is Trachymene ochracea.

Ochraceofulva: [o-Kra-se-o-ful-va] From Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Fulvus, which is Latin for reddish-yellow. It refers to pileus and gills on fungi, which are reddish-yellow and yellowish. A good example is Lepiota ochraceofulva.

Ochraceofulvus: [o-Kra-se-oh-ful-vus] From Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Fulvus, which is Latin for reddish-yellow. It refers to pileus and gills on fungi, which are reddish-yellow and yellowish. A good example is Cortinarius ochraceofulvus.

Ochraceous: [o-kra-se-os] From ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for pale yellow or ōkhrós, which Ancient Greek for pale ocher. It refers to the egg like structures, which contain spore and are ejected forcefully from the peridium. A good example is Crucibulum laeve.

Ochralasia: [o-kra-la-se-a] From ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Lasios which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown somewhat matted hairs. A good example was Hibbertia ochrolasia, which is now known as Hibbertia drummondii.

Ochrantha: [o-kran-tha] From ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are pale yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-fawn in colour. A good example is Hutchinsia ochrantha, which is now known as Phlegmatospermum cochlearinum.

Ochranthum: [o-kran-thum] From ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are pale yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-fawn in colour. A good example is Phlegmatospermum ochranthum, which is now known as Phlegmatospermum cochlearinum.

Ochrea: [oh-kre-a] From ōchreāta, which is Latin for a sheath. It refers to sheaths, which form at the nodes by two stipules often uniting as a single unit and remaining as a scar after the leaf has dropped or the branch has grown out.

Ochreata: [oh-kree-a-ta] From ōchreāta, which is Latin for a sheath. It refers to sheaths, which form at the nodes by two stipules often uniting as a single unit and remaining as a scar after the leaf has dropped or the branch has grown out. A good example is Kailarsenia ochreata.

Photo upper Acacia alata, lower Casuarina equisetifolia -andi Mellis

Ochreatus: [oh-kre-a-tus] From ōchreātus, which is Latin for a sheath. It refers to sheaths, which forms at the nodes by two stipules often uniting as a single unit and remaining as a scar after the leaf has dropped or the branch has grown out. A good example is Potamogeton ochreatus.

Ochrocarpos: [o-kro-Kar-pos] From Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the colour of the fruits, which are pale yellowish-brown. A good example was Ochrocarpos touriga, which is now known as Mammea touriga.

Ochrocoleus: [o-kro-ko-le-us] From Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Koleos which is Ancient Greek for a sheath. It refers to the culm’s sheaths, which is pale yellowish-brown. A good example is Juncus ochrocoleus.

Ochrolasia: [o-kro-la-si-a] From ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Lasios which is Ancient Greek for somewhat hairy. It refers to structures or organs, which is somewhat covered in hairs. A good example was Ochrolasia drummondii, which is now known as Hibbertia drummondii.

Ochroleuca: [o-kro-loo-ka] From ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Leucos which is Ancient Greek for white. It refers to flowers, which are pastel yellow to cream. A good example is the flowers on Habenaria ochroleuca.

Ochroleucous: [o-kro-loo-kos] From ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Leucos, which is Ancient Greek for white. It refers to flowers, which are pale yellowish-brown. A good example is the flowers on Banksia audax.

Ochroleucus: [o-kro-loo-kus] From ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Leucos which is Ancient Greek for white. It refers to flowers, which are pale yellowish-brown. A good example was Stenochilus maculatus var. ochroleucus, which is now known as Eremophila maculata subsp. brevifolia and Eremophila maculata subsp. maculata.

Ochroma: [o-kroh-ma] From ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown. It refers to flowers, which are pale yellowish-brown. A good example is the flowers on Diuris ochroma.

Ochropetala: [o-kro-pe-ta-la] From ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to flowers, which are pale yellowish-brown. A good example is the flowers on Hysterobaeckea ochropetala.

Ochrophloia: [o-kro-floi-a] From ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Phlóos, which is Ancient Greek for the inner bark. It refers to the barks, which are being pale yellowish-brown. A good example is the bark on Eucalyptus ochrophloia.

Ochrophylla: [o-kro-fil-la] From ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which often have a pale ochre colour. A good example is the bark on Amanita ochrophylla.

Ochrophyllus: [o-kro-fil-lus] From Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which often have a pale ochre colour. A good example is the bark on Phyllanthus ochrophyllus, which is now known as Sauropus ochrophyllus.

Ochroptera: [o-kro-te-ra] From Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for pale brownish-yellow and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to seeds, which have a yellowish-ochre coloured wing. A good example is the bark on Hakea ochroptera.

Ochrosaccus: [ok-ro-sak-us] From Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Saccatus, which is Latin for a sack or bag. It refers to seed heads, which appear like small brownish-yellow sacks. A good example is Carex ochrosaccus.

Ochrosia: [o-kro-si-a] From Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown. It refers to timbers in some species, which is pale yellow. A good example is Ochrosia elliptica.

Ochrosperma: [o-kro-sper-ma] From Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which are pale yellowish-brown which is much paler than other species in the genus. A good example is Ochrosperma citriodorum.

Ochrostákhus: [o-kro-sta-shus] From Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for a flower spike. It refers to seeds, which are pale yellowish-brown compared to reddish-brown on other species in the genus. A good example is the mature spikes of Eleocharis ochrostákhus.

Ochrotricha: [o-kro-trahy-ka] From Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Trikos/Trikoma, which is Ancient Greek for to bear hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which have pale yellowish-brown hairs. A good example is the pale yellow-brown tomentose hairs on Dicrastylis ochrotricha, which is now known as Dicrastylis exsuccosa var. tomentosa.

Ocimifolia: [o-si-mi-foh-li-a] From okimon, which is Ancient Greek or ōcimum, which is Latin for a fragrant aroma or basil and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have a fragrant aroma similar to Basil. A good example was Opercularia ocimifolia, which is now known as Opercularia aspera.

Ocimum: [o-si-mum] From okimon, which is Ancient Greek or ōcimum, which is Latin for a fragrant aroma or basil and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have a fragrant aroma similar to Basil. A good example is the table herb, lemon basil known as Ocimum basilicum.

Ocrea: [o-kre-a] From ókris, which is Ancient Greek or later Ocrea, which is Latin for a type of covering or sock which protects the shin. It refers to sheaths, which forms at the nodes by two stipules often uniting as a single unit and remaining as a scar after the leaf has dropped or the branch has grown out. A good example is the leaf ocreas on Polyscias elegans.

Ocreata: [o-kre-a-ta] From ókris, which is Ancient Greek or later Ocrea, which is Latin for a type of covering or sock which protects the shin. It refers to sheaths, which forms at the nodes by two stipules often uniting as a single unit and remaining as a scar after the leaf has dropped or the branch has grown out. A good example is Eleocharis ocreata which the Australian plants are now known as Eleocharis minuta.

Ocreate: [o-kre-eit] From ókris, which is Ancient Greek or later Ocrea which is Latin for a type of covering or sock which protects the shin. It refers to stipular bases which surround the stem above the insertion of a petiole or blade.

Ocreola: [o-kre-oh-la] From ókris, which is Ancient Greek or later Ocrea, which is Latin for a type of covering or sock which protects the shin. It refers to sheaths, which forms at the nodes by two stipules at the base of a pedicle or peduncle. A good example is Polyscias sambucafolia.

Ocreolate: [o-kre-oleit] From ókris, which is Ancient Greek or later Ocrea, which is Latin for a type of covering or sock which protects the shin. It refers to small stipular bases, which surround the stem above the insertion of a petiole or blade.

Octo: [ok-toh] From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō which is Latin for eight.

Octandra: [ok-tan-dra] From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō, which is Latin for eight and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to flowers, which have eight stamens. A good example is the exotic ink bush Phytolacca octandra or the tropical native shrub Phaleria octandra.

Octandrum: [ok-tan-drum] From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō, which is Latin for eight and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for the male. It refers to flowers, which have eight stamens. A good example is Xanthophyllum octandrum.

Octandrus: [ok-tan-drus] From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō, which is Latin for eight and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for the male. It refers to flowers, which have eight stamens. A good example is Potamogeton octandrus.

Octarrhena: [ok-tar-re-na] From Oktṓm, which is Ancient Greek or later Octōm which is Latin for eight and Arrenm which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to flowers, which has eight stamens. A good example is Octarrhena pusilla.

Octavianina: [ok-ta-vi-a-ni-na] From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō, which is Latin for eight and Vianina, which is Latinized from a Malaysian vernacular for guessed at, to be conjectured or to be predicted. Its reference is unclear. A good example is the fungus Octavianina tasmanica, which is now known as Octaviania tasmanica.

Octaviana: [ok-ta-vi-a-na] From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō, which is Latin for eight and Vianina, which is Latinized from a Malaysian vernacular for guessed at, to be conjectured or to be predicted. Its reference is unclear. A good example is the fungus Octaviania tasmanica.

Octoclinis: [ok-to-klin-is] From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō, which is Latin for eight and klī́nein which is Ancient Greek for to lean towards change. It refers to gradual changes in characteristics exhibited by a species of adjacent populations. A good example was Octoclinis macleayana, which is now known as Callitris macleayana.

Octomaculata: [ok-to-ma-kyoo-la-ta] From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō, which is Latin for eight and Maculātus which is Latin for spotted. It refers to structures or organs usually the flowers, which have eight spots. A good example is the two red spots found at the base of each petal on Levenhookia octomaculata.

Octonervia: [ok-to-ner-vi-a] From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō, which is Latin for eight and Neuron which is Ancient Greek for a nerve. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which have eight distinct veins. A good example is Ludwigia octovalvis.

Octonervium: [ok-to-ner-vi-um] From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō, which is Latin for eight and Neuron which is Ancient Greek for a nerve. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which have eight distinct veins. A good example is Acacia octonervium.

Octastichous or 3/8 Phyllotaxy: [ok-ta-sti-chos or fil-lo-tak-si] From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō, which is Latin for eight, Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and taxis, which is Ancient Greek for to place in order. It refers to the realignment of leaves, which are on the same line or axis after completing three rotations: Octastichous or 3/8 Phyllotaxy. A good example is Pimelea octophylla.

Octophylla: [ok-to-fil/fahy-la] From Oktṓ, From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō, which is Latin for eight and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the realignment of leaves, which are on the same line or axis after completing three rotations: Octastichous or 3/8. A good example is Pimelea octophylla.

Octotriginta: [ok-to-trahy-jin-ta] From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō, which is Latin for eight, tri, which is Ancient Greek for three and maybe Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It may refer to the realignment of ovaries, which are on the same line or axis after completing three rotations: Octastichous or 3/8. A good example is Banksia octotriginta.

Octovalvis: [ok-to-val-vis] From Oktṓ, which is Ancient Greek or later Octō, which is Latin for eight and Valvae, which is Latin for a door leaf. It refers to a fruit having eight separate compartments. A good example is Ludwigia octovalvis.

Oculata: [o-kyoo-la-ta] From Ocularis, which is Latin for an eye. It refers to a sap sucking insect with large eyes. A good example is Conostylis occulta.

Oculatum: [o-kyoo-la-tum] From Ocularis, which is Latin for an eye. It refers to a sap sucking insects, which have large eyes. A good example is the fungus Didymium oculatum.

Oculatus: [o-kyoo-la-tus] From Ocularis, which is Latin for an eye. It refers to a sap sucking insects, which have large eyes. A good example is Gelastocoris oculatus.

Odd Binate: [od bi-neit] From Bi/Bis, which is Greek/Latin for two. It refers to leaves, which are placed opposite along the stem or rachis with a single leaflet at the apex. A good example is the pinnae on Nephrolepsis cordata.

Odgersii: [o-ger-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Odgers. A good example is Cyphanthera odgersii subsp. odgersii.

Odixia: [o-diks-si-a] From Ixia, which is Ancient Greek for sticky. It refers to plants, which have many glands that secrete a sticky resin. A good example is Odixia achlaena.

Odocoileops: [o-do-Koi-le-ops] From Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for having teeth, Coil, which is Old English for to be wound around and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for to resemble. It refers to flowers, or leaves which spiral around the stems and somewhat resemble little teeth. A good example is Synaphea odocoileops.

Odollam: [oh-dol-lam] Odallam may have been Latinized from the local Indian name that refers to the plants found there or may refer to the poisonous characteristics of suicide or homicide plant. If so it refers to the kernels, which are very toxic and virtually impossible to isolated in autopsies with police relying more on the symptoms of death. A good example was Cerbera odollam in which the Australian species are now known as Cerbera manghas.

Odonnellii: [o-don-nel-li-ahy] Is named in honour of O’Donnell but which O’Donnell cannot be substantiated. A good example is Goodenia odonnellii.

Odontites: [o-don-ti-tes] From Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for a tooth or teeth. It refers to organs, which have rather prominent teeth. A good example is the toothed fronds on Asplenium odontites, which is now known as Asplenium flaccidum.

Odontocalyx: [o-don-to-Kal-iks] From Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for having teeth and Kalyx, which is Ancient Greek for a cup or calyx. It refers to calyx’ lobes, which have a tooth like appendage. A good example is Kardomia odontocalyx.

Odontocarpa: [o-don-to-Kar-pa] From Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for to have teeth and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a tooth like appendage. A good example is the (fruits) hypanthia on Eucalyptus obconica.

Odontocarpum: [o-don-to-Kar-pum] From Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for to have teeth and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a tooth like appendage. A good example is the fruits on the red seaweed Sargassum odontocarpum.

Odontocarpus: [o-don-to-Kar-pus] From Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for to have atooth or teeth and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a tooth like appendage at the apex. A good example is the (fruits) hypanthia on Potamogeton odontocarpus, which is now known as Potamogeton tricarinatus.

Odontoclada: [o-don-to-Kla-da] From Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for to have a tooth or teeth and Klados, which is Ancient Greek or Cladus, which is Latin for a stick, stem or small branch. It refers to stems, which have a sharp tooth like spines. A good example is Jacksonia odontoclada.

Odontolepis: [o-don-to-le-pis] From Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for to have teeth and Lepis, which is Ancient Greek for a scale. It refers to scales, which are more tooth like. A good example is Waitzia odontolepis, which is now known as Waitzia suaveolens subsp. suaveolens.

Odontosperma: [o-don-to-sper-ma] From Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for having a tooth or teeth and Spérma which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which have a tooth like appendage. A good example is Trichosanthes odontosperma.

Odontospermum: [o-don-to-sper-mum] From Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for having a tooth or teeth and Spérma which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which have a tooth like appendage. A good example is Eriocaulon odontospermum.

Odorata: [oh-dor-a-ta] From Odōrāta, which is Latin for a smell or a bad aroma. It refers to the leaves or flowers, which have a smell or fragrance which is often unpleasant. A good example is Psydrax odorata.

Odoratissima: [oh-dor-a-tis-si-ma] From Odōrātum, which is Latin for a smell or a bad aroma and -Issima, which is Greek/Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to structures or organs, which smells the strongest of any species in the genus. A good example is the fruits on Stemodia odoratissima, which is now known as Adenosma muelleri.

Odoratissimus: [oh-dor-ah-tis-si-mus] From Odōrātum, which is Latin for a smell or a bad aroma and -Issima, which is Greek/Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to structures or organs, which smells the strongest of any species in the genus. A good example is the fruits on Pandanus odoratissimus, which is now known as Pandanus tectorius which smell somewhat off as they age.

Odoratum: [oh-dor-a-tum] From Odōrātum, which is Latin for a smell or a bad aroma. It refers to the leaves or flowers, which have a smell or fragrance which is often unpleasant. A good example is Leptospermum odoratum, which is now known as Leptospermum emarginatum.

Odoratus: [oh-dor-ei-tus] From Odōrātum, which is Latin for a smell or a bad aroma. It refers to the leaves or flowers, which have a smell or fragrance which is often unpleasant. A good example is Exocarpos odoratus.

Odorifera: [oh-dor-ri-fer-a] From Odōrātum, which is Latin for a smell or a bad aroma and Ferae/Ferārumm which is Latin for to bear. It refers to the aroma of flowers or leaves which is strong and unpleasant. A good example is the smell of the leaves on Zieria odorifera.

Oecophylla: [oh-ko-fil-la] Maybe from Oenone, which is Ancient Greek for a beautiful mountain nymph and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It may refer to the beauty of the ants and their weaving of the leaves together. The leaves being a popular choice of the green weaver ants Oecophylla longinoda and Oecophylla smaragdina to construct their nests. A good example is Oecophylla smaragdina. The ants are being trialled as an organic agricultural, pest control alternative to chemical control in India and Africa at the moment and should be utilised in the same circumstances here.

Green Weaver Ants Oecophylla smaragdina.

Oederoides: [oh-der-oi-deez] Maybe named in honour of Georg Christian Edler von Oldenburg Oeder: 1728–1791, who was a German-Danish botanist, medical doctor, economist and social reformer who is known for his works on the Danish flora and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Oeder? genus. A good example was Genetyllis oederoides, which is now known as Darwinia oederoides.

Oedipus: [oh-di-pus] From Oidáō, which is Ancient Greek for a swelling and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to pedicels or petioles, which are much thicker than other species in the genus. A good example is the petioles on Solanum oedipus.

Oenanthe: [oh-nan-the] From Oenone, which is Ancient Greek for a beautiful mountain nymph and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which the Oenone sought revenge. A good example is the poison from the species which was often used in Socrates’s suicide – Hemlock, Oenanthe crocata or Conium maculatum.

Oenochila: [oh-no-chi-la] From Oenotheros, which is Ancient Greek for roots smelling of wine and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to labellum, which have an aroma somewhat like port wine. A good example is Arachnorchis oenochila.

Oenopolia: [oh-no-po-li-a] From Oenone, which is Ancient Greek for a beautiful mountain nymph and Polia, which is Ancient Greek for pale grey. It may refer to the early days of the love affair between Paris and Oenone where there would have been great lust. A good example is the fact that over 300 fly species have been recorded attending the flowers on Ziziphus oenopolia in vane attempts in courtships and mating.

Oenothera: [oh-no-the-ra] From Oenothera, which is Ancient Greek for wine scented. It refers to roots which have an aroma somewhat like port. A good example is Oenothera triloba.

Oenotheroides: [oh-no-the-roi-deez] From Oenotherum, which is Ancient Greek for wine scented and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to roots which have an aroma somewhat like port and resemble the Oenothera genus. A good example is Hibbertia oenotheroides which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to its real or correct classification.

Oenotrichia: [oh-no-trahy-ka] From Oenotheros, which is Ancient Greek for roots smelling of wine and Trichos, which is Ancient Greek for a hair or hairs of the type mentioned in the prefix. It refers to hairs on roots, which appear to emit an aroma or colour like port wine. A good example is Oenotrichia tripinnata.

Oenpelliensis: [oh-en-pel-li-en-sis] From Kunbarllanjnja, which is Latinized for the local vernacular of the Kunwinjku people and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to the Anglisation of the name Oenpelli, which is where the first plants were discovered and are restricted to in the far north east of the Northern Territory. A good example is Triumfetta oenpelliensis.

Offincale: [of-fin-Kal-ee] From Officinale, which is Latin for a substances or organisms; usually plants, with uses in medicine and herbalism. It refers to plants, which have been, or are used in pharmaceuticals or special culinary benefit with a medical benefit attached to them. A good example is the Asian Calendula, Jasminum offincale.

Offincalis: [of-fin-Kal-iks] From Officinalis, which is Latin for a substances or organisms; usually plants, with uses in medicine and herbalism. It refers to plants, which have been, or are used in pharmaceuticals or special culinary benefit with a medical benefit attached to them. A good example is the Asian Calendula, Calendula offincalis.

Ogcerostylus: [og-ser-o-sti-lus] Maybe from Ṓkhra, which is Ancient Greek for yellowish, dull fawnish-gold, dull yellowish-brown and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a post, pillar or column. It refers to the female reproductive organs between the stigma and ovaries, which are yellowish in colour. A good example was Ogcerostylus humifusus, which is now known as Siloxerus humifusus.

Ogilvieanum: [oh-gil-vi-a-num] Is named in honour of P. Ogilvie, who probably collected the type specimen. A good example is Lasiopetalum ogilvieanum.

Oides: [oi-dee z] From Eîdos/Oides, which is the Greek suffix for alike or similar to. It refers to a structure, organ or even the plant resembling another plant’s structure, organ or plant. A good example is Pandorea jasminoides which resembles the exotic Jasmine.

Olax: [o-laks] From Bolax, which is Ancient Greek for a furrow. It refers to the flowers having a small longitudinal furrow. A good example is Olax angulata.

Oldei: [ol-de-ahy] Is named in honour of Peter Olde. A good example is Grevillea oldie.

Oldenlandia: [ol-den-lan-di-a] Is named in honour of Henrick Bernard Oldenland; 1663-1697, who was a German born South African botanist. A good example is Oldenlandia galioides.

Oldfieldanus: [old-feel-da-nus] Is named in honour of Augustus F. Oldfield; 1821-1887, who was an English botanist who collected in Tasmania and walked from Sydney to Melbourne in the late 1840’s A good example is Sirpus oldfieldianus, which is now known as Isolepis oldfieldiana.

Oldfieldii: [old-feel-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Augustus F. Oldfield; 1821-1887, who was an English botanist who collected in Tasmania and walked from Sydney to Melbourne in the late 1840’s A good example is Acacia oldfieldii.

Olea: [o-lee-a] From Olea, which is Latin for olive (oil). It refers to the olive plant in which the oil was very valuable. A good example is Olea paniculata.

Oleaefolia:[o-lee-foh-li-uh] From Olea, which is Latin for olive (oil) and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble the leaves of the Olive tree. A good example is Olea paniculata.

Oleaginus:[o-lee-ji-nus] From Olea, which is Latin for olive (oil) and Ginus, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which have the ability to produce oil. A good example is Cortinarius oleaginus.

Olearia: [o/oh-leer-i-a] Is named in honour of Johann Gottfried Ölschläger; 1603-1671, who was a German horticulturist and author of a flora of Halle in Germany. His name was Latinized to the Latin form of Olearius. A good example is the daisy Olearia hygrophila.

Oleaster: [o-lee-as-ter] From Olea, which is Latin for olive (oil). It refers to plants, which resemble the olive trees of Mediterranean Europe. A good example Denhamia oleaster.

Oleifera: [o-lee-feer-a] From Olea, which is Latin for olive (oil)  and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which bear fruits and oil similar to the European olive tree. A good example is Moringa oleifera.

Oleifolia: [o-lee-foh-li-a] From Olea, which is Latin for olive (oil) and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the olive trees of Mediterranean Europe. A good example is Psydrax oleifolia.

Oleifolium: [o-lee-foh-li-um] From Olea, which is Latin for oil and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the olive trees of Mediterranean Europe. A good example is Heterodendrum oleifolium, which is now known as Alectryon oleifolium.

Oleifolius: [o-lee-foh-li-us] From Olea, which is Latin for oil and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the olive trees of Mediterranean Europe. A good example is Alectryon oleifolius.

Oleoides: [o-lee-oi-dees] From Olea, which is Latin for olive (oil) and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have an overall appearance that resemble the olive trees of Mediterranean Europe. A good example is the leaves on Grevillea oleoides.

Oleosum: [o-lee-oh-sum] From Olea, which is Latin for olive (oil). It refers to the overall appearance of the trees, which resemble the olive trees of Mediterranean Europe. A good example is Syzygium oleosum.

Oleracea: [o-ler-a-se-a] From Olerācea, which is Latin for edible. It refers to plants which were extensively used as the main vegetable in many parts of the world. A good example is Portulaca oleracea.

Oleraceum: [oh-le-ra-se-um] From Olerāceus, which is Latin for edible. It refers to plants which were extensively used as the main vegetable in many parts of the world. A good example is the common, exotic, sow thistle daisy Solanum oleraceum, which is now known as Solanum americanum.

Oleraceus: [oh-lee-ra-se-us] From Olerāceus, which is Latin for edible. It refers to plants which were extensively used as the main vegetable in many parts of the world. A good example is the common, exotic, sow thistle daisy Sonchus oleraceus.

Olgana: [ol-ga-na] From Olidus, which is Latin for a few or feeble. It may refer to plants, which have fewer flowers than other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia olgana.

Olganum: [ol-ga-num] From Olidus, which is Latin for a few or feeble. It may refer to plants, which have fewer flowers than other species in the genus. A good example is Racesperma olananum, which is now known as Acacia olgana.

Olida: [o-lee-da] From Olidus, which is Latin for a bad smell. It refers to the leaves and or stems, which emit a bad aromatic odour when crushed. A good example is Eucalyptus olida.

Olidum: [o-lee-dum] From Olidus, which is Latin for a bad smell. It probably refers to the leaves and or spikes, which have a strongly aromatic smell when crushed. A good example is the rare Tasmanian orchid Prasophyllum olidum.

Olicanthum: [o-li-kan-thum] From Olidus, which is Latin for a few or feeble and ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for a spine or thorn. It refers to plants, which have a few weak or soft spines or prickles. A good example is Solanum oligacanthum.

Oligandra: [o-li-gan-dra] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to stamens, which are fewer on this species than other species in the genus. A good example is Thryptomene oligandra.

Oligandrum: [o-li-gan-drum] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to stamens, which are fewer on this species than other species in the genus. A good example is Leptospermum oligandrum.

Oligandrus: [o-li-gan-drus] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to stamens, which are fewer on this species than other species in the genus. A good example is Calycopeplus oligandrus.

Oligantha: [o-li-gan-tha] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which have fewer flowers in a head than other species in the genus. A good example Darwinia fascicularis subsp. oligantha.

Oliganthema: [o-li-gan-the-ma] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have a fewer stamens than other species in the genus. A good example is Olearia oliganthema which is now; unfortunately, considered to be extinct.

Oliganthum: [ol-i-gan-thum] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have a fewer stamens than other species in the genus. A good example is Genoplesium oliganthum.

Oliganthus: [o-li-gan-thus] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have a fewer stamens than other species in the genus. A good example Leucopogon oliganthus.

Oligarrhena: [o-li-gar-ree-na] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Arrhena, which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to flowers, which have just two or four stamens compared to other species in the genus which have 5 anthers. A good example is Oligarrhena micrantha.

Oligarrhenoides: [o-li-gar-ren-oi-deez] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few, Arrhena, which is Ancient Greek for a male and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers, which have just two or four stamens/anthers compared to other species which have 5 anthers, which is similar to the Oligarrhena genus. A good example is Monotoca oligarrhenoides.

Oligocephala: [o-li-go-ke/se-fa-la] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Kephalḗ which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to plants, which have flower heads than other species in the genus. A good example was Fimbristylis oligocephala, which is now known as Fimbristylis cephalophora.

Oligocephalum: [o-li-go-ke/se-fa-lum] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Kephalḗ which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to plants, which have flower heads than other species in the genus. A good example is Spyridium oligocephalum.

Oligocephalus: [o-lee-go-ke/se-fa-lus] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Kephalḗ which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to plants, which have flower heads than other species in the genus. A good example is Oreobolus oligocephalus.

Oligochaetochilus: [o-li-go-chee-to-chi-lus] From Oligos, which is Ancient Greek for a few or feeble, Chaite/Khaeite, which is Ancient Greek for a bristle or bristles and Cheilos/Kheilos which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to structures or organs, which have a few short, feeble bristles. A good example is Oligochaetochilus wapstrarum, which is now known as Pterostylis wapstrarum.

Oligoclada: [o-li-go-kla-da] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Klados, which is Ancient Greek or cladus, which is Latin for a twig, stem or branch. It refers to plants, which have an open growth habit. A good example is Atalaya oligoclada.

Oligococca: [o-li-go-ko-ka] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Cocca, which is Latin for a dry berry. It refers to plants, which have few fruits or fertile fruits. A good example is Caldesia oligococca.

Oligocolea: [o-li-go-kol-e-a] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and probably from Coleos, which is Ancient Greek for a sheath. It refers to the plants resembling a grass that have a few to several sheaths surrounding the bases of the culms. A good example is Lepyrodia oligocolea.

Oligodonta: [o-li-go-don-ta] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Donta which is Ancient Greek for a tooth or teeth. It refers to leaves or at times other organs, which have very poorly developed teeth. A good example is Hibbertia oligodonta.

Oligomera: [o-li-go-mer-a] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Meris, which is Ancient Greek for a portion or number. It refers to a description of plants, which have fewer numbers of members within a given whorl. A good example is Baeckea oligomera.

Oligomerous: [o-li-goh-mer-uh s] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Meris, which is Ancient Greek for a portion or number. It refers to a description of a reduction in the numbers of members within a whorl.

Oligomerum: [o-li-go-mer-um] From Oligos, which is Ancient Greek for a few or feeble and Meris, which is Ancient Greek for a portion or number. It refers to a description of It refers to plants, which have fewer stamens of members within a given whorl compared to other species in the other closely related genre. A good example is Ochrosperma oligomerum.

Oligoneura: [oli-go-nyoo-ra] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which only have a few faint nerves. A good example is Acacia oligoneura.

Oligoneurum: [oli-go-nyoo-rum] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a few and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which only have a few faint nerves. A good example was Racosperma oligoneurum, which is now known as Acacia oligoneura.

Oligophlebum: [oli-go-fle-bum] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Phléps, which is Ancient Greek for a conspicuous veins. It refers to leaves, which have very fewer conspicuous veins. A good example was Racosperma oligophlebum, which is now known as Acacia cowleana.

Oligophylla: [oli-go-fil-la] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which have fewer leaflets than other species in the genus. A good example is Swainsona oligophylla.

Oligorrhiza: [oli-gor-rahy-za] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Rrhíza, which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to plants, which have fewer roots than other species in the genus. A good example was Lemna oligorrhiza, which is now known as Landoltia punctata.

Oligosperma: [oli-go-sper-ma] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to plants, which produce fewer seeds or spores than other species in the genus. A good example is Botelua oligosperma.

Oligostachya: [oli-go-sta-sha] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for a flowering stem. It refers to plants, which have fewer flowering stems than other species in the genus. A good example is Austrostipa oligostachya.

Oligotaxy: [o-li-go-tak-si] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Taxis/Taxus, which is Ancient Greek for an arrangement or placed in an order. It refers to plants, which have fewer formed organs, usually not numerous in number when used in classifying species.

Oligotricha: [oli-go-trahy-ka] From Olígoi, which is Ancient Greek for a few and Trichos, which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to the plants, which have very few hairs. A good example is Hoya oligotricha.

Olitorius: [o-li-tor-i-us] From Olitorius, which is Latinized from the Jewish word for a plant in northern Africa and Asia used as a vegetable. A good example is Corchorus olitorius.

Olivacea: [o-li-va-se-a] From Oliva, which is Latin for deep yellowish-green and Aceous, which is Latin for to resemble. It refers to structures or organs, which are olive-green. A good example is the flowers on Eucalyptus olivacea.

Olivaceous: [o-li-va-se-os] From Oliva, which is Latin for deep yellowish-green and Aceous which is Latin for to resemble. It refers to structures or organs, which are olive-green. A good example is the flowers on Sarcochilus olivaceus.

Oliveri: [o-li-ver-ahy] From Oliva, which is Latin for deep yellowish-green. It refers to structures or organs, which are olive green in colour. A good example is the leaf colour on Cinnamomum oliveri.

Olivina: [o-li-vin-a] From Oliva, which is Latin for deep yellowish-green. It refers to structures or at times an organs, which are olive-green in colour. A good example is the leaves on Eucalyptus olivina.

Ollaris: [o-li-ar-is] From Ollaris, which is Late Latin for belonging to pots.

Olsenii: [ol-sen-i-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Ian Sinclair Olsen; 1942-20.., who was an Australian horticulturalist, landscape designer and plant collector. A good example is Acacia olsenii.

Omalanthus: [oh-ma-lan-thus] From Homolos, which is Ancient Greek for flat and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to the flattish flowers and cocca. A good example is Omalanthus populifolium which is also correctly known as Homalanthus populifolium.

Omalophylla: [oh-mahl-oh-fil-la] From Homalos, which is Ancient Greek for flat and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which have flat leaves. A good example is Acacia omalophylla.

Omalophyllum: [oh-mal-o-fil-lum] From Homalos, which is Ancient Greek for flat and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which have flat leaves. A good example was Racosperma omalophyllum, which is now known as Acacia omalophylla.

Omearana: [oh-mee-ra-na] Is named in honour of Omeara. A good example was Goodenia omearana which is presently been reassigned as Goodenia sp. east pilbara until further studies can place into the correct species.

Omegandra: [oh-me-gan-dra] From ōméga, which is Ancient Greek for great and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to the male reproductive organs, which are prominently displayed. A good example is Omegandra kanisii.

Omissa: [oh-mis-sa] From Omissus, which is Latin for to be overlooked, omitted or neglected. It refers to plants, which are often over looked and often categorized as insignificant. A good example is Podolepis omissa.

Omissus: [oh-mis-us] From Omissus, which is Latin for to be overlooked, omitted or neglected. It refers to the plants, which are often over looked and often categorized as insignificant. A good example is Plectranthus omissus.

Ommatosperma: [om-ma-to-sper-ma] Maybe from Ommatids, which is Latin for a large genus of flies and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It may refer to seeds which are often devoured or spread by flies. A good example is Acacia ommatosperma.

Ommatospermum: [om-ma-to-sper-mum] Maybe from Ommatids, which is Latin for a large genus of flies and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It may refer to seeds which are often devoured or spread by flies. A good example was Racosperma ommatospermum, which is now known as Acacia ommatosperma.

Omnifertilis: [om-ni-fer-ti-lis] From Omnius, which is Latin for to come together and Fertilis, which is Latin for fruitful. It refers to fruits, which have a cord that resembles an umbilicus. It may have few or an abundance of seeds attached. A good example is Actinotus omnifertilis.

Omphacomeria: [om-fa-ko-mer-i-a] From Omphalós, which is Ancient Greek for a navel or umbilical and Meris, which is Ancient Greek for a portion or member number. It refers to fruits, which have a small naval. A good example is Omphacomeria acerba.

Omphalea: [om-fa-le-a] From Omphalós, which is Ancient Greek for a navel or umbilical. It refers to the little navels on some fruits and outer navels on others. A good example is Omphalea papuana.

Omphalina: [om-fa-li-na] From Omphalós, which is Ancient Greek for a navel or umbilical. It refers to the little navels on some fruits and outer navels on others. A good example is Omphalina chromacea.

Omphalolappula: [om-fa-lo-lap-pyoo-la] From Omphalós, which is Ancient Greek for a navel or umbilical and Lappa, which is Latin for a burr. It refers to the burr fruits, which have a long pedicels, which resembles an umbilical cord. A good example is Omphalolappula concava.

Omphalotus: [om-fa-lo-tus] From Omphalós, which is Ancient Greek for a navel or umbilical and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to the pileus of some fungi which somewhat resemble a twisted umbilicus cord along the margins. A good example is Omphalotus nidiformis.

Oncinocalyx: [on-si-no-kal-iks] From Oncinna, which is Latin for well-made or skilfully attached and Kalyx, which is Ancient Greek for a cup. It refers to the calyxes, which are persistent around the fruit. A good example is Oncinocalyx betchei.

Oncinocarpa: [on-si-no-kar-pa] From Oncinna, which is Latin for well-made or skilfully attached and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits or pods, which have are produced in large numbers. A good example is Brachyscome oncocarpa.

Oncinocarpum: [on-si-no-kar-pum] From Oncinna, which is Latin for well-made or skilfully attached and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits or pods, which have are produced in large numbers. A good example was Racosperma oncocarpum, which is now known as Acacia oncocarpa.

Oncinophylla: [on-si-no-fil-la] From ónkos, which is Ancient Greek for a mass or bulk and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are produced in mass. A good example is Acacia oncinophylla.

Oncinophyllum: [on-si-no-fil-lum] From ónkos, which is Ancient Greek for a mass or bulk and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are produced in mass. A good example is Racosperma oncinophyllum, which is now known as Acacia oncinophylla.

Oncinotropis: [on-si-no-tro-pis] From ónkos, which is Ancient Greek for a mass or bulk and Tropis, which is Ancient Greek for a ship’s keel. It refers to the lower petals on legumes, which often resemble a large ship’s keel. A good example was Swainsona oncinotropis, which is now known as Swainsona swainsonioides.

Oncogyne: [on-ko-jahyn] From ónkos, which is Ancient Greek for a mass or bulk and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to styles and stigmas, which are more prominent than on other species in the genus. A good example is Grevillea oncogyne.

Oncinophylla: [on-si-no-fil-la] From ónkos, which is Ancient Greek for a mass or bulk and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are produced in mass. A good example is Acacia oncinophylla.

Oncinophyllum: [on-si-no-fil-lum] From ónkos, which is Ancient Greek for a mass or bulk and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are produced in mass. A good example was Racosperma oncinophyllum, which is now known as Acacia oncinophylla.

Oncophylla: [on-ko-fil-la] From ónkos, which is Ancient Greek for a mass or bulk and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are produced in mass. A good example is Calytrix oncophylla.

Oncophyllum: [on-ko-fil-la] From ónkos, which is Ancient Greek for a mass or bulk and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are produced in mass. A good example is Oncophyllum minutissimum.

Oncosporum: [on-ko-sporum] From ónkos, which is Ancient Greek for a mass or bulk and Sporon, which is Ancient Greek for fern spore or a seed. It refers to spores or fine seeds which are produced in mass. A good example is fine seeds on Oncosporum granulatum, which is now known as Marianthus granulatus.

Ondinea: [on-di-ne-a] Maybe from Condita, which is Latin for well hidden. It may refer to the plants, which are hidden among other water plants or hiding its flowers as they are not as showy as other species in the genus. A good example is Nymphaea ondinea.

Onoprienkoana: [on-no-pri-en-koh-a-na] From Onoprienk, which maybe Latinized for a district in far north eastern Queensland and Iana/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Onoprienko district in far north eastern Queensland. A good example is Cryptocarya onoprienkoana.

Onosmiflora: [on-os-mi-flor-a] From Onosma, which is Ancient Greek for to smell like a donkey and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers which smell like donkeys. A good example is Epacris onosmiflora, which is now known as Epacris purpurascens.

Ontogenesis: [on-to-jen-e-sis] From Ontos, which is Ancient Greek for to be the beginning or in existence and Geneia/Genos, which is Ancient Greek for to be born or produced. It refers to the science of studying the origination and development of an organism from the time of conception or fertilization of the egg to the organism’s maturing and often through including death the organism.

Ontogenetica: [on-to-je-net-ik-a] From Ontos, which is Ancient Greek for to be the beginning or in existence and Geneia/Genos, which is Ancient Greek for to be born or produced. It refers to the science of studying the origination and development of an organism from the time of conception or fertilization of the egg to the organism’s maturing and often through including the entire lifespan of the organism.

Ontogeney: [on-to-je-ne-ahy] From Ontos, which is Ancient Greek for to be the beginning or in existence and Geneia/Genos, which is Ancient Greek for to be born or produced. It refers to the science of studying the origination and development of an organism from the time of conception or fertilization of the egg to the organism’s maturing and often through including the entire lifespan of the organism.

Onychosepalum: [on-ahy-ko-se-pa-lum] From Onyx, which is Ancient Greek for a claw and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum, which is Latin for a sepal. It refers to the sepals looking similar to a claw. A good example is the sepals on Onychosepalum laxiflorum.

Oocarpa: [oo-kar-pa] From Oión, which is Ancient Greek for an egg and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a typical ovate egg shape. A good example is Corymbia oocarpa.

Oocarpum: [oo-kar-pum] From Oión, which is Ancient Greek for an egg and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a typical ovate egg shape. A good example is the sporangium on Macromitrium oocarpum, which is now known as Macromitrium prorepens.

Oocyte: [oo-sahyt] From Oión, which is Ancient Greek for an egg and Kyte, which is Ancient Greek for a chamber. It refers to an immature female germ (one oocyte matures during the menstrual cycle) cell that gives rise to an ootid and then eventually to an ovum, while several others partially mature and then disintegrate.

Oogensis: [oo-jen-sis] From Oión, which is Ancient Greek for an egg and Génesis, which is Ancient Greek for the origin of. It refers to the differentiation of the ovum, into a cell which is able to develop further when conception or fertilization has been completed. The ovum has developed from the primary oocyte by maturation

Oogonium: [oo-go-ni-um] From Oión, which is Ancient Greek for an egg and Gonos, which is Ancient Greek for the “sexual reproduction”. It refers to the chamber in which the ovum will be conceived or fertilized and where it will develop further.

Ooliekirrus: [oo-li-e-kir-rus] From Oión, which is Ancient Greek for an egg and Liekirrus, which is unknown. It may refer to the emerging fungi which resemble eggs on the ground. A good example is Leucoagaricus ooliekirrus.

Oosphere: [oos-feer] From Oión, which is Ancient Greek for an egg and Sphaîra, which is Ancient Greek or Sphaîra, which is Latin for a shere or global shape and form. It refers to a large non motile female gamete or egg cell which has formed in an oogonium and is awaiting conception or fertilization.

Ootheca 1:[oo-thee-ka] From Oión, which is Ancient Greek for an egg and Thḗkē/Tithénai, which is Ancient Greek for to place or put in. It refers to a sheath or compartment, which encloses an organ. It protects and feeds the fertilized egg, spores or developing seeds.

Ootheca 2:[oo-thee-ka] From Oión, which is Ancient Greek for an egg and Thḗkē/Tithénai, which is Ancient Greek for to place or put in. It refers to egg cases of some insects,  where the eggs are tightly wrapped in silk. A good example is the egg sacs of the Praying Mantis. Not to be confused for a spermathecal.

Op.cit: [op.cit] Is the abbreviation of Opere Citato. Is the Citing for the above text.

Opaca: [oh-pa-ka] From Opacus, which is Latin for shady, dark or obscure. It refers to species, which prefer darker locations in the forest or providing shade for others. A good example of a plant that prefers dark habitats is Clematicissus opaca and one that provide shade is Corymbia opaca.

Opacula: [oh-pa-kyoo-la] From Opacus, which is Latin for shady, dark or obscure. It refers to species, which prefer darker locations in the forest or providing shade for others. A good example of a plant that creates plenty of shade is Corymbia opacula.

Opacum: [oh-pa-kum] From Opacus, which is Latin for shady, dark or obscure. It refers to species, which prefer darker locations in the forest or providing shade for others. A good example of a plant that grows in darker moist habitats is Solanum opacum.

Opacus: [oh-pa-kus] From Opacus, which is Latin for shady, dark or obscure. It refers to species, which prefer darker locations in the forest or providing shade for others. A good example of a plant that grows in darker watery habitats is Echinodorus opacus.

Opaque: [oh-peik] From Opacus, which is Latin for shady, dark or obscure. It refers to organs, which are not quite transparent or translucent in that they do not allow the full penetrable to light.

Opercula: [oh-per-kyoo-la] From Operculum, which is Latin for a cover or lid. It refers to the caps, on the buds of certain trees. A good example is the operculum on Eucalyptus resinifera.

Opercularia: [oh-per-kyoo-lar-i-a] From Operculum, which is Latin for a cover or lid. It refers to the caps on the buds of certain trees, which cover the petals and sexual organs or the shape of a flower head resembling a cap. A good example is Opercularia aspera.

Operculata: [o-per-kyoo-lei-ta] From Operculum, which is Latin for a cover or lid. It refers to the caps on the buds of certain trees, which cover the petals and sexual organs or the shape of a flower head resembling a cap. A good example is the flowers on Xyris operculata where the flowers are protected by hard papery bracts where only one flower is released at a time.

Operculatum: [o-per-kyoo-la-tum] From Operculum, which is Latin for a cover or lid. It refers to the caps on the buds of certain trees, which cover the petals and sexual organs or the shape of a flower head resembling a cap. A good example is the flowers on Syzygium operculatum Syzygium nervosum where the flowers are protected by caps, similar to those found on Eucalyptus and Corymbia trees.

Operculate Capsule: [o-per-ku-leit, kap-sool] From Operculum, which is Latin for a cover or lid. It refers to where the capsule dehisces through pores, each of which is covered by a lid or flap. A good example is the fruits on Pemphis acidula.

Operculatus: [o-per-kyoo-lei-tus] From Opercula which is Latin for a lid. It refers to the caps on the buds of certain trees, which cover the petals and sexual organs or the shape of a flower head resembling a cap. A good example was Cleistocalyx operculatus, which is now known as Syzygium nervosum.

Operculina: [o-per-ku-li-na] From Opercula which is Latin for a lid. It refers to the caps on the buds of certain trees, which cover the petals and sexual organs or the shape of a flower head resembling a cap. A good example is Operculina riedeliana.

Operculum: [o-per-ku-lum] From Opercula which is Latin for a lid. It refers to the caps on the buds of certain trees, which cover the petals and sexual organs or the shape of a flower head resembling a cap. A good example is found in the Eucalyptus genus including Eucalyptus grandis.

Operculum Scar: [o-per-ku-lum, skar] From Opercula which is Latin for a lid and Eskhára which is Ancient Greek or later Eschara which is Latin for a wound mark left From A, burn. It refers to the ring around the hypanthium where the operculum is shed from. A good example is the fruits on Eucalyptus astringens.

Ophiocephala: [o-fee-oh-Ke/se-fa-la] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for a snake and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads, which somewhat resemble a snake or serpent’s head. A good example was Lobelia ophiocephala, which is now known as Isotoma scapigera.

Ophioglossa: [o-fee-oh-glos-sa] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for a snake and Glossum, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to labellums on some orchids, which are long and thin like a snakes tongue. A good example is Pterostylis ophioglossa.

Ophioglossum: [o-fee-oh-glos-sum] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for a snake and Glossum, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to structures, which are long and thin like a snakes tongue. A good example is Ophioglossum petiolatum, which is now known as Ophioglossum reticulatum.

Ophioglossifolius: [o-fee-oh-glos-si-foh-li-us] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for a snake,  Glossum, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to fronds or leaves, which have a long appendage on the apex. A good example is Ranunculus ophioglossifolius.

Ophioglossoides: [o-fee-oh-glos-soi-deez] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for a snake, Glossum, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Ophioglossum genus, in that they have long thin tongue like appendage on the apexes of the fertile fronds which bear the sporangia. A good example is the fronds on Myoporum ophioglossoides.

Ophioglossum: [o-fee-oh-glos-sum] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for a snake and Glossum, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to long thin tongue like appendage on the apexes of the fertile fronds which bear the sporangia. A good example is found on the fronds of Ophioglossum lusitanicum.

Ophiolithica: [o-fee-oh-li-thi-ka] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for a snake and Lithos, which is Ancient Greek for a stone. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on serpentine soils or rocks. A good example is Acacia ophiolithica.

Ophiolithicum: [o-fee-oh-li-thi-kum] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for a snake and Lithos, which is Ancient Greek for a stone. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on serpentine soils or rocks. A good example was Racosperma ophiolithicum, which is now known as Acacia ophiolithica.

Ophiolitica: [o-fee-oh-li-ti-ka] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for a snake and Lithos, which is Ancient Greek for a stone. It refers to the plants, which prefer to grow on serpentine soils or rocks. A good example is Allocasuarina ophiolitica.

Ophiopogonoides: [o-fee-o-poh-go-noi-deez] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for a snake, Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which  resemble the Ophiopogon genus or mundo grass. A good example is the horticultural flower Romnalda ophiopogonoides.

Ophiorrhiza: [o-fee-oh-rahy-za] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for a snake and Rrhyza, which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to the main rhizome roots, which are long and thin. A good example is Ophiorrhiza australiana.

Ophioxyloides: [o-fee-oh-sahy-loi-deez] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs which is Ancient Greek for a snake, Xylon/Xylode which is Ancient Greek for wood or woody and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which are woody with snake like stems similar to those found on the Ophioxylon genus. A good example is Alstonia spectabilis subsp. ophioxyloides.

Ophitica: [o-fi-ti-ka] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for serpentine stones. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on serpentine soils/clays to grow in. A good example is Eucalyptus ophitica.

Ophiuroides: [o-fi-yoo-roi-deez] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for a snake, and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to labellum, which is long and thin like a snakes tail. A good example was Rottboellia ophiuroides, which is now known as Mnesithea rottboellioides.

Ophiuros: [o-fee-yoo-ros] From Ophī́s/Ophī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for a snake, and Oura, which is Ancient Greek for a tail. It refers to the labellum, which are long and thin like a snakes tail. A good example is Ophiuros exaltatus.

Ophrys: [o-frees] From Ophrys, which is Ancient Greek for an eyebrow. It refers to labellum, which vaguely resembles an eyebrow. A good example is Ophrys unifolia, which is now known as Microtis unifolia.

Opilia: [o-pi-li-a] From Opilião, which is Ancient Greek for long and lanky as in the legs of a daddy long legs spider. It refers to the long hanging peduncles of the flowers and fruits resembling small snakes hanging from the branches. A good example is Opilia amentacea.

Opisthiolepis: [o-pis-thi-o-lep-is] From Opisthen, which is Ancient Greek for the back or behind section of the skull and Lepis, which is Ancient Greek for a scale. It refers to gland, which are located behind the ovary of the flower. A good example is Opisthiolepis heterophylla.

Oplismenoides: [o-pli-me-noi-deez] From Hoplismos, which is Ancient Greek for a weapon. It refers to the spiked awns, which look rather menacing similar to those on the Oplismenus genus. A good example is Setaria oplismenoides.

Oplismenus: [o-plis-me-nus] From Hoplismosm, which is Ancient Greek for a weapon. It refers to spiked awns, which just look rather menacing and somewhat like the old spiked clubs used in battle. A good example is Oplismenus undulatifolium.

Oporina: [o-por-i-na] From Opora, which is Ancient Greek for autumn. It refers to plants, which flower in the autumn. A good example is Diuris oporina.

Opponens: [o-po-nenz] From Oppōnēns, which is Latin for an opponent or to oppose. It refers to leaves, which are opposite on the stems when most species in the genus are alternate or sub alternate. A good example is Bertya opponens.

Opposita: [o-po-si-ta] From Oppositus, which is Latin for being on the other side. It refers to the leaves, which appear at 180 degrees to each other on the same axis. A good example is Ficus opposita.

Opposite: [o-po-sit] From Oppositus, which is Latin for being on the other side. It refers to the leaves, which appear at 180 degrees to each other on the same axis. A good example is Backhousia citriodora.

Opposite Stamens: [o-po-sit, stei-menz] From Oppositus, which is Latin for having one organ immediately above another organ. It refers to the stamens, which appear immediately above the petals or on rare occasions the sepals. A good example is Melastoma affine which has 5 stamens opposite the petals and 5 stamens opposite the sepals.

Oppositicuspis: [o-po-si-ti-kus-pis] From Oppositus, which is Latin for being on the other side and Cuspis, which is Latin for a point or being pointed. It refers to organs, which have two points or horn like structures which appear at 180 degrees to each other and on the same axis. A good example is the sharp horns on the seeds on Bassia oppositicuspis and Sclerolaena oppositicuspis.

Oppositifolia: [o-po-si-ti-foh-li-a] From Oppositus, which is Latin for being on the other side and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which appear at 180 degrees to each other and on the same axis on the stem. A good example is Eremophila oppositifolia subsp. oppositifolia.

Oppositifolium: [o-po-si-ti-foh-li-um] From Oppositus, which is Latin for being on the other side and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which appear at 180 degrees to each other and on the same axis on the stem. A good example is Xanthóstemon oppositifolium.

Oppositifolius: [o-po-si-ti-foh-li-us] From Oppositus, which is Latin for being on the other side and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which appear at 180 degrees to each other and on the same axis on the stem. A good example is Glinus oppositifolius.

Optima: [op-tima] From Optimus which is Latin for optimum or the best. It refers to habitats and environments which seem ideal places to grow. A good example is Eucalyptus optima.

Opulentum: [o-pyoo-len-tum] From Oppulentus, which is Latin for wealthy or sumptuous. It refers to leaves, which are in generous proportions giving a very lush look. A good example is Amphineuron opulentum.(It has not been established whether this fern is native or a recent arrival to far north east Queensland from across the Straight.)

Opulifolium: [oh-pyoo-li-foh-li-um] From Optimus, which is Latin for optimum or the best and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have copious quantities and larger leaves than other species in the genus. A good example is Chenopodium opulifolium.

Opuntia: [o-pun-ti-a] From Opuntia, which is Latin for a prickly pear. It refers to a genus of cacti like plants, which can be identified by their wide, flat, branching pads. A good example is the problemsome weed Opuntia stricta.

Oramicola: [or-ra-mi-koh-la] From ōra, which is Latin for frontier, limit edge, rim or border. It usually refers to plants, which grow on the edge. A good example is Hoya australis subsp. oramicola which grows in the far north west of the continant as on the edge or limit of land.

Orania: [or-a-ne-a] Is named in honour of Prince William of Orange who was an English King. A good example was Orania beccarii, which is now known as Oraniopsis appendiculata.

Oraniopsis: [or-a-ni-op-sis] Is named in honour of Prince William of Orange who was an English King and Opsis which is Ancient Greek for to appear like as in sight. It refers to the plants appearing similar to the Orania genus. A good example is Oraniopsis appendiculata.

Oraria: [or-ari-a] From Ora, which is Latin for the sea shore. It refers to habitats of a very rare rainforest species, which is along the seashore. A good example is Fontainea oraria.

Orarium: [awr-ari-uh m] From Ora, which is Latin for the sea shore. It refers to habitats of a very rare rainforest species, which is along the seashore. A good example is Racosperma orarium, which is now known as Acacia oraria.

Orbata: [or-ba-ta] From Orbātum, which is Latin for a deprived from. It refer to structures, which are deprived almost deprived of organs. A good example is the spikes on Digitaria orbata which are often almost hairless.

Orbea: [or-be-a] From Orbis, which is Latin for a circular or disc shape. It refer to the shape of the prominently large, central disc on the flowers. A good example is the African carrion flower Orbea variegate which is often grown as a horticultural curiosity.

Orbicular: [or-bik-yoo-lar] From Orbiculātum, which is Latin for an orb or disc. It refers to leaves, which resemble a disc. A good example is Melaleuca orbicularis.

Hydrocotyle verticillata

Orbiculare: [or-bi-kyoo-lair] From Orbiculātum, which is Latin for an orb or disc. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a disc in shape or the individual florets on grasses. A good example is Paspalum orbiculare.

Orbicularis: [or-bik-yu-lar-is] From Orbiculātum, which is Latin for an orb or disc. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a disc in shape. A good example is Acrotriche orbicularis.

Orbiculata: [or-bik-yoo-la-ta] From Orbiculātum, which is Latin for round like an orb or disc. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a disc in shape. A good example is the sundew Drosera orbiculata.

Orbiculatum: [or-bik-yoo-la-tum] From Orbiculātum, which is Latin for round like an orb or disc. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a disc in shape. A good example is the leaves on Solanum orbiculatum.

Orbifolia: [or-bi-foh-li-a] From Orbiculātum which is Latin for circular or disc shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble a disc. A good example is Eucalyptus orbifolia.

Orbifolium: [or-bi-foh-li-um] From Orbiculātum which is Latin for circular or disc shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble a disc. A good example was Racosperma orbifolium, which is now known as Acacia orbifolia.

Orbifolius: [or-bi-foh-li-us] From Orbiculātum which is Latin for circular or disc shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble a disc. A good example is Eriochilus scaber subsp. orbifolius.

Orchardii: [or-char-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Anthony (Tony) E. Orchard; 1946-20.., who was an Australian botanist and herbarium curator in New Zealand, Tasmania and editor of Flora of Australia. A good example is  Dampiera orchardii.

Orchid: [or-kid] From Orchis, which is Latin for a testicle. It refers to the shape of the roots in some early described genre from Europe which resemble a man’s testicles. A good example are the Australian orchids including Arthrochilus irritabilis.

Arthrochilus prolixus – andi Mellis

Orchidaceae: [or-kid-ei-se-ei] From Orchis, which is Latin for a testicle. It refers to the shape of the roots in some early described species which resembles a man’s testicles. A good example is Cymbidium madidum.

Orchidologist: [or-ki-dol-o-jist] From Orchis which is Latin for a testicle, Ology which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies the science of Orchidaceae.

Orchidology.: [or-ki-dol-o-jee] From Orchis, which is Latin for a testicle and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science of studying Orchidaceae.

Orchiodes: [or-ki-oh-deez] From Orchis, which is Latin for a testicle and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the shape of the roots in some early described species which resembles a man’s testicles. A good example was Orchiodes polygonoides, which is now known as Rhomboda polygonoides.

Ordensis: [or-den-sis] From Ord, which is Latinized for the Ord River and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were discovered and live along the Ord River A good example is the sundew Drosera ordensis.

Order: [or-der] From Ordein/Ordo, which is Latin for the rank of an animal or plant which is below the rank of the Class and above the rank of the family.

Ordiana: [or-di-a-na] From Ord, which is Latinized for the Ord River and Iana/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered and grow along the Ord River. A good example is Eucalyptus ordiana.

Ordii: [or-di-ahy] Maybe named in honour of D. Orrd who was an Australian plant collector in Western Australia or possibly Sir Harry Ord a past governor of Western Australia. A good example is Lomandra ordii.

Ordinifolia: [or-di-ni-foh-li-a] From Ordinarium,, which is Latin for ordinary or average and Folium, which is Ancient Greek for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are typical of the Melaleuca genus. A good example is Melaleuca ordinifolia.

Oreades: [o-re-a-deez] From Oreias/Oreios, which is Latin for of the mountains. It refers to plants, which prefer mountainous habitats. A good example is Telopea oreades.

Oreillyana: [oh-rahy-li-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Alfonso Bernard O’Reilly; 1903–1975, who was an Australian born Irishman, author and bushman. He is best known for the discovery of the 1937, crash site in Lamington National Park of a Stinson Model A airplane and the rescue of the two survivors after trekking through mountainous rainforest for two days. A good example is Pittosporum oreillyanum.

Oreobolus: [o-re-obo-lus] From Oreias/Oreios, which is Ancient Greek or Oreas, which is Latin for of mountains and Bolos, which is Ancient Greek for a clump. It refers to plants, which form clumps on the ground in mountainous habitats. A good example is synonymous with Oreobolus pumilio or Oreobolus distichus.

Oreocaena: [o-re-o-se-na] From Oreias/Oreios, which is Ancient Greek or Oreas, which is Latin for of the mountains and -ānum/Ensis, which are Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which prefer mountainous habitats. A good example is the Grampian’s Zieria, Zieria oreocaena.

Oreocallis: [o-re-ohkal-lis] From Oreias/Oreios, which is Ancient Greek or Oreas, which is Latin for of the mountains and Kallos, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful. It refers to the plants, which form beautiful clumps on the ground in the mountains. A good example was Oreocallis wickhamii, which is now known as Alloxylon flammeum.

Oreodaphne: [o-re-ohdaf-ne] From Oreias/Oreios, which is Ancient Greek or Oreas, which is Latin for of the mountains and Dáphnē, which is Greek nymph in mythology who was changed into a laurel tree to escape her pursuer Apollo. It refers to plants, which resemble the European Daphne genus. A good example was Oreodaphne bowiei, which is now known as Cryptocarya laevigata.

Oreodéndron: [o-re-oh-den-dron] From Oreias/Oreios, which is Ancient Greek or Oreas, which is Latin for of the mountains and Déndron which is Ancient Greek for a tree. It refers to the plants,which grow as a tree compared to most the other members of the genus that grow as shrubs in the mountains. A good example was Oreodéndron biflorum, which is now known as Phaleria biflora.

Oreodoxa: [o-re-oh-dok-sa] From Oreias/Oreios, which is Ancient Greek or Oreas, which is Latin for of the mountains and Doxa which is Latin for glory. It refers to the plants, which display glorious colours on mountainous terrain. A good example is Dillwynia oreodoxa.

Oreogena: [o-re-oh-je-na] From Oreias/Oreios, which is Ancient Greek or Oreas, which is Latin for of the mountains and Génesis, which is Ancient Greek for the origin of. It refers to the plants, which grow in mountainous terrain. A good example is Ixora oreogena.

Oreomrrhyis: [o-re-ohrahy-is] From Oreias/Oreios, which is Ancient Greek or Oreas, which is Latin for of the mountains and Myrrhis, which is Ancient Greek for a fragrant herb from Europe. It refers to plants, which have a similar fragrance to the Myrrhs of Europe. A good example is Oreomyrrhis argentea.

Oreophila: [o-re-ohfi-la] From Oreias/Oreios, which is Ancient Greek or Oreas, which is Latin for of the mountains and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which love to grow high in the mountains. A good example is Myrsine oreophila.

Oreophilum: [o-re-ohfi-lum] From Oreias/Oreios, which are Ancient Greek or Oreas, which is Latin for of the mountains and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which love to grow high in the mountains. A good example is Rytidosperma oreophilum.

Oreophilus: [o-re-ohfi-lus] From Oreias/Oreios, which are Ancient Greek or Oreas, which is Latin for of the mountains and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which love to grow high in the mountains. A good example is Adenanthos oreophilus.

Oreopodion: [o-re-o-po-di-on] From Oreias/Oreios, which are Ancient Greek or Oreas, which is Latin for of the mountains and maybe Pous, which is Ancient Greek or pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to plants, which grow at the foot of mountains. A good example is the sundew Drosera oreopodion.

Oreoporantha: [o-re-ohpor-an-tha] From Oreias/Oreios, which are Ancient Greek or Oreas, which is Latin for of the mountains and Porōsus, which is Ancient Greek for an opening and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which have a distinct opening just prior to dehiscing. A good example is Oreoporanthera petalifera, which is now known as Poranthera petalifera.

Oresbia: [o-res-bi-a] From Oresbius, which is Latin for living on mountains. It refers to plants, which have habitats that are high up on the mountains. A good example is Eucalyptus oresbia.

Orgadophila: [or-ga-do-fi-la] From Orgado, which is Ancient Greek for a meadow, well watered or fertile plot and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on fertile meadows.  A good example is Eucalyptus orgadophila.

Orgadophilum: [or-ga-do-fi-lum] From Orgado, which is Ancient Greek for a meadow, well watered or fertile plot and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on fertile meadows. A good example is Solanum orgadophilum.

Orgadophilus: [or-ga-do-fi-lus] From Orgado, which is Ancient Greek for a meadow, well watered or fertile plot and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on fertile meadows. A good example is Cyperus orgadophilus.

Organic: [or-ga-nik] From Organikós, which is Ancient Greek or later Organicos , which is Latin for life or living. It now refers to food production utilising living matter instead of synthetic inputs.

Orianthera: [o-ri-an-ther-a] From Orientalis, which is Latin for the oriental or eastern and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have originated from the Orient or Asian. A good example is Orianthera judithiana.

Orbicola: [or-bi-koh-la] From Órnumi, which is Ancient Greek or later Óros, which is Greek/Latin for a mountain or prominent hill Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow at the base of mountains, on the slopes or peaks of mountains. A good example is Vittadinia australasica var. oricola which prefers to grow near the base of mountains or large hills.

Orientalia: [o-ri-en-ta-li-a] From Orientalis, which is Latin for the oriental or eastern. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the east or orient.

Orientalis: [o-ri-en-ta-lis] From Orientalis, which is Latin for the oriental or eastern. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the east or the orient. A good example is Typha orientalis.

Orifice: [o-ri-fis] From Orificium, which is Latin for an aperture. It refers to openings, vents or cavities, which is much larger than a stomata. A good example is the orifices on Acacia irrorata.

Orites: [o-ri-teez] From Orios, which is Ancient Greek for of the mountains and for Native which is Ancient Greek for a resident of. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on mountains or at higher altitudes. A good example is Orites excelsus.

Ormocarpoides: [or-mo-kar-poi-deez] From Ormos, which is Ancient Greek for a cord or chain, Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to fruiting pods, which hang on long pedicel like ropes similar to those of the Ormocarpus genus. A good example is Desmodium ormocarpoides.

Ormocarpum: [or-mo-kar-pum] From Ormos, which is Ancient Greek for a cord or chain and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruiting pods, which hang on long pedicel like ropes similar to those of the Ormocarpus genus. A good example is Ormocarpum trichocarpum.

Ormondii: [or-mon-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Ormond. A good example is Ormosia ormondii.

Ormosia: [or-mo-si-a] From Ormos, which is Ancient Greek for a cord or chain. It refers to fruiting pods, which hang down on long thick pedicel cord like ropes. A good example is Ormosia ormondii.

Ornans: [or-nanz] From Ornans, which is Latin for ornate or beautiful. It refers to the overall beauty of the plants, which are rather ornate. A good example is Abrophyllum ornans.

Ornata: [or-na-ta] From Ornans, which is Latin for ornate or beautiful. It refers to the overall beauty of the flowers being very ornate. A good example is Trachymene ornata.

Ornatissimum: [or-na-tis-si-mum] From Ornans, which is Latin for ornate or beautiful and -Issima, which is Latin for the most or superlative. It refers to our beloved bush tick, which when viewed with an open mind are rather ornate in appearance. A good example is Amblyomma triguttatum var. ornatissimum.

Ornatissimus: [or-na-tis-si-mus] From Ornans, which is Latin for ornate or beautiful and -Issima, which is Latin for the most or superlative. It refers to plants, which are very ornate. A good example is Cyperus ornatissimus.

Ornatus: [or-na-tus] From Ornans, which is Latin for ornate or beautiful. It refers to plants, which have an overall beauty in the flowers that are very ornate. A good example is the Australian bee eater Merops ornatus or the beautiful deep pink flowers on the orchid Petalochilus ornatus.

Ornduffia: [orn-duffi-a] Is named in honour of Robert Ornduff; 1932-2000, who was an American botanist who studied extensively around Darwin. A good example is Ornduffia reniformis.

Ornithochilus: [or-nitho-chi-lus] From Ornis, which is Ancient Greek for a bird and Keilos, which is Ancient Greek or Cheilos, which is Laton for a lip. It refers to flowers, which have a large rather ornate labellum. A good example is the exotic lily Ornithochilus hillii.

Ornithogalum: [or-nitho-ga-lum] From Ornis, which is Ancient Greek for a bird and Galum which is Ancient Greek for milk. It refers to the plants, which have a milky white outer colour with a dark or black centre like a bird dropping. A good example is the exotic lily Ornithogalum arabicum.

Ornithologist: [or-nithol-o-jist] From Ornis, which is Ancient Greek for a bird, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies the science of birds.

Ornithology: [or-nithol-o-jee] From Ornis, which is Ancient Greek for a bird and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science of studying of birds.

Ornithophily: [or-nitho-fi-li] From Orniothos, which is Ancient Greek for birds and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or being loved. It refers to plants, which are pollinated by birds especially those in the honey eater family. A good example of a plant which relies on bird pollination is Grevillea stenomera.

Ornithopoda: [or-nitho-poh-da] From Orniothos, which is Ancient Greek for birds and Pous/Pedi, which is Ancient Greek for a foot or feet. It may refer to small birds using the culms as a perch when eating the seeds on Dimeria ornithopoda or small birds finding protection amongst the tri-lobed pungent foliage of Grevillea ornithopoda, which is now known as Grevillea manglesii subsp. ornithopoda.

Orobanche: [o-ro-banke] From Orobos, which is Ancient Greek for the vetch and Ancho, which is Ancient Greek for to strangle. It refers to the plants, which are parasitic on broad leaf grains especially pasture crops including vetches. A good example is Orobanche cernua.

Oroboides: [o-ro-boi-deez] From Orobos, which is Ancient Greek for the vetch and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which resemble the vetch plants Vicia ervilia. A good example is Swainsona oroboides.

Orographic lift: [o-ro-gra-fik, lift] From Orios, which is Ancient Greek for of the mountains, Graphikós, which is Ancient Greek for to draw a picture and Liften, which is Old English or Lipta which is Nordic for to raise. It refers to the study of moisture formation against the relief of mountains. It broadly includes hills and steep cliffs that produce moist air to rise as it moves up and over a mountain range to form clouds.

Orographic precipitation: [o-ro-gra-fik, pree-si-pi-tei-shon] From Orios, which is Ancient Greek for of the mountains, Graphikós, which is Ancient Greek for to draw a picture and Praecipitātiō which is Latin for to fall head on. It refers to small droplets of moisture forming in the uplift of moisture against the hills, cliffs or mountains falling against the uplift as very fine rainfall often with the rain falling in a vertical direction upwards.

Orographic rise: [o-ro-gra-fik, rahyz] From Orios, which is Ancient Greek for of the mountains, Graphikós, which is Ancient Greek for to draw a picture and Rīsan, which is Old English, Rijzen, which is Dutch, Rīsan, which is German or Reisan, which is Gothic for a rise or upward slope. It refers to any slope where clouds form as moist air is compressed and is forced to rise up and over the slope.

Orophila: [o-ro-fi-la] From Orios, which is Ancient Greek for of the mountains and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to the love of growing high in the mountains. A good example is Alyxia orophila.

Orophilum: [o-ro-fi-lum] From Orios, which is Ancient Greek for of the mountains and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which have a love of growing high in the mountains. A good example is Syzygium hemilamprum subsp. orophilum.

Ortho: [or-tho] From Orthos, which is a Greek prefix for upright, straight, right or correct.

Orthocarpa: [or-tho-kar-pa] From Orthos, which is a Greek prefix for upright, straight, right or correct and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which stand erect on the parent plants. A good example is Acacia orthocarpa.

Orthocarpum: [or-tho-kar-pum] From Orthos, which is a Greek prefix for upright, straight, right or correct and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which stand erect on the parent plants. A good example was Racosperma orthocarpum, which is now known as Acacia orthocarpa.

Orthocarpus: [or-tho-kar-pus] From Orthos, which is a Greek prefix for upright, straight, right or correct and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are erect on the parent plants. A good example is the American invasive weed Orthocarpus purpurascens.

Orthocerus: [or-tho-ser-us] From Orthos, which is a Greek  prefix for upright, straight, right or correct and Keros which is Ancient Greek for a horn. It refers to the two upper petals on orchids, which appear like erect horns. A good example is Orthoceras strictum.

Orthochaeta: [or-tho-chee-ta] From Orthos, which is Ancient Greek for upright, straight, right or correct and Chaeta, which is Ancient Greek for a bristle. It refers to seeds, which have a single bristly hair. A good example is Glossogyne orthochaeta.

Orthocheila: [awr-tho-chee-la] From Orthos, which is a Greek  prefix for upright, straight, right or correct and Cheilos which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to the lower petals, which have a lip or lip and tongue. A good example is Euphrasia orthocheila subsp. orthocheila.

Orthogramma: [or-thoh-gram-ma] From Orthos, which is a Greek prefix for upright, straight, right or correct and Grāmina/Grāmen which are Latin for a grass. It refers to grasses, which have an erect growth habit. A good example was Orthogramma laevigata, which is now known as Blechnum ambiguum.

Orthophylla: [or-tho-fahyl-la] From Orthos, which is a Greek  prefix for upright, straight, right or correct and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are produced in mass. A good example was Logania orthophylla, which is now known as Logania linifolia.

Orthophyllum: [or-tho-fahyl-lum] From Orthos, which is a Greek prefix for upright, straight, right or correct and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are produced in mass. A good example is Macromitrium orthophyllum.

Orthopogon: [or-tho-poh-gon] From Orthos which is a Greek  prefix for upright, straight, right or correct and Pṓgōn, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to beards, which stands erect from its structure or organ. A good example is Orthopogon abortivus.

Orthorrhyncha: [or-tho-rhin-ka] From Orthos, which is Greek for upright, straight, right or correct and Rhyncha, which is Ancient Greek for a nose. It refers to fruits, which have a nose like appendage at the apex. A good example is Hakea orthorrhyncha.

Orthosiphon: [or-thoh-sahy-fon] From Orthos, which is Ancient Greek for upright, straight, right or correct and Siphon, which is Ancient Greek for a tube. It refers to anthers, which are long and thin and tube like or resemble a cats whiskers. A good example is Orthosiphon aristatus.

Orthostachyum: [or-tho-sta-kum] From Orthos, which is Ancient Greek for upright, straight, ight or correct and Stachya, which is Ancient Greek for an ear of corn. It refers to flower spikes, which are held more erect than other species in the genus. A good example was Panicum orthostachyum, which is now known as Digitaria gibbosas.

Orthothylax: [or-tho-thahy-laks] From Orthos, which is Ancient Greek for upright, straight, right or correct and Siphon, which is Ancient Greek for a tube. It refers to anthers, which are long and thin like a tube or cats whiskers. A good example was Orthothylax glaberrimus, which is now known as Helmholtzia glaberrima.

Orthotricha: [or-tho-trahy-ka] From Orthos, which is a Greek  prefix for upright, straight, right or correct and Tríchōma, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to hairs, which grow straight and erect. A good example is Acacia orthotricha.

Orthotrichum: [or-tho-trahy-kum] From Orthos, which is a Greek prefix for upright, straight, right or correct and Tríchōma, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to hairs, which grow straight and erect. A good example was Racosperma orthotrichum, which is now known as Acacia orthotricha.

Orthotropous: [or-tho-tro-pos] From Orthos, which is a Greek  prefix for upright, straight, right or correct and Tropos which is Ancient Greek for to turn or to bend or Tropḗ ,which is Ancient Greek for turning or bending. It refers to organs, which are long and straight where the funicular attachment is at one end and the micropyle is at other end without the need for it to coil.

http://www.dnp.go.th/botany/BFC/flwer.html

Orthrosanthus: [or-thro-san-thus] From Orthros, which is Ancient Greek for morning and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which open up very soon after sunrise. A good example is Orthrosanthus multifloris.

Orygioides: [or-ji-oi-deez] From Oresbius, which is Latin for living on mountains and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which were first discovered and prefer habitats that are high up on the mountains. A good example is Glinus orygioides.

Oryza: [or-ahy-za] From Oryza, which is Ancient Greek for Asian rice. It refers to the one of the wild rice species from Asia. A good example is the commercial white rice Oryza sativa or the native rice Oryza rufipogon.

Oryzoides: [or-zoi-deez] From Oryza, which is Ancient Greek for the rice grass and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the wild rice species of Oryza genus. A good example is Echinochloa oryzoides.

Osbeckia: [os-be-ki-a] Is named in honour of Pehr Osbeck; 1723-1805, who was a Swedish naturalist and explorer where he collected over 600 specimens from south east China for Linnaeus. A good example is Osbeckia australiana.

Osbornia: [oz-bor-ni-a] Is named in honour of John Osborn; 1828-1902, who was an Irish born Australian who analysed Eucalyptus oils for Mueller and was a pioneer in litho photography. A good example is Osbornia octodonta.

Osbornianum: [oz-bor-ni-a-num] Is named in honour of John Osborn; 1828-1902, who was an Irish born Australian who analysed Eucalyptus oils for Mueller and was a pioneer in litho photography. A good example is Chenopodium osbornianum, which is now known as Dysphania simulans.

Osbornii: [oz-bor-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of John Osborn; 1828-1902, who was an Irish born Australian who analysed Eucalyptus oils for Mueller and was a pioneer in litho photography. A good example is Swainsona osbornii , which is now known as Swainsona galegifolia var. osbornii.

Oschatzia: [oz-chat-zi-a] Is named in honour of Dr. Ozchatz; who invented microtome which allows scientists to cut organs into very thin microscopic sizes. A good example is Oschatzia cuneifolia.

Oshanesii: [oh-sha-ne-si-ahy] Is named in honour of John O’Shanesy; 1834-1899, who was an Irish born Australian nurseryman and plant collector with his younger brother Patrick for Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is  the stems on Acacia oshanesii.

Osier: [o-si-er] From Ausaria, which is Latin for a long slender branchlet with great flexibility. It refers to the branches and stems, which have good flexibility. A good example is the stems on Agonis flexuosus.

Osmophore: [os-mo-for] From Osmo/Osme, which is Ancient Greek for a scent and Phoros, which is a Greek suffix for to bear or bearing. It refers to organs on a flower, which is responsible for the fragrance, scent or odour. A good example is the scent glands on the flowers of Chiloglottis diphylla.

Osmosis: [os-moh-sis] From ōsmós, which is Ancient Greek for to push. It refers to the movement, diffusion from a solution with higher concentrations of salts, sugars or minerals through cell walls to a solution of lower concentrations of salts, sugars or minerals. Osmosis is important for plant survival because:

1. It is a mean by which plant cells maintain their water content despite water losses to the air that increases in warm dry air,

2. It provides turgidity to the softer tissues and is, therefore, essential for mechanical support,

3. It controls the absorption of water by root hairs from the soil into the plant,

4. Diffused pressure deficit due to loss of water through stomata and sugar production causes movement of water across the cortical cells of the roots,

5. Cell to cell diffusion of mineralised water affects the rate of osmosis,

6. Conduction of water from xylem elements to the neighboring cells is controlled by osmosis,

7. Growing tips of roots remain turgid because of osmosis,

8. Higher osmotic pressure of the cells provides resistance to the plants against drought injury,

9. It controls opening and closing of stomata during transpiration through its regulation of the turgidity of the stomata’s guard cells,

10. Movement of plants and plant parts like the movement of leaflets of the sensitive plant Mimosa pudica, nyctinastic helionastic movement plants that open and close their flowers or leaves at night different light densities are controlled by cell turgor which is induced by osmosis,

11. Osmosis influences the meristematic activity of the cells and hence growth of the plant,

12. Dehiscencing of fruits and sporangia to release fern spores are controlled by osmosis.

Osmunda: [os-mun-da] From Osmund, which is Latin for a royal fern. It refers to ferns, which are considered the most regal of all ferns. A good example is Osmunda barbara, which is now known as Todea barbara.

Osseous: [os-se-oh-us] From Ostéon, which is Latin for a bone or bony. It refers to organs usually the bracts, which have a bony appearance or feel. A good example is the bracts Lomandra longifolia which have a somewhat bony appearance.

Osteocarpum: [os-tee-oh-kar-pum] From Ostéon, which is Ancient Greek for a bone or bony and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits or seeds, which resemble bone joints. A good example is Osteocarpum acropterum.

Osteocarpum acropterum seeds
Courtesy of the South Australian Seed Conservation Centre at
http//saseedbank.com.Au/index.php?action=opengenus&genus=Osteocarpum

Ostiole 1: [os-ti-ohl] From Ostiolum, which is Latin for a little door. It refers to the opening of a syconium fruit such as figs where the fruits produce the flowers inside the immature fruit. A good example is the fungus Geastrum triplex.

Ostiole 2: [os-ti-oh l] From Ostiolum, which is Latin for a little door. It refers to a pore or hole through which spores are ejected; for an ascomycete at the apex of the perithecium, or for a basidiomycete the mouth of a puffball or earth-star. A good example is the immature fruits of Ficus hispida.

Ostrearia: [os-tree-a-ri-a] From Ostrea, which is Latin for an oyster. It refers to fruits, which somewhat resemble oyster shells in the way they open to release the seeds. A good example is Ostrearia australiana.

Ostrina: [os-tri-na] From Oštrina, which is Ancient Greek for to sharpen or acuity. It refers to structures or organs, which have sharp edges. A good example is the leaves on Eremophila ostrina.

Ostrinum: [os-tri-num] From Oštrina, which is Ancient Greek for to sharpen or acuity. It refers to structures or organs, which have sharp edges. A good example is the tepals on Genoplesium ostrinum which all taper to what appears to be sharp points.

Oswaldii: [os-wal-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Ferdiland Oswald; was a German pharmacist who lived in South Australia and collected plants for Ferdiland Mueller. A good example is Acacia oswaldii.

Osyricera: [oz-i-ri-ser-a] From Osyria/Syria, which is Latin for Syria and Sere, which is early Latin or Cēra, which is Latin for waxy or wax. It refers to structures or organs, which have a waxy look or feel, the connection to Syria is unknown. A good example was Osyricera purpurascens, which is now known as Blepharochilum macphersonii.

Otanthera: [o-tan-ther-a] From Otos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear and Antha/Anthos, which are Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which somewhat resemble an ear. A good example was Otanthera bracteata, which is now known as Melastoma cyanoides.

Othonna: [o-thon-na] From óthonna, which is ancient Greek for the name of an unknown plant from in ancient Syria. A good example is Othonna gypsicola.

Otiostigma: [o-ti-oh-stig-ma] From Akriós, which is Ancient Greek or ōtiō, which is Latin for emptiness, peace and quiet. It refers to the mood the plants emit and habitats the plants grow in. A good example is Synaphea otiostigma.

Otocarpa: [o-toh-kar-pa] From ōtós, which is Ancient Greek or much later ōtus, which is Latin for a horned or eared owl and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have two distinct ears or horns. A good example was Sida otocarpa, which is now known as Abutilon otocarpum.

Otocarpum: [o-toh-kar-pum] From ōtós, which is Ancient Greek or much later ōtus, which is Latin for a horned or eared owl and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have two distinct ears or horns. A good example is Abutilon otocarpum.

Ottelia: [o-tel-li-a] From Ottel-ambel, which is Latinized from the vernacular name of the plant in Malabar. A good example is Ottelia ovalifolia.

Ottochloa: [o-to-kloh-a] Is probably named in honour of Otto Stapf; 1857–1933 who was an Austrian botanist and taxonomist and Khloa, which is Ancient Greek for a grass. A good example is the grass Ottochloa gracillima.

Ottonis: [o-to-nis] Is named in honour of Christoph Friedrich Otto; 1783–1856, who was a German gardener and botanist. A good example was Melaleuca ottonis, which is now known as Melaleuca squamea.

Oulopha: [o-lo-fa] From Oul, which is Ancient Greek for curly and Pha, which is Ancient Greek for a bean originally used by Pedanius Dioscorides to describe beans. A good example is the curly haired follicles on Synaphea oulopha.

Outlying: [out-lahy-ing] It refers to the distribution of a plant being found outside its normal range. This is opposed to a disjunct population which is found within its natural range.

Ouveanum: [oh-vee-num] From Ovalis, which is Latin for an egg shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It usually refers to a leaf which has the outline of an egg in shape. A good example was Cladium ouveanum, which is now known as Baumea juncea.

Oval: [oh-val] From Ovalis, which is Latin for an egg shape. It usually refers to the outline of an egg in shape of a leaf.

Ovale: [oh-veil] From Ovalis, which is Latin for an egg shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which has the outline of an egg in shape. A good example was Leptospermum ovale, which is now known as Leptospermum parvifolium.

Ovalifolia: [oh-va-li-foh-li-a] From Ovalis, which is Latin for an egg shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which has the outline of an egg in shape. A good example is Prostanthera ovalifolia.

Ovalifolium: [oh-va-li-foh-lium] From Ovalis, which is Latin for an egg shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which has the outline of an egg in shape. A good example is Zanthoxylum ovalifolium.

Ovalifolius: [oh-va-li-foh-lius] From Ovalis, which is Latin for an egg shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which has the outline of an egg in shape. A good example is the exotic legume being trialled for pastures Leucopogon ovalifolius.

Ovalis: [oh-va-lis] From Ovalis, which is Latin for an egg shape. It refers to leaves, which has the outline of an egg in shape. A good example is Halophilus ovalis.

Ovaries: [oh-var-eez] From Ovari/Ovarium which is Latin for an egg. It refers to the lower part of the pistil in angiosperms, which contain the infertile seeds or newly fertile seeds. It is the plural of an ovary.

Ovariole: [oh-var-i-ohl] From Ovari/Ovarium which is Latin for an egg. It refers to the tubules in an insect or arthropod which contains the numerous eggs.

Ovary: [oh-var-ee] From Ovari/Ovarium which is Latin for an egg. It refers to the lower part of the pistil in angiosperms which contain the infertile seeds or newly fertile seeds.

Ovary Grevillea sp.
Cassia brewsteri

Ovata: [oh-va-ta] From Ovatis, which is Latin for almost an egg shape. It usually refers to organs, which have an ovate shape or form like an egg. A good example is the leaves on Maireana ovata.

Ovate: [oh-veit] From Ovatis, which is Latin for almost an egg shape. It refers to organs, which have the outline of an egg.

Ovate leaves on Coleus foetida

Ovatiflora: [oh-va-ti-flor-a] From Ovatis, which is Latin for almost an egg shape and and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have the outline of an egg. A good example is Hodgkinsonia ovatiflora.

Ovatum: [oh-vaum] From Ovatis, which is Latin for almost an egg shape. It refers to organs or at times the fruit, which have an egg shape or form. A good example of an ovate leaf is found on Zygophyllum ovatum while Canarium ovatum is a good example of an ovoidal fruit.

Ovatus: [oh-vatus] From Ovatis, which is Latin for almost an egg shape. It refers to grass spikes, which has the outline of an egg in shape. A good example is Echinopogon ovatus.

Ovendenii: [oh-ven-de-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Peter John Overland; 1929-20.., who was a forester, collector of plant material and worked in special botanical work in forests which included research into Eucalyptus dieback. A good example is Eucalyptus caleyi subsp. ovendenii.

Over lapping: [oh-ver, laping] It refers to petals or leaves where one edge lies over the adjacent organ. See Imbricate and contorted.

Oviformis: [oh-vi-for-mis] From ōvālis, which is Latin for ovate and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to burrs, which have a continual nuisance to sheep getting caught in the wool. A good example was Eucalyptus oviformis which is now defunct as it appears to be a natural hybrid between Eucalyptus pseudoglobulus and Eucalyptus tereticornis.

Ovigera: [oh-vi-jer-a] From ovigera, which is Latin for bearing eggs. It refers to organs or fruits, which have the shape or form of a bird’s egg. A good example is Trichosanthes ovigera.

Ovina: [o-vi-na] From Ovinus, which is Latin for of sheep. It refers to fruits or seeds, which resemble burrs that are continually a nuisance to sheep because they get caught in the wool of sheep devalueing the raw fleece. A good example is Acaena ovina.

Ovinum: [o-vi-num] From Ovinus, which is Latin for of sheep. It refers to the individual flowers in the floral heads, which are surrounded by thick, floccose, woolly hairs. A good example is Eryngium ovinum.

Oviparous: [o-vi-par-os] From Oviparus, which is Latin for to lay an egg. It refers to the laying of eggs as in the case of reptiles, birds, fish and many Arthropods which hatch following their expultation.

Ovoid: [oh-void] From Ovoides, which is Latin for a solid egg shape. It refers to organs usually the fruits, which are the shape of an egg. A good example is Canarium ovatum.

Ovoidal: [oh-voidal] From Ovoides, which is Latin for a solid egg shape. It refers to the description of a solid organs, usually the fruit s, which are the shape of an egg. A good example is Canarium ovatum.

Ovoidea: [oh-voi-de-a] From Ovoides, which is Latin for a solid egg shape. It refers to a description of a solid organ usually the fruits or flowers, which have the shape of an egg. A good example was Acacia ovoidea, which is now known as Acacia verticillata subsp. ovoidea.

Ovoideum Ovularis:: [oh-voi-di-um] From Ovoides, which is Latin for a solid egg shape. It refers fruits or flower buds, which have the shape of an egg. A good example was Triglochin ovoideum, which is now known as Triglochin hexagona.

Ovoideus: [oh-voi-di-us] From Ovoides, which is Latin for a solid egg shape. It refers to fruits or flowers, which have the shape of an egg. A good example is Isopogon ovoideus.

Ovoviviparous: [oh-vohvi-vi-par-os] From Ovari/ovarium, which is Latin for an egg and Viviparus, which is Latin for live. It refers to the incubation of eggs, which are hatched internally or as they are being expelled thus they do not have a placental attachment to the mother.

Ovularis: [oh-vyoo-lar-is] From Ovari/ovarium, which is Latin for an egg. It refers to the shape of the fruits, which resemble a bird’s egg. A good example is Gardenia ovularis.

Ovulate: [o-vyooleit] From Ovaria/Ovarium, which are Latin for an egg. It refers to ovules, which are in the process of releasing the eggs.

Ovule: [ov-vyool] From Ovulum, which is Latin for a little egg. It refers to organs, which sit below the pistil that becomes fertilized to produce the seeds.

Ovuliferous Scales: [ov-vyoo-li-fer-os, skeilz] From Ovari/ovarium which is Latin for an egg and Fera/Fereūm which are Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to highly modified lateral branches in the axil of leaf bracts, which bear ovules. They may be flat or peltate, woody or fleshy.

Owenia: [oh-we/wee ni-a] Is named in honour of Sir Richard Owen; 1804–1892, was a British born palaeontologist who studied bones from caves in Wellington New South Wales and was an anti-Darwinist. A good example is Owenia acidula.

Oxalidifolia: [ok-sahl-i-di-foh-li-a] From Oxalis, which is Ancient Greek for an acid salt and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the Oxalis genus. A good example is Oxalis chnoodes.

Oxalis: [ok-sa-lis] From Oxalis, which is Ancient Greek for an acid salt. It refers to the taste being similar to Sorrel which is high in oxalic acid. A good example is Oxalis chnoodes.

Oxaloides: [ok-sa-loi-deez] From Oxalis, which is Ancient Greek for an acid salt and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have a similar taste to Oxalis. A good example is Marsilea oxaloides var. drummondii.

Oxiphoeria: [ok-si-fo-ri-a] maybe from Ôxos, which is Ancient Greek for an environmental linguistic statement and Phoíbē/Phoîbos, which are Ancient Greek for bright or brilliant. It refers to plants, of which, one may make an exclamation over like “oh look at that.” (brilliance of that plant) A good example was Oxiphoeria foetida, which is now known as Calomeria amaranthoides.

Oxleya: [oks-lee-a] Is named in honour of John Joseph William Molesworth Oxley; 1783–1828, was an Australian explorer. A good example is Flindersia oxleya.

Oxleyana: [oks-lee-a-na] Is named in honour of John Joseph William Molesworth Oxley; 1783–1828, was an Australian explorer. A good example is Flindersia oxleyana.

Oxleyi: [oks-li-ahy] Is named in honour of John Joseph William Molesworth Oxley; 1783–1828, was an Australian explorer. A good example is Clianthus oxleyi, which is now known as Swainsona Formosa.

Oxyantha: [ok-see-an-tha] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed. It refers to leaves, which have rather pointed apexes that are sharp to touch. A good example is Grevillea oxyantha subsp. oxycantha.

Oxycalyotra: [ok-see-ka-lip-tra] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed and Kalúpton, which is Ancient Greek or Calyptra, which is Latin for a cover or veil. It refers to structures or organs, which have sharp pointed apexes. A good example is the sepals on Grevillea oxyantha subsp. oxyantha.

Oxycarpa: [ok-see-kar-pa] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed. It refers to fruits, which are covered in short sharp spines. A good example is Fraxinus oxycarpa.

Oxycarpum: [ok-see-kar-pum] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits, which have sharp points. A good example is Abutilon oxycarpum.

Oxycarpus: [ok-see-kar-pus] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys which are Greek for sharp and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits, which have sharp points. A good example is Oreobolus oxycarpus subsp. oxycarpus.

Oxycedrus: [ok-see-se-drus] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Cedrus which is Latin for a cedar tree. It refers to the fruits, which have sharp points. A good example Acacia oxycedrus.

Oxychloris: [ok-see-klor-is] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Kloris, which is Ancient Greek for the Nymph of spring or greenish yellow. It refers to colours, which are greenish-yellow, lime-green and pale green which are all vibrant colours of spring growth. A good example is Oxychloris scariosa.

Oxyclada: [ok-see-kla-da] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for stem or branch. It refers to stems and branches, which have numerous sharp appendages or short spines. A good example is Acacia oxyclada.

Oxycladum: [ok-see-kla-dum] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Klados which is Ancient Greek for stem or branch. It refers to stems and branches which have numerous sharp appendages or short spines. A good example was Racosperma oxycladum, which is now known as Acacia oxyclada.

Oxycladium: [ok-see-kla-di-um] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Klados which is Ancient Greek for stem or branch. It refers to stems and branches which have numerous sharp appendages or spines. A good example is Oxycladium semiseptatum, which is now known as Mirbelia viminalis.

Oxyclona: [ok-see-khloh-na] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Klṓn, which is Ancient Greek for a slip, snippet or twig. It refers to small stems and very small branches, which have numerous sharp appendages or spines. A good example is Lobelia oxyclona.

Oxycocoides: [ok-see-ko-koi-deez] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble those of the Oxalis genus. A good example is the leaves on Baeckea oxycocoides.

Oxydectes: [ok-see-dek-tes] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Dectes which is unknown. It refers to plants, which have structure or organ, which has a sharp edge or point. A good example was Oxydectes phebalioides, which is now known as Croton phebalioides.

Oxygen: [ok-see-jen] From Oxus, which is Ancient Greek for acid and Gennan which is Greek for to generate. Symbol O   Atomic Number 8

Oxyglossus: [ok-see-glos-sus] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Glossos, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to labellum, which have a distinct appearance of a tongue. A good example is Acianthus oxyglossus.

Oxylepis: [ok-see-le-pis] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Lepis which is Ancient for a scale. It refers to structures or organs , which have sharp or pointed scales. A good example is Coronidium oxylepis.

Oxylobioides: [ok-see-lo-bi-oi-deez] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp, Lobos/Lobī, which is Ancient Greek or Lobus which is Latin for a lobe and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the species, which have a similar appearance to those of the Oxylobium genus. A good example is Leptosema oxylobioides

Oxylobium: [ok-see-loh-bi-um] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Lobos/Lobī, which is Ancient Greek or Lobus which is Latin for a lobe. It refers to the lobes on the pods, which are rather sharp on some species. A good example is Oxylobium robustum.

Oxymitra: [ok-see-mi/mahy-tra] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Mitra, which is Ancient Greek for a type of bishop’s hat. It refers to capsules or calyptras/operculums, which resemble a bishop’s hat. A good example is Eucalyptus oxymitra.

Oxymyrrhine: [ok-see-mi/mahyr-rahyn] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Greek for sharp and Myrrha/Smyrna, which are Greek for the Myrrh tree of Europe. It refers to Myrrha who was transformed into a myrrh tree; by the gods as punishment for having had incestuous intercourse with her father and gave birth to Adonis while she was a tree. for her son she gave him the expensive Myrrha fragrant balming oil. Thus It refers to plants, which have a fragrant aroma; but which is more astringent or sharper than the genuine oil of the Myrrha tree. (Strange the incestuous oil was a gift for Jesus from the three wise men) A good example is Oxymyrrhine gracilis.

Oxyphoeria: [ok-see-fo-e-ri-a] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed and -Phoría which is from –Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear. It refers to the leaves, bearing rather long tapered apexes. A good example was Oxyphoeria foetida, which is now known as Calomeria amaranthoides.

Oxyphylla: [ok-see-fi/fahyl-la] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which taper to a fine point. A good example is Grewia oxyphylla.

Oxyphyllum: [ok-see-fi/fahyl-lum] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which taper to a long point. A good example is Cyrtococcum oxyphyllum.

Oxypoma: [ok-see-poh-ma] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed and Poma, which is Ancient Greek for a lid. It refers to calyptras or operculums, which have very pointed apexes. A good example was Eucalyptus oxypoma which is now a defunct name as it has been found to be a natural hybrid of Eucalyptus largiflorens and possibly Eucalyptus camaldulensis and or Eucalyptus coolabah subsp. coolabah.

Oxyptera: [ok-see-te-ra] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to the lobes on the pods, which are rather sharp. A good example is Dodonaea oxyptera.

Oxyrachis: [ok-see-ra-chis/shis] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed and Rhákhis, which is Ancient Greek for a spine or ridge. It refers to plants, which have a coarse or somewhat spiny ridge along the rachis. A good example is Indigofera oxyrachis.

Oxysepala: [ok-see-se-pa-la] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sēpalum, which is Latin for a sepal or sepals. It refers to sepals, which taper to a very distinct point. A good example is Oxysepala shepherdii.

Oxysepalus: [ok-see-se-pa-lus] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sēpalum, which is Latin for a sepal or sepals. It refers to sepals, which taper to a very distinct point. A good example is Rumex oxysepalus, which is now known as Rumex drummondii.

Oxystachya: [ok-see-stah-she-a] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys,  which is Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for an ear of corns. It refers to flower heads, which resemble the shape and form of an ear of corn. A good example is Fimbristylis oxystachya.

Oxystelma: [ok-see-stel-ma] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed and Stelma, which is Ancient Greek for a girdle. It may refer to flowers, which have a prominent swelling around the base where the strongly acute sepals are united. A good example is Oxystelma esculentum.

Oxystigma: [ok-see-stig-ma] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed and Stígma/Stízein, which is Ancient Greek for the female reproductive organ upon the style which is receptive to receiving pollen. It refers to stigmas, which have a centrally positioned, pointed appendage. A good example was Grevillea oxystigma, which is now known as Grevillea pilulifera.

Oxytrichum: [ok-see-trahy-kum] From Oxalis/Oxus/Oxys, which are Ancient Greek for sharp or pointed and Thrix, which is Latin for hairy. It refers to organs or parts of organs, which are covered in hairs. A good example is the leaves, flower buds and fruits on Lepidium oxytrichum which all have pointed apexes and covered in white rigid hairs.

Ozandra: [o-zan-dra] From Ozo, which is Ancient Greek for to smell and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man or male. It refers to flowers, which have a somewhat male or man smell about them. A good example was Ozandra hyssopifolia, which is now known as Melaleuca hypericifolia.

Ozantha: [o-zan-tha] From Ozein, which is Ancient Greek for to have a smell and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have a somewhat unpleasant smell. A good example is Pycnarrhena ozantha.

Ozothamnoides: [o-zo-tham-noi-deez] From Ozein, which is Ancient Greek for to have a smell, Thamnos, which is Ancient Greek for a shrub and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the leaves having a strong but pleasant smell similar to that of the Ozothamnus genus. A good example is Haeckeria ozothamnoides.

Ozothamnus: [o-zo-tham-nus] From Ozein, which is Ancient Greek for to have a smell and Thamnos, which is Ancient Greek for a shrub. It refers to shrubs, which emit a strong pleasant or unpleasant smell. A good example is Ozothamnus adnatus.

“Pa – Py”

Pachocephalum: [pa-ko-ke/se-fa-lum] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Kephal which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads, which have a stocky appearance. A good example is Trichinium pachocephalum, which is now known as Ptilotus macrocephalus.

Pachocephalus: [pa-ko-ke/se-fa-lus] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Kephal which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads, which have a stocky appearance. A good example is Ptilotus macrocephalus.

Pachomai: [pa-ko-mahy] From Pachomai, which is unknown. A good example was Eremophila pachomai, which is now known as Eremophila tietkensii.

Pachy: [pa-kee] From Pakhús which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness.

Pachyacra: [pa-kee-a-kra] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Akris, which is Ancient Greek for a summit. It refers to glands, which are covered by a thickening at the apex of the phyllodes. A good example is Acacia pachyacra.

Pachyacrum: [pa-kee-a-krum] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Akris, which is Ancient Greek for a summit. It refers to glands, which is covered by a thickening at the apex of the phyllodes. A good example is Racosperma pachyacrum, which is now known as Acacia pachyacra.

Pachyarthron: [pa-kee-ar-thron] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Arthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint. It refers the joints, which are along the stems being thicker than the stems. A good example is Schizachyrium pachyarthron.

Pachycalyx: [pa-kee-ka-liks] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Kalyx, which is Ancient Greek for a cup. It refers to calyxes, which are much thicker than other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus pachycalyx.

Pachycarpa: [pa-kee-kar-pa] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits, which are rather thick or larger than other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus pachycarpa.

Pachycarpum: [pa-kee-kar-pum] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits, which are rather thick or larger than other members of the genus. A good example was Racosperma pachycarpum, which is now known as Acacia pachycarpa.

Pachycarpus: [pa-kee-kar-pus] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits being rather thick or larger than other members of the genus. A good example is Ranunculus pachycarpus.

Pachycauly: [pa-kee-kor-lee] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek or Caulis, which is Latin for a stem. It refers to trees that have disproportionately thick trunks and few branches for their height. A good example is Brachychiton populneus.

Pachyceras: [pa-kee-ke-ras] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn or spur. It refers to spurs which are generally much longer and thicker than other species in the genus. A good example was Utricularia pachyceras, which is now known as Utricularia singeriana.

Pachychaetus: [pa-kee-chee-tus] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Khaite, which is Ancient Greek for bristly. It refers to hairs, which are short and thick even compared to hispid hairs.

Pachyclada: [pa-kee-kla-da] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a branch. It refers to the stems and branches, which are rather thick. A good example is Leptomeria pachyclada.

Pachycladum: [pah-kee-kla-dum] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a branch. It refers to the stems and branches, which are rather thick. A good example maybe seen with the odd branches on Bryum pachycladum.

Pachycladus: [pa-kee-kla-dus] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a branch. It refers to the stems and branches, which are rather thick. A good example maybe seen with the odd branches on Xanthorrhoea malacophylla.

Pachycornia: [pa-kee-kor-ni-a] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Kornis, which is Ancient Greek for a horn. The genus’s of Halscaria, Pachycornia, Sclerostegia, Tecticornia and Tegicorniaare now all subsumed to be transferred to the Tecticornia genus as per international reckoning and recommendation until further investigations are completed on the Australian species to prove otherwise. A good example was Pachycornia triandra, which is now known as Tecticornia triandra.

Pachygone: [pah-kee-goh-ne] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Gone, is unknown. A good example is Pachygone ovata.

Pachylepis: [pa-kee-le-pis] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Lepis, which is Ancient Greek for scale or scaly. It refers to structures or organs, which have thick scales. A good example was Cynanchum pachylepis, which is now known as Marsdenia araujacea.

Pachylima: [pa-kee-li-ma] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Līma which is Ancient Greek for mucous, slippery and slimy or Lima, which is Latin for smooth file. It may refer to seeds which when wetted are covered in a thick mucousy slime. A good example is Daviesia pachylima.

Pachyloma: [pa-kee-loh-ma] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Loma, which is Ancient Greek for an edge or margin. It refers to structures or organs, which have a thicker margin than the rest of the surface. A good example is Eucalyptus pachyloma.

Pachylostyla: [pa-kee-lo-stahy-la] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness, Lomak which is Ancient Greek for an edge or margin and Stízō, which is Ancient Greek or Stilus, which is Latin for to mark with a pointed instrument or a column. It refers to the female reproductive organ between the stigma and carpels which is shorter and thicker than other species in the genus. A good example is Grevillea pachylostyla.

Pachymitus: [pa-kee-mi-tus] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Mitos, which is Latin for footed or a thread. It refers to the pedicels, which are stout. A good example is Pachymitus cardaminoides.

Pachymorphic: [pa-kee-mor-fik] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for to take the form of. It refers to plants, in which the local variety of a species is distinguishable from other populations of the species by having a structure organ, which is much thicker. A good example is the roots on Bambusa arnhemica.

Pachynema: [pa-kee-nee-ma] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to the Algae forming thick spreading threads. A good example is Valoniopsis pachynema.

Pachyneura: [pa-kee-nyoo-a] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Neûron which is Ancient Greek for a vein or nerve. It refers to veins on the leaves which are rather thick. A good example is Dodonaea pachyneura.

Pachypharynx: [pa-kee-fa-rinks] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Phárynx, which is Ancient Greek for a throat, cavity or chasm. It refers to structures or organs, which have a thick corky texture and deep valleys. A good example is the leaves on Pachypharynx neglecta, which is now known as Atriplex vesicaria and which recurve upwards towards the margins producing a deep valley along the midvein.

Pachyphloia: [pah-kee-floi-a] From Pakhús. which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Phlos/Phloem. which is Ancient Greek for bark. It refers to barks, which have a thick corky texture. A good example is Acacia pachyphloia.

Pachyphylla: [pa-kee-fi/fahyl-la] From Pakhús. which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaves, which are somewhat thicker than other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia pachypylla.

Pachyphyllum: [pa-kee-fi/ahyl-lum] From Pakhús. which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are rather thick compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Dysoxylum pachypyllum.

Pachyphyllus: [pa-kee-fi/fahyl-lus] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are are much thicker than other species in the genus. A good example is Melaleuca pachypyllus.

Pachypoda: [pa-kee-poh-da] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Pous, which is Ancient Greek for a foot. It refers to stem bases, which swell quite remarkably like a foot. A good example is the exotic garden plants Actaea pachypoda.

Pachypodum: [pa-kee-poh-dum] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Pous, which is Ancient Greek for a foot. It refers to stem bases, which swell quite remarkably like a foot. A good example was Racosperma pachypodm, which is now known as Acacia pachypoda.

Pachyptera: [pa-kee-te-ra] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to the stems, which have a thick stem. Avery good example is Brachyscome pachyptera.

Pachypteris: [pa-kee-te-ris] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to the stems, which have a thick stem. Avery good example is Acacia alata.

Pachyrrachis: [pa-kee-ra-kis] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Rháchis, which is Greek/Latin for the central leaf midrib of a leaf or frond. It refers to the rachises, which are much thicker than other species in the genus. A good example is Ardisia pachyrrhachis.

Pachyrhiza: [pa-kee-rahy-za] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Riza, which is Greek/Latin for a root. It refers to the roots, which are rather thick. A good example is Hibbertia pachyrrhiza.

Pachyrhizum: [pa-kee-rahy-zum] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Riza, which is Greek/Latin for a root. It refers to roots, which are much thicker than other species in the genus. A good example is Syzygium pachyrrhizum.

Pachyrrhyzus: [pah-kee-rahy-zus] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Riza, which is Greek/Latin for a root. It refers to the roots, which are rather thick. A good example is Jimcana bean Pachyrhizus erosus.

Pachysperma: [pa-kee-sper-ma] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the seeds, which are thick or larger than other species in the genus. A good example is Ristantia pachysperma.

Pachyspermus: [pa-kee-sper-mus] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the seeds, which are thick or larger than other species in the genus. A good example is Xanthostemon pachyspermus, which is now known as Ristantia pachysperma.

Pachystoma: [pa-kee-stoh-ma] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Stóma, which is Ancient Greek for a mouth or an opening. It refers to tepals, which remain partially in the closed position similar to a pair of pouted lips. A good example is Pachystoma pubescens.

Pachystomoides: [pa-kee-sto-moi-deez] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness, Stóma, which is Ancient Greek for a mouth or an opening and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to orchids, which has flowers that resemble the Pachystoma genus. A good example is Nervilia pachystomoides, which is now known as Didymoplexis pachystomoides.

Pachysurus: [pah-kee-syoo-us] From Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick or thickness and Swer, which is Latin Possibly Ancient Latin for a branch or pole. It refers to naked stems, which resemble poles. A good example was Pachysurus angianthoides, which is now known as Gnephosis angianthoides.

Pacifica: [pa-si-fi-ka] From Pācifica, which is Latin for the Pacific Ocean. It refers to plants, which grow close to the Pacific Ocean or Islands or in the Pacific Ocean. A good example is Glycine pacifica or Pteris pacifica.

Paddisonii: [pa-di-so-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Paddison. A good example is Actinotus paddisonii.

Paedoglauca: [pa-do-glor-ka] From Paeonia, which is Greek and named by Theophrastus for Paeon, the physician to the Gods who, in mythology, was changed into a flower by Pluto and Gauko/Glaukós which is Ancient Greek for opaque grey. It refers to leaves, which are opaque grey similar to several of the poppies. A good example is Eucalyptus paedoglauca.

Paenula: [pahy-nyoo-la] From Paenulae, which is Latin for an ancient sleeveless, hooded cloak worn by the Roman peasants. It refers to sepals, which are loosely cloaked around the flowers. A good example is the flowers on Paenula storyi.

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Paeoniifolia: [pahy-o-ni-foh-li-a] From Paeonia, which is Greek and named by Theophrastus for Paeon, the physician to the Gods who, in mythology, was changed into a flower by Pluto and Folia, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble those of the Phoeny poppy China’s national flower emblem. A good example is Tacca pinnatifida var. paeoniifolia, which is now known asTacca leontopetaloides.

Paeoniifolium: [pahy-o-ni-foh-li-um] From Paeonia, which is Greek and named by Theophrastus for Paeon, the physician to the Gods who, in mythology, was changed into a flower by Pluto and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble those of the Phoeny poppy China’s national flower emblem. A good example was Dracontium paeoniifolium, which is now known asAmorphophallus paeoniifolius.

Paeoniifolius: [pahy-o-ni-foh-li-us] From Paeonia, which is Greek and named by Theophrastus for Paeon, the physician to the Gods who, in mythology, was changed into a flower by Pluto and Folius, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble those of the Phoeny poppy China’s national flower emblem. A good example Amorphophallus paeoniifolius.

Paeoninsularis: [pahy-o-nin-syoo-lar-is] From Paeninsularis, which is Latin for a peninsular. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on peninsulars. A good example is Hibbertia paeninsularis.

Pagetia: [pa-je-ti-a] Is named in honour of Sir James Paget; 1814–1899, who was a physician and an author of Botany. A good example is the Pagetia genus however the Australian species have all been placed in the new Bosistoa genus which includes Bosistoa pentacocca var. pentacocca.

Pagophila: [pa-go-fi-la] From Pāgō, which is Latin for an area or district outside the metropolitan area and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for to love or loving. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in the countryside just outside of built up areas. A good example is Pimelea pagophila.

Painted: [pein-ted] From Paint, which is middle English for to cover in colour. It refers to Colours, which are disposed in streaks of unequal thickness and intensity.

Paisleyi: [peiz-lee-ahy] Is named in honour of Paisley. A good example is Eremophila paisleyi.

Palachila: [pa-la-chi-la] From Paleo, which is Ancient Greek for chaff and Cheilos which is Latin for a lip or a pair of lips. It refers to orchids, which have paler coloured labellum. A good example is Diuris palachila.

Palae: [pa-lee] From Pāla/ Pālae, which are Ancient Greek/Latin for chaff. It refers to the final, usually smaller piece of chaff, which surrounds the sedd of most grasses. A good example is the colour of the leaves which are very pale on Drosera paleacea subsp. paleacea.

Paleacea: [pa-lee-a-see-a] From Pale, which is Ancient Greek for chaff and Aceous, which is Latin for reLating to. It refers to structures or organs, which have a characteristic which resembles chaff. A good example is the colour of the leaves which are very pale on Drosera paleacea subsp. paleacea.

Palaeobotanist: [pa-lee-o-bo-tan-ist] From Palaiós, which is Ancient Greek for ancient or prehistoric, Bio(tanic), which is Ancient Greek for life (plants) and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies the science of fossilized plants.

Palaeobotanology: [pa-lee-oh-bo-tan-ol-o-jee] From Palaiós, which is Ancient Greek for ancient or prehistoric, Bio(tanic), which is Ancient Greek for life (plants) and Ology which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science of studying fossilized plants.

Palaeobotany: [pa-lee-oh-bo-ta-nee] From Palaiós, which is Ancient Greek for ancient or prehistoric and Bio(tanic), which is Ancient Greek for life (plants). It refers to the science of fossilized plants.

Palaeomammalogy: [pa-lee-oh-ma-malojee] From Palaiós, which is Ancient Greek for ancient or prehistoric, Mammal, which is Ancient Greek for a milk producing animal and Ology which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science of studying the history of mammals through past geologic ages.

Palaquium: [pa-la-qwee-um] From Palakinhin, which is Latinized from the Philippine vernacular for let it grow. It probably refers to species, which secrete latex. A good example in Australia is Palaquium galactoxylum.

Palasepala: [pa-la-se-pa-la] From Palea, which is Latin for chaff like scale on grasses and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum which is Latin for a sepal. It refers to sepals, which are more like the palae of grasses than true sepals like the other species in the genus. A good example in Australia is Boronia palasepala.

Palate: [pal-it] From Palatum, which is Latin for the roof of the mouth. It refers to a rounded projecting part of a flower’s upper lip usually associated with orchids.

Palate or Labellum on Cymbidium madidum.

Palea: [pa-ee] From Palea, which is Latin for chaff like scale on grasses. It refers to the two inner scales or bracts, which directly surround each floret in a grass spikelet and later the seed.

Paleacea: [pa-lee-a-se-a] From Palea, which is Latin for a chaff like scale. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in rough scales. A good example is the hard fungi Pultenaea paleacea.

Paleaceum: [pa-lee-a-se-um] From Palea, which is Latin for a chaff like scale. It refers to scales, which are found on the stipes and pinnae of the fronds. A good example is Asplenium paleaceum.

Paleaceus: [pa-lee-a-se-us] From Palea, which is Latin for a chaff like scale. It refers to fungi, which resemble large scales growing upon each other. A good example is the hard fungi Psoroma paleaceum.

Paleata: [pa-lee-a-ta] From Palea, which is Latin for a chaff like scale. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in rough scales. A good example is the hard fungi Opercularia paleata, which is now known as Opercularia aspera.

Paleomammalogy: [pa-lee-oh-mam-malojee] From Palaios, which is Ancient Greek for ancient or prehistoric, Mammal which is Ancient Greek for a milk producing animal and Ology which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science of studying the history of mammals of past geologic ages.

Paleomorphic: [pa-lee-oh-mor-fic] From Paleo, which is Ancient Greek for pale and Morpheus, which is Ancient Greek for to change. It refers to flowers, without symmetry; usually with an indefinite number of stamens and carpels, and usually subtended by bracts or discoloured upper leaves. (Most are found in fossil records).

Paliformis: [pa-li-for-mis] From Paleo, which is Ancient Greek for pale and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the pale colour of the flowers and or leaves. A good example is the colour of the leaves and flowers on Eucalyptus paliformis.

Palinaktinodromous: [pa-li-nak-ti-no-dro-mos] From Palinact, which is Ancient Greek for conductive tissue (venation) and Dromous, which is Ancient Greek for running from. It refers to the study of the conductive tissue where there are one or more subsidiary radiations above the primary one.

Palisotii: [pa-li-so-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Ambroise Marie François Joseph Palisot, Baron de Beauvois; 1752–1820, who was French naturalist and entomologist. A good example is Arthropteris palisotii.

Pallens: [pa-lenz] From Pallēns, which is Greek or Pallidum, which is Latin for blanching or deficient or waning in colour. It refers to structures or organs, which are pale in colour. A good example is Melaleuca pallescens.

Pallescens: [pa-les-senz] From Pallidum, which is Latin for deficient or waning in colour. It refers to structures or organs, which are pale in colour. A good example is Melaleuca pallescens.

Pallid: [pal-lid] From Pallidum, which is Latin for deficient or waning in colour. It refers to structures or organs, which are rather pale in colour.

Pallida: [pal-li-da] From Pallida, which is Latin for deficient or waning in colour. It refers to structures or organs, which are very pale in colour. A good example is Grevillea pallida.

Pallide-fusca: [pal-lid- foo-skah] From Pallidum, which is Latin for deficient or waning in colour and Fusca, which is Latin for Brownish-yellow. It refers to structures or organs, which are pale Brownish-yellow in colour. A good example is Cuculus pallidus.

Pallidiflora: [pal-li-di-flor-a] From Pallidum, which is Latin for deficient or waning in colour and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are a little too much paler than other species in the genus. A good example is Hibbertia pallidiflora.

Pallidiflorum: [pal-li-di-flor-um] From Pallidum, which is Latin for deficient or waning in colour and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are much paler than other species in the genus. A good example is the flowers on Epilobium pallidiflorum.

Pallidiflorus: [pahl-li-di-flor-us] From Pallidum, which is Latin for deficient or waning in colour and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are much paler than other species in the genus. A good example is the flowers on Phyllanthus scaber var. pallidiflorus.

Pallidifolia: [pal-li-di-foh-li-a] From Pallidum, which is Latin for deficient or waning in colour and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to fronds, leaves or phyllodes which are a little paler in colour than other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia pallidifolia.

Pallidifolium: [pal-li-di-foh-li-um] From Pallidum, which is Latin for deficient or waning in colour and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to fronds, leaves or phyllodes which are a little paler in colour than other species in the genus. A good example is Solanum pallidifolium.

Pallidifolius: [pal-li-di-foh-li-us] From Pallidum, which is Latin for deficient or waning in colour and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to fronds, leaves or phyllodes which are a little paler in colour than other species in the genus. A good example is Calothamnus planifolius var. pallidifolius.

Pallidiramosa: [pal-li-di-ra-moh-sa] From Pallidum, which is Latin for deficient or waning in colour and Ramose, which is Latin for many branches. It refers to shrubs which have a lot of pale coloured branches. A good example was Acacia pallidiramosa, which is now known as Acacia ligulata.

Pallidum: [pal-lid-um] From Pallidum, which is Latin for deficient or waning in colour. It refers to flowers, which are off white in colour. A good example is Astroloma pallidum.

Pallidus: [pal-lid-us] From Pallidus, which is Latin for deficient or waning in colour. It refers to culms, leaves or flowers, which are much paler in colour than other species in the genus. A good example is Juncus pallidus.

Palm: [parlm] From Palámē, which is Ancient Greek or later Palma, which is Latin for the shape of a hand. It refers to leaves, which resemble a person’s hand with outstretched fingers. A good example is the leaves on Licuala ramsayi.

Palmata: [pal-mata] From Palmatus, which is Latin for the shape of a hand. It refers to structures usually the leaves or fronds, that is sectioned or divided palmately into distinct segments like a hand. A good example is the leaves on Schizaea palmata, which is now known as Schizaea fistulosa.

Palmate: [pal-meit] From Palámē, which is Ancient Greek or later Palma, which is Latin for the shape of a hand. It refers to leaves, which resemble a person’s hand with outstretched fingers. A good example is the leaves on Livistona australis.

Palmate Venation: [pal-meit ve-nei-shon] From Palámē, which is Ancient Greek or later Palma, which is Latin for the shape of a hand, Vēna, which is Latin for a vein and –ātiō, which is Latin for whence. It refers to veins on leaves, which are typically found on leaves that resemble a person’s hand with outstretched fingers. A good example is the leaves on Hibiscus splendens or the fronds on Livistona muelleri.

Palmate venation

Palmately Compound: [pal-meit-lee, kom-pour-nd] From Palámē, which is Ancient Greek or later Palma, which is Latin for the shape of a hand and Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together and Ponere, which is Latin for to put. It refers to leaves, which resemble a person’s hand with outstretched fingers and are put together in groups. A good example is the leaves on Livistona australis.

Palmatisect: [pal-mati-sekt] From Palámē, which is Ancient Greek or later Palma, which is Latin for the shape of a hand and Sequi, which is Latin for to follow or next. It refers to structures, which resemble a person’s hand with outstretched fingers and are sectioned or divided palmately into distinct segments. A good example is the leaves on Livistona decipiens.

Palmatus: [pal-matus] From Palmatus, which is Latin for the shape of a hand. It refers to structures usually the leaves or fronds, that is sectioned or divided palmately into distinct segments like a hand. A good example is the leaves on Livistona rigidula.

Palmeri: [parl-mer-ahy] Is named in honour of Sir James Palmer; 1803-1871, who was a physician, pastoralist and politician in Victoria. A good example is Palmeria foremanii.

Palmeria: [pal-mer-i-a] Is named in honour of Sir James Fredrick Palmer; 1803-1871, who was a physician, pastoralist and the first president of the Legislative Council of Victoria. A good example is Palmeria foremanii.

Palmeriana: [pal-mer-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Edward Palmer; 1833?-1899, who was a Queensland MLA and keen amateur anthropologist who studied aboriginal uses of indigenous plants. A good example was Bacularia palmeriana, which is now known as Linospadix palmerianus.

Palmerianus: [parl-mer-i-a-nus] Is probably named in honour of Edward Palmer; 1833?-1899, who was a Queensland MLA and keen amateur anthropologist who studied aboriginal uses of indigenous plants but I have been unable to substantiated it. A good example is Linospadix palmerianus.

Palmerstoniae: [parl-mer-sto-ni-ee] Is probably named in honour of Christie Palmerston; 1850?-1897, who was an explorer and collector of rainforest plants in northern Australia but I have been unable to substantiated it. A good example was Dendrobium palmerstoniae, which is now known as Thelychiton adae.

Palmerstonii: [parl-mer-sto-ni-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Christie Palmerston; 1850?-1897, who was an explorer and collector of rainforest plants in northern Australia but I have been unable to substantiated it. A good example is Endiandra palmerstonii.

Palmicola: [parl-mikoh-la] From Palmatus which is Latin for the shape of a hand Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or reside. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on palm trees. A good example is the orchids Oberonia palmicola and Graphina palmicola which grow on palms in wet litorale rainforest wallums.

Paludal: [pah-loo-dal] From Paludosa which is Greek or Palūs/ Palūdōsum, which is Latin for wallums, swamps or marshes. It refers to the habitats, which are very wet as in marshes or swamplands. Good examples range from Melaleuca quinquenervia, Ludwigia peploides, Philydrum lanuginosum down to Mazus pumilio.

Paludicola: [pal-yoo-di-koh-la] From Paludosa which is Greek or Palūs/ Palūdōsum, which is Latin for a swamp, marsh or wallum Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in wallum environments. A good example is Marsdenia paludicola.

Paludosa: [palyoodoh-sa] From Paludosa which is Greek or Palūs/ Palūdōsum, which are Latin for wallums, swamps or marshes. It refers to the habitats, which are very wet as in wallums marshes or swamplands. A good example is Mitrasacme paludosa.

Paludosum: [palyoodoh-sum] From Paludosa which is Greek or Palūs/ Palūdōsum, which is Latin for wallums, swamps or marshes. It refers to the habitats, which are very wet as in wallums, marshes or swamplands. A good example is Panicum paludosum.

Paludosus: [palyoodoh-sus] From Paludosa which is Greek or Palūs/ Palūdōsum, which is Latin for wallums, swamps or marshes. It refers to the habitats, which are wet as in marshes or swamplands. Two good example are Callistemon paludosus and Calochilus paludosus.

Palustre: [pal-us-stre] From Paludosa which is Greek or Palūs/ Palūdōsum, which is Latin for wallums, swamps or marshes. It refers to plants, which grow adjacent to very wet areas where capillary action is strongly evident. A good example is Xerochrysum palustre.

Palustris: [pal-usstris] From Paludosa which is Greek or Palūs/ Palūdōsum, which is Latin for wallums, swamps or marshes. It refers to plants, which love of wet places like wallums, marshes and swamps. A good example is Prostanthera palustris.

Palynologist: [pa-lahy-nol-o-jist] From Palynos, which is Ancient Greek for pollen, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies pollens both as a botanist, as fossil records, or as a forensicologist.

Palynology: [pa-lahy-nol-o-jee] From Palynos, which is Ancient Greek for pollen and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science of studying pollens as a botanist, as in fossil records, or as a forensicologist.

Pamelae: [pa-me-lee] Is named in honour of Pamela. A good example is Sporobolus pamelae.

Pampeanus: [pampee-a-nus] From Pampe, which is Latinized for a locality and Ensis/Anus, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to the plants, which were first discovered in the Pampe region. A good example is Gymnopilus pampeanus, which is now known as Gymnopilus junonius.

Panaeolina: [pa-nee-oh-li-na] From Panaeolus, which is Ancient Greek for all variegated. It refers to organs, which are densely spotted, streaked or have striations. A good example is the stalks on one of the hallucinatory mushroom Panaeolus foenisecii.

Pampliniana: [pampli-ni-a-na] From Pampe, which is Latinized for a locality and Ensis/Anus, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to the plants, which were first discovered in the Pampe region. A good example was Hakea pampliniana, which is now known as Hakea tephrosperma.

Panaeolus: [pa-nee-o-lus] From Panaeolus, which is Ancient Greek for all variegated. It refers to organs, which are densely spotted. A good example is the stalks on one of the hallucinatory mushroom Panaeolus cyanescens, which turn blue when bruised.

Panaetioides: [pa-nee-ti-oi-deez] From Panax, which is Ancient Greek for to cure all and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which; with some imagination, resembles the Chinese Ginseng. A good example is Leiocarpa panaetioides.

Panas: [pan-as] From Panax, which is Ancient Greek for to cure all. It refers to the Chinese Ginseng Panax notoginseng or Panax Schinseng, tianqi田七- seven fields, sānqī 三七- thirty-seven or translated as basically cure all from a science view or rencan人参 ginseng in simple lay talk.

Panax: [pan-aks] From Panax, which is Ancient Greek for to cure all. It refers to the Chinese Ginseng Panax notoginseng or Panax Schinseng田七, tianqiseven fields, sānqī 三七 thirty-seven or translated as basically cure all From A, science view or rencan人参 ginseng in simple lay talk. A good example is the local common named plant Elderberry Panax known as Polyscias sambucifolia because of the superficial above ground appearance.

Pancheri: [pan-cher-ahy] Is named in honour of Jean Armand Isidore Pancher; 1814–1877, who was a French gardener and botanist who spent many years in the Pacific region collecting for Adolphe-Théodore Brongniart and Jean Antoine Arthur Gris. A good example is Baloghia pancheri.

Panda: [pan-da] From Pandō, which is Latinized from the Philippine vernacular name for I spread out. It refers to the branching habits of the trees. A good example is Eucalyptus panda.

Pandacaqui: [pan-da-ka-chu-ee] From Pandacaqui, which is Latinized for the Philippines. It refers to plants, which were first found and named from the Philippines. A good example is Tabernaemontana pandacaqui.

Pandanaceum: [pan-dan-a-se-um] From Pandan, which is Latinized from the Malayan vernacular name for to have sword like spiralling leaves. It refers to leaves, which take the form of a sword and spiral from around the trunk. A good example is Scleroderma pandanaceum.

Pandanicarpa: [pahn-dan-ni-kar-pa] From Pandan, which is Latinized from the Malayan vernacular name for to have sword like spiralling and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which resemble the fruits of the Pandanus palm to look at, but much smaller. A good example is Pandanus tectorius.

Pandanifolia: [pan-dan-ni-foh-li-a] From Pandan, which is Latinized from the Malayan vernacular name for to have sword like spiralling leaves and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which take the form of a sword and spiral around the trunk. A good example is Pandanus tectorius.

Pandanophylla: [pan-dan-ni-fi/fahyl-la] From Pandan, which is Latinized from the Malayan vernacular name for to have sword like spiralling leaves and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which take the form of a sword and spiral around the trunk. A good example is Mapania sumatrana subsp. pandanophylla and Mapania pacifica of which only the former is known from Australia and it is not known whether it is native or introduced.

Pandanophyllum: [pan-dan-no-fi/fahyl-lum] From Pandan, which is Latinized from the Malayan vernacular name for to have sword like spiralling leaves and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which take the form of a sword and spiral around the trunk. A good example is Thoracostachyum pandanophyllum, which is now known as Mapania sumatrana subsp. pandanophylla and Mapania pacifica of which only the former is known from Australia and it is not known whether it is native or introduced.

Pandanum: [pan-dan-um] From Pandan, which is Latinized from the Malayan vernacular name for to have sword like spiralling leaves. It refers to leaves, which take the form of a sword and spiral from the base. A good example is Dipodium pandanum.

Pandanus: [pan-dan-us] From Pandan, which is Latinized from the Malayan vernacular name for to have sword like spiralling leaves. It refers to leaves, which take the form of a sword and spiral from around the trunk. A good example is Pandanus tectorius.

Pandorea: [pan-dor-ee-a] From Pandora, which is Ancient Greek for the first human woman created by the gods, specifically by Hephaestus and Athena on the instructions of Zeus. Each god created her and bestowed upon her unique gifts. All the gods joined in offering her “seductive gifts”. According to the myth, Pandora opened the pithos; a jar not Pandoras box as is mistranslated in modern accounts, releasing all the evils of humanity plagues and diseases, leaving only Hope inside once she had closed it again. It refers to vines, which have capsules that resemble the general outline of the pithos ewer or a box crossed with a jar. A good example was Bignonia pandorae, which is now known as Pandorea pandorana.

Pandorana: [pan-dor-a-na] From Pandora, which is Ancient Greek for the first human woman created by the gods, specifically by Hephaestus and Athena on the instructions of Zeus. Each god created her and bestowed upon her unique gifts. All the gods joined in offering her “seductive gifts”. According to the myth, Pandora opened the pithos; a jar not Pandoras box as is mistranslated in modern accounts, releasing all the evils of humanity plagues and diseases, leaving only Hope inside once she had closed it again. It refers to vines, which have capsules that resemble the general outline of the pithos ewer or a box crossed with a jar. A good example is the fruits on Pandorea pandorana.

Pandorea: [pan-dor-ee-a] From Pandora, which is Ancient Greek for the first human woman created by the gods, specifically by Hephaestus and Athena on the instructions of Zeus. Each god created her and bestowed upon her unique gifts. All the gods joined in offering her “seductive gifts”. According to the myth, Pandora opened the pithos; a jar not Pandoras box as is mistranslated in modern accounts, releasing all the evils of humanity plagues and diseases, leaving only Hope inside once she had closed it again. It refers to vines, which have capsules that resemble the general outline of the pithos ewer or a box crossed with a jar. A good example is Pandorea jasminoides.

Pandurata: [pan-dyoora-ta] From Pandura, which is Latin for a type of musical instrument. It refers to an organ, which are fiddle shaped. A good example is Coelogyne pandurata.

Panduratum: [pandyoora-tum] From Pandura, which is Latin for a type of musical instrument. It refers to organs, which are fiddle shaped. A good example is Albugo ipomoeae-panduratae.

Panduratus: [pandyoora-tus] From Pandura, which is Latin for a type of musical instrument. It refers to organs, which are fiddle shaped. A good example is Isopogon panduratus.

Panduriform: [pandyoori-form] From Pandura, which is Latin for a type of musical instrument and Forme, which is Latin for a shape or form. It refers to organs, which are fiddle shaped. That is to be obovate with a shallow or deep sinus or indentation on each side near the base and with two small basal lobes.

Panduriformis: [pandyoori-for-mis] From Pandura, which is Latin for a type of musical instrument and Forme, which is Latin for a shape or form. It refers to organs, which are fiddle shaped. That is to be obovate with a shallow or deep sinus or indentation on each side near the base and with two small basal lobes. A good example is Hibiscus panduriformis.

Panellus: [pa-nel-lus] From Panellus, which is Latin for a panal or a cushion. It refers to pileus, which resemble small pillows or cushions on old logs and the lower trunks of old trees in the forest. A good example is Panellus stipticus.

Panhesya: [pan-hes-eea] From Panhesya which is unknown. A good example is Synaphea panhesya.

Panicea: [pa-ni-se-a] From Paniceum, which Latin for bread. It refers to flowers or fruiting bodies that resemble bread. A good example is Cyperus umbellatus var. panicea.

Paniceum: [pa-ni-se-um] From Paniceum, which Latin for bread. It refers to flowers or fruiting bodies that resemble bread. A good example is the small blue fungus that resembles bread mould in colour Physarum paniceum.

Paniceus: [pa-ni-se-us] From Paniceum, which Latin for bread. It refers to flowers or fruiting bodies that resemble bread. A good example was Cyperus paniceus, which is now known as Cyperus umbellatus var. panicea.

Panicle: [pa-nikl] From Panos, which is Ancient Greek or Pānicula, which is Latin for a flower head. It refers to compound flower heads, which are extensively branched. See above – “Inflorescence Arrangements”.

Panicularia: [pa-ni-kyoo-lar-i-a] From Panos, which is Ancient Greek or Pānicula, which is Latin for a tuft especially in relation to panicles. It refers to flower heads which are relatively scruffy of tufted. A good example was Panicularia latispicea, which is now known as Glyceria latispica.

Paniculata: [pa-ni-kyoo-la-ta] From Panos, which is Ancient Greek or Pānicula, which is Latin for a flower head. It refers to flowers, which are arranged in a head. A good example is Libertia paniculata.

Paniculate: [pa-ni-kyoo-leit] From Panos, which is Ancient Greek or Pānicula, which is Latin for a flower head. It refers to flower heads, which are extensively branched.

Paniculatum: [pa-ni-kyoo-lei-tum] From Panos, which is Ancient Greek or Pānicula, which is Latin for a flower head. It refers to many flowers, which are arranged in a compact head. A good example is Syzygium paniculatum.

Paniculatus: [pa-ni-kyoo-lei-tus] From Panos, which is Ancient Greek or Pānicula, which is Latin for a flower head. It refers to the many flowers, which are arranged in a compact head. A good example is Mallotus paniculatus.

Paniculiform: [pa-ni-kyoo-li-form] From Panos, which is Ancient Greek or Pānicula, which is Latin for a flower head and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the flowers, which have the form of a compact panicle. A good example of compact panicles is Syzygium cormiflorum.

Paniculosa: [pa-ni-kyoo-loh-sa] From Panos, which is Ancient Greek or Pānicula, which is Latin for a flower head or Panos which is Ancient Greek for a flower head. It refers to flowers, which are arranged in a head. A good example is Pomaderris paniculosa subsp. paniculosa.

Paniculosum: [pa-ni-kyoo-loh-sum] From Panos, which is Ancient Greek or Pānicula, which is Latin for a flower head or Panos which is Ancient Greek for a flower head. It refers to flowers, which are arranged in a head. A good example is Synoum glandulosum subsp. paniculosum.

Panicum: [pa-nikum] From Panicum, which is Latin for the wild grasses in the Panicum genus. It refers to plants, which are related to the wild Panicum genus. A good example is Panicum bisulcatum.

Panis: [pa-nis] From Pānis, which is Latin for a loaf of bread or a cake. It refers to Lichens, which resemble a loaf of bread or a cake. A good example is Perenniporia medulla-panis.

Pannate: [pan-neit] From Pannus, which is Latin for a soft rag or a piece of cloth. It refers to organs, which have soft hairs that feel like felt or velvet.

Pannosa: [pan-noh-sa] From Pannus, which is Latin for a soft rag or piece of cloth. It refers to trichomus hairs, which feel like felt or velvet. A good example is Correa alba var. pannosa.

Pannosum: [pa-noh-sum] From Pannus, which is Latin for a soft rag or piece of cloth. It refers to trichomus hairs, which feel like felt or velvet. A good example is Trichomanes pannosum, which is now known asAsplenium pannosum.

Pannosus: [pa-noh-sus] From Pannus, which is Latin for a soft rag or piece of cloth. It refers to trichomus hairs, which feel like felt or velvet. A good example is Convolvulus pannosus, which is now known asJacquemontia pannosa.

Panoides: [pa-noi-deez] Probably from Pānus, which is Latin for millet or an ear of millet and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to pileus, which have very similar colours to the panicles of ripe millet. A good example is Tapinella panoides.

Pantoleuca: [pan-to-loo-ka] Maybe from Pantos, which is Ancient Greek for an idle fellow and Leukos, which is Ancient Greek for white. It may refer to the pure white trunks and isolation of plants, which refers to a person standing in isolation and being idle. A good example is Eucalyptus pantoleuca.

Pantoniana: [pan-to-ni-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Joseph Anderson Panton 1831-1913 who was a Scottish born Australian police magistrate in Victoria and amateur plant collector. A good example is Ficus pantoniana.

Pantonii: [pan-to-ni-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Joseph Anderson Panton 1831-1913 who was a Scottish born Australian police magistrate in Victoria and amateur plant collector. A good example is Bursaria spinosa subsp. pantonii.

Panus: [pa-nus] From Pânos which is Ancient Greek or Pānus which is Latin for a thread on a bobbin or bobbin. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a bobbin in form. A good example is Bursaria spinosa subsp. pantonii.

Papagola: [pa-pa-go-la] From Pápago, and earlier papabos which is Latinized from the Spanish for a legume growing there. for the poppy flower. It refers to legumes, which has similar leaves that grow in Spain. A good example was Sarcocephalus papagola, which is now known as Nauclea orientalis.

Papaver: [pa-pei-ver] From Papaver, which is Latin for the poppy flower. It refers to plants, which resemble or are related to the poppy. A good example is the exotic garden poppy Papaver laciniatum.

Papaverifolia: [pa-pei-ver-i-foh-li-a] From Papaver which is Latin for the poppy flower and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the leaves of the Asian Poppy. A good example is Gymnogramma papaverifolia, which is now known as Paraceterach muelleri.

Papaverifolium: [pa-pei-ver-i-foh-li-um] From Papaver which is Latin for the poppy flower and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the leaves of the Asian Poppy. A good example is Solanum papaverifolium.

Papery: [pei-per-ee] From Papyrus, which is Latin for thin, flimsy and dry. It refers to the petals, leaves or bark being thin and papery. A good example is the chartaceous bark on Melaleuca quinquenervia.

Paphia: [pa-fi-a] Probably from a, miss spelling of Baphia. From Baphe which is Ancient Greek for a red dye. It refers to a Mediterranean plant, which was used to extract a deep red dye of which the deep red, waxy flowers look like the liquid dye. Australia is represented with a single species in which Paphia meiniana is a good example.

Papilio: [pa-pi-li-oh] From Papilio, which is Latin for a butterfly and Aceae, which is Latin for a family grouping. It refers to a family of legumes, which have flowers that resemble the outline of a butterfly. A good example is Brachysema papilio.

Papilionaceae: [pa-pi-li-oh-na-se-a] From Papilio, which is Latin for a butterfly and Aceae, which is Latin for a family grouping. It refers to a family of legumes, which have flowers, which look similar to the outline of a butterfly. A good example is Viminaria juncea.

Papilionaceaus: [pa-pi-li-oh-na-se-us] From Papilio, which is Latin for a butterfly and Aceae ,which is Latin for a family grouping. It refers to family of legumes, which have flowers, which look similar to the outline of a butterfly. A good example is Viminaria juncea.

Papillae: [pa-pil-lee] From Papula, which is Latin for a nipple or bump. It refers to leaves and stems, which have small bumps that resemble those found on the areola of breasts or goose bumps. A good example is the papilla capsules on Comersperma ericinum or Tortula pagorum.

Papillata: [pa-pil-la-ta] From Papula, which is Latin for a nipple or little bumps. It refers to small bumps, which resemble those found on the areola of breasts or goose bumps. A good example is found on the leaves and stems on Philotheca papillata.

Papillate: [pa-pil-leit] From Papula, which is Latin for a nipple or little bumps on the aereole, which sounds the nipple. It refers to small bumps, which resemble those found on the areola of breasts or goose bumps.

Papillatus: [pa-pil-la-tus] From Papula, which is Latin for a nipple or little bumps on the aereole, which sounds the nipple. It refers to small bumps, which resemble those found on the areola of breasts or goose bumps. A good example is found on the leaves and stems on Homoranthus papillatus.

Papillifolia: [pa-pil-li-foh-li-a] From Papula, which is Latin for a nipple or little bumps on the aereole, which sounds the nipple. It refers to small bumps, which resemble those found on the areola of breasts or goose bumps.A good example is Euphorbia papillifolia.

Papillifolium: [pa-pil-li-foh-li-um] From Papula, which is Latin for a nipple or little bumps on the aereole, which sounds the nipple. It refers to small bumps, which resemble those found on the areola of breasts or goose bumps. A good example is the leaves on the moss of Macromitrium papillifolium, which is now known as Macromitrium prorepens.

Papillilabium: [pa-pil-li-la-bi-um] From Papilio, which is Latin for a butterfly. It refers to a genus of orchids having flowers, which look similar to a butterfly in flight. A good example is Papillilabium beckleri.

Papillosa: [pa-pil-loh-sa] From Papula, which is Latin for a nipple or little bumps on the aereole, which sounds the nipple. It refers to small bumps, which resemble those found on the areola of breasts or goose bumps. A good example is found on the fruits/gum nuts of Corymbia papillosa.

Papillose: [pa-pil-lohs] From Papula, which is Latin for a nipple or little bumps on the aereole, which sounds the nipple. It refers to small bumps, which resemble those found on the areola of breasts or goose bumps. A good example is Lepidium perfoliatum.

Papillosum: [pa-pil-lohsum] From Papula, which is Latin for a nipple or little bumps on the aereole, which sounds the nipple. It refers to small bumps, which resemble those found on the areola of breasts or goose bumps. A good example is Lepidium papillosum.

Pappochroma: [pa-po-kro-ma] From Pappos, which is Latin for downy and fluffy and Krôma which is Ancient Greek for the intensity of distinctive hue or the saturation of a colour. It refers to structures or organs, usually the flowers, which have an intense or variable saturation of a colour. A good example is Pappochroma paludicola.

Pappochromum: [pap-po-kro-mum] From Pappos, which is Latin for downy and fluffy and Krôma, which is Ancient Greek for the intensity of distinctive hue or the saturation of a colour. It refers to structures or organs, usually the flowers, which have an intense or variable saturation of a colour. A good example is Pappochroma pappochromum.

Pappochromus: [pa-po-kro-mus] From Pappos, which is Latin for downy and fluffy and Krôma, which is Ancient Greek for the intensity of distinctive hue or the saturation of a colour. It refers to structure, or organs, usually the flowers, which have an intense or variable saturation of a colour. A good example is Lagenopappus pappocromus.

Pappophorum: [pap-po-for-um] From Pappos, which is Latin for downy and fluffy and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which is covered in fluffy type hairs. A good example is the crown of fluffy hairs on Pappophorum avenaceum, which is now known as Enneapogon avenaceus.

Pappos: [pa-pos] From Páppos, which is Ancient Greek for a grandfather. It refers to bristles or feathery like hairs, or at times scales at one end of seeds, which resemble poppy’s whiskers. They are usually found on the Asterales order or some grass seeds. A good example is the seeds on Olearia nernstii.

Papposa: [pa-posa] From Páppos, which is Ancient Greek for a grandfather. It refers to bristles or feathery like hairs, or at times scales at one end of seeds, which resemble poppy’s whiskers. They are usually found on the Asterales order or some grass seeds. A good example is Digitaria papposa.

Pappus: [pa-pus] From Páppos, which is Ancient Greek for a grandfather. It refers to bristles or feathery like hairs, or at times scales at one end of seeds, which resemble poppy’s whiskers. They are usually found on the Asterales order or some grass seeds. A good example is the seeds on Xerochrysum bracteatum or Olearia nernstii.

Xerochrysum bracteatum seeds showing pappus.

Papuana: [pa-pyoo-a-na] From Papuah, which is probably Latinized from the Malay vernacular for frizzy in reference to the Papuan New Guinee people’s hair being very frizzy like.(Previously known as the fuzzy wuzzy people) It refers to plants, which come from Papua New Guinee. A good example is Corymbia papuana which is also found in Australia.

Papulentus: [pa-pyoo-lentus] From Papula, which is Latin for a nipple or little bumps. It refers to a description of any structure or organ, which is covered in small bumps like nipples or goose bumps. A good example is the seeds on Ranunculus papulentus.

Papulipetalum: [pa-pyoo-li-pe-ta-lum] From Papula, which is Latin for a nipple or little bumps and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to petals, which are covered in minute papulose bumps that resemble those found on the areola of breasts or goose bumps. A good example is the seeds on Bulbophyllum papulipetalum.

Papulosa: [pa-pyoo-loh-sa] From Papula, which is Latin for a nipple or little bumps. It refers to structures or organs, which has small bumps that resemble those found on the areola of breasts or goose bumps. A good example is the seeds on Acacia papulosa.

Papulosum: [pa-pyoo-lohsum] From Papula, which is Latin for a nipple or little bumps. It refers to structures or organs, which has small bumps that resemble those found on the areola of breasts or goose bumps. A good example is the seeds on Racosperma papulosum, which is now known as Acacia papulosa.

Papyracea: [pa-pahyra-se-a] From Pápȳros, which is Latin for thin, flimsy and dry. It refers to the petals, leaves or bark, which are paper like. A good example is the somewhat flaky bark on Pouteria papyracea.

Papyraceum: [pa-pahyra-se-um] From Pápȳros, which is Latin for thin, flimsy and dry. It refers to the petals, leaves or bark, which are like paper. A good example is the somewhat flaky bark on Syzygium papyraceum.

Papyraceus: [pa-pahyra-se-us] From Pápȳros, which is Latin for thin, flimsy and dry. It refers to the petals, leaves or bark, which are like paper. A good example is the somewhat flaky bark on Boletus papyraceus, which is now known as Pachykytospora papyracea.

Papyrocarpa: [pa-pahyro-kar-pa] From Pápȳros, which is Latin for thin, flimsy and dry and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the petals, leaves or bark, which resemble paper. A good example is the somewhat flaky bark on Acacia papyrocarpa.

Papyrocarpum: [pa-pahyro-kar-pum] From Pápȳros which is Latin for thin, flimsy and dry and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the petals, leaves or bark, which resemble paper. A good example is the somewhat flaky bark on Racosperma papyrocarpum, which is now known as Acacia papyrocarpa.

Paquerina: [pa-choo-ri-na] From Papyrus, which is Latin for thin, flimsy and dry and Querina which is Latin for pertaining to an oak. Its refers to structures or organs, which resemble dried Oak leaves. The reference to Paquerina graminea, which is now known as Brachyscome graminea is not clear.

Para: [para] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside. It refers to a close approximation.

Parablechnum: [pa-ra-blek-num] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Blechnum which is Ancient Greek for a type of fern. It refers to ferns, which are very closely related the Blechnum genus. A good example is fern Parablechnum ambiguum, which is now known as Blechnum ambiguum.

Parabolica: [para-bo-lik-a] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Bolikos which is Ancient Greek or Bolicus which is Latin for a mirror like curve where there is an equal distance from a fixed point known as the focal point and a fixed straight line the directrix. In botany the directrix refers to the mid vein on a leaf and the margins the outer lines to calculate the focal point. A good example is the leaves on Rhagodia parabolica.

Parabolic shaped leaves on Rhagodia parabolica.

Paracaleana: [para-ka-lee-na] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Kaleana which is Ancient Greek for a calamity. It may refer to the mix up with the uncanny similarity in appearance of a flying duck and an orchid together. A good example is the flying duck orchid Paracaleana minor.

Paraceterach: [para-se-ter-ak] From Pará, which is Ancient Greek for attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Sjetrak, which is Ancient Greek or Chetrak which is Ancient Persian for a fern. It may refer to plants, which closely resemble a typical fern. A good example is Paraceterach reynoldsii.

Parachidendron: [para-ki-den-dron] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree. It refers to trees, which resemble other trees in the Archidéndron genus. A good example is Parachidendron pruinosum.

Paracolpica: [para-kol-pi-ka] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Kólaphos, which is Ancient Greek or Colaphus, which is Latin for to be struck, hit or taking a blow. It refers to anthers, which are all laid out flat as though they have taken a heavy blow. A good example was Corymbia paracolpica, which is now known as Corymbia papuana.

Paractaenum: [parak-tee-num] From Pará, which is Ancient Greek or paradoxum and Actae, which is Ancient Greek for by the foreshore, seaside or a wet habitat that is presumably slightly saline. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in boggy soils. A good example was Panicum paractaenum, which is now known as Paractaenum novae-hollandiae.

Paractia: [parak-ti-a] From Pará, which is Ancient Greek or paradoxum. It refers to structures or organs, which have parallel sides. A good example is the leaves on Corymbia paractia.

Paradisiaca: [para-di-si-a-ka] From Parádisica, which is Latinized for gardens, parks and paradise. It refers to plants, which emit a strong affect that one is entering the Garden of Eden, utopia or paradise. A good example is Musa paradisiaca or its hybrids which are known locally as the Cavandish banana.

Paraditopa: [para-di-toh-pa] From Parádoxon, which is Ancient Greek or paradoxum, which is Latin for that which seems self-contradictory or absurd but in reality expresses a possible truth and maybe Tópazos which is Ancient Greek or Topazus which is Latin for a fluosilicate of aluminum mineral with prismatic orthorhombic crystals of various colours usually pale blueish or blueish-pink. It refers to fungi pileus, which exhibit glistening similarities to the topaz. A good example is Clitocybe paraditopa.

Paradoxa: [para-dok-sa] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix that is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Doxos, which is Greek for unbelievable. It usually refers to grasses, which have the growth habit of bushes in the desert rather than a typical grass. A good example is Zygochloa paradoxa.

Paradoxum: [para-dok-sum] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Doxos, which is Ancient Greek for unbelievable. It refers to the unparalleled beauty of flower spikes, which are held above the other marsh plants in its habitat. A good example is Lythrum paradoxum.

Paradoxus: [para-doks-us] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Doxos, which is Ancient Greek for unbelievable. It refers to flowers, which are compared to other plants in semi arid habitats are exquisitely beautiful. A good example is Xanthóstemon paradoxus.

Parafolia: [para-foh-li-a] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Folia, which is Ancient Greek for foliage. It refers to leaves, which when compared to other plants in semi-arid habitats are truly beautiful. A good example is Xanthóstemon paradoxus.

Paragoodia: [para-goo-di-a] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Goodia, which is named in honour of Peter Good; 17..-1803, who was an English gardener at the Kew Gardens and assistant to botanist Robert Brown on the voyage of HMS Investigator under Matthew Flinders, charting of the east coast of Australia was charted, and plant material and seeds were collected. A good example is Paragoodia crenulata.

Parakeelya: [para-kee-li-a] From Parakeelya, which is Latinized from one of the local Aboriginal names for the plant in central Australia. It could well refer to the exquisite beauty of the flowers. A good example was Parakeelya balonensis, which is now known as Calandrinia balonensis.

Parallela: [paral-le-la] From Pará, which is Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Allelos, which is Greek or Allelus, which is Latin for to show the identity of. It usually refers to the veins in the leaves or phyllodes, which run parallel to each other. A good example is Grevillea parallela.

Parallelicuspis: [para-lel-li-kus-pis] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside, Allelos, which is Ancient Greek or Allelus, which is Latin for to show the identity of any organs similarity when compared to those of another species and Cusp, which is Latin for a point. It refers to two or more apendages, which risefrom the fruits or seeds which are close to being parallel. A good example is Sclerolaena parallelicuspis where the two horn like appendages on the seeds are more parallel than other species in the genus.

Parallelinervis: [paral-lel-li-ner-vis] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside, Allelos, which is Ancient Greek or Allelus, which is Latin for to show the identity of any organs similarity when compared to those of another species and Neûron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve or vein. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have close parallel veins. A good example is Grevillea parallelinervis.

Parallelodromous: [paral-lel-o-dro-mos] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Drómos, which is Ancient Greek for race running. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have parallel veins which originate from various positions along the mid vein. A good example is Grevillea parallelinervis.

Parallel Venation on Coleus parviflorus.

Parallel Venation: [para-lel, ve-nei-shon] From Pará, which is Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside, Allelos, which is Greek or Allelus, which is Latin for to show the identity of Vēna, which is Latin for a vein and –ātiō, which is Latin for whence. It refers to leaves, any organs similarity when compared to those of another species. A good example is the leaves on Ghania aspera.

Parasitic: [para-si-tic] From Parásītos, which is Ancient Greek or Parasītus, which is Latin for one who eats at another’s table. In Ancient Greek it strictly referred to a person who entertained the host and was given a free meal for his/her services in entertaining. (No, not politicians as they are generally not good at entertaining.) It refers to plants, which often resemble its host, attaches itself then acquires its nutrient, from the host at times at the expense of the hosts life. A good example is Dendrophthoe vitellina.

Paralimnetica: [para-lim-ne-ti-ka] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Limnētēsm which is Ancient Greek for pertain to living in a fresh water marsh or pond. It refers to plants, which grow in or on the banks of fresh water swamps and wallums. A good example was Eucalyptus paralimnetica, which is now known as Eucalyptus spreta.

Paralium: [para-li-um] From Parálios, which is Ancient Greek for maritime especially in relation to growing by the seaside. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow adjacent to the oceans. A good example is Helichrysum paralium, which is now known as Ozothamnus turbinatus.

Paramapania: [para-ma-pa-ni-a] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Mapania which is Latin for a type of Cyperus. It refers to the likeness of the two genres. A good example is the reed Paramapania parvibractea.

Paramignya: [para-mi-jahy-na] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Mignya maybe Latinized from one of the Asian or Indonesian vernaculars for beside the sea. It may refer to plants, which prefer coast lines and estuary habitats and environments. A good example is the frontal and back dune vine Paramignya trimera, which is now known as Luvunga monophylla.

Paraneura: [para-nyoo-ra] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek or nervus, which is Latin for a vein. It refers to parallel veins, which are very close together. A good example is Acacia paraneura.

Paraneurachne: [para-nyoo-rak-ne] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside, Neuron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus which is Latin for a vein and Achne, which is Ancient Greek for chaff or the glumes and palaea together. It refers to the Paraneurachne genus being closely related to the Neurachne genus. A good example is Paraneurachne muelleri.

Paraneuum: [para-nyoo-rum] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus which is Latin for a vein. It refers to parallel veins, which are very close together. A good example was Racosperma paraneurum, which is now known as Acacia paraneura.

Parantennaria: [paran-ten-nar-i-a] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Antennaria, which is Latin for almost wiped out or annihilated. It refers to plants, which grow in habits that are close to being wiped out. A good example is the cold alpine loving plants of Parantennaria uniceps which are threatened by Global warming.

Parapachygone: [para-pa-chay-gon] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb, Mygyna which is Latin for to be close to, near, side by side or beside, Pakhús, which is Ancient Greek for thick and Gonos, which is Ancient Greek for angles. It refers to plants, which are similar to the Pachygone genus that have thick flower spikes appearing at various angles from the thickish leaf axils. A good example is Parapachygone longifolia.

Paraphebe: [para-fe-be] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Hebe, which is Ancient Greek for the Goddess of youth and puberty. It refers to plants, which resemble the Hebe genus.

Paraphyletic: [para-fahy-le tik] From Pará, which is a Greek suffix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Phyletikos, which is Ancient Greek for a tribesman. It refers to the science of studying the evolutionary history of a group of organism’s phylogenetics.

Paraphyses: [para-fahy-ses] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Physis, which is Ancient Greek for the natural form of an organism. It refers to hairs, flagella like structures or filiform organs in or on the sorus of ferns.

Parapinnate: [para-pin-neit] From Pará, which is a Greek suffix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Pinnatum, which is Latin for a feather. It refers to leaflets or pinnae, which are in pairs along a single axis. Even pinnate opposed to imparipinnate or odd pinnate. A good example is the even pinnate leaflets on Dysoxylum fraserianum or the odd pinnate leaflets on Pteris vittata.

Parapolystichum: [para-po-li-sti-chum] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside, Polús/Poly, which is Ancient Greek for many and Stíkhos, which is Ancient Greek for a poetry verse or soldiers in a row. It refers to the many sporangia, which are all in a neat row similar to the Polystichum genus. A good example is Parapolystichum decompositum.

Parapteroceras: [para-te-ro-se-ras] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside, Pterō, which is for a wing and Kērōs, which is Ancient Greek or Cērō, which is Latin for I smear or coat with wax. It refers to structures or organs, which tightly compacted and resemble a small wing covered in wax. A good example is the leaves and flowers on Parapteroceras papuanum.

Pararchidendron: [para-kahy-den-dron] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside, Arche, which is Ancient Greek for to have power and sovereignty and Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree. It refers to the overall aspect or trees, which stand up to the best with exuding power and sovereignty. A good example is Pararchidendron pruinosum.

Pararistolochia: [para-i-stol-o-ki-a] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside, Aristos, which is Ancient Greek for the best and Lochia which is Ancient Greek for delivering. It refers to similarities in growth habits and the appearances of the flowers, to those of the Aristochlia genus. A good example is Pararistolochia praevenosa.

Parasarchilus: [para-sar-chi-lus] From Parasartie, which is Latin for the edge of a ship where the top of the hull and the deck meet and Kheîlos which is Ancient Greek for a lip or on the edge. It refers to similarities between the labellum on an orchid and the hull of a ship. A good example is Parasarcochilus hirticalcar.

Paraserianthes: [para-ser-i-an-thes] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside, Seri, which is Ancient Greek for silk and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers, which are similar to those of the Serianthes genus. A good example is Paraserianthes toona.

Parasite: [para-sahyt] From Parasītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Parasīticus, which is Latin for a person who receives free meals in return for amusing or impudent conversation including flattering remarks. It refers to one that eats at another’s table or for living at another’s expense or an organism that lives on or in another species body and obtains all or most its nutriment from that species. A good example is Cuscuta australis.

Parasitic: [para-si-tik] From Parasītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Parasīticus, which is Latin for a person who receives free meals in return for amusing or impudent conversation including flattering remarks. It refers to one that eats at another’s table or for living at another’s expense or an organism that lives on or in another species body and obtains all or most its nutriment from that species. A good example is the flowering plant Dendrophthoe vitellina often seen low down on various Acacia species or Eucalyptus species or the fungus Cordyceps gunnii.

Parasitica: [para-si-ti-ka] From Parasītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Parasīticus, which is Latin for a person who receives free meals in return for amusing or impudent conversation including flattering remarks. It refers to one that eats at another’s table or for living at another’s expense or an organism that lives on or in another species body and obtains all or most its nutriment from that species. A good example is Christella parasitica whose growth habits displaces other plants in its niche.

Parasiticum: [para-si-ti-kum] From Parasītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Parasīticus, which is Latin for a person who receives free meals in return for amusing or impudent conversation including flattering remarks. It refers to one that eats at another’s table or for living at another’s expense or an organism that lives on or in another species body and obtains all or most its nutriment from that species. A good example is Dysoxylum parasiticum, when it was once thought; incorrectly, that the flowers were parasitic on another tree species.

Parasitica: [para-si-ti-ka] From Parasītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Parasīticus, which is Latin for a person who receives free meals in return for amusing or impudent conversation including flattering remarks. It refers to one that eats at another’s table or for living at another’s expense or an organism that lives on or in another species body and obtains all or most its nutriment from that species. A good example is Cyclosorus parasiticus Christella parasitica whose growth habits displaces other plants in its niche.

Paratrophis: [para-tro-fis] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Trophis, which is Greek for large and stout. It refers to the size and hardness of the timber. A good example was Paratrophis australiana, which is now known as Streblus glaber subsp. Australianus.

Parcifolia: [parsi-foh-li-a] From Parcum, which is Latin for sparse or frugal and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have fewer leaves than most other species in the genus. A good example is Macrozamia parcifolia.

Parciusculus: [parsi-u-skyoo-lus] from Parcum, which is Latin for frugal or scant and Unculum, which is Latin for somewhat in reference to the prefix. It refers to organs, which are rather scant or meagre in numbers on the structure. A good example are usually more arid loving plants or plants which grow on dry cliffs or hills like Cochlospermum gillivraei which have far fewer leaves especially as the dry season progresses.

Pardalina: [parda-li-na] From Pardalium, which is Latin for to be spotted like a leopard. It refers to flowers, which have spots that resemble the spots on a leopard. A good example is Thelymitra pardalina.

Pardalinum: [parda-li-num] From Pardalium, which is Latin for to be spotted like a leopard. It refers to flowers, which have spots that resemble the spots on a leopard that are placed randomly and of different shapes and sizes. A good example is Dipodium pardalinum.

Pardina: [pardi-na] From Paradinalis, which is Latin for spotted like a leopard. It refers to flowers, which have spots that resemble a leopard. A good example is Diuris pardina.

Parduyna: [pardyoo-na] From Parcum, which is Latin for sparse or frugal and Duyna, which is unknown. It may refer to flowers, which have the same number of organs. – 3 or 6 petals, 3 or 6 sepals each have 3 or 6 stamen and 3 stigmas. A good example was Parduyna multiflora and is now known as Schelhammera multiflora.

Pareira: [parei-ra] From Parietarius, which is Latin for walls. It refers to the stinging hairs of the dense almost impenetrable thickets of some species. A good example was Cissampelos pareira which is now known under several sub species and varieties of which one is found in north Queensland, Cissampelos pareira var. hirsuta.

Parenchyma: [paren-chi-ma] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Enkhyma which is Ancient Greek for an infusion. It refers to thin cellulose walled cells, which make up the cortex and pith of the stems and roots, the internal portions of leaves and fronds and the soft portions of fruits comprise parenchyma cells. Parenchyma cells remain alive, following maturity and perform many functions like water and nutrient storage, replacement of damaged cells and physical support. Special organs like chloroplasts the organelles where photosynthetic reactions occur are situated in the parenchyma cells.

Parenchymatous: [paren-chi-ma-tos] From Pará, which is a Greek prefix which is usually attached to a descriptive verb and stands for to be close to, near, side by side or beside and Enkhyma, which is Ancient Greek for an infusion. It refers to thin cellulose walled cells, which make up the cortex and pith of the stems and roots, the internal portions of leaves and fronds and the soft portions of fruits comprise parenchyma cells. Parenchyma cells remain alive, following maturity and perform many functions like water and nutrient storage, replacement of damaged cells and physical support. Special organs like chloroplasts the organelles where photosynthetic reactions occur are situated in the parenchyma cells.

Parenterolobium: [paren-ter-o-loh-bi-um] From Pérnēmi, which is a Greek for even or equal to, Integrum which is Latin for whole, complete or intact and Lobós, which is Ancient Greek or Lobus/Lobī, which is Latin for an ear lobe. It refers to structures or organs, which have lobes equal in size or shape to another related organ. A good example was Parenterolobium rosulatum, which is now known as Albizia rosulata subsp. rosulata.

Paresttia: [parest-ti-a] From Pārēre, which is Latin for I am visible or I appear. It refers to plants, which stand out amongst their peers. A good example was Parentucellia latifolia, which is now known as Davallia denticulata.

Parietal: [pari-ei-tal] From Parietarius which is Latin for walls. It refers to where the placenta is on the wall or on intruding partitions of a unilocular compound ovary.

Parietaria: [pari-e-tar-i-a] From Parietarius, which is Latin for walls. It refers to plants, which have stinging hairs that are dense almost like some impenetrable thickets of some species. A good example is Parietaria debile.

Pariilis: [pari-lis] From Parilis, which is Latin for parallel to, equal to or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble another species in the genus. A good example was Hakea parilis which is very similar to Hakea teretifolia and is now known as Hakea teretifolia subsp. hirsuta.

Parinari: [parin-ar-i] From Parinari which is Latinized from the local Guinea (Africa) vernacular name for the tree Parinari curatellifolia. A good example in Australia is Parinari nonda.

Paripinnately Compound: [pa-ri-pin-neit-lee, kom-pound] From Pār, which is Latin for equal or equal to and Pinnātum, which is Latin for a feather or at times a wing. It refers to leaves, which resemble a feather and have two equal leaflets at the apex as opposed to an odd pinnate leaf. A good example is Toona ciliata. See page Leaf & Frond Types & Parts.

Pariti: [pa-ri-ti] Is unknown. A good example was Pariti wrayae, which is now known as Alyogyne sp. hutt-river.

Parkinsonia: [par-kin-so-ni-a] Is named in honour of Sydney Parkinson; 1745-1771, who was a Scottish botanical artist travelling with Captain James Cook and Sir Joseph Banks. A good example is Parkinsonia aculeata.

Parkinsonii: [par-kin-so-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Sydney Parkinson; 1745-1771, who was a Scottish botanical artist travelling with Captain James Cook and Sir Joseph Banks. A good example was Ficus parkinsonii , which is now known as Ficus henneana.

Parlatorei: [par-la-tor-ee-ahy] Is named in honour of Palator. A good example was Callitris parlatorei, which is now known as Callitris macleayana.

Parmentiera: [par-men-ti-e-ra] Is named in honour of Antoine Agustine Parmentier; 1737-1813, who was a French agronomist, researcher into food conservation including refrigeration and with Napolean established the first mandatory small pox vaccinations. A good example is Parmentiera aculeata.

Parnassifolia: [par-nas-si-foh-li-a] From Parnassus, which is Latinized for Mount Parnassus in Greece and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the foliage which resembles the foliage of the “grass of Parnassus”. A good example is Caldesia parnassifolia.

Parnassifolium: [par-nas-si-foh-li-um] From Parnassus, which is Latinized for Mount Parnassus in Greece and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the foliage which resembles the foliage of the “grass of Parnassus”. A good example was Limnanthemum parnassifolium which is an unresolved name and will probably be known officially as Villarsia, Nymphoides or Ornduffia genus in the future.

Parnkalliana: [parn-kal-li-a-na] Is named in honour of Parnkalla, which is Latinized from the Aboriginal vernacular for an Aboriginal tribe in the Port Lincoln area of South Australia. A good example is Veronica parnkalliana.

Parodii: [pa-ro-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Parod. A good example is Eleocharis parodii.

Parotia: [pa-ro-ti-a] Is named in honour of Frederick William Parrot; 1791-1841, who was a German naturalist. All the Australian birds have been moved to the ptiloris genus. The birds are an essential distributors of berry seeds around the northern east coast rainforests. A good example is Ptiloris victoriae.

Parramattense [para-mat-tens] From Paramatta, which is a Latinized for the Parramatta district in Sydney. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Parramatta area west of Sydney. A good example was Racosperma parramattense, which is now known as Acacia parramattensis.

Parramattensis: [para-ma-ten-sis] From Paramatta, which is a Latinized for the Parramatta district in Sydney. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Parramatta area west of Sydney. A good example is Acacia parramattensis.

Parrana: [para-na] Is named in honour of Parr. A good example is Entada parrana.

Parrisiae: [paris-i-ee] Is named in honour of Dr. Barbara S. Parris, who was a New Zealander, noted pteridologist and specialist in the worldwide revision of Grammitis and Doodia. A good example is the herbal scented shrub Zieria parrisiae.

Parrumbalus: [parum-ba-lus] From Parrumbalus, which is unknown. A good example is Gymnopilus parrumbalus.

Parsimonious: [parsi-mo-ni-os] From Parcere, which is Latin for to economize and Monia, which is Latin for stingy or very frugal. It refers to the ideal where you want a formula to have as fewer variables as possible but where you can still make a reasonable prediction.

Parsimony: [parsi-mo-nee] From Parcere, which is Latin for to economize and Monia, which is Latin for stingy or very frugal. It refers to the where 2 competing hypothesis is being considered the simpler explained hypothesis will be chosen.

Parsonsia: [parso-ni-a] Is named in honour of James Parsons Parmentier; 1705-1770, who was a British physician and author. A good example is Parsonsia brownii.

Parted: [parted] From Parted, which is English for to be separated. It refers to a leaf where the indentations or incisions cut 1/2-3/4 distance to midvein or base.

Parthenicus: [parthe-ni-kus] From Parthenos, which is Ancient Greek for a virgin. It refers to fruits, which often form producing fertile seeds without being cross pollinated. A good example is the commercial pineapple Desmocladus parthenicus.

Parthenocarpic: [parthen-o-kar-pik] From Parthenos, which is Ancient Greek for a virgin and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to a fruit which can form with or without mature seeds and without being fertilized. A good example is the commercial pineapple Ananas comosus.

Parthenogenesis: [parthen-o-je-ne-sis] From Parthénos, which is Ancient Greek for a virgin and Génesis, which is Ancient Greek for the origin or creation of a new generation. It refers to reproduction, which involves development of a female or rarely of a male gamete without fertilization. It occurs most commonly among lower plants and some invertebrate animals but rarely as a natural process among seed plants and vertebrates. A good example is of a seed plant which can produce both fertilized and none fertilized seeds is Viola betonicifolia.

Parthenogenic: [parthen-o-je -nik] From Parthénos, which is Ancient Greek for a virgin and Génesis, which is Ancient Greek for the origin or creation of a new generation. It refers to reproduction, which involves development of a female or rarely of a male gamete without fertilization. It occurs most commonly among lower plants and some invertebrate animals but rarely as a natural process among seed plants and vertebrates. A good example is of a seed plant which can produce both fertilized and none fertilized seeds is Viola betonicifolia.

Partimpatens: [partim-pei-tenz] From Patánē, which is Ancient Greek or Parten, which is Latin for a flat plate and Part which is Latin for a part or section. It probably refers to habitats, which are large sandy flats or shallow sandy basins. A good example is Sporobolus partimpatens.

Partite: [partahyt] From Parted, which is English for to be separated. It refers to leaves, where the indentations or incisions are divided into equal parts but joined at the base. A good example is the sepals of Drosera adelae.

Parva: [par-va] From Parva which is Latin for very small and insignificant. It refers to structures or organs, which are much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example is the overall size of Tmesipteris parva.

Parvi: [par-vi] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum, which is Latin for small. It refers to structures or organs, which are small or comparatively small when compared to other structures or organs on other species in the genus.

Parvibarbata: [par-vi-bar-ba-ta] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum, which is Latin for small and Barbata which is Latin for a beard or to be barbed. It refers to hairs, which are shortly barbed. A good example of a long, open, scruffy type beard is found on Scaevola parvibarbata.

Parvibractea: [par-vi-brahk-te-a] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum, which is Latin for small and Bracteata which is Latin for a specialized leaf behind the flowers or leaf. It refers to modified leaf or scales, which are typically small, with a flower or flower cluster in its axil. A good example was Genoplesium parvicallum, which is now known as Paramapania parvibractea.

Parvicallum: [par-vi-kal-lum] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum, which is Latin for small and Bracteātum which is Latinized from Slovonic for thick and hard. It refers to structures or organs, which have a slightly hard and thickened surface. A good example is Genoplesium parvicallum.

Parvicalyx: [par-vi-ka-liks] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum which is Latin for small and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for a husk or covering – the calyx. It refers to calyxes, which are much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example is Hovea parvicalyx.

Parvicaruncula: [par-vi-kar-un-kyoo-la] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum, which is Latin for small and Caruncula, which is Latin a protuberance at or surrounding the hilum of a seed. It refers to plants, whose seeds have a small caruncula. A good example is Euphorbia parvicaruncula.

Parviceps: [par-vi-seps] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum which is Latin for small and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flowers, which are smaller, more compact and denser than other species in the genus. A good example is Agonis parviceps.

Parviflora: [par-vi-flor-a] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum which is Latin for small and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs from the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are smaller than other species in the genus. A good example is Grevillea parviflora.

Parvifloris: [par-vi-flor-us] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum which is Latin for small and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs from the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are somewhat smaller when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Plectranthus parvifloris.

Parviflorum: [par-vi-flor-um] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum which is Latin for small and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs from the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are somewhat smaller when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Comesperma parviflorum.

Parviflorus: [par-vi-flor-us] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum which is Latin for small and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs from the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are somewhat smaller when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Leucopogon parviflorus.

Parvifolia: [par-vi-foh-li-a] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum, which is Latin for small and Folium, which is Latin for a foliage. It refers to leaves, which are very small. A good example was Melaleuca leucadendra var. parvifolia, which is now known as Melaleuca leucadendra var. crosslandiana.

Parvifolium: [par-vi-foh-li-um] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum, which is Latin for small and Folium, which is Latin for a foliage. It refers to leaves, which are very small. A good example is Myoporum parvifolium.

Parvifolius: [par-vi-foh-li-us] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum, which is Latin for small and Folius, which is Latin for a foliage. It refers to leaves, which are rather small or smaller than other species in the genus. A good example is Leucopogon parvifloris.

Parvipetala: [par-vi-pe-ta-la] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum, which is Latin for small and Pétalon, which is Ancient Greek for the coloured part of a flower the petals. It refers to flowers, which are much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example is Diuris parvipetala.

Parvipinnula: [par-vi-pin-nyoo-la] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum, which is Latin for small and Pinna, which is Latin for a barb of a feather. It refers to pinnules of leaves or fronds which are smaller than other species in the genus. A good example Acacia parvipinnula.

Parvipinnulum: [par-vi-pin-nyoo-lum] From Paûros which is Ancient Greek or Parvum which is Latin for small and pinna which is Latin for a barb of a feather. It refers to the pinnules of leaves or fronds, which are small. A good example was Racosperma parvipinnulum, which is now known as Acacia parvipinnula.

Parvisepta: [par-vi-sep-ta] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum, which is Latin for small and Saeptum/Saepīre, which is Latin for a fence or barrier. It may refer to small barrier like ridges, which occur down the centre of the petals. A good example is Velleia parvisepta.

Parviseta: [par-vi-se-ta] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum, which is Latin for small and Setae, which is Latin for a bristle. It refers to bristles, which are usually at the base of the seeds. A good example is Deyeuxia parviseta.

Parvistaminea: [par-vi-sta-min-ee-a] From Paûros, which is Ancient Greek or Parvum, which is Latin for small and Stêma, which is Ancient Greek for a thread. It refers to male reproductive organs on a flower, which are rather short. A good example is Melaleuca parvistaminea.

Parvivallis: [par-vi-val-lis] From Parvum, which is Latin for very small and insignificant and Vallis/Vallēs, which is Latin for a valley, vale or hollow. It refers to structures or organs, which has a valley like depression or hollow section. A good example is the small floral tube on Calytrix parvivallis.

Parvula: [par-vyoo-la] From Parvula, which is Latin for very small and insignificant. It refers to the leaves, which are very small when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus parvula.

Parvuliflorum: [par-vyoo-li-flor-um] From Parvum, which is Latin for very small and insignificant and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to the flowers, which are much smaller when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Lasiopetalum parviflorum.

Parvulum: [par-vyoo-lum] From Parvulum, which is Latin for very small and insignificant. It refers to leaves, which are much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example was Leptospermum parvulum, which is now known as Sannantha virgata.

Parvum: [par-vum] From Parvum, which is Latin for very small and insignificant. It refers to plants, which are much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example is Asplenium parvum.

Paryphantha: [pa-rahy-fan-tha] From Paryph, which is unknown and Antha/Anthos which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. A good example is Paryphantha mitchelliana, which is now known as Thryptomene calycina.

Pascal: [paskal] From Pastillus, which is Latin for a pale colour. It refers to colours, which are soothing, soft, near neutral, milky or lack strong chromatic content. That is they are between white and a pale colour. Also see Pastel.

Pascoeana: [pasko-ee-na] Is named in honour of Ian G. Pascoe; 1949-20.., who was an Australian botanist, director of the Burnley Herbarium and native fungi specialist. A good example is the fungus Triodia pascoeana.

Pascua: [paskyoo-a] Originally from Pascua, which was Ancient Greek/Latin for uncountable and later Páskhar, which is Greek or Pascua/Pascha which is Latin or Pesakh, which is Hebrew for the Passover – Easter. It possibly refers to the original meaning where the fungus can be found in uncountable numbers clustered together when ideal conditions exist. A good example is the fungus Clitocybe pascua.

Pascuinus: [paskyoo-i-nus] From Pāscuī, which is Latin for pastures or grazing land. It refers to plants, which frequently grow in moist open grasslands including pastures. A good example is Ranunculus pascuinus.

Pascuorum: [paskyoo-or-um] Originally from Pascua, which was Ancient Greek/Latin for uncountable and later Páskhar which is Greek, Pascua/Pascha, which is Latin or Pesakh which is Hebrew for the Passover – Easter. It possibly refers to the fact that Jute plants were extensively grown. A good example is the native Jute Corchorus pascuorum.

Paspalidioides: [paspa-li-di-oi-deez] From Paspalos, which is Ancient Greek for a type of millet, Idion, which is Greek/Latin for reflecting a close association with another specie or organ and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to grasses, which resemble the Paspalidium genus in that they are very similar to the European millets. A good example is Setaria paspalidioides.

Paspalidium: [paspah-li-di-um] From Paspalos, which is Greek for a type of millet and Idion, which is a Greek/Latin suffix reflecting a close association with another specie or organ. It refers to the grasses, which are very similar to the European millets. A good example is Paspalidium rarum.

Paspalodes: [papa-lo/loh-deez] From Paspalos, which is Ancient Greek for a type of millet. It refers to the grasses, which resemble the horticultural millets. A good example is Paspalum longifolium.

Paspalum: [paspa-lum] From Paspalos, which is Ancient Greek for a type of millet. It refers to the grasses, which resemble the horticultural millets. A good example is Paspalum longifolium.

Passeriniodes: [passer-in-i-oh-deez] From Passerina, which is Latin for a sparrow and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. The reference is unclear to the author. A good example of the name is Olearia passerinoides.

Passiflora: [pas-si-flor-a] From Páthos, which is Greek or Passiō, which is Latin for to have a strong love or passion for and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is from the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to the flowers, which are exquisite beauty and holds your attention for long periods like the suffering of love ones caught up in a strong passion of love. A good example is Passiflora aurantia var. aurantia.

Pastel: [pas-tel] From Pastillus, which is Latin for a pale colour. It refers to colours, which are soothing, soft, near neutral, milky or lack strong chromatic content. That is, they are between white and a pale colour. See Pascal.

Pastinaca: [pastin-a-sa] From Pastināca/Pastinācae, which is Latin for a Parsnip. It refers to plants, which are related to the parsnips of Europe. A good example of the horticultural legume in parsnips, Pastinaca sativa.

Pastoralis: [pastor-a-lis] From Pāstōrālis, which is Latin for pertaining to the country or to live in the country as in a rural; rustic rural scene. It refers to plants, which grow in a visualised rural or rustic scene. A good example is Eucalyptus pastoralis, which is now known as Eucalyptus bigalerita.

Pataczekii: [pa-ta-ze-ki-ahy] Is named in honour of Wally Pataczek, who was a Tasmanian Forest Ranger who first discovered the plant. A good example is Acacia pataczekii.

Patagiata: [pa-ta-ji-a-ta] From Patagonia, which is Latinized/Spanish for the district in Southern Peru with reference to a foot. Its reference is unclear. A good example is Acacia patagiata.

Patagiatum: [pa-ta-ji-ei-tum] From Patagonia, which is Latinized/Spanish for the district in Southern Peru with reference to a foot. Its reference is unclear. A good example was Racosperma patagiatum, which is now known as Acacia patagiata.

Patagonica: [pa-ta-go-ni-ka] From Patagonia, which is Latinized/Spanish for the district in Southern Peru with reference to a foot. It refers to fungi, which were first discovered in southern Peru. A good example is Galerina patagonica.

Patch dynamics: [pa-tch, dahy-na-miks] From Pacche, which is Old English or Pedaceum, which is Latin for a piece of; usually fabric to cover a hole and Dynamikosm which is Ancient Greek for a powerful energy. It refers to an ecological perspective, which has a structural function and dynamics of an ecological system with interactive patches. It also refers to the spatiotemporal changes within and among patches that make up a landscape and is ubiquitous in terrestrial and aquatic systems across organizational levels of spatial scales. From a patch dynamics perspective, populations, communities, ecosystems, and landscapes are all mosaics of patches that differ in size, shape, composition, history, and boundary characteristics. A good example of patchwork dynamics can be seen on marginal desert areas with Owenia reliqua.

Patellaris: [pa-tel-lar-is] From Patella, which is Latin for small flat pan. It refers to fruits or seeds, which resemble a patina pan (Pizza pan). A good example is the apex of the hypanthium on Eucalyptus patellaris.

Patelliform 1: [pa-tel-li-fawrm] From Patella, which is Latin for small flat pan. It refers to organs, which resemble a patina pan (Pizza pan). A good example is the seeds on Hypoestes floribunda.

Patelliform 2: [pah-tel-li-form] From Patella, which is Latin for small flat pan. It refers to fruits or seeds, which resemble a patina pan (Pizza pan). A good example is the fruits on Hakea laurina.

Patellitecta: [pa-tel-li-tek-ta] From Patella, which is Latin for small flat pan and Tēcta/Tēctum, which are Latin for covered, hidden or protected. It usually refers to fruits, which are pan shape and camouflaged amongst the foliage. A good example is the fruits on Trianthema patellitecta.

Patens: [pei-tenz] From Patina, which is Latin for something which is wide open. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a patina pan (Pizza pan). A good example is Prasophyllum patens.

Patenticuspis: [pei-ten-ti-cus-pis] From Patina, which is Latin for something which is wide open and Cusp, which is Latin for a point. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a patina pan with the handle (Pizza pan). A good example is Sclerolaena patenticuspis.

Patentiflora: [pei-ten-ti-flor-a] From Patina, which is Latin for something which is wide open and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, from the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which open wide like a patina pan (Pizza pan). A good example was Eucalyptus patentiflora, which is now known as Eucalyptus melliodora.

Patentifolia: [pei-ten-ti-foh-li-a] From Patina, which is Latin for something which is wide open and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble a patina pan with the handle (Pizza pan). A good example is Lepilaena patentifolia.

Patentifolium: [pei-ten-ti-foh-li-um] From Patēns, which is Latin for open and wide spreading and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have a wide spreading open habit of growth. A good example is Lepilaena patentifolia.

Patentiloba: [pei-ten-ti-loh-ba] From Patina, which is Latin for something which is wide open and Lobos/Lobī, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to leaves, which have several thick narrow pungent lobes well-spaced and angled to inflict the most damage. A good example is Grevillea patentiloba.

Patentinerva: [pei-ten-ti-ner-va] From Patina which is Latin for something which is wide open and Neûron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve. It usually refers to veins on the leaves, which are widely spaced and very prominent. A good example isEucalyptus patentinervis.

Patentinervis: [pei-ten-ti-ner-vis] From Patina, which is Latin for something which is wide open and Neûron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve. It usually refers to the veins on the leaves, which are widely spaced and very prominent. A good example is Eucalyptus patentinervis.

Patericola: [pa-ter-i-koh-la] From Platel/Plata, which is Old French for a plateau, Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on flat plateaus. A good example is Eriocaulon patericola.

Patersonia: [pa-ter-soh-ni-a] Is named in honour of William Paterson; 1755-1810, who was a British governor and founder of Launceston and botanical collector. A good example is Patersonia sericea.

Patersoniana: [pa-ter-soh-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of William Paterson; 1755-1810, who was a British governor and founder of Launceston and botanical collector. A good example was Hartighsea patersoniana, which is now known as Dysoxylum bijugum.

Patersonii: [pa-ter-soh-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of William Paterson; 1755-1810, who was a British governor and founder of Launceston and botanical collector. A good example is Blechnum patersonii.

Pathogen: [pa-tho-jen] From Páthos, which is Ancient Greek for suffering and Génos, which is Ancient Greek for a kind, race or type. It refers to any agent, especially a virus, bacterium which causes suffering by way of disease in tissues or body of a living organism. A good example is Austropuccinia psidii, myrtle rust, which often be seen on the leaves of the native guava Rhodomyrtus psidioides.

Patina: [pa-ti-na] From Patánē, which is Ancient Greek for a flat dish or Patina, which is Latin for a plate or pan. It refers to a thin crust or covering on surfaces, which are similar to the green oxidation that forms on bronze. A good example can be seen on the lower laminas of Goiya semiglauca.

Patinata: [pa-tin-a/ei-ta] From Patánē, which is Ancient Greek for a flat dish or Patina, which is Latin for a plate or pan.  It refers to a thin crust or covering on the surface similar to the green oxidation that forms on bronze. A good example is Polyalthia patinata.

Patinate: [pa-tin-eit] From Patánē, which is Ancient Greek for a flat dish or Patina, which is Latin for a plate or pan. It refers to thin crusts or coverings on surfaces, which are similar to the green oxidation that forms bronze colouration on the leaves. A good example is Polyalthia patinata.

Patricia: [pa-tri-ki-a] From Patricum, which is Latin for a noble woman. It refers to flowers, which are rather impressive. A good example was Sprengelia patricia, which is now known as Andersonia echinocephala.

Patrickiae: [pa-tri-ki-ee] Is named in honour of Susan J Patrick; 1944-20.., who was an Australian herbarium botanist and  ecologist in Western Australia. A good example is Euryomyrtus patrickiae.

Patula: [pa-tyoo-la] From Patulus, which is Latin for spreading. It refers to plants, which have a spreading habit of growth. A good example is Acrotriche patula.

Patulifolia: [pa-tyoo-li-foh-li-a] From Patulus, which is Latin for spreading and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are divaricate or spread out 180 degrees on the stems. A good example is Grevillea patulifolia.

Patulifolium: [pa-tyoo-li-foh-li-um] From Patulus, which is Latin for spreading and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are divaricate or spread out 180 degrees on the stems. A good example was Racosperma oncinophyllum subsp. patulifolium, which is now known as Acacia oncinophylla subsp. patulifolia.

Patulifolius: [pa-tyoo-li-foh-li-us] From Patulus, which is Latin for spreading and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are divaricate or spread out 180 degrees on the stems. A good example is the leaves on the moss Fissidens patulifolius.

Patulus: [pa-tyoo-lus] From Patulus, which is Latin for spreading. It refers to plants, which have a spreading growth habit. It refers to leaves/leaflets which are divaricate. A good example is Bridellia exaltata.

Pauci: [por-si] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few. It usually refers to plants, which produce fewer flowers than other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus pauciflora.

Paucicostata: [por-si-ko-sta-ta] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Costātus which is Latin for to have ribs. It refers to structures or organs, which have a fewer faint ribs than other species in the genus. A good example is the leaves on Lemna paucicostata, which is now known as Lemna aequinoctialis.

Paucidentata: [por-si-den-ta-ta] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Dentātus, which is Latin for to have a tooth or teeth. It refers to organs usually the leaves which have a fewer teeth than other species in the genus. A good example is Olearia paucidentata.

Pauciflora: [por-si-flor-a] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which produce fewer flowers or which are poorer bloomers than other species in the genus. A good example is Persoonia pauciflora.

Paucifloris: [por-si-flor-is] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which produce fewer flowers or which are poorer bloomers than other species in the genus. A good example is Juncus paucifloris.

Pauciflorum: [por-si-flor-um] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which produce fewer flowers or which are poorer bloomers than other species in the genus. A good example is Memecylon pauciflorum var. pauciflorum.

Pauciflorus: [por-si-flor-us] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which produce fewer flowers or which are poorer bloomers than other species in the genus. A good example is Pseudanthus pauciflorus.

Paucifoliolata: [por-si-fo-li-oh-la-ta] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which produce fewer leaves than other species in the genus. A good example is Swainsona paucifoliolata.

Paucifolia: [por-si-foh-li-a] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which produce fewer leaves than other species in the genus. A good example is Tetratheca paucifolia.

Paucifolium: [por-si-foh-li-um] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which produce fewer leaves than other species in the genus. A good example is Calycopeplus paucifolium which is a spelling error found in some earlier publications for Calycopeplus paucifolius.

Paucifolius: [por-si-foh-li-us] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which produce fewer leaves than other species in the genus. A good example is Calycopeplus paucifolius.

Paucijuga: [por-si-joo-ga] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Juga, which is Ancient Greek for a yoke. It refers to plants, which produce few seeds and that look as though they are joined together on a yoke. A good example Acacia deanei subsp. paucijuga.

Pauciovulata: [por-si-o/oh-vu-la-ta] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Ovulata, which is Latin for to bear an ovule. It refers to plants, which usually produce a single seed. A good example Rhodamnia pauciovulata.

Pauciradiatus: [por-si-ra-di-ei-tus] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Radiata, which is Latin for to spread out From A, point. It refers to structures which have organs, which spread out. A good example is the leaves on Senecio pauciradiatus which radiate out in a very poor fashion.

Pauciseta: [por-si-se-ta] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Seta, which is Latin for a bristle. It refers to organs, which produce fewer bristles than other species in the genus. A good example Corymbia pauciseta.

Paucispicata: [por-si-spi-ka-ta] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few or poorly formed and Spicea, which is Latin for a spike on a grass similar to an ear. It refers to spikes, which produces fewer florets than other species in the genus. A good example was Fimbristylis paucispicata, which is now known as Fimbristylis paucispiceus.

Paucispiceus: [por-si-spi-se-us] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Spicea, which is Latin for a spike on a grass similar to an ear. It refers to spikes, which produce fewer florets than other species in the genus. A good example is Enteropogon paucispiceus.

Paucistaminea: [por-si-sta-min-e-a] From Paucī, which is Latin for a few and Stêma, which is Ancient Greek or Stamen which is Latin for an anther and filament as the collective together. It refers to flowers, which have fewer stamens than other species in the genus. A good example is Symplocos paucistaminea which has fewer than 20 stamens, which is far fewer than all the other species in the genus.

Paula: [por-la] Is probably named in honour of Gaylene Paul who was an Australian botanical artist. A good example is Acacia paula.

Paulum: [por-lum] Is probably named in honour of Gaylene Paul who was an Australian botanical artist. A good example was Racosperma paulum, which is now known as Acacia paula.

Paulforsteri: [porl-for-ster-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Paul Foster but it cannot be substantiated. A good example is Parsonsia paulforsteri.

Pauli-guilielmi: [por-li-gwee-li-el-mi] Is named in honour of Pauli-Guilielm. A good example is Macrozamia pauli-guilielmi.

Paulineae: [por-li-ne-ee] Is probably named in honour of Gaylene Paul who was an Australian botanical artist. A good example is Stylidium paulineae.

Pavetta: [pa-vet-ta] From Pavetta, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the Malabar word for the type species of the tree found there. A good example is Pavetta australiensis.

Pavonia: [pa-von-i-a] From pavoninus, which is Latin for a peacock. It refers to the showy flowers, which are very conspicuous like the feathers of a peacock. A good example is Pavonia calycina.

Pavonina: [pa-von-ni-na] From pavoninus, which is Latin for a peacock. It refers to the showy flowers followed by the ripe seeds which are very conspicuous and beautiful like the feathers of a peacock. A good example is Adenanthera pavonina.

Pavopennacea: [pa-vo-pen-na-se-a] From pavoninus, which is Latin for a peacock. It refers to flowers, which are bright blue and yellow followed by the deep blue-purple fruits, which are very conspicuous like the feathers of a peacock. A good example is Dianella pavopennacea.

Pawlikowskyana: [por-li-kour-skee-a-na] Is named in honour of Pawlikowskyana. A good example was Acacia pawlikowskyana, which is now known as Acacia myrtifolia.

Paxia: [pak-si-a] Is most likely named in honour of Ferdinand Albin Pax; 1858–1942 who was a Bohemian botanist and entomologist specializing in Lepidoptera, Diptera, and spermatophytes. A good example is Paxia australasica, which is now known as Neopaxia australasica.

Paxii: [pak-si-ahy] Is most likely named in honour of Ferdinand Albin Pax; 1858–1942 who was a Bohemian botanist and entomologist specializing in Lepidoptera, Diptera, and spermatophytes. A good example is Monotaxis paxii.

Paxtonii: [paks-to-ni-ahy] Is most likely named in honour of Paxton. A good example is the unresolved plant known as  Pultenaea paxtonii.

Paynterae: [pein-ter-ee] Is most likely named in honour of Paynter. A good example is Tetratheca paynterae.

Peacockeana: [pee-ko-kee-a-na] Is named in honour of Lance Beresford Peacocke, who was an Australian forester and founder of the type specimen. A good example is Eucalyptus peacockeana.

Peacockii: [pee-ko-kee-ahy] Is named in honour of John T. Peacock, who was an English collector of succulents. A good example is Leptochloa peacockii.

Pearsonii: [peer-so-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of William Henry Pearson; 1849-1923, who was an English herpaticologist (studied liverworts). A good example is Melaleuca pearsonii.

Pearsoniorum: [peer-so-niorum] Is named in honour of an unknown collector named Pearson. A good example is Pouteria pearsoniorum.

Peat: [peet] It refers to partially decomposed organic matter which is the pre formation of brown coal.

Pecoris: [pe-kor-is] From Pecoris, which is Latin for any animal that gathers in flocks or herds other than those used for ploughing, carting or riding. It refers to plants, which attract a large number of birds to their flowers. A good example was Xanthorrhoea pecoris, which is now known as Xanthorrhoea preissii.

Pectinata: [pek-tin-ata] From Pectinare, which is Latin for to comb or a comb. It refers to parallel teeth, which appear like the teeth of a comb. A good example is Arachnorchis pectinata.

Pectinate: [pek-tin-eit] From Pectinare, which is Latin for to comb or a comb. It refers to flowers, which have parallel teeth like the teeth on a comb. A good example is the southern populations on the Nullarbor Plains Grevillea huegelii.

Pectinatum: [pek-tin-eitum] From Pectinare, which is Latin for to comb. It refers to organs, which resemble a comb. A good example is the fungus Geastrum pectinatum.

Pectinatus: [pek-tin-eitus] From Pectinare, which is Latin for to comb. It refers to organs, which resemble a comb. A good example is Senecio pectinatus.

Pectinella: [pek-tinnel-la] From Pectinare, which is Latin for to comb and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to organs, which resemble a comb. A good example was Pectinella antarctica, which is now known as Amphibolis antarctica.

Pedately: [ped-eitlee] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a little foot or feet. It refers to the leaflets sharing a common petiole or appendage. A good example is the horticultural crop Manihot esculenta.

Pedatum: [ped-eitum] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a little foot or feet. It refers to fronds, which resemble a bird’s foot. A good example is the shape of the fronds on the exotic fern Adiantum pedatum or the native fern Adiatum hispidulum.

Pedderensis: [ped-der-en-sis] From Pedder, which is Latinized for Lake Pedder and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered around Lake Pedder in southern Tasmania. A good example is Centrolepis pedderensis.

Pedersonii: [ped-erso-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Pederson. A good example is Genoplesium pedersonii.

Pedicel: [pe-di-sel] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have very long pedicels. A good example was Helipterum rosea which are now known as Rhodanthe rosea.

Rhodanthe rosea

Pedicellare: [ped-i-sel-lair] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have very long pedicels. A good example is Stenopetalum pedicellare.

Pedicellata: [ped-i-sel-la-ta] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a little foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have very short pedicels which are almost subsessile. A good example was Wehlia pedicellata, which is now known as Homalocalyx pulcherrimus.

Pedicellate: [ped-i-sel-leit] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a little foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have short pedicels.

Pedicellatum: [ped-i-sel-lei-tum] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a little foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have very short pedicels which are almost subsessile. A good example is Astroloma pedicellatum.

Pedicellatus: [ped-i-sel-lei-tus] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a little foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have very short pedicels which are almost subsessile. A good example was Cenchrus pedicellatus subsp. pedicellatus, which is now known as Cenchrus pedicellatus subsp. pedicellatus.

Pedicellosa: [ped-i-sel-loh-sa] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a little foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have very distinct pedicel. A good example is Hydrocotyle pedicellosa.

Pedicellosum: [ped-i-sel-loh-sum] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have very distinct pedicels compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Lepidium pedicellosum.

Pedicillare: [pe-di-sil-lair] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a little foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have very short pedicels which are almost subsessile. A good example was Hypericum pedicellare, which is now known as Hypericum gramineum.

Pedicillata: [pe-di-cil-a-ta] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a little foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have very short pedicels which are not quite subsessile. A good example is Philotheca salsolifolia subsp. pedicellata.

Pedimontana: [pe-di-mon-ta-na] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Montana which is Latin for a mountain. It refers to plants, which have a foothold on hills and mountains. A good example is Corymbia pedimontana.

Pedina: [pe-di-na] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to each flower head having a very long, distinct pedicel. A good example Acacia pedina.

Pedinum: [pe-di-num] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to each flower head having a very long, distinct pedicel. A good example Racosperma pedinum, which is now known as Acacia pedina.

Pedleyanus: [ped-lee-a-nus] Is named in honour of Leslie Pedley; 1930-20.., who was an Australian botanist who specialized in the Acacia genus. A good example Ptilotus pedleyanus.

Pedleyi: [ped-lee-ahy] Is named in honour of Leslie Pedley; 1930-20.., who was an Australian botanist who specialized in the Acacia genus. A good example Acacia pedleyi.

Pediglossa: [pe-di-glos-sa] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet or maybe from Pédon which is Ancient Greek or the soil or ground and Glôssa which is Ancient Greek or Glossa which is Latin for a tongue. Its reference to orchids, which have a thickened pedicel more like a tongue. A good example is Pterostylis pedoglossa.

Peduncle: [pe-dun-kl] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have a peduncle and pedicel. The primary or main stalk which all the pedicels are derived.

Plectranthus nitidum has a very short peduncle.

Pedunculare: [pe-duhn-kyoo-lair] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have a relatively longer peduncle or pedicel than other flowers in the genus that is, the primary or main stalk which all the pedicels are derived. A good example was Gompholobium pedunculare, which is now known as Gompholobium huegelii.

Peduncularis: [pe-dun-kyoo-lar-is] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have a relatively longer peduncle or pedicel than other flowers in the genus. The primary or main stalk which all the pedicels are derived. A good example is Dillwynia peduncularis.

Pedunculata: [pe-dun-kyoo-la-ta] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have a peduncle and pedicel. The primary or main stalk which all the pedicels are derived. A good example is Procris pedunculata.

Pedunculate: [pe-dun-kyoo-leit] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have a peduncle and and pedicel. The primary or main stalk which all the pedicels are derived. A good example is the female flowers on Casuarina cunninghamiana.

Pedunculatum: [pe-dun-kyoo-lei-tum] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to the flowers, which have a conspicuous peduncle and or pedicel. The primary or main stalk which all the pedicels are derived. A good example is Myriophyllum pedunculatum.

Pedunculatus: [pe-dun-kyoo-lei tus] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to flowers, which have a peduncle or stalk. The primary or main stalk which all the pedicels are derived. A good example is Pandanus tectorius var. pedunculatus.

Pedunculosa: [pe-dun-kyoo-loh-sa] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to the flowers, which have a prominent peduncle or stalk. The primary or main stalk which all the pedicels are derived. A good example is Glossogyne pedunculosa, which is now known as Glossocardia bidens.

Pedunculosum: [pe-dun-kyoo-loh-sum] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to the flowers, which have a prominent peduncle or stalk. The primary or main stalk which all the pedicels are derived. A good example is Ophioglossum pedunculosum.

Peeneri: [pee-ner-ahy] Is named in honour of Peener. A good example is Eucalyptus eremicola subsp. peeneri.

Peg-sterigmata: [peg, ster-rig-ma-ta] From Sterigma/Sterizein, which are Greek for to support. It refers to lateral stems, which grow where the leaf was attached to the stem and remains persistent after the leaf dehisces. That is, they are part of the abscission layer between the peg and leaf. A good example is Xenolachne flagellifera which develops a long elongated sterigmata to form the basidio spores.

Pelagia: [pel-a-ji-a] From Pelagikós, which is Ancient Greek or Pelagicus, which is Latin for to grow way out at sea. It may refer to the type species or a number of earlier species which were found growing on Islands in the Bass Straight. A good example was Kunzea pelagia, which is now known as Kunzea ambigua.

Pelagica: [pel-a-ji-ka] From Pelagikós, which is Ancient Greek or Pelagicus which is Latin for to grow way out at sea. It may refer to the type species and earlier species found that were growing on isolated Islands. A good example was Dendrophthoe pelagica which is now included in Dendrophthoe glabrescens.

Pelargonium: [pel-ar-goh-ni-um] From Pelargo, which is Ancient Greek for a stork, Gera, which is Ancient Greek for a geranium and Nion, which is a Latin suffix for denoting an action or a condition. It refers to plants, which are similar to the Geranium genus but differ in having only seven perfect stamens whereas the Geranium genus has 10 stamens. A good example is Pelargonium australe.

Pelinos: [pe-li-nos] From Pīlātum/Pilō, which is Latin for to pluck feathers, skin an animal or peel a fruit. Its reference is unclear. A good example is Pimelea pelinos.

Pellaea: [pe-lee-a] From Pellos, which is Ancient Greek for a deep colour. It refers to leaves, fronds or other organs, which have a deep green colour. A good example is the fronds on Pellaea calidirupium.

Pellicula 1: [pee-li-kyoo-la] From Pellicula/Pellis, which is Latin for the thin membrane or thin skin. It refers to a delicate outside membrane as on the surface of yeasts and bacteria. A good example is Echinoplaca pellicula.

Pellicula 2: [pee-li-kyoo-la] From Pellicula/Pellis, which is Latin for the thin membrane or thin skin. It refers to the skin like growth on the surface of a liquid culture. A good example is the iron bacteria of Gallionella ferruginea.

Pellita: [pel-li-ta] From Pállō, which is Ancient Greek or Pelnō which is Latin for to bring closer. It may refer to the individual flowers, which are much smaller than other species in the genus so need closer attention for identification. A good example is the waxy surface on the leaves of Eucalyptus pellita.

Pellitum: [pel-li-tum] From Pállō, which is Ancient Greek or Pelnō which is Latin for to bring closer. It may refer to the individual flowers, which are much smaller than other species in the genus so need closer attention for identification. A good example is the waxy surface on the leaves of Racosperma pellitum, which is now known as Acacia pellita.

Pelloiae: [pel-loi-ee] From Pelloidal, which is Latin for reLating to or consisting of minute particles of microcrystalline or cryptocrystalline carbonates. It may refer to plants, which prefer to grow in soils of very fine particles. A good example is the oil dots on the leaves of Acacia pelloiae, which is now known as Acacia drummondii subsp. elegans.

Pellucid: [pel-loo-sid] From Pellucidus, which is Latin for allowing the maximum amount of light to penetrate, to be very clear. It usually refers to oil glands, which are associated with the leaves or at times the flowers being very clear or transluscent. A good example is the oil dots on the leaves of Boronia rosmarinifolia.

Pellucida: [pel-loo-si-da] From Pellucidus, which is Latin for allowing the maximum amount of light to penetrate, to be very clear. It refers to oil glands, which are associated with the leaves or at times the flowers being very clear or translucent. A good example is Peperomia pellucida.

Pellucidum: [pel-loo-si-dum] From Pellucidus, which is Latin for allowing the maximum amount of light to penetrate, to be very clear. It refers to oil glands, which are associated with the leaves or at times the flowers being very clear or translucent. A good example is Asplenium pellucidum.

Pellucidus: [pel-loo-si-dus] From Pellucidus, which is Latin for allowing the maximum amount of light to penetrate, to be very clear. It refers to oil glands, which are associated with the leaves or at times the flowers being very clear or translucent. A good example is the pileus on the fungus, Coprinellus pellucidus.

Pelonastes: [pe-lo-nas-tes] From Pelos, which is Latinized from the Spanish for bald and Asta, which is Latin for to stand on, to stand by or to stand for. It usually refers to leaves, phyllodes or frond margins, which are devoid of ciliate hairs or teeth. A good example was Pelonastes tuberculata, which is now known as Myriophyllum drummondii.

Pelophila: [pe-lo-fi-la] From Pelos, which is Latinized from the Spanish vernacular for bald. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have no teeth and are smooth and glabrous. A good example is Acacia pelophila.

Pelophilum: [pe-lo-fi-lum] From Pelos, which is Latinized from the Spanish vernacular for bald. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have no teeth and are smooth and glabrous. A good example was Racosperma pelophilum, which is now known as Acacia pelophila.

Peltandroides [pel-tan-droi-deez] From Pelte, which is Ancient Greek or Peltatus, which is Latin for a small shield, Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a male and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which somewhat resemble the Peltandra genus in that the stamens are hidden beneath the base of a recoiled spathe. A good example is Typhonium peltandroides.

Peltata: [pel-ta-ta] From Pelte, which is Ancient Greek or Peltatus, which is Latin for a small shield. It refers to leaves, which have the petioles or leaf stalks attached to the leaf blade somewhere towards the middle of the blade away from the leaf margin like a small, hand held shield. A good example is Merremia peltata.

Peltate: [pel-teit] From Pelte, which is Ancient Greek or Peltatus, which is Latin for a small shield. It refers to leaves, which have the petioles or leaf stalks attached to the leaf blade somewhere towards the middle of the blade away from the leaf margin. A good example is the leaves on Macaranga tanarius.

Macaranga tanarius showing peltate leaves

Peltatum: [pel–teitum] From Pelte, which is Ancient Greek or Peltatus, which is Latin for a small shield. It refers to leaves which have the petioles or leaf stalks attached to the leaf blade somewhere towards the middle of the blade away from the leaf margin. A good example is the filmy ferns fronds on Hymenophyllum peltatum.

Peltatus: [pel–tatus] From Pelte, which is or Peltatus which is Latin for a small shield. It refers to leaves, which have the petioles or leaf stalks attached to the leaf blade somewhere towards the middle of the blade away from the leaf margin. A good example is the south east Asian tree which develops peltate leaves as it matures and is known as Varnish wood orMallotus peltatus.

Peltiform: [pel–tiform] From Pelte, which is Ancient Greek or Peltatus which is Latin for a small shield and Forme which is Latin for a shape or type. It refers to leaves, which have the petioles or leaf stalks attached to the leaf blade somewhere towards the middle of the blade away from the leaf margin. A good example is the leaves on Eucryphia lucida which are verging on being peltate.

Peltiger: [pel–ti-jer] From Pelte, which is Ancient Greek or Peltatus which is Latin for a small shield. It refers to leaves, which have the petioles or leaf stalks attached to the leaf blade somewhere towards the middle of the blade away from the leaf margin. A good example is Malleostemon peltiger.

Peltigera: [pel–tijer-a] From Pelte, which is Ancient Greek or Peltatus which is Latin for a small shield and gera which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to leaves, which have the petioles or leaf stalks attached to the leaf blade somewhere towards the middle of the blade away from the leaf margin. A good example is Micromyrtus peltigera.

Peltophorum: [pel–tofor-um] From Pelte which is or Peltatus which is Latin for a small shield and Phoreo which is Greek to bear or bearing. It refers to the shape of the stigma which is shaped like a small curved shield. A good example is Peltophorum pterocarpum.

Pembertonensis: [pem–ber-ton-en-sis] From Pemberton, which is Latinized for the township of Pemberton and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in and around the Gloucetser National Park adjacent to Pemberton in south west Western Australia. A good example is Setaria pembertonensis.

Pemphis: [pem–fis] From Pemphis, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the local Malabar word for the tree. A good example is Pemphis acidula.

Penangiana: [pen-an-jI-a-na] From Penang, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the local Malay word for Penang and Iana/Ianus, which is Latin for from or of. A good example is Bridelia penangiana.

Pendens: [pen-denz] From Pendens/Pendere, which is Latin for to hang down. It refers to branches and stems, which droop or hang down. A good example is Eucalyptus pendens.

Pendent: [pen-dent] From Pendens/Pendere which is Latin for to hang down. It refers to branches, which droop, hang down or weep. A good example is Pittosporum angustifolium which was formally known as Pittosporum phyllyreoides.

Pendula: [pen-dyoo-la] From Pendens/Pendere, which is Latin for to hang down. It refers to branches or stems, which droop, hang down or weep. A good example is Acacia pendula.

Penduliflora: [pen-dyoo-li-flor-a] From Pendens/Pendere, which is Latin for to hang down. It refers to branches or stems, which droop, hang down or weep. A good example is the sundew Drosera penduliflora.

Pendulina: [pen-dyoo-li-na] From Pendens/Pendere, which is Latin for to hang down. It refers to branches or stems, which droop, hang down or weep. A good example is the sundew Eremophila pendulina.

Pendulosa: [pen-dyoo-loh-sa] From Pendens/Pendere, which is Latin for to hang down. It refers to branches which droop, hang down or weep. A good example is Cyathodes pendulosa.

Pendulous: [pen-dyoo-lus] From Pendens/Pendere, which is Latin for to hang down. It refers to branches or stems, which droop, hang down or weep. A good example is Leptospermum brachyandra.

Pendulum: [pen-dyoo-lum] From Pendens/Pendere, which are Latin for to hang down. It refers to branches or stems, which droop, hang down or weep. A good example is Ophioglossum pendulum.

Pendulus: [pen-dyoo-lus] From Pendens/Pendere which are Latin for to hang down. It refers to branches which droop, hang down or weep. A good example is Dendrophthoe pendulus.

Penicellatus: [pe-ni-sel-la-tus] From Peniculatum, which is Latin for an artist’s fine paint brush or tuft of fine hairs. It refers to the individual flowers, which have hairs like the hairs found on a fine paint brush. A good example is Leucopogon penicellatus.

Penicillaris: [pen-i-sil-lar-is] From Peniculatum, which is Latin for an artist’s fine paint brush or tuft of fine hairs. It refers to the individual flowers, which are hairs like the hairs found on a fine paint brush. A good example is Pimelea penicillaris.

Pencillata: [peni-sil-la-ta] From Peniculatum, which is Latin for an artist’s fine paint brush or tuft of fine hairs. It refers to the individual flowers or flower spikes, which have hairs like those found on a fine paint brush. A good example was Banksia conferta subsp. penicillata or the native grass Austrodanthonia penicillata.

Penicillatum: [peni-sil-lei-tum] From Peniculatum, which is Latin for an artist’s fine paint brush or tuft of fine hairs. It refers to the individual florets on the grasses, which are hairs like the hairs found on a fine paint brush. A good example is Rytidosperma penicillatum.

Penicillium: [pen-ni-sil-i-um] From Peniculatum, which is Latin for an artist’s fine paint brush or tuft of fine hairs. It refers to fungi, which have thread like root hairs like those found on a fine paint brush. A good example is Penicillium radicum.

Penicula: [pen-i-kyoo-la] From Peniculatum, which is Latin for an artist’s fine paint brush or tuft of fine hairs. It refers to the individual flowers, which have hairs similar to those found on a fine paint brush. A good example is Melaleuca penicula.

Peniculata: [pen-i-kyoo-la-ta] From Peniculatum, which is Latin for an artist’s fine paint brush or tuft of fine hairs. It refers to the individual flowers, which have hairs similar to those found on a fine paint brush. A good example is Thelymitra peniculata.

Peninnervia: [pen-ni-ner-vi-a] From Penna/Penni, which is Latin for a feather and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve or vein. It refers to veins, which spread out but not reaching the margins. A good example is found on most Eucalyptus species leaves including Eucalyptus cinerea.

Peninsula: [pe-nin-soo-la] From Pae, which is Latin for almost and Insula, which is Latin for an Island. It refers to plants, which grow on a piece of land jutting out into a body of water. A good example is Randia sp. peninsula.

Peninsularis: [pe-nin-syoo-lar-is] From Pae, which is Latin for almost and Insula, which is Latin for an Island. It refers to plants, which grow on a piece of land jutting out into a body of water. A good example is Melicope peninsularis.

Peninsulensis: [pe-nin-syoo-len-sis] From Pae, which is Latin for almost, Insula, which is Latin for an Island and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which grow on a piece of land jutting out into a body of water. A good example is Pararistolochia peninsulensis.

Pennamarina: [pen-na-mar-i-na] From Penna, which is Latin for a feather and Marinus, which is Latin for the sea. It refers to leaves or fronds, which have the appearance that they have just been pulled from the sea. A good example is Blechnum pennamarina.

Pennantia: [pen-nan-ti-a] From Pennant, which is Latin for a flag. It probably refers to the type species which is the flagship of the species with a single species growing on the Three King Islands of New Zealand or the Large leaves of the species drooping like flags. A good Australian example is Pennantia cunninghamii.

Pennata: [pen-na-ta] From Pennatus, which is Latin for arranged like the barbs on a feather. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have leaflets which are closely packed along the rachis like a feather. A good example is Acacia pennata.

Pennatula: [pen-na-tyoo-la] From Pennatus, which is Latin for arranged like the barbs on a feather. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have leaflets which are closely packed along the rachis like a feather. A good example is Acacia pennatula.

Pennatulum: [pen-na-tyoo-lum] From Pennatus, which is Latin for arranged like the barbs on a feather. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have leaflets which are closely packed along the rachis like a feather. A good example was Racosperma pennatulum, which is now known as Acacia pennatula.

Pennatum: [pen-na-tum] From Panna/Penni, which are Latin for the barb of a feather. It refers to pinnae on the leaflets, which are arranged like the barbs on a feather. A good example is Rhizogonium pennatum.

Pennatus: [pen-na-tus] From Panna/Penni, which are Latin for the barb of a feather. It refers to pinnae on leaflets, which are arranged like the barbs on a feather. A good example is Cyperus pennatus var. armstrongii.

Pennigera: [pen-ni-jer-a] From Penna/Penni, which is Latin for a feather and Gerus, which is Latin for to bear. It refers to leaves or fronds, which are feather like. A good example is fronds on Pneumatopteris pennigera.

Pennigerus: [pen-ni-jer-us] From Penna/Penni, which is Latin for a feather and Gerus, which is Latin for to bear. It refers to plants, which bear feather like fronds. A good example was Cyclosorus pennigerus, which is now known as Cyclosorus pennigerus in New Zealand.

Penninervis: [pen-ni-ner-vis] From Penna/Penni, which is Latin for a feather and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek or nervus, which is Latin for a nerve or vein. It refers to veins which spread out like the barbs off the rachis but not reaching the margins. A good example Acacia penninervis var. penninervis.

Pennisetis: [pen-ni-se-tis] From Penna/Penni, which is Latin for a feather and Seta, which is Ancient Greek for bristly or Seate which is Latin for bristly. It refers to spikes, which appear like soft, bristly feathers. A good example was Schoenus pennisetis.

Pennisetum: [pen-ni-se-tum] From Penna/Penni, which is Latin for a feather and Seta, which is Ancient Greek or Seate, which is Latin for bristly. It refers to structures or organs, which somewhat have a feather form and are covered in long, spiky bristles. A good example was Pennisetum alopecuroides, which is now known as Cenchrus purpurascens.

Penniveined: [pen-ni-veind] From Penna/Penni, which is Latin for a feather and Vena, which is Latin for a nerve, or vein. It refers to veins, which spread out on the leaves or other organs like barbs off the rachis without reaching the margins. A good example is the veins on many Eucalyptus and Corymbia including Corymbia trachyphloia.

Penrithensis: [pen-ri-then-sis] From Penrith, which is Latinized for Penrith and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in or around Penrith in New South Wales. A good example was Eucalyptus penrithensis which is now defunct as it has been found to be a natural hybrid possibly between Eucalyptus sparsifolia and Eucalyptus sclerophylla

Pensilis: [pen-si-lis] From Pendens/Pendere, which is Latin for to hang down. It refers to branches or stems, which droop, hang down or weep. A good example is Glyptostrobus pensilis where the fruits hang down like pendants.

Pensylvanicum: [pen-sahyl-va-ni-kum] From Pensylvanicum, which is Latinized for Pensylvania. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in Gnaphalium Pennsylvania. A good example is Gnaphalium pensylvanicum.

Penta: [pen-ta] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five.

Pentaceras: [pen-ta-se-ras] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Keros, which is Ancient Greek for a goat’s horn. It refers to the five carpels, which all have a horn thus five horns. A good example is Pentaceras australe.

Pentachondra: [pen-ta-son-dra] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Chondrion, which is Ancient Greek for a cartilage. It refers to petals, which anumber five and are stark white like cartilage. A good example is Pentachondra dehiscens.

Pentacocca: [pen-ta-koh-ka] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and kokkos, which is Ancient Greek for a dry berry. It refers to fruits, which have compartments. A good example is Bosistoa pentacocca.

Pentacraspedon: [pen-ta-kras-pe-don] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Craspedium, which is Latin for an edge or a fringe. It refers to organs, which have five compartments and all have a long, stiff hairs along the edge. The reference of five is unclear on Pentacraspedon denudatum, which is now known as Amphipogon turbinatus.

Pentactis: [pen-tak-tis] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and maybe Actis, which is Ancient Greek for one of the sons of Rhodos and Helios. Actis, along with his brothers, Triopas, Macar and Candalus, were jealous of a fifth brother, Tenages’s, skills in science. They killed him and Actis escaped to Egypt and according to Diodorus Siculus, Actis built the city of Heliopolis in Egypt to honour his father Helios. It was from him that the Egyptians learned astrology. It refers to the five compartments in the fruits. A good example was Dendrobium pentactis, which is now known as Dichopus insignis.

Pentacyclic: [pen-ta-sahy-klik] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Klein, which is Ancient Greek for to encircle. It refers to the chemical bond of which squalene is the most important as it is the basis of all steroids while others include antifungal and antibacterial components. A good example of a plant that contains pentacyclic structures is Pittosporum phylliraeoides.

Pentadactyla: [pen-ta-dak-tahy-la] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Dactylos, which is Ancient Greek for a finger. It refers to leaves, which have five leaflets. A good example of is Ipomoea pentadactyla, which is now known as Merremia quinata.

Pentadactylis: [pen-ta-dak-tahy-lis] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Dactylos, which is Ancient Greek for a finger. It refers to leaves, which have five radiating leaflets. A good example of was Ipomoea pentadactyla, which is now known as Merremia quinata.

Pentadactylon: [pen-ta-dak-tahy-lon] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Dactylos, which is Ancient Greek for a finger. It refers to leaves, which have five leaflets. A good example of the name was Pentadactylon angustifolium, which is now known as Persoonia linearis of which I cannot substantiate any segment of its characteristis that have 5 in them.

Pentadenia: [pen-ta-den-ni-a] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Adena, which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to the five glands, which are along the rachis of the leaves. A good example is Acacia pentadenia.

Pentadenium: [pen-ta-de-ni-um] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and dín, which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to the five glands, which are along the rachis of the leaves. A good example was Racosperma pentadenium, which is now known as Acacia pentadenia.

Pentadynamis: [pen-ta-dahy-na-mis] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Dúnamis, which is Ancient Greek for powerful. It probably refers to flowers (five petals) which give a powerful display; in arid areas, when in bloom. A good example is Pentadynamis incana, which is now known as Crotalaria eremaea subsp. eremaea.

Pentaedra: [pen-tee-dra] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Taedra, which is Ancient Greek for the most beautiful and caring. It refers to plants, which have five somewhat beautiful angles on the stems often the angles have small or fragile wings. A good example was Acacia pentaedra, which is now known as Acacia extensa.

Pentagona: [pen-ta-go-na] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Gonon which is Ancient Greek or Gonum which is Latin for an angle. It refers to fruits, which have five distinct angles. A good example is Maireana pentagona.

Pentagonal: [pen-ta-go-nal] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Gonon which is Ancient Greek or Gonum which is Latin for an angle. It refers to plants, which have five somewhat beautiful angles on the stems often the angles have small or fragile wings. A good example is Acacia extensa.

Pentagonantha: [pen-ta-go-nan-tha] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Gonon, which is Ancient Greek or Gonum, which is Latin for an angle and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for a flower or the male reproductive organ in a flower. It refers to the flowers which may have up to five angles. A good example is Babingtonia pentagonantha.

Pentagonaster: [pen-ta-go-na-ster] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Gonon, which is Ancient Greek or Gonum which is Latin for an angle and Astḗr which is Ancient Greek for a star. It refers to capsules or fruits, which have five distinct angles like a star. A good example is the capsules on Pentagonaster baxteri, which is now known as Kunzea baxteri.

Pentagona: [pen-ta-goh-na] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Gonon, which is Ancient Greek or Gonum which is Latin for an angle. It refers to the fruits, which have five distinct angles. A good example is Melaleuca pentagona.

Pentagonum: [pen-ta-go-num] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Gonon, which is Ancient Greek or Gonum which is Latin for an angle. It refers to the fruits, which have five distinct angles. A good example was Myrtoleucodendron pentagonum, which is now known as Melaleuca pentagona.

Pentalepis: [pen-ta-le-pis] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Lepís which is Ancient Greek or scale or scaly. It refers to structures or organs, which have five distinct scales. A good example is Pentalepis ecliptoides.

Pentamera: [pen-ta-mer-a] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Merus, which is Latin for five rows. It refers to flowers, which have five members -5 sepals, 5 petals and 5 or at times 10 stamens. A good example is Diospyros pentamera.

Pentamerous: [pen-ta-me-ros] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Merus, which is Latin for five rows. It refers to a description of flowers, which have five members -5 sepals, 5 petals and 5 or at times 10 stamens. A good example is the Acacia genus including Australia’s floral emblem Acacia pycantha.

Pentandra: [pen-tan-dra] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to plants, which have five anthers or stamens. A good example is Caustis pentandra which has five anthers instead of the normal three or six found in the genus.

Pentandrus: [pen-tan-drus] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to flowers, which have five stamens. A good example is Ranunculus pentandrus var. pentandrus.

Pentapanax: [pen-ta-pan-aks] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Panacea, which is Ancient Greek for to cure all. It refers to the Chinese Gingsin, which has five leaflets radiating out from the petiole. A good example was Pentapanax bellendenkerensis, which is now known as Polyscias bellendenkerensis.

Pentapetala: [pen-ta-pe-ta-la] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for a thin metalic plate later used for the description of specialised coloured leaves surrounding the bud of a flower – the petals. It refers to flowers, which have five petals, twhich may be unusual for the species or the petals are very distinct in the species compared to other species in the genus. A good example was Lysinema pentapetalum.

Pentapetes: [pen-ta-pee-tes] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Pétomai, which is Ancient Greek for I seek or desire or Petītum, which is Latin for I sought after. It probably refers to the petals and stamens which are rather spectacular. A good example is the five, scarlet red petals and five, long scarlet-red stamens on Pentapetes phoenicea.

Pentaphylla: [pen-tah-fahyl-lah] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which have five deeply divided lobes. A good example is Trichosanthes pentaphylla.

Pentaphyllum: [pen– ta-fi/fahyl-lum] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf, phyllode or frond. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which have five lobes. A good example is the fie beautiful frond lobes on Pronephrium pentaphyllum.

Pentaphyllus: [pen– ta-fi/fahyl-lus] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves to plants, which have five lobes. A good example is Hibiscus pentaphyllus.

Pentapogon: [pen-ta-poh-gon] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Pogonias, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to seeds, which have five awns that resemble a scruffy beard. A good example is Pentapogon quadrifidus.

Pentaptelion: [pen-tap-te-li-on] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to the five petals which closely resemble a birds feather. A good example was Pentaptelion involucratum, which is now known as Leucopogon plumulifloris.

Pentaptera: [pen-ta-te-ra] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to seeds, which have five distinct arms with very distinct wings attached. A good example was Babbagia pentaptera, which is now known as Osteocarpum pentapterum.

Pentapterum: [pen-ta-te-rum] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to seeds which have five distinct arms with very distinct wings attached. A good example is Osteocarpum pentapterum.

Pentaptilon: [pen-tap-ti-lon] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Ptilon, which is Ancient Greek for a stiff feather. It refers to flower spikes, which look a little like a bird’s feather. A good example is Pentaptilon careyi.

Pentasticha: [pen-ta-sti-cha] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Stíkhos, which is Ancient Greek for a row or ranked. It refers to leaves, which have five leaves in a whorl at each node or which are five ranked – that is there are five leaves in two complete whorls before the next (sixth) leaf lies directly above the first leaf. See 2nd/3rd ranked at top of glossary. A good example is Persoonia pentasticha.

Pentastichum: [pen-ta-sti-chuhm] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Stíkhos, which is Ancient Greek for a row or ranked. It refers to leaves, which have five leaves in a whorl at each node or which are five ranked – that is there are five leaves in two complete whorls before the next (sixth) leaf lies directly above the first leaf. See 2nd/3rd ranked at top of glossary. A good example is Leucobryum pentastichum.

Leucobryum: [pen-tah-sti-chum] From Leukós, which is Ancient Greek for white and Bbrúon, which is Ancient Greek or later Bryon which is Latin for a moss or bright oyster green. It refers to the leaves on mosses, which are bright green with a whitish covering. A good example is the moss Leucobryum pentastichum.

Pentataphrus: [pen-ta-ta-frus] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Táphros, which is Ancient Greek for a Straight of water in Greece between Corsica and Sardinia. Its reference is unclear. A good example was Pentataphrus behrii, which is now known as Astroloma conostephioides.

Pentastylis: [pen-ta-stahy-lis] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a part of the female reproductive organ between the ovaries and the stigma. A good example is Cadellia pentastylis.

Pentatropis: [pen-ta-tro-pis] From Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Tropis, which is Ancient Greek for the keel on a ship. It refers to seeds or at times other organs, which have five ribs or ridge like keels. A good example is the seeds on Maireana pentatropis.

Pentisea: [pen-ti-se-a] Maybe from Pentiseae, which is Ancient Greek or Appendicium, which is Latin for an appendix. Its reference is unclear. A good example is the seeds on Pentisea gertrudeae, which is now known as Caladenia gertrudae.

Pentzkeanum: [pent-ke-a-num] Is named in honour of Theodor Pentche/Pentzke. A good example was Pithecellobium pentzkeanum, which is now known as Archidendron ramiflorum.

Peperomia: [pep-er-roh-mi-a] From Peper, which is Ancient Greek for a pepper and Omos, which is equivalent to Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the flavour of some early species, which are similar to pepper. A good example without the heat or flavour is Peperomia blanda var. floribunda.

Peplidium: [pep-li-di-um] From Phibalee, which is Ancient Greek for a kind of myrtle. It refers to leaves, which have the appearance of a myrtle bush. A good example is Peplidium foecundum.

Peploides: [pep-loi-deez] From Phibalee, which is Ancient Greek for a kind of myrtle and Eîdos/Oides, which are Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the appearance of the shrubs especially the leaves, which resemble some of the myrtles of Europe. A good example is Ludwigia peploides.

Peplos: [pep-los] From Pelos/Peplus, which are Ancient Greek for a rich outer robe or shawl worn by women in ancient Greece, hanging in loose folds usually pulled over the head. It refers to a description of long soft calyxes, which hang down over flowers or fruits. A good example is the flowers of Calycopeplus paucifolius.

Peplus: [pep-lus] From Pelos/Peplus, which are Ancient Greek for a rich outer robe or shawl worn by women in ancient Greece, hanging in loose folds usually pulled over the head. It refers to long soft calyxes, which hang down over the flowers. A good example is the flowers on the beautifull, small Euphorbia peplus.

Pepo: [pep-o/oh] From Pepon, which is Latin for a large ripe pumpkin. It refers to fruits, which have a leathery no septate rind derived from an inferior ovary. A good example is the fruits of Diplocyclos palmatus.

Peraggregata: [per-ag-gre-ga-ta] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Aggregata which is Latin for collecting together. It refers to fungi, which grow in congregations. A good example is Clitocybe peraggregata.

Perakense: [per-a-kens] From Perak, which is Latinized for the Malaysian name of the tree and Anum/Ensis, which are Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the state of Perak in Malaysia. A good example is Glochidion perakense.

Peralata: [per-a-la-ta] From Petrum/Petrōs, which is Ancient Greek for a rock. It refers to plants, which go prefer to grow on rocks. A good example is tarrietia peralata, which is now known as Argyrodendron peralatum, which often grows on rocky volcanic soils or island situations.

Peralatum: [per-a-la-tum] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Alatum, which is Latin for a wing. It may refer to the seed’s wings which go beyond the normal size of a seeds wing. A good example is Argyrodendron peralatum.

Peralbus: [per-al-bus] From Per/Peri which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Albus which is Latin for white. It refers to the flowers colours being around the whites. A good example is Hibiscus peralbus.

Peralta: [per-al-ta] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Alata which is Latin for a wing. It refers to seeds which have a very large wing. A good example was Heritiera peralata, which is now known as Argyrodendron peralatum.

Peramara: [per-a-mar-a] May be from Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Amārum, which is Latin for to be bitter to the taste buds. It refers to structures or organs, which are crude or bitter to eat. It refers to leaves or at times other organs, which are rather crude or more bitter to eat than other species or sub species in the genus. A good example is Lufa aegyptiaca var peramara.

Perangusta: [pe-ran-gus-ta] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Angusta, which is Latin for narrow. It refers to leaves or at times other organs, which are rather narrow. A good example is Eucalyptus perangusta.

Perangustum: [pe-ran-gus-tum] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Angustum, which is Latin for narrow. It refers to leaves or at times other organs, which are narrow. A good example was Racosperma perangustum, which is now known as Acacia perangusta.

Perangustus: [pe-ran-gus-tus] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Angustus, which is Latin for narrow. It refers to leaves or at times other organs, which are narrow. A good example is Cyperus perangustus.

Peraspera: [pe-ra-sper-a] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Aspera, which is Latin for roughened. It refers to stems, leaves or other organs, which are rougher than other species in the genus. A good example is Euphrasia orthocheila subsp. peraspera.

Peratosa: [per-a-toh-sa] From Pratoso, which is Latinized from the Italian for a meadow. It refers to plants, which prefer meadow like environments to grow in. A good example is Glycine peratosa.

Perbella: [per-bel-la] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and bella which is Ancient Greek for beautiful and Bella/Bellus, which is Latin for beautiful. It refers to the flowers, which pass through beautiful becoming more or even the most beautiful species in the genus. A good example is the exotic cactus Mammillaria perbella.

Perbellum: [per-be-lum] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and bella which is Ancient Greek for beautiful and Bella/Bellus, which is Latin for beautiful. It refers to the flowers, which pass through beautiful becoming more or even the most beautiful species in the genus. A good example is Myoporum platycarpum subsp. perbellum.

Perbellus: [per-bel-lus] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Bella/Bellus which is Latin for beautiful. It refers to flowers, which are exquisitely more beautiful than other species in the genus. A good example is the horticultural exotic cactus Echinocereus perbellus.

Perbrevidens: [per-bre-vi-denz] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very, Brevis which is Ancient Greek for short and Videns, which is Latin for do you not see? It refers to flowers, which are very tiny but still make an impact when grouped together. A good example is Hardenbergia perbrevidens.

Percava: [per-ka-va] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Cava which is Latin for concave. It refers to pileus, which have a concave top. A good example is Collybia percava.

Percostata: [per-ko-sta-ta] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Costatus which is Latin for to have ribs. It refers to structures or organs, which are prominently ribbed. A good example is Freycinetia percostata or the hypanthium on the fruits of Eucalyptus percostata.

Percurrent: [per-ku-rent] From Percussum, which is Latin for to run along or run besides. It refers to organs, which extends along the whole length of a structure or other organ but not continued beyond it or the apex. A good example is Alisma lanceolatum which has percurrent tertiary veins.

Percussa: [per-kus-sa] From Percussum, which is Latin for to run along or run besides. It refers to organs, which extends along the whole length of a structure or other organ but not continued beyond it or the apex. A good example was Schellolepis percussa, which is now known as Goniophlebium percussum.

Percussum: [per-ku-sum] From Percussum, which is Latin for to run along or run besides. It refers to organs, which extends along the whole length of a structure or other organ but not continued beyond it or the apex. A good example is Goniophlebium percussum.

Peregrinum: [per-re-grin-um] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Grina which is Latin for foreign. It may refer to plants, which have the ability to grow in new soils and new locations. A good example is Lepidium peregrinum.

Perennans: [per-en-anz] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Annan which is Latin for a year. It refers to plants, which have two or more flowering cycles before they die. A good example is Oxalis perennans.

Perennial: [per-e-ni-al] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Annan which is Latin for a year. It refers to a plants, which live beyond two or more years and requires three or more growing seasons to complete its life cycle, first forming the vegetative parts then the reproductive parts. Agood examlpw of a perennial plant is Prostanthera ovalifolia.

Perenniporia: [per-en-ni-por-i-a] Maybe from Perene, which is Greek for perpetual or al year and Póros, which is Greek for a passage way or pore. It refers to Lichens, which produce spore producing pores all year round. A good example is Perenniporia medulla-panis.

Perennis: [per-en-nis] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very. A good example is Lachnagrostis perennis.

Perfect: [per-fekt] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Effectus which is Latin for to bring to completion. It refers to flowers, which are effectively complete in having both the pistol and stamens present within the same flower. A good example is the flowers on Eucalyptus kruseana.

Peroffskyana: [pe-of-skee-ei-na] Is named in honour of Count Grafen von Peroffsky, who was a Russian benefactor of the Saint Petersburgh Botanic Gardens. A good example is Lepidozamia peroffskyana.

Perfoliata: [per-foh-li-a-ta] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves on the spikes, which appear to have spikes that grow through the middle. A good example is Velleia perfoliata.

Perfoliatum: [pur-fo-li-a-tum] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Folium, which is Latin for a leaf or foliage. It refers to bases of leaves, which are surround the stem as though the stem or stalk appears to pass through the leaf. A good example is the north American herb used to abate flu symptoms Eupatorium perfoliatum.

Perfoliatus: [pur-fo-li-a-tus] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Folium, which is Latin for a leaf or foliage. It refers to bases of the leaves, which surround the stem as though the stem or stalk appears to pass through the leaf. A good example is Potamogeton perfoliatus.

Perglandulosa: [per-glan-dyoo-loh-sa] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Glans, which is Latin for an organ that secretes a secretion. It refers to organs, which resemble holes or small lumps usually on the leaves. A good example is Eremophila perglandulosa.

Pergracilis: [per-gra-si-lis] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Folium, which is Latin for a leaf or foliage and Gracilis, which is Latin for graceful and slender. It refers to the overall growth habit of the grasses, which are look delicate and graceful. A good example is Eragrostis pergracilis.

Pergranulata: [per-gra-nyoo-la-ta] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Granula, which is Latin for a granule, a small particle or pellet. It refers to stem sections, which resemble small pebbles laid upon each other. A good example is Tecticornia pergranulata subsp. pergranulata.

Pergularia: [per-ju-lar-i-a] From Pergula/Pergulae, which are Latin for a booth, stall, shop in front of a house, a hut or hovel, an arbour or brothel. It refers to plants, which are well suited to growing over a pergola or arbour. A good example was Pergularia cinerascens, which is now known as Tylophora cinerascens.

Perianth 1: [pe-ri-anth] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to a tube that splits down one side or partially splits down one side. A good example is the perianth tube or corolla of Grevillea banksii.

Perianth 2: [pe-ri-anth] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to petals and Sepals, which are spoken as a single entity. A good example is the flowers on Senna aclinus.

Pericalymma: [pe-ri-ka-lahym-ma] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Kálumna, which is Ancient Greek or Calymna, which is Latin for the Greek mythological legend of kalymnos who was thrown to the bottom of the earth by his foes but landed on an Island that rose from the Aegean Sea. Its reference is unclear. A good example is the pulpy fruits on Pericalymma spongiocaule.

Pericarp 1: [Pe-ri-kar p] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to a fruits outer layers when spoken about as a complete section that includes the exocarp and mesocarp.

Pericarp 2: [pe-ri-kar p] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the tissue surrounding the fertilized ovary. A good example is the pulpy fruits on Dianella caerulea.

Pericarpous: [pe-ri-kar pus] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have the tissue surrounding the fertilized ovary. A good example is the fruits on Rubus parvifolia.

Periculosus: [per-i-kyoo-lo-sus] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Culosos, which is Ancient Greek for somewhat. It may refer to flowers, which are somewhat spectacular or around the spectacular vision. A good example is the fruits on Actinotus periculosus.

Pericladial: [pe-ri-kla-di-al] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Klados which is Ancient Greek for a branch or stem. It refers to organs, which have sheath surrounding the base.

Periculosa: [per-ri-kyoo-lo/loh-sa] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and maybe Culus, which is Latin for fewer. It refers to phyllodes, which seem to be few on older plants. A good example was Acacia periculosa, which is now known as Acacia nyssophylla.

Periderm Cells: [pe-ri-derm, selz] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very, Derma, which is Ancient Greek or Dermis, which is Latin for the skin and Cells, which is Latin for a small room. It refers to the thicker outer walls of cells near the surface. They are the corky cells in the stems of dicotyledon plants that make up the protective outer layers of stems and trunks.

Peridiole 1: [pe-ri-di-ohl] From Peridiola, which is Latin for a membrane by which the spores of some Algals and Fungi are immediately covered.A good example is the membranous covers on various birds nest fungi including Cyathus striata.

Peridiole 2: [pe-ri-di-ohl] From Peridiola, which is Latin for adivision of the gleba having a separate wall frequently acting as a unit for distribution of the spore within the peridole. Peridoles are ejected at speeds of 1–5 meters per second utilizing less than 2mm of the kinetic energy in falling raindrops. Raindrops that hit the rim of the basidiome have the most effective at ejecting peridioles. The mean angle of ejection varies from 67 to 73° and the peridioles travelled over an estimated maximum horizontal distance of 1 m. Each peridiole carries a funiculus (cord) that remains tightly compressed during the ejection period. The funiculus unravels when its adhesive surface strikes a surrounding obstacle and acts as a brake that quickly reduced the velocity of the projectile. In nature, this elaborate mechanism tethers the peridiole to vegetation for browsing herbivores to distribute some of the peridoles further afield away from the parent plants.

Schematic of Cyathus striata and its working parts

Peridium: [pe-ri-di-um] From Peridiolum, which is Latin for a membrane wall. It refers to a wall or membrane, which assists in the ejection of Peridiole when struck by a rain drop.A good example is the membranous covers on various birds nest fungi or Nidula species.

Perigynium 1: [pe-ri-jahy-ni-um] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to the modified tubular bract which surrounds the seed of the genus Carex. A good example is Carex fascicularis.

Perigynium 2: [pe-ri-jahy-ni-um] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to the modified organs that surround the antheridia on mosses. A good example is Meteoriopsis reclinata.

Perigynous: [pe-ri-jahy-nus] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very around and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to the modified tubular bract which surrounds the ovary of intermediate superior flowers. A good example is Carex appressa.

Perigyny: [pe-ri-jahyn] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gýnos/Gunḗ, or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to sepals, petals and stamens, which are attached to the floral tube or hypanthium surrounding the ovary with the tube or hypanthium free from the ovary in superior flowers. A good example is Blandfordia nobilis.

Perileuca: [pe-ri-loo-ka] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Leuka, which is Ancient Greek for white. It refers to flowers, which are beyond white to translucent and off white in colour. A good example is Styphelia perileuca.

Perine: [pe-reen] Probably from Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Inein, which is Ancient Greek for the tissue between the anus and the vulva in women or the anus and the scrotum in men. It refers to the outer covering of some fern spores, which have a different configuration than the exospore which is found in the majority of ferns. https: //books.google.com. Au/books – Differences between perine and exospore from evolution page 49 – 51.

Peripentadenia: [pe-ri-pen-ta-de-ni-a] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very, Penta, which is Ancient Greek for five and Adena, which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to the type species, which has 5 glands near the apex of the leaf petioles or at the base of the leaves. A good example is Peripentadenia phelpsii which actually has just two glands on the petioles.

Peripheral: [per-if-er-al] From Periphery, which is Ancient Greek for near to the outside. It refers to the outer surface or edge of a structure or habitat being on the edge. A good example is Avicennia marina subsp. marina which grows at the edge of the sea.

Peripleura: [pe-ri-ploo-ra] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Pleurá which is Ancient Greek for a rib or a side of something. It probably refers to bracteoles, which are numerous on the side of the flower buds. A good example is Peripleura arida.

Periploca: [pe-ri-plo-ka] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Ploco which is Ancient Greek for in whorls. It refers to stems, which are twine around another structure. A good example is Pandorea jasminoides.

Peripterygium: [pe-ri-te-ri-ji-um] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to ovaries or seeds, which are surrounded by two very large wings. A good example is Peripterygium moluccanum, which is now known as Cardiopteris moluccana.

Periscelianthum: [per-is-se-li-an-thum] From Periscelis/Periscelidēs, which is Latin for an anklet or Garter and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to pedicels, which have a distinct band at or near the base. A good example is Stylidium periscelianthum.

Perisperm: [pe-ri-sperm] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the layer of nutrient that is beyond the embryo of the seed commonly known as the endosperm.

Perispermous: [pe-ri-sperm-os] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Spérma which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to endosperm, which are the food reserves are stored.

Perispore: [pe-ri-spor] From Perieteia, which is Ancient Greek for about or around and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the outer covering or membrane surrounding the spore in some ferns, which have a different configuration than those that have an exospore.

Perissa: [pe-ris-sa] Maybe from Perissä, which is Latin for to pine with love. It may refer to plants, which are very beautiful. A good example is Banksia serratuloides subsp. perissa.

Peristeranthus: [pe-ri-ster-an-thus] From Peristera, which is Latin for a dove and maybe ánthos, which is Ancient Greek or Anthus, which is Latin for a small bird or may be ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. The pollen-bearing portion of the stamen usually at the apex of the filament. It may refer to the flowers, of the type species, which were white and appeared like small doves along the flowering spike all taking flight at the same time. A good example is Peristeranthus hillii.

Peristrophe: [pe-ri-stro-fe] From Perieteia, which is Ancient Greek for about or around and Trophicos/Trophe, in which is Ancient Greek for to nourish or feed. It refers to plants, which are near the bottom of the food chain. A good example is Peristrophe brassii.

Peristrophic: [pe-ri-tro-fik] From Perieteia, which is Ancient Greek for about or around and Strophḗ, which is Ancient Greek for Stropha, which is Latin for to turn, bend or twist. It refers to vines, which rely on twisting arouns anothers structure.

Peristylus: [pe-ri-stahy-lus] From Perieteia, which is Ancient Greek for about or around and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a part of the female reproductive organ between the ovaries and the stigma. It refers to styles, which almost completely surround the anthers in orchids. A good example is Peristylus papuanus.

Perithecia: [pe-ri-the-si-a] From Perieteia, which is Ancient Greek for about or around and Thḗkē/Thēca/Thēcae, which are Greek for a case or a box. It refers to fungi, which have many small flask like structures in which the asci are formed, with a narrow opening at its apex through which spores can escape. Thus it is the plural of perithecium. A good example is Poronia punctata.

Perithecium: [pe-ri-the-si-um] From Perieteia, which is Ancient Greek for about or around and Thḗkē/Thēca/Thēcae, which are Greek for a case or a box. It refers to small flask like structures in which the asci are formed, with a narrow opening at its apex through which spores can escape. A good example is Cordyceps gunnii.

Perizostera: [pe-i-zos-ter-a] From Perieteia, which is Ancient Greek for about or around and Zōstḗr, which is Ancient Greek for a girdle or later Zōstēr/Zōstēria, which are Greek/Latin for a kind of sea grass. It refers to plant’s leaves, which somewhat resemble the sea grasses in the Zostera genus. A good example is Stylidium perizostera.

Perlaxa: [per-lak-sa] From Per, which is Latin for each or every and Laxa, which is Latin for slack or loose. A good example is Puccinellia perlaxa.

Perlonga: [per-long-a] From Per, which is Latin for each or every and Longa which is Latin for long. It refers to spikes, which are longer on this species than other species in the genus. A good example is Swainsona perlonga.

Perminuta: [per-min-yoo-ta] From Per, which is Latin for each or every and Minutum, which is Latin for small, little or diminished. It refers to plants, which are much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example was Utricularia perminuta, which is now known as Utricularia violacea.

Perminutum: [per-min-yoo-tum] From Per, which is Latin for each or every and Minutum, which is Latin for small, little or diminished. It refers to plants, which are much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example was Stylidium perminutum, which is now known as Stylidium perpusillum.

Pernettya: [per-net-ti-a] Is named in honour of Antione Joseph Pernetty; 1716-1801, who was a Benedictine Priest on the Falkland Islands and botanical collector. A good example was Pernettya tasmanica, which is now known as Gaultheria tasmanica.

Perniciosa: [per-ni-ki-oh-sa] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very, Nikios, which is Ancient Greek for noxious, diseased or harmful and Osa, which is Ancient Greek for abundance. It refers to seeds, which get entangled in wool on sheep and clothing and may also harbour air born fungus in the dense growth. A good example is the seeds of Aristida perniciosa.

Peroffskyana: [per-of-skee-a-na] Is named in honour of Count Peroffsky; 1794-1857, who was a Russian nobleman and benefactor of the St. Petersburg Botanical Garden. A good example is Lepidozamia peroffskyana.

Perojoa: [per-ojoh-a] From Per, which is Ancient Greek each and Joa which is unknown. Its reference is unclear. A good example was Perojoa microphylla, which is now known as Leucopogon microphyllus.

Peroonia: [per-oo-ni-a] Is named in honour of Christiaan Hendrik Persoon; 1761–1836, who was a South African botanist, mycologist who made additions to Linnaeus’ mushroom taxonomy. A good example was Peroonia helix which is a spelling error for Persoonia helix which is seen in some earlier publications.

Perotis: [per-otis] From Peros, which is Ancient Greek for mutilated and Otos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear. It refers to ears, which have a single disjunct seed. A good example is Perotis rara.

Perplexa: [per-plek-sa] From Perplexus, which is Latin for complicated or tangled. It refers to plants, which have tangled stems. A good example was Eucalyptus perplexa, which is now known as Eucalyptus jensenii.

Perplexus: [per-plek-sus] From Perplexus, which is Latin for complicated or tangled. It refers to plant, which are rather tangled. A good example is the parasitic dodder vine Cuscuta australis.

Perpusilla: [per-pu-sil-la] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Pusillus, which is Latin for minute or insignificant. It refers to structures or organs, which is rather minute or very insignificant especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is the overall size of Brachyscome perpusilla.

Perpusillum: [per-pu-si-lum] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very, Pusillus, which is Latin for minute or insignificant and Um, which is Latin for a degree. It refers to structures or organs, which are rather minute or very insignificant especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is the overall size of Epilobium perpusillum.

Perpusillus: [per-pu-sil-lus] From Per/Peri, which is Latin for around, through, beyond, extra or at times very and Pusillus, which is Latin for minute or insignificant. It refers to structures or organs, which are rather minute or very insignificant especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is the overall size of Fissidens perpusillus, which is now known as Eucalyptus Fissidens tenellus var. australiensis.

Perriniana: [per-ri-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of George Samual Perrin; 1849-1900, who was a British born Australian forester. A good example is Eucalyptus perriniana.

Perrottetia: [per-ro-te-ti-ah] Is named in honour of George Samuel Perrottet; 1793-1870, who was a Swiss born, French botanist who studied horticultural affects in Senegal. A good example is Perrottetia arborescens.

Perryana: [per-ri-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Mrs. Gillian Perry; 1943-2011, who was an Australian Herbarium botanist at the Western Australian herbarium. A good example is Logania perryana.

Perryi: [per-ri-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Perry but which Perry cannot be substantiated. A good example is Acacia perryi.

Persanguinea: [per-san-gwin-e-a] From Per, which is Greek/Latin each or every and Sanguinea, which is Latin for blood-red. It refers to structures or organs, which are all blood-red. A good example is the upper pileus on Russula persanguinea.

Persea: [per-se-a] From Persea, which is Greek/Latin and derived from either the Egyptian or Persian word for a sacred fruit bearing tree from the district. A good example is the exotic horticultural Avocado tree known as Persea americana.

Persecans: [per-se-kanz] From Persecāns, which is Latin for to discect or cut up. It refers to flower heads, which are much looser than other species in the genus. A good example is Lepidosperma persecans.

Persicaria: [per-si-kar-i-a] From Persicaria, which is Ancient Greek for the peach tree. It refers to leaves, which are similar to those of the wild peach trees of Asia Minor. A good example is Persicaria hydropiper.

Persiciflorum: [per-si-ki-flor-um] From Persicaria, which is Ancient Greek for the peach tree and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are similar in shape and size to the similar to those of the wild peach trees of Asia Minor. A good example was Leptospermum persiciflorum, which is now known as Leptospermum squarrosum.

Persicarifolia: [per-si-kar-i-foh-li-a] From Persicaria, which is Ancient Greek for the peach tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are similar to those of the wild peach trees of Asia Minor. A good example is Tristania persicifolia, which is now known as Tristania neriifolia.

Persiehana: [per-see-ha-na] Is named in honour of W. A. Persieh; 1826-1…, who was an Australian plant collector and one of Mueller’s more prolific collectors from north Queensland. A good example is Hakea persiehana.

Persistens: [per-sis-tenz] From Persistens, which is Latin for to remain attached. It refers to organs, which remain attached to another organ or structure well after the usual time. A good example is the capsules on Eucalyptus persistens.

Persistent: [per-sis-tent] From Persistens, which is Latin for to remain attached. It refers to organs, which remains attached to another organ or structure well after the usual time. A good example is the style on the capsules of Grevillea banksii.

Personata: [per-son-a-ta] From Personatus, which is Latin for to be two lipped, mouthed or masked. It refers to plants, which are readily confused with another species within the genus. A good example is Aristida personata.

Personate: [per-so-neit] From Personatus, which is Latin for to be two lipped, mouthed or masked. It refers to plants, which are readily confused with another species within the genus. A good example is the exotic garden snapdragons known as Antirrhinum majus.

Personatum: [per-son-a-tum] From Personātum, which is Latin for to be two lipped, mouthed or masked. It refers to plants, which are readily confused with another species within the genus. A good example is one of the leaf spot fungi Cercosporidium personatum. Note that a biopsy, with microscopic cultures is the only positive test in determining the exact fungi species.

Personatus: [per-son-a-tus] From Personatus, which is Latin for to be two lipped, mouthed or masked. It refers to plants, which are readily confused with another species within the genus. A good example is the masked garden jumping spider Maratus personatus.

Persoonia: [per-soo-ni-a] Is named in honour of Christian Hendrik Persoon; 1761-1836, who was a French botanist who specialised in Fungi. A good example is Persoonia linearis.

Persoonioides: [per-soo-ni-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Christian Hendrik Persoon; 1761-1836, who was a French botanist who specialised in Fungi and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble some of the plants in the Persoonia genus. A good example is Persoonia linearis.

Persquamata: [per-skwar-ma-ta] From Per, which is Latin for each or every and Squamata, which is Latin for scaly. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in more scales than other species in the genus. A good example is Hibbertia persquamata.

Pertinax: [per-tin-ahks] From Per, which is Latin for each or every and Tenax/ Tinācis, which is Latin for tenacious. (In relation to Helvius Pertinax who was a Roman military leader and Roman Emperor for the first three months of 193, succeeding Commodus to become the first emperor during the tumultuous Year of the Five Emperors and succeeded by Didius Julianus.) It refers to plants, which need great tenacity to grow where other species in the genus would succumb. A good example is Persoonia pertinax.

Pertonella: [per-to-nel-la] From Pétra, which is Ancient Greek for a rock and Ella which is Ancient Greek for the feminine form or to be feminine. It refers to lichens, which grow on rocks and make the rocks look softer and more refined like a lady. A good example is Graphina pertenella.

Pertusa: [per-too-sa] From Pertusus, which is Latin for to be two lipped, mouthed or masked. It refers to appendages on an organs, which somewhat resembles two lips. A good example is Bothriochloa pertusa.

Peruviana: [per-roo-vi-a-na] From Peru, which is Latinized for Peru and Ensis/Ana, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in Puru. A good example is Gratiola peruviana.

Peruvianum: [per-roo-vi-a-num] From Peru, which is Latinized for Peru and Ensis/Ana, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in Puru. A good example is Gossypium peruvianum var. caravonicum, which is now known asGossypium barbadense.

Pervagans: [per-va-ganz] From Pervagātum, which is Latin for to spread out or to wander far and wide. It refers to plants, which have habits and environments that cover many forms. A good example is Persoonia pervagans, which is now known as Persoonia pinifolia.

Pervagata: [per-va-ga-ta] From Pervagāta/Pervagātum, which is Latin for to spread out or to wander far and wide. It refers to plants, which often have branches or stems spreading and growing in all directions. A good example is Rhodomyrtus pervagata.

Pes-caprae: [pes, Ka-pree] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Karpos (Carpel/Caprae) which is Latinized from a local Spanish vernacular for a fruit and is erroneously stated by many authors as a goat’s foot (botany). It refers to the long leg like stalks with a single petiole like fruit at the apex. The common name refers to the leaves which have a cleft similar in appearance to those of a goat’s hoof print. A good example is Ipomea pes-caprae subsp. brasilliensis.

Pescottiana: [pes-kot-ti-a-na] Is named in honour of Edward Edgar Pescott; 1872-1954 who was an Australian educator photographer and keen orchidologist, who expanded the native orchids of Victoria to 150 different species. A good example is Chiloglottis pescottiana.

Pesticide: [pes-ti-sahyd] From Pestes, which is Latin for disease, plague or destruction and Kaidō, which is Latin for to cut, strike, kill or murder. It usually refers to toxic, chemical concoctions aimed at killing pests of crops like DDT, Benzene hexachloride, Aldrin, Malathion and Toxaphene to mention a few. It can refer to less harmful direct natural cides like natural pyrethrum, garlic, natural oils (neem, sunflower, canola, Eucalyptus etc.) natural soap or diseases like Bacillus Thuringiensis and Beauveria Bassiana to mention a few. There are also natural preadators like Green lace Wing, lady beetles etc., which can be encouraged to control pests without harmful side affects.

Petal: [pe-tal] From Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which are Ancient Greek for thin metal sheet. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators. A good example is the redish-orange petals on cassia brewsteri.

Petals on Cassia brewsteri – andi Mellis

Petalantherous: [pe-ta-lan-ther-os] From Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread outor open wide or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which are Ancient Greek for thin metal sheet

Petaliferous: [pet-al-if-er-us] From Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread outor open wide or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which are Ancient Greek for thin metal sheet and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators. They often ocurr as a collection of sub petals near the base of the true petals. A good example is Lespedeza juncea subsp. sericea.

Petalocalyx: [pet-a-lo-kal-iks] From Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Greek for thin metal leaf and Kalyx/Kalyptein which is Ancient Greek for a covering. It refers to calyxes, which are equal to or longer than the petals. A good example is Thomasia petalocalyx.

Petalochilus: [pet-a-lo-chi-lus] From Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Greek for thin metal leaf and Cheilos which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to labelum or corolla lips, which aid in the attraction of pollinators. A good example was Petalochilus carneus which is now know Caladenia carnea.

Petalogyne: [pet-a-lo-jahyn] From Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which are Greek for thin metal leaf and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to styles, which resemble a small petal rather than a style. A good example was Petalogyne labicheoides, which is now known as Petalostylis cassioides.

Petaloid: [pet-a-loid] From Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized coloured leaves which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to structures or organs, which somewhat resemble petals. A good example is the petaloid styles on Ptilotus exaltus.

Petalolepis: [pet-a-lo-le-pis] From Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Greek for thin metal leaf and Lepis, which is Ancient Greek for a scale. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators that are more scale like than true petals. A good example was Petalolepis ferruginea, which is now known as Ozothamnus ferrugineus.

Petalophylla: [pet-a-lo-fi/fahyl-la] Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Greek for thin metal leaf and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries below the petals that aid in the attraction of pollinators. They are more leaf like than true petals. A good example is Corymbia petalophylla.

Petalophyllum: [pet-a-lo-fi/fahyl-lum] Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Greek for thin metal leaf and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries below the petals that aid in the attraction of pollinators. They are more leaf like than true petals. A good example is Petalophyllum preissii.

Petalostemon: [pe-tal-o-ste-mon] From Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Greek for thin metal leaf and Stêma, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower. It refers to stamens which are more petal like than columns.

Petalostemum: [pe-tal-o-ste-mum] From Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Greek for thin metal leaf and Stêma, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower. It refers to filaments, which are fused to the corolla tube or petals while the anthers are free. A good example is the exotic flower Petalostemum purpureum.

Petalostigma: [pe-ta-lo-stig-ma] From Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Greek for thin metal leaf and Stigma, which is Ancient Greek for the female receptive reproductive organ on a flower. It refers to stigmas, which are more or less petaloid or petal like. A good example is Petalostigma pubescens.

Petalostylis: [pet-a-loh-stahy-lis] From Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Greek for thin metal leaf and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a part of the female reproductive organ between the ovaries and the stigma. It refers to styles, which are more or less petaloid or petal like. A good example is Petalostylis labicheoides.

Petasmatodes: [pe-tas-ma-toh-deez] From Petaso/Petasites, which are Latin for a wide brimmed floppy type hat or a parachute like hat and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaf sheaths, which are occluded distally, or petals and sepals, which have broader and thicker margins. A good example is Dianella caerulea var. petasmatodes.

Petermanensis: [pee-ter-ma-nen-sis] From Peterman, which is Latinized for the Peterman district which is west of Uluru and Mutitjuta in the Northern Territory and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants which were first discovered in the Peterman district. A good example is Dicrastylis petermannensis.

Petermannia: [pee-ter-man-ni-a] Is named in honour of August Peterman; 1822-1878, who was a German geographer and cartographer. A good example is Petermannia cirrosa.

Petersenii: [pee-ter-se-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Petersen but which Petersen cannot be substantiated. A good example Deparia petersenii.

Petersianum: [pee-ter-si-a-num] Is named in honour of Wilhelm Karl Hartwich (often written as Hartwig) Peters; 1815-1883, who was a German naturalist and explorer. A good example Biophytum petersianum.

Petersonii: [pee-ter-so-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Peterson but which Peterson cannot be substantiated. A good example Leptospermum petersonii.

Petilum: [pe-til-um] From Petalon, which is Ancient Greek or Petalum which is Latin from Petannynai to be opened wide. It refers to labellum, which look more like a petal. A good example is Prasophyllum petilum.

Petiolar: [pe-ti-oh-lar] From Petiolus, which is Latin for a remarkable leaf stalk. It refers to leaf stalks, which are very long. A good example is Alocasia brisbanensis.

Petiolare: [pe-ti-oh-lar-e] From Petiolus, which is Latin for a leaf stalk. It refers to leaf stalks, which are rather long. A good example is Conospermum petiolare.

Petiolaris: [pe-ti-oh-lar-is] From Petiolus, which is Latin for a leaf stalk. It refers to leaf stalks, which much longer than other species in the genus. A good example is Cordyline petiolaris.

Petiolata: [pe-ti-oh-la-ta] From Petiolus, which is Latin for a leaf stalk. It refers to leaf stalks, which are somewhat longer than other species in the genus. A good example is Amylotheca petiolata.

Petiolate: [pe-ti-oh-leit] From Petiolus, which is Latin for a leaf stalk. It refers to leaf stalks, which are rather long.

Petiolatus: [pe-ti-oh-la-tus] From Petiolus, which is Latin for a leaf stalk. It refers to leaf stalks, which is much longer than other species in the genus. A good example is Ptilotus petiolatus.

Petiole 1: [pe-ti-ohl] From Petiolus, which is Latin for a leaf stalk. It refers to stalks, which attach the leaf or frond directly to the stem or rhizome. A good example is the petiole on Dictymia brownii.

Petiole 2: [pe-ti-ohl] From Petiolus, which is Latin for a leaf stalk. It refers to stalks of compound leaves or fronds, which attach the rachis to the stem or rhizome. A good example is the edible passion fruit Passiflora caerulea or one of the beautiful native passion fruits Passiflora aurantia or the beautiful and popular fern Adiantum aethipopicum.

Petiolosum: [pe-ti-o-loh-sum] From Petiolus, which is Latin for a leaf stalk. It refers to leaves, which have distinctly, long leaf stalks. A good example is Geniostoma petiolosum.

Petiolulate: [pe-ti-o-lyoo-leit] From Petiolus, which is Latin for a leaf stalk. It refers to stalks of compound leaves or fronds, which are further divided and attaches the leaflet or pinnule to the petiolule. The stalks on the leaflets. A good example is Cassia brewsterii.

Petiolule: [pe-ti-o-lyool] From Petiolus, which is Latin for a leaf stalk. It refers to stalks of compound leaves or fronds, which attach the rachis to the stem or rhizome. A good example is Cheilanthes sieberii.

Petraea: [pe-tree-a] From Petraîos, which is Ancient Greek or Petraeum, which is Latin for a rock or a rocky place. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on rocky ground or grow in rocky environments. A good example is Prostanthera petraea.

Petraeum: [pee-tree-um] From Petraîos, which is Ancient Greek or Petraeum, which is Latin for a rock or a rocky place. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on rocky ground or grow in rocky environments. A good example was Racosperma petraeum, which is now known as Acacia petraea.

Petraeomyrtus: [pe-tree-o-mer-tus] From Petraîos, which is Ancient Greek or Petraeum, which is Latin for a rock or a rocky place and Myrtus/Myrtī which is Latin for the Myrtle trees and shrubs of Europe. It refers to plants, which grow on rocky environments and have leaves that resemble the Myrtle. A good example is Petraeomyrtus punicea.

Petraeovitex: [pe-tree-o-vahy-teks] From Petraîos, which is Ancient Greek or Petraeum, which is Latin for a rock or a rocky place and VitEx, which is Ancient Greek for the grape vine genus. It refers to plants, which have a rocky habitat and the growth habit of grape vines. A good example is Petraeovitex multiflora.

Petraeum: [pe-tree-um] From Petraîos, which is Ancient Greek or Petraeum, which is Latin for a rock or a rocky place. It refers to plants, which prefer habits associated with large basalt boulders on slopes. A good example is Tetrastigma petraeum.

Petrapendula: [pe-tra-pen-dyoo-la] From Petraîos, which is Ancient Greek or Petraeum, which is Latin for a rock or a rocky place and Pendula, which is Latin for I hang down. It refers to plants, which prefer habits associated with large basalt boulders on slopes and can be seen hanging down over cliffs and the on rock shelves. A good example is Tetrastigma petraeum.

Petreiana: [pe-trei-i-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Petrei;18??-1875, who was an Australian forester. A good example is Rhaphidophora petrieana.

Petrensis: [pe-tren-sis] From Petra, which is Ancient Greek for a rock and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which originate from rocky habitats usually skeletal sands or calcarata sands over limestone. A good example is Eucalyptus petrensis.

Petiveri: [pe-tri-ver-i] Is named in honour of Petiver. A good example was Panicum petiveri, which is now known as Echinochloa colona which is under considerable discussion as to whether it is a native grass or an introduced species.

Petriei: [pee-tri-ahy] Is named in honour of Donald Petrie; 1846-1925, who was a New Zealand botanist and taxonomist. A good example is Alphitonia petriei.

Petrieana: [pe-tree-a-na] Is named in honour of Donald Petrie; 1846-1925, who was a Scottish born, New Zealand taxonomist, botanist, taxonomist and teacher. A good example is Rhaphidophora petrieana.

Petrophila: [pe-tro-fi-la] From Petra, which is Ancient Greek for a rock and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which love to grow in very rocky habitats or on rock shelves. A good example is Poa petrophila.

Petrophile: [pe-troh-fil] From Petra, which is Ancient Greek for a rock and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which love to grow in very rocky habitats or on rock shelves. A good example is Petrophile macrostachya.

Petrophiloides: [pe-tro-fil-oi-deez] From Petra, which is Ancient Greek for a rock, Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which love to grow in very rocky habitats or on rock shelves. A good example is Conostylis petrophiloides.

Petrophilum: [pe-tro-fil-um] From Petra, which is Ancient Greek for a rock and Phílos which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which love to grow in very rocky habitats or on rock shelves. A good example is Solanum petrophilum.

Petrophilus: [pe-tro-fil-us] From Petra, which is Ancient Greek for a rock and Phílos which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, that love of rocky habitats. A good example is the exotic weed Erigeron petrophilus.

Petrorhizous: [pe-tro-rahy-zos] From Petraîos, which is Ancient Greek or Petraeum, which is Latin for a rock or a rocky place and Rhiza, which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to plants, which have roots that grow over rocks and in the cracks of rocks. A good example is Podocarpus lawrencei.

Petroselinum: [pe-tro-se-li-num] From Pterón, which is Ancient Greek or Pterón, which is Latin for a wing and Selinum which is Ancient Greek for the old name of a carrot. It refers to winged stems and leaves, which resemble those of carrots. A good example is the table herb Petroselinum crispum.

Petrotheca: [pe-tro-the-ka] From Pterón, which is Ancient Greek or Pterón which is Latin for a wing and Thḗkē/Thēca/Thēcae, which are Greek for a case or a box. It refers to fruits, which are square and have distinct wings on the corners. A good example is Petrotheca glandulosa, which is now known as Tetratheca glandulosa.

Pterostylis: [pe-tro-stahy-lis] From Pterón, which is Ancient Greek or Pterón which is Latin for a wing and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a part of the female reproductive organ between the ovaries and the stigma. It refers to styles, which are flattened like wings or have distinct extension like wings. A good example is Pterostylis petrosa.

Pettigrewianum: [pe-ti-groo-wi-a-num] Is named in honour of William Pettigrew; 1825-1906, who was a Scottish born Australian surveyor and timber merchant. A good example Dysoxylum pettigrewianum.

Peuce: [pe-yoos] From Peuke, which is Ancient Greek for the fir tree. It refers to plants, which have the general outline of the Fir tree. A good example Acacia peuce.

Peucedanum: [pe-yoo-se-da-num] From Peukedanon, which is Ancient Greek for hogs fennel or the old name for parsnips. It refers to plants, which resemble dill, aniseed or fennel. A good example is the horticultural herb Peucedanum graveolens.

Pfeifferianus: [fei-fer-i-a-nus] Is probably named in honour of Ludwig Karl Georg Pfeiffer (Louis); 1805-1877, who was a German physician, botanist and conchologist who studied the natural history of the west Indies but I cannot substantiate it 100mm. A good example Oreobolus pfeifferianus, which is now known as Oreobolus pumilio.

Phacellothrix: [fa-sel-lo-thriks] From Phacelos, which is Ancient Greek for a cluster or bundle and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It probably refers to pappus, which have a whirl of white hairs. A good example is the monospecific genus of Phacellothrix cladochaeta.

Phaceloma: [fa-se-loh-ma] From Phacelos, which is Ancient Greek for a cluster or bundle and Loma, which is Ancient Greek for a fringe. It refers to pappus, which have white hairs. A good example is Helichrysum phaceloma which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to its real or correct classification.

Phaeanthus: [fee-an-thus] From Phaeos, which is Ancient Greek for dusty grey and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to structures or organs, which are dusty-grey in colour. A good example is the flowers on Juncus phaeanthus.

Phaenophylla: [fee-no-fahyl-la] From Phaeos, which is Ancient Greek for dusty grey and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to fruits, which are a dusty fawnish-grey colour. A good example is Endiandra phaeocarpa.

Phaeocalyx: [fee-okaliks] From Phaeos, which is Ancient Greek for dusty grey and Kalyx, which is Ancient Greek for a cup or covering. It refers calyxes, which are dusty grey in colour. A good example is Acacia phaeocalyx.

Phaeocarpa: [fee-o-kar-pa] From Phaeos, which is Ancient Greek for dusty grey and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are a dusty fawnish-grey colour. A good example is Endiandra phaeocarpa.

Phaeoclavia: [fee-o-kla-vi-a] From Phaeos, which is Ancient Greek for dusty grey and Clava, which is Latin for a club. It refers to stamens, which have a dusty-gray hood or wings. A good example is Caladenia phaeoclavia, which is now known as Arachnorchis toxchilla.

Phaeolasia: [fee-o-la-si-a] From Phaeos, which is Ancient Greek for dusty grey and Lasia, which is Ancient Greek for shaggy hairs or Lasio, which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to structures or organs, which has very pale dusky grey in colour hairs. A good example is Cassytha phaeolasia, which is now known as Cassytha pubescens.

Phaeoleuca: [fee-o-loo-ka] From Phaeos, which is Ancient Greek for dusty grey and Leukos, which is Ancient Greek for white. It refers to structures or organs, which are very pale dusky grey in colour. A good example is leaves and culms on Fimbristylis phaeoleuca.

Phaeosperma: [fee-o-sper-ma] From Phaeos, which is Ancient Greek for dusty grey and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which have a dusty grey colour. A good example was Cracca phaeosperma, which is now known as Tephrosia phaeosperma.

Phaeotricha: [fee-o-trahy-ka] From Phaeos, which is Ancient Greek for dusty grey and Trichos, which is Ancient Greek for to have hair. It refers to the new growth and coppice growth and stems which is covered in course hairs. A good example was Eucalyptus phaeotricha, which is now known as Eucalyptus tindaliae.

Phaeotrichum: [fee-o-trahy-kum] From Phaeos, which is Ancient Greek for dusty grey and Trichos, which is Ancient Greek for to have hair. It refers to the new growth and coppice growth and stems which is covered in course hairs. A good example was Scleroderma phaeotrichum, which is now known as Mycenastrum corium.

Phaius: [fei-us] From Pha/Phaius, which are Ancient Greek for to have a deep colour. It refers to the colour of the flowers, which are often deep reddish-brown. A good example is sepals and petals on Phaius tancarvilleae.

Phalaenophily: [fa-lenofi-li] From Phalaenopsis, which is Ancient Greek for moths and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which are pollinated by moths. A good example of flowers being pollinated by moths is Hymenosporum flavum.

Phalaenopsis: [fa-lenopsis] From Phalaenopsis, which is Ancient Greek for moths and ópsis, which is Ancient Greek for to bear an appearance similar to. It refers to flowers, which resemble a moth with rounded, spreading wings. A good example is the Queensland floral emblem the Cooktown Orchid. A good example was Dendrobium bigibbum var. bigibbum.

Phalanges: [fa-lanjes] From Phalanges, which is Greek/Latin for a military configuration. It refers to structures or organs, which spread like the fingers on a hand. (Phalanx singular) A good example is the female flowers on Pandanus lauterbachii.

Phalangium: [fa-lanji-um] From Phalángion, which is Ancient Greek or later Phalangium/Phalangia, which are Latin for a type of spider. Its reference to a spider is unclear. A good example is the female flowers on Phalangium pendulum, which is now known as Arthropodium milleflorum.

Phalanx: [fa-lanks] From Phálanx, which is Ancient Greek for a Macedonian and Greek army close formation with shields abut and long spears. It refers to flowers, which are compact and have styles that open in a phalanx formation of having styles pointing forward and progressively upwards. A good example was Grevillea phalanx, which is now known as Grevillea dryandroides.

Phaleria: [fa-leri-a] From Phalaros, which is Ancient Greek for patches of white or Phalos, which is Ancient Greek for brilliant white. It refers to flowers, which have brilliant white patches. A good example is Phaleria chermsideana.

Phalloides: [fal-loi-deez] From Phallós, which is Ancient Greek or Phallus, which is Latin for a penis especially when erect and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to fungi, which resemble the Phallus genus in that they stand more erect than other species in the genus. A good example is Amanita phalloides.

Phallus: [fal-lus] From Phallós, which is Ancient Greek or later Phallus which is Latin for a penis especially when erect. It refers to fungi, which resemble an erect penis in that the Kteis, which were circular, concave pedestals, or receptacles, on which the Phallus, or column (obelisk) rested. The union of these two, structures represent the generative and reproducing principles of nature. Here is found the origin of the point within a circle, a symbol which was first adopted by the old sun worshipers. The Compass arranged above the Square symbolizes the (male) Sun, impregnating the passive (female) Earth accepting its life-producing rays. The true meanings, then are two-fold: the earthly (human) representations are of the man and his phallus (penis), and the woman with her receptive Kteis (vagina).The male-female divinities were commonly symbolized by the generative parts of man and woman. The Phallus and Kteis are the emblems of regeneration reproduction. It refers to the base of the culms being situated in a small circular, concave pedestal at the base. A good example is Phallus rubicundus.

Phallus multicolor

Phanerandra: [fa-ner-an-dra] From Phanerós, which is Ancient Greek for to view and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to plants, which produce more obvious male organs in stamens than other species in the genus. A good example was Phanerandra esquamata, which is now known as Leucopogon esquamatus.

Phanerocotylar: [fa-nero-ko-tahy-la] From Phainos, which is Ancient Greek for to shine and Kotýlē, which is Ancient Greek for a cup. It refers to cotyledon or the seed leaves, which are glossy. A good example is Alyxia ruscifolia.

Phanerophlebia: [fa-nero-ko-fle-bi-a] From Phainos, which is Ancient Greek for to shine and Phlebos, which is Ancient Greek for a vein. It refers to veins, which are prominent and glossy. A good example is Grevillea phanerophlebia.

Pharangites: [fa-ranji-teez] From Pharyn, which is Ancient Greek for the throat and Gytis, which is Latin for unit or holiday cabin which is well furnished. It probably refers to corolla tube, which have all the attached organs in good proprotions. A good example is Acacia pharangites.

Pharmacologist: [far-makol-o-jist] From Pharmakeia, which is Ancient Greek or Pharmacia, which is Latin for drugs, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies the preparation and or separation of drugs from plant tissues. An example of a Pharmacologist is George Christian Wittstein.

Pharmacology: [far-makol-o-jee] From Pharmakeia, which is Ancient Greek or Pharmacia, which is Latin for drugs and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the study of the preparation and or separation of drugs from plant tissues. An example of a person who studied Pharmacology is George Christian Wittstein.

Pharus: [fa-rus] From Phainos, which is Ancient Greek for a small Island where Lighthouse of Alexandria was built. It refers to spikes, which are most prominent and stand out like a beacon or lighthouse. A good example was Pharus banksii, which is now known as Leptaspis banksii.

Phascoides: [fas-koi-deez] From Phaseolos, which is Ancient Greek or Phaseolus, which is Latin for a small boat and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the capsules, which are somewhat shaped like a keel. A good example is Mitrasacme phascoides.

Phaseolifolia: [fa-se-o-li-foh-li-a] From Phaseolos, which is Ancient Greek or Phaseolus, which is Latin for a small boat and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. This species is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to which species name should be allocated. A good example is Kennedia phaseolifolia.

Phaseoloides: [fa-seeo-loi-deez] From Phaseolos, which is Ancient Greek or Phaseolus, which is Latin for a small boat and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to pods, which resemble a small boat or the pods on the French beans. A good example is Pueraria phaseoloides.

Phaseolus: [fah-seo-lus] From Phaseolos, which is Ancient Greek or Phaseolus, which is Latin for a small boat. It refers to the pods of many beans, which look like small boats. A good example is the domestic horticultural French bean Phaseolus lunatus.

Phasmatodes: [fas-ma-toh-deez] From Phaseolos, which is Ancient Greek or Phaseolus, which is Latin for a small boat and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the pods, which resemble small boats or the French bean. A good example is Irenepharsus phasmatodes.

Phasmoides: [fas-moi-deez] From Phaseolos, which is Ancient Greek or Phaseolus, which is Latin for a small boat and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to pods, which have a typical bean dried bean appearance. A good example Acacia phasmoides.

Phathyrantha: [fa-thrahy-an-tha] From Phathy, which is Latin for unknown and Antha/Anthos, which are Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. A good example Conostylis phathyrantha.

Phebalioides: [fe-ba-loi-deez] From Phebaleos, which is Ancient Greek for a fig. The actual resemblance is unclear however it may refer to ancient Greek poets using the word instead of the myrtle when reciting. A good example is Asterolasia phebalioides.

Phebalium: [fe-bali-um] From Phebaleos, which is Ancient Greek for a fig. The actual resemblance is unclear however it may refer to ancient Greek poets using the word instead of the myrtle when reciting. A good example is Phebalium squamulosum subsp. longifolium.

Pheidochloa: [fei-do-kloa] From Phaedos, which is Ancient Greek for sparingly and Chloa, which is Ancient Greek for a grass. It refers to grasses, which have very delicate habits. A good example is Pheidochloa gracilis in which gracilis accentuates the slim though gracious nature of the grasses.

Pheladenia: [fe-la-deni-a] From Apheles, which is Ancient Greek for simple and Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to labellum, which have a gland/s on the columns. A good example is Pheladenia deformis.

Phellandra: [fel-lan-dra] From Apheles, which is Ancient Greek for simple and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to stamens or anthers, which have a single cell. A good example was Eucalyptus phellandra, which is now known as Eucalyptus radiata subsp. radiata.

Phelpsii: [felp-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Phelps. A good example is Peripentadenia phelpsii.

Phenax: [fe-naks] From Phenakistḗs, which is Ancient Greek for an imposter or cheat. It refers to the plants, which were mistaken for another species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus phenax which alludes to it being misapplied to Eucalyptus ancep.

Phenology: [fe-nol-ojee] From Phenos, which is Ancient Greek for appearing or seeming to and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the study of natural time occurrences like when a plant flowers or when it fruits or when animals migrate in association with climate change.

Pheromones: [fe-romohnz] From Phero/Pherein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or to bring and Hormon, which is Ancient Greek for to set in motion or to excite and stimulate. It refers to the specific chemical odours, which females emit to attract a male partner. A good example of its use is the flowers of Cryptostylis hunteriana in luring certain male wasp species to assist in the fertilization.

Pherosphaera: [fe-rossee-a] From Phero/Pherein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or to bring and Sphaîra, which is Ancient Greek or Sphaera, which is Latin for a shere or global shape and form. It refers to the shape of fruits, which are cone shape. A good example is Pherosphaera fitzgeraldii.

Philadelphus: [fil-la-del-fus] Is named in honour of  Philadelphus; 309–246 BCE, who was a Greek king of Ptolemaic region in Egypt from 283 to 246. It refers to the Ancient Greek name for brotherly love. A good example was Philadelphus laniger, which is now known as Leptospermum lanigerum.

Philippensis: [fil-lip-pen-sis] From Philippines, which is Latin for the Philippine Islands and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the Philippines. A good example is Mallotus philippensis.

Philippinensis: [fil-lip-pin-nen-sis] From Philippines, which is Latin for the Philippine Islands and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the Philippines. A good example is Eleocharis philippinensis.

Philippicum: [fil-li-pi-kum] From Philipines which is Latin for the Philippines Islands and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the Philippines. A good example is Glochidion philippicum.

Phillipsiae: [fil-lipsi-ee] Maybe named in honour of Dr. Auther M. Phillips; 1738-1814, who was an American botanist and author specializing in plants of the Grand Canyon. A good example is Goodenia phillipsiae.

Phillipsiana: [fil-lipsi-ana] Maybe named in honour of Dr. Auther M. Phillips; 1738-1814, who was an American botanist and author specializing in plants of the Grand Canyon. A good example is Poa phillipsiana.

Phillipsii: [fil-lipsi-ahy] Is named in honour of Phillips but which Phillips cannot be substantiated. A good example is Eremophila phillipsii.

Phyllyreoides: [fil-lahy-ree-oi-deez] From Phyllyrea, which is Ancient Greek for a genus of plants found in Greece and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, especially the foliage, which closely resembles the Phyllyrea genus. A good example is Pittosporum phillyreoides.

Philonothum: [fil-o-noh-thum] From Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved and Nóthos, which is Ancient Greek for false or counterfeit. It refers to plants, which closely resemble another/other species in the genus. A good example is Geranium philonothum which is most likely now known as Geranium potentilloides.

Philotheca: [fil-othe-ka] From Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be in love and Theca, which is Ancient Greek for a box. It refers to stamens, which are fused at the base and form glabrous tube that resembles a box. A good example is Philotheca ciliata.

Philoxeroides: [fil-ok-ser-oi-deez] From Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved, Xeros, which is Ancient Greek for dry and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the drying and desiccation of leaves from beetles. A good example is reportable noxious weed from America Alternanthera philoxeroides.

Philum: [fi-lum] From Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be in love.

Philus: [fi-lus] From Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be in love.

Phily: [fi-lahy] From Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be in love.

Philydrella: [fi-lahy-drel-la] From Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be in love and Húdōr, which is Ancient Greek or Hydro which is Ancient Greek for water. It refers to the plants, which prefer wet marshes and swamps to grow in. A good example is Philydrella drummondii. 

Philydrum: [fi-li-drum] From Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to love and Húdōr, which is Ancient Greek or later Hydro which is Greek for water. It refers to plants, which prefer wet habitats. A good example is Philydrum lanuginosum.

Phlebocalymma: [fle-bo-ka-lahym-ma] From Phleb, which is Ancient Greek for a blood vessel or vein and Kalymnos, which is Ancient Greek for one of the mythological sons of Uranus and Gaia who feared that one of his sons would dethrone him Titans, the Giants, the Cyclops and the Ekatocheires, Uranus, decided to throw them all in the Tartarus, the bottom of the earth. Kalymnos was saved as the Island of Kalymnos rose from the sea. A good example was Phlebocalymna lobospora, which is now known as Sphenostemon lobosporus.

Phlebocarpa: [fle-bo-kar-pa] From Phlebos, which is Ancient Greek for a blood vessel or vein and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are rather veiny. A good example is Acacia phlebocarpa.

Phlebocarpum: [fle-bo-kar-pum] From Phlebos, which is Ancient Greek for a blood vessel or vein and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are rather veiny. A good example was Racosperma phlebocarpum, which is now known as Acacia phlebocarpa.

Phlebocarya: [fle-bo-kar-i-a] From Phlebos, which is Ancient Greek for a blood vessel or vein and karon, which is Ancient Greek for a nut. It refers to the nuts, which have prominent longitudinal veins. A good example is Phlebocarya ciliata.

Phlebochilus: [fle-bo-chi-lus] From Phlebos, which is Ancient Greek for a blood vessel or vein and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to labellum on orchids, which have distinct vein markings. A good example was Phlebochilus bryceana, which is now known as Caladenia bryceana subsp. byrceana and Caladenia bryceana subsp. cracens.

Phlebopetala: [fle-bo-pe-ta-la] From Phlebos, which is Ancient Greek for a blood vessel or vein and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It usually refers to coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators that have a prominent longitudinal vein/s. A good example is Acacia phlebopetala.

Phlebopetalum: [fle-bo-pe-ta-lum] From Phlebos, which is Ancient Greek for a blood vessel or vein and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It usually refers to coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators that have a prominent longitudinal veins. A good example is Spyridium phlebophyllum.

Phlebophylla: [fle-bo-fi/fahyl-la] From Phlebos, which is Ancient Greek for a blood vessel or vein and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek or leaf or phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have a prominent longitudinal vein. A good example is Acacia phlebophylla.

Phlebophyllum: [fle-bo-fi/fahyl-lum] From Phlebos, which is Ancient Greek for a blood vessel or vein and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek or leaf or phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have a prominent longitudinal vein. A good example was Racosperma phlebophyllum, which is now known as Acacia phlebophylla.

Phlebopus: [fle-bo-poos] From Phlebos, which is Ancient Greek for a blood vessel or vein and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It may refer to some individuals developing large club like stalks. A good example is the giant Boletes mushroom Phlebopus marginatus.

Phlegmaria: [fleg-mar-i-a] From Phlégma, which is Ancient Greek for a flame as to rise up suddenly or to flare up and Maria, which is Latin for a lunar plain. The reference is obscure unless it refers to the exquisite beauty that erupts emotions in one’s heart. A good example is Lycopodium phlegmaria.

Phlegmarioides: [fleg-mar-i-oi-deez] From Phlégma, which is Ancient Greek for a flame as to rise up suddenly or to flare up, Maria, which is Latin for a lunar plain and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have a close resemblance to the Phlegmaria genus in that its exquisite beauty can erupt emotions in one’s heart. A good example is Huperzia phlegmarioides.

Phlegmariurus: [fleg-ma-ri-u-rus] From Phlégma, which is Ancient Greek for a flame as to rise up suddenly or to flare up and Maria, which is Latin for a lunar plain. It refers to plants, which resemble the Phlegmaria genus. A good example is Phlegmariurus lockyeri.

Phlegmatocarpa: [fleg-ma-to-kar-pa] From Phlégma, which is Ancient Greek for a flame as to rise up suddenly or to flare up and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which develop all of a sudden to the stage of ripening and discharging the seeds or spore. A good example is the daisy Blennospora phlegmatocarpa.

Phlegmatocarpus: [fleg-ma-to-kar-pus] From Phlégma, which is Ancient Greek for a flame as to rise up suddenly or to flare up and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which develop all of a sudden to the stage of ripening and discharging the seeds or spore. A good example was Calocephalus phlegmatocarpus, which is now known as Blennospora phlegmatocarpa.

Phlegmatospermum: [fleg-ma-to-sper-mum] From Phlégma which is Ancient Greek for a flame as to rise up suddenly or to flare up and Spermum which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which develop all of a sudden to the stage of ripening and discharging. A good example is Phlegmatospermum cochlearinum.

Phleoides: [fle-oi-deez] From Phleos, which is Latin for the name of a grass and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the grasses, which are typical grasses. A good example is Echinopogon phleoides.

Phloem: [floh-em] From Phloios, which is Ancient Greek for one of the vascular conducting tissues. The vascular conducting tissues transport carbohydrates and other sugars from the leaves to other organs within the plant.

Phlogiflorum: [floh-gi-flor-um] From Phlogos, which is Ancient Greek for a flame and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to structures or organs, which display a pink, reddish or yellowish-red colour especially when viewed From A, distance. A good example is Dracophyllum phlogiflorum.

Phlogopappa: [floh-go-pa-pa] From Phlogos, which is Ancient Greek for a flame and Pappus, which is Ancient Greek for a grandfather. It refers to the pink, reddish and or yellowish-red coloured flowers, which smother the shrubs and the 3 to 4mm white to pale grey bristles on the achenes which resemble an old man’s beard. A good example is Olearia phlogopappa.

Phloia: [floi-ah] From Phloia, which is Ancient Greek for bark. It refers to the outer layer of woody cells along the trunk, branches and stems of perennials. A good example is Eucalyptus phloia.

Phlomoides: [flo-moi-deez] From Phloia, which is Ancient Greek for bark and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to barks, which resemble outer layer of woody cells along the trunk, branches and stems of perennials. A good example is Solanum phlomoides.

Phoenicea: [fo-ni-se-a] From Phoenix, which is Ancient Greek for the mythical bird or the colour purplish-red to viminea orange. It usually refers to the colour of the flowers or at times the bark. A good example is the colour of the flowers on Eucalyptus phoenicea.

Phoeniceus: [fo-ni-se-us] From Phoenix, which is Ancient Greek for the mythical bird or the colour purple-red. It often refers to the colour of the flowers or bark. A good example was the colour of the flowers on Callistemon phoeniceus, which is now known as Melaleuca phoeniceus.

Phoidophylla: [foi-do-fahyl-lah] From Phois, which is Ancient Greek for a blister or blisters and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the raised blisters on the leaves. A good example is Melaleuca phoidophylla.

Pholidia: [fo-li-di-a] From Pholidōt/Pholidōtós, which is Ancient Greek for to be clad in scales or very scaly. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in scales or the leaves are reduced to scale like appendages. A good example was Pholidia gibbifolia, which is now known as Eremophila gibbifolia.

Pholidiopsis: [fo-li-di-op-sis] From Philis, which is Ancient Greek for horny scales and ópsis, which is Ancient Greek for to bear an appearance similar to. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in horny scales. A good example was Pholidiopsis santalina, which is now known as Eremophila santalina.

Pholidogynum: [fo-li-do-jahy-num] From Pholidōt/Pholidōtós, which is Ancient Greek for to clad in scales or very scaly. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in scales. A good example is the stems, pedicels and petioles on Lepidium pholidogynum.

Pholidophylla: [fo-li-do-fahyl-la] From Pholidōt/Pholidōtós, which is Ancient Greek for to clad in scales or very scaly and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are densely covered in horn like scales. A good example is Verticordia pholidophylla.

Pholidota: [fo-li-do-ta] From Pholidōt/Pholidōtós, which is Ancient Greek for to clad in scales or very scaly. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in scales. A good example is the flowering spikes of Pholidota imbricata in which the flowers resemble large scales along the spike.

Pholidotum: [fo-li-do-tum] From Pholidōt/Pholidōtós, which is Ancient Greek for to clad in scales or very scaly. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in scales. A good example was Helichrysum pholidotum, which is now known as Ozothamnus pholidotus.

Pholidotus: [fo-li-do-tus] From Pholidōt/Pholidōtós, which is Ancient Greek for to clad in scales or very scaly. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in scales. A good example is Ozothamnus pholidotus.

Phosphorous: [fos-for-os] From Phos, which is Ancient Greek for light and Phoros, which is Ancient Greek for a bearer. It refers to white phosphorous, which glows in the presence of Oxygen. Symbol P, Atomic Number 15

Photiniphylla: [fo-ti-ni-fahyl-la] From Phōtein/Phōteinós, which are Greek for bright and shiny and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are bright and shiny or bright and glossy. A good example is Urticastrum photiniphylla, which is now known as Dendrocnide photinophylla.

Photoperiodism: [foh-toh-per-i-o-dizm] From Photos, which is Ancient Greek for light, Periodic which is Latin for a period and Ismós which is Ancient Greek for an action taking place. It refers to plants, which are actually controlled by night length rather than day length. Many flowering plants use the pigment phytochrome to sense seasonal changes in day length, which they take as signals to flower. This sensitivity to day length is termed Photoperiodism Flowering plants are classified as long day plants, short day plants, or day neutral plants, depending on their particular response to changes in night length. Long day plants require certain night time lengths shorter than 12 hours to start flowering. These plants are usually noted for flowering in the spring or summer. A good example is Xerochrysum bracteatum.

Photoperiodismic: [foh-toh-per-i-o-diz-mik] From Photos, which is Ancient Greek for light, Periodic which is Latin for a period and Ismós which is Ancient Greek for an action taking place. It refers to plants, which are actually controlled by night length rather than day length. Many flowering plants use the pigment phytochrome to sense seasonal changes in day length, which they take as signals to flower. This sensitivity to day length is termed Photoperiodism Flowering plants are classified as long day plants, short day plants, or day neutral plants, depending on their particular response to changes in night length. Long day plants require certain night time lengths shorter than 12 hours to start flowering. These plants are usually noted for flowering in the spring or summer. A good example is Rhodanthe chlorocephala.

Photos: [foh-tos] From Photos, which is Ancient Greek for Light.

Photosynthesis: [foh-toh-sin-the-sis] From Photos, which is Ancient Greek for Light and Synthesis which is Greek/Latin for to put in place. It refers to the chemical process of water and carbon dioxide to produce simple sugars using the various spectrums of light energy absorbed within the plants chloroplasts.

Phragmites: [frag-mi-teez] From Phragma, which is Ancient Greek for a fence or at times a hedge. It refers to impenetrable barriers around marshes that the plants form. A good example is Phragmites australis.

Phragmostoma: [frag-mo-stoh-ma] From Phragma, which is Ancient Greek for a fence or at times a hedge and Stóma, which is Ancient Greek for an opening or a mouth. It refers to stomas which are surrounded by hairs or a lip. A good example is Euphrasia phragmostoma.

Phreatia: [free-ti-a] From Phreat, which is Ancient Greek for ground water or a well. It refers to the flowers, which have the appearance of minute wells. A good example is the critically endangered orchid Phreatia limenophylax.

Phrygian: [frahy-ji-an] From Phrygiānus, which is Latin for an ancient lost people of the Mediterranean area their language or culture. It refers to plants, which are usually lost amongst the foliage of its host. A good example is the critically endangered honeyeater Anthochaera Phrygia which is vitally important for the cross pollination of several rare woodland Eucalyptus trees.

Phrygianthus: [frahy-ji-an-thus] From Phrygiānus, which is Latin for an ancient lost people of the Mediterranean area their language or culture. It refers to plants, which are usually lost amongst the foliage of its host. A good example was Phrygilanthus celastroides, which is now known as Muellerina celastroides.

Phucagrostis: [fu-ka-gro-stis] From Phûkos, which is Ancient Greek for seaweed and Agrostis, which is Ancient Greek for a grass. It refers to seaweeds, which resemble s grass or commonly known as eel grass. A good example was Phucagrostis antarctica, which is now known as Amphibolis antarctica.

Phusicarpos: [fus-i-kar-pos] From Phus, which is Ancient Greek for crests or areolar hairs and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which may be very average as the closest Greek word I can find refers to what is natural. A good example was Phusicarpos ellipticus, which is now known as Hovea elliptica.

Phycography: [fahy-ko-gra-fee] From Phûkos, which is Ancient Greek for an algae or seaweed and Graph, which is Ancient Greek for a drawing. It refers to the science of studying algae and seaweeds.

Phycologist: [fahy-ko-lo-jist] From Phyco, which is Ancient Greek for an algae or seaweed, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies the science of algae and seaweeds.

Phyla: [fahy-la] From Phŷlon/Phȳ́ein, which is Ancient Greek for to bring forth. It refers to classification of plants, below a Kingdom and above a Class. A good example is the exotic herb which has become a national weed is Phyla nodiflora which was extensively and incorrectly sold in Australia as a native plant for many years.

Phylacis: [fi/fahy-la-kis] From Phyllas, which is Ancient Greek for a guard or protector. It refers to sepals, which are larger than the flowers and continue to grow after flowering has ceased to cover the fruits. A good example is Phylacium bracteosum.

Phylacium: [fi/fahy-lasium] From Phyllas, which is Ancient Greek for a guard or protector. It refers to sepals, which are larger than the flowers and continue to grow after flowering has ceased to cover the fruits. A good example is Phylacium bracteosum.

Phylicifolia: [fi/fahy-li-si-foh-lia] From Phŷllikos, which is Ancient Greek for an abundance or plenty and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants which have very dense foliage. A good example is Pomaderris phylicifolia subsp. phylicifolia.

Phylicifolium: [fi/fahy-li-si-foh-li-um] From Phŷllikos, which is Ancient Greek for an abundance or plenty and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have very dense foliage. A good example is Leionema phylicifolium.

Phylicifolius: [fi/fahy-li-si-foh-li-us] From Phŷllikos, which is Ancient Greek for an abundance or plenty and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have very dense foliage. A good example is Eriostemon phylicifolius var. phylicifolius, which is now known as Leionema phylicifolium.

Phylicoides: [fi/fahy-li-koi-deez] From Phŷllikos, which is Ancient Greek for an abundance or plenty and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Phylica genus in that they have very dense foliage. A good example is Phyllota phylicoides.

Phylirifolia: [fi/fahy-li-ri-foh-li-a] From Phŷllikos, which is Ancient Greek for an abundance or plenty and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have an abundance of leaves or a dense foliage. A good example is Pomaderris phylirifolia.

Phyllachne: [fi/fahy-lak-ne] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Achne, which is Ancient Greek for chaff. It refers to leaves, which have the resemblance of green chaff. A good example is Phyllachne colensoi.

Phyllamphora: [fi/fahy-lam-for-a] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Phóros, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to the plants, which are very dense and prominent while the seeds have a lot of chaff. A good example is Nepenthes phyllamphora which has recently been separated from Nepenthes mirabilis.

Phyllangium: [fi/fahy-lan-ji-um] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Angeion, which is Ancient Greek for a cup. It refers to calyxes, which are almost completely surrounding the petals and other organs as though they were inside a cup. A good example is Phyllangium sulcatum.

Phyllantha: [fi/fahy-lan-tha] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Antheros, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower the anthers or the flower. It refers to small flowers, which are surrounded by the leaves. A good example is Ulota phyllanthi in which the apex or the leaves appear to be small flowers.

Phyllanthera: [fi/fahy-lan-the-ra] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Antheros, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower the anthers. It refers to anthers, which are somewhat leaf like. A good example is Phyllanthera grayi.

Phyllanthi: [fi/fahy-lan-thi] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Antheros, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower the anthers. It refers to small flowers, which are surrounded by the leaves. A good example is Olax phyllanthi.

Phyllanthoides: [fi/fahy-lan-the-oi-deez] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Antheros, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower the anthers and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Phyllanthus genus in that the flowers are surrounded by the leaves. A good example is Bridelia phyllanthoides.

Phyllanthus: [fi/fahy-lan-thus] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Antheros, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower the anthers. It refers to small flowers, which are surrounded by the leaves. A good example is Phyllanthus tenellus.

Phyllaries: [fi/fahy-lar-eez] From Phyllárion, which is the diminutive of Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the specialized leaves surrounding some flowers. A good example is found on Brachyscome multifida.

Phyllaries (Green sepal like leaves) on Brachyscome multifida

Phyllary: [fi/fahyl-lar-ee] From Phyllárion, which is the diminutive of Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to bracts, which form the invocular part of the head of an inflorescence in composite flowers. A good example is found on Brachyscome iberidifolia.

Phylliraeoides: [fi/fahyl-li-ree-oi-deez] From Phyllárion, which is the diminutive of Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek and Phul-lis, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. Looking at Phul-lis it refers to plants, which resemble the Almond tree. In Ancient Greek mythology it refers to a young lady who killed herself for love, and was turned into an almond tree. A good example is found on Pomaderris phylliraeoides, which is now known as Pomaderris andromedifolia subsp. andromedifolia.

Phyllids: [fi/fahyl-lidz] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaf like structures on mosses and other byrophytes which carry out photosynthesis on the plants. A good example is Fissidens linearis.

Phyllite soils/rocks: [fi/fahy-lahyt, soilz/roks] It refers toeing derived from shale or clay that has undergone further metamorphosis to create very fine mica dominated rocks and soil. A good example is found in the deeper rocks below the Brisbane CBD (15m-20m) and Mount Cootha Botanic Gardens in Brisbane’s south west.

Phyllocarpa: [fi/fahyl-lo-kar-pa] From Phyllárion, which is the diminutive of Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to Lichens, which have somewhat leaf like organs or bear leaf like fruiting bodies. A good example is Blackiella conduplicata var. phyllocarpa, which is now known as Atriplex lindleyi subsp. conduplicata.

Phyllocarpum: [fi/fahy-lo-kar-pum] From phúllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf and karpos, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruiting bodies which resemble a leaf or leaves. A good example is the lichens in the Xanthoparmelia genus.

Phylloclymma: [fi/fahyl-lo-klahym-ma] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Kálymma, which is Ancient Greek for a veil. It refers to leaves, which have a veil like extension around the petiole and often clasping the stem. A good example was Phyllocalymma filaginoides, which is now known as Angianthus micropodioides.

Phyllocalymmeus: [fi/fahyl-lo-klahym-me-us] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Kálymma, which is Ancient Greek for a veil. It refers to leaves, which have a veil like extension around the petiole and often clasping the stem. A good example is Pleuropappus phyllocalymmeus.

Phyllocephala: [fi/fahyl-lo-ke/se-fei-lah] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to heads of flowers, which are surrounded by dried leaf like ray petals. A good example was Angianthus phyllocephalus, which is now known as Cephalosorus carpesioides.

Phyllocephalum: [fi/fahyl-lo-ke/se-fa-lum] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to heads of flowers, which are surrounded by dried leaf like ray petals. A good example was Acroclinium phyllocephalum, which is now known as Rhodanthe fuscescens.

Phyllocephalus: [fi/fahyl-lo-se/ke-fa-lus] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Cephalus, which is Latin for a head. It refers to leaves, which surround the flower heads like a necklace. A good example was Styloncerus phyllocephalus, which is now known as Cephalosorus carpesioides.

Phylloclada: [fi/fahyl-lo-klad-a] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Klados, which is Ancient Greek or Cladus, which is Latin for a branch. It refers to leaflets which appear as though they are leaves on small branches. A good example is Phyllocladus aspleniifolium.

Phyllocladus: [fi/fahyl-lo-klad-us] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stick, stem or small branch. It refers to leaves, which somewhat resemble stems or small branches. A good example is Phyllocladus aspleniifolium.

Phyllodes: [fi/fahy-lohdz] From Phullṓdēs, which is Ancient Greek for resembling a leaf. It refers to the leaf like structures on certain plants like in the Acacia genus. A good example is the lichens in the Acacia granitica.

Acacia granitica showing phyllodes and juvenile leaves on seedlings- andi Mellis

Phyllodial: [fi/fahyl-lo-di-al] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves, which are in fact derived from flattened petioles or spines that resemble and have the functions of leaves. A good example is the phyllodes on the Acacia genus including Acacia podalyrifolia.

Phyllodinea: [fi/fahyl-loh-din-e-a] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf, Oides which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to and Inos which is Ancient Greek or Ina/Inea, which is Latin to form the feminine form of a noun. It refers to leaves, which closely resemble the leaves of many Acacia species. A good example is Senna phyllodinea.

Phyllodiae: [fi/fahyl-loh-di-a] From Phyllodes, which is Ancient Greek for being leaf. It refers to flattened petioles or spines, which resemble and have the functions of leaves. A good example is the fungus Uromyces phyllodiae, which is now known as Endoraecium digitatum.

Phyllodium: [fi/fahyl-loh-di-um] From Phyllodes, which is Ancient Greek for being leaf. It refers to flattened petioles or spines, which resemble and have the functions of leaves. A good example is Phyllodium hackeri.

Phyllodoce: [fi/fahyl-lo-dohs] From Phyllodoce, which is Latin for one of the 50 sea nymph daughters of Nereus and Doris, mentioned by the Roman writer Virgil. A good example was Phyllodoce dodonaeifolia, which is now known as Acacia dodonaeifolia.

Phylloglossum: [fi/fahy-lo-glos-sum] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf, Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to and Glossum, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to leaves, which resemble a long thin tongue. A good example is Phylloglossum drummondii.

Phylloide: [fi/fahyl-loid] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to a flattened petiole or spines, which now resemble and have the functions of leaves. A good example is Acacia saligna.

Phyllopappus: [fi/fahyl-lo-pa-pus] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Páppos, which is Ancient Greek for a grandfather. It refers to leaves, which are covered in white or greyish-white hairs like poppy’s beard. A good example was Phyllopappus lanceolatus, which is now known as Microseris lanceolata.

Phyllopoda: [fi/fahyl-lo-po-da] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to leaves, which have a distinct shape that resembles a foot. A good example is Eremophila phyllopoda.

Phylloporus: [fi/fahyl-lo-por-us] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Póros, which is Ancient Greek for a passage way through a body. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which have prominent pores. A good example is the inner pileus of the gill fungus Phylloporus rhodoxanthus.

Phyllorhiza: [fi/fahyl-lo-rahy-za] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Rhíza, which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to roots as seen on some specialized orchids which are flattened and perform some functions of leaves. A good example is Chiloschista phyllorhiza.

Phyllorhizum: [fi/fahyl-lo-rahy-zum] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Rhíza, which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to roots as seen on some specialized orchids which are flattened and perform some functions of leaves. A good example was Thrixspermum phyllorhizum, which is now known as Chiloschista phyllorhiza.

Phyllorhizus: [fi/ahyl-lo-rahy-zus] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Rhíza, which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to roots as seen on some specialized orchids which are flattened and perform some functions of leaves. A good example is Sarcochilus phyllorhizus, which is now known as Chiloschista phyllorhiza.

Phyllostachya: [fi/fahy-lo-sta-shi-a] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for a spike. It refers to the flowering spikes, which have leaves. A good example is the exotic garden plant Hypoestes phyllostachya.

Phyllostachys: [fi/fahy-lo-sta-kee-us] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for a (cob of corn) flower spike. It refers to leaves, which form shields around the flower spikes. A good example is Leucopogon phyllostachys.

Phyllostegia: [fi/fahyl-lo-ste-ji-a] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Stégē which is Ancient Greek for a roof or covering. It refers to leaves, which spread out from the stems and appear like small rooves over the flowers below. A good example is Neotysonia phyllostegia.

Phyllota: [fi/fahyl-lo-ta] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for leaf like and Taxis/Taxus, which is Ancient Greek for to arrange in order. It refers to leaves, which appear to be neatly arranged along the stems. A good example is Phyllota grandiflora.

Phyllotaxis: [fi/fahyl-lo-tak-sis] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for leaf like and Taxis/Taxus, which is Ancient Greek for to be arranged or placed in order. It refers to where the leaves primarily function is photosynthetic and are so arranged to take advantage of the available sunlight. A good example is Brachychiton acerifolium.

Phyllotaxiology: [fi/fahy-lo-tak-si-ol-o-jee] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf, Taxis/Taxus, which is Ancient Greek for to arrange in order and Ology which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the study of the arrangement of leaves on plants.

Phyllotaxy: [fil-lo-tak-see] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf and Taxis/Taxus, which is Latin for to place in order. It refers to the realignment of leaves, which are on the same line or axis after completing three rotations: Octastichous or 3/8 Phyllotaxy. A good example is Pimelea octophylla.

Phylogenetic: [fi/fahyl-lo-jene-tik] From Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a tribe or race and Genes, which is Ancient Greek for to be born from. It refers to the study of the flora and fauna kingdom of where a species is placed in an evolutionary family tree and how its genes retained certain characteristics.

Phylum: [fi/fahy-lum] From Phŷlon which is Ancient Greek for a tribe or race. It refers to the study of the flora and fauna kingdoms and how they are related to each other. It is ranked below the Kingdom and above the rank of the Class.

Phymatocarpus: [fi/fahy-mat-o-kar-pus] From Phymatos, which is Ancient Greek for a swelling and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the type specimen’s fruits having swollen warty growths. A good example is Phymatocarpus maxwellii.

Phymatopteris: [fahy-mat-o-te-rus] From Phymatos, which is Ancient Greek for a swelling and Ptéris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to ferns which have a swollen base on the rachis. A good example was Phymatopteris simplicissima, which is now known as Selliguea simplicissima.

Phymatosorus: [fahy-mat-o-sor-us] From Phymatos, which is Ancient Greek for a swelling and Sōrós which is Ancient Greek for a pile or a heap. It refers to the swollen sporangia which are piled high with spore. A good example was Phymatosorus grossus, which is now known as Microsorum grossum.

Physalis: [fi/fahy-sa-lis] From Physa/Physos, which is Ancient Greek for a bladder. It refers to the inflated calyxes. A good example is Physalis minima.

Physarum: [fahy-sar-um] From Physa/Physos, which is Ancient Greek for a bladder. It refers to the spore capsules on certain fungi, which resemble small bladders. A good example is Physarum affine.

Physocalyx: [fi/fahy-so-ka-liks] From Physos, which is Ancient Greek for a bladder and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for specialized cupular leaves behind the petals. It refers to calyxes which appear to be inflated. A good example is Eremophila physocalyx.

Physocarpa: [fi/fahy-so-kar-pa] From Physos, which is Ancient Greek for a bladder and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which swell up like a bladder. A good example is Dodonaea physocarpa.

Physocarpus: [fi/fahy-so-kar-pus] From Physos, which is Ancient Greek for a bladder and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which swell up like hollow bladders. A good example is the exotic weed that many children once played with Gomphocarpus physocarpus.

Physodes: [fi/fahy-so-deez] From Physos, which is Ancient Greek for a bladder. It refers to calyxes, which resemble a bladder when in the bud stage. A good example is Pimelea physodes.

Physolobium: [fi/fahy-so-loh-bi-um] From Physos, which is Ancient Greek for a bladder and Lobōs, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to calyxes, which resemble a bladder when in the bud stage, or calyxe lobes, which resemble a bladder when in the bud stage. A good example was Physolobium macrophyllum, which is now known as Kennedia lateritia.

Physopsis: [fi/fahy-sop-sis] From Physos, which is Ancient Greek for a bladder and ópsis, which is Ancient Greek for to have the appearance of. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a bladder. A good example is the ovaries on Physopsis lachnostachya.

Phyto: [fahy-toh] From Phyton, which is Ancient Greek or Phytos which is Latin for a plant.

Phytochromics: [fahy-to-krom-iks] From Phyton, which is Ancient Greek or Phytos, which is Latin for a plant and Chomus, which is Latin for colour usually red. It refers to where a plant is light sensitive or has light sensitive receptors. A good example is the leaves on Albizia lebbeck which open and close according to the light intensity.

Phytogenesis: [fahy-toje-ne-sis] From Phyton, which is Ancient Greek or Phytos, which is Latin for a plant and Genesis, which is Ancient Greek for to be born from. It refers to the branch of botany that deals with the evolutionary history of the development of present day plants.

Phytogeographer: [fahy-tojee-o-gra-fer] From Phyton, which is Ancient Greek or Phytos, which is Latin for a plant, Geos which is Ancient Greek for the soil/rocks and Graph, which is Ancient Greek for a picture. It refers to a person who studies the geographical distribution patterns of flora and their interrelationships in geographical terms.

Phytogeography: [fahy-tojee-o-gra-fi] From Phyton, which is Ancient Greek for a plant or Phytos, which is Latin for a plant, Geos, which is Ancient Greek for the soil/rocks and Graph which is Ancient Greek for a picture. It refers to the study of the geographical distribution patterns of flora and their interrelationships in geographical terms.

Phytolacca: [fahy-to-la-ka] From Phyton, which is Ancient Greek for a plant or Phytos, which is Latin for a plant and Lacca which is Latin for milk. It refers to the reddish milky sap. A good example is the exotic inkweed bush Phytolacca octandra.

Phytologist: [fahy-tol-o-jist] From Phyton, which is Ancient Greek or Phytos which is Latin for a plant, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies the interrelationships of flora.

Phytology: [fahy-tol-o-jee] From Phyton, which is Ancient Greek or Phytos which is Latin for a plant and Ology, which is Greek to study. It refers to the scientific study of plants and is equivalent to the Greek word of Botany and is rarely used.

Phytomorphology: [fahy-to-mor-fo-lo-jee] From Phyton, which is Ancient Greek or Phytos, which is Latin for a plant, Morphos which is Greek to change and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to Study. It refers to any of the modern research into the study of the physical form and external structure of plants.

Phytophthora: [fahy-to-thor-a] From Phyton, which is Ancient Greek for a plant and Phthorá, which is Ancient Greek for to destroy or utter destruction. It refers to the fungi’s ability to kill their hosts. The fungi produce zoospores which swim through the soil where its mycelia grow throughout the hair root absorbing carbohydrates and nutrients, thus destroying the structure of the root tissues and killing off the plants ability to absorb water and moisture from the soil. A good/bad example which has and is causing die off in our Eucalyptus forests is Phytophthora cinnamomi.

Phytoremediation: [fahy-to-re-mee-di-ei-shon] From Phyton, which is Ancient Greek or Phytos, which is Latin for a plant, Re, which is Latin for again and Mediation, which is Latin for something bad or defective requiring correction. It refers to the use of plants in taking up large quantities of chemicals from the sail or water or the breakdown of hazardous chemicals in the soil or water. Some good examples of plants that can remove hazardous chemicals from the soil are Melastoma affine – aluminium based chemicals, Cannabis sativa – most heavy metals including arsenic, Pteris tremula- arsenic, Pteris vittaria– arsenic & lead and Beta vulgaris – iodine and boron.

Phytosociology: [fahy-to-soh-si-ol-o-jee] From Phyton, which is Ancient Greek or Phytos, which is Latin for a plant, Sociologie which is French for the organization and functioning of human society and Ology , which is ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the study of ecology dealing with the origin, composition, structure and classification of Floris tic communities including the geographical distribution and interrelationships of flora in their ecological zones.

Piceoides: [pi-kee-oi-deez] From Pikris, which is Ancient Greek for the Picris genus and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the dwarf sunflowers in the Picris genus. A good example was Poranthera piceoides, which is now known as Poranthera ericoides.

Pickardii: [pi-kar-di-ahy] Is named in honour of John Pickard; 1944-20.., who was an Australian botanist, ecologist and plant collector. A good example is Acacia pickardii.

Pickeringii: [pi-kar-rin-ji-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Charles Pickering; 1805–878, who was an American anthropologist and botanist. A good example is Calandrinia pickeringii.

Picridifolia: [pi-kri-di-foh-li-a] From Pikris, which is Ancient Greek for the Picris genus and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which resemble the dwarf sunflowers in the Picris genus. A good example is Olearia picridifolia.

Picris: [pi-kris] From Pikris, which is Ancient Greek for a bitter weed. It refers to small sunflower like herbs, which are often weedy and have a bitter taste. A good example is Picris barbarorum.

Picrophloia: [pi-kro-floi-a] From Pikris, which is Ancient Greek for a bitter and Phloia, which is Ancient Greek for a bark. It refers to inner barks, which have a bitter taste. A good example is Linociera picrophloia, which is now known as Chionanthus picrophloia.

Picrophyta: [pi-kro-fahy-ta] From Pikris which is Ancient Greek for a bitter weed and Phuton, which is Ancient Greek for a plant. It refers to plants, which have a bitter or at times a bitter-sweet taste. A good example is Picrophyta calcarata , which is now known as Goodenia calcarata.

Picrosperma: [pi-kro-sper-ma] From Pikris, which is Ancient Greek for a bitter weed and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which have a bitter taste. A good example is Fontainea picrosperma.

Picta: [pic-ta] From Piktus/Pictus, which is Latin for painted or streaked. It refers to flowers, which are streaked. A good example is Diuris picta.

Pictum: [pic-tum] From Piktus/Pictus, which is Latin for painted or streaked. It refers to flowers, which are streaked. A good example is Dipodium pictum.

Pictus: [pic-tus] From Piktus/Pictus, which is Latin for painted or streaked. It refers to flowers, which are streaked. A good example is Geodorum pictus.

Pieter botte: [pie-ter, bot] From Mount Pieter Botte in far north eastern Queensland’s Cape Tribulation where the type specie was discovered. A good example is Medicosma sp. pieter botte

Pigea: [pi-je-a] From Pigrum, which is Ancient Greek for dull. It refers to structures or organs, which is not glossy thus has a dull appearance. A good example was Pigea monopetala, which is now known as Hybanthus filiformis.

Pilata: [pi-la-ta] From Pīlātum, which is Latin for to be armed with javelons. It refers to structures or organs usually seeds, which are armed or covered in long spines. A good example Austrostipa pilata.

Pilbarensis: [pil-bar-en-sis] From Bilybara, which is Latinized from the local Nyamal and Banyjima Aboriginal vernacular for dry and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which grow in the Pilbara district of Western Australia. A good example is Eucalyptus pilbarensis.

Pileanthus: [pi-lee-an-thus] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short soft hairs and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to the anthers, which are covered in short soft hairs. A good example is the petals on Pileanthus peduncularis.

Pileata: [pi-lee-a-ta] From Pīleātus, which is Ancient Greek for a cap or Pileus, which is Latin for a skull cap. It refers to calyptras, which are rather prominent compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus pileata.

Pileipellis: [pi-la-pel-lis] From Pīleātus, which is Ancient Greek for a cap or Pileus and Pélma, which is Ancient Greek for the uppermost layer of hyphae in the pileus of a fungus fruiting body. It refers to the spore carrying organ of fungi, which are concealed high up under the pileus. A good example is the edible mushroom Macrolepiota clelandii.

Pileus: [pi-lee-us] From Pīleātus, which is Ancient Greek for a cap or Pileus, which is Latin for a skull cap. It refers to the umbrella or ball shaped spore carrying organ of fungi. A good example is the edible mushroom Macrolepiota clelandii

Red pileus or cap on Russula aff. rosacea -andi Mellis

Pileus Margin: [pi-lee-us, mar-jin] From Pīleātus, which is Ancient Greek for a cap or Pileus, which is Latin for a skullcap and Margo, which is Latin for a border. It refers to fungi, which have umbrella or ball shaped spore carrying organs. A good example is the edge of the Pileus on the mushroom Cortinarius archeri.

Cortinarius archeri showing the brown pileus margin and the mauve pileus cap

Pileus Shapes: [pi-lee-uhs, sheips] From Pīleātus, which is Ancient Greek for a cap or Pileus, which is Latin for a skull cap and Shape, which is old English for form. It refers to the form the pileus takes. A good example is the applanate form of the pileus on the edible mushroom Agaricus campestris.

Austroboletus rostrupii with a hemisherical pileus Bovista sp. with a globose pileus Trogia sp. with its typical Funnel shape pileus

Pilibunda: [pi-li-bun-da] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short soft, wavy hairs and Abundus, which is Latin for plentiful or abundantly. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in soft, wavy hairs. A good example is the leaves and stems on Pimelea pilibunda, which is now known as Pimelea imbricata var. piligera

Pilibundus: [pi-li-bun-dus] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short soft, wavy hairs and Abundus, which is Latin for plentiful or abundantly. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in soft, wavy hairs. A good example is the petals on Leucopogon microphyllus var. pilibundus.

Pilidiostigma: [pi-li-di-oh-stig-ma] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft, wavy hairs and Stigma, which is Latin for to the pollen receptive, female reproductive organ on the style of a flower. It refers to stigmas except the receptive section, which are densely covered in short, soft, wavy hairs. A good example is Pilidiostigma glabrum.

Pilifer: [pi-li-fer] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft, wavy hairs and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in short, soft hairs. A good example is the petals on Leucopogon pilifer.

Pilifera: [pi-li-fer-a] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft, wavy hairs and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in short, soft hairs. A good example is the leaves on Hydrocotyle pilifera.

Piliferum: [pi-li-fer-um] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft, wavy hairs and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures organs, which are moderately to densely covered in short, soft hairs. A good example is Stylidium piliferum.

Piliferus: [pi-li-fer-us] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft, wavy hairs and Ferae/Ferārus, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are moderately to densely covered in short, soft hairs. A good example is Pileanthus peduncularis subsp. piliferus.

Piligera: [pi-li-jer-a] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft hairs and Gera, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in short soft hairs. A good example is Acacia piligera.

Piligerum: [pi-li-jer-um] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft hairs and Gera, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in short soft hairs. A good example was Racosperma piligerum, which is now known as Acacia piligera.

Piliostigma: [pi-l-o-stig-ma] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft, wavy hairs and Stígma/Stízein, which is Ancient Greek for the female reproductive organ upon the style which is receptive to receiving pollen. It refers to stigmas, which are surrounded in soft wavy hairs. A good example is Piliostigma malabaricum, which is now known as Bauhinia malabaricum.

Piliostylus: [pi-li-o-stahy-lus] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft hairs and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek or Stylus which is Latin for a column. It refers to styles, which are covered in short, soft pilose hairs. A good example is Banksia pilosstylis.

Pilipes: [pi-li-pes] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft hairs and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to pedicels, which are covered in short, soft pilose hairs. A good example was Millettia pilipes, which is now known as Callerya pilipes.

Pilitis: [pi-li-tis] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft hairs and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to pedicels, which are covered in short, soft pilose hairs. A good example is Pilitis milliganii, which is now known asRichea milligani.

Pilligaense: [pil-li-ga-ens] From Billarga, which is Latinized from the local Kamilaroi aboriginal vernacular for the swamp oak and Ensis/Ana, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered and grow in the Pilliga Scub National Park. A good example was Racospermum pilligaense, which is now known as Acacia pilligaensis.

Pilligensis: [pil-li-ga-en-sis] From Billarga, which is Latinized from the local Kamilaroi aboriginal vernacular for the swamp oak and Ensis/Ana, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered and grow in the Pilliga Scub National Park. A good example is Daviesia pilligensis.

Pilocarina: [pi-lo-kar-i-na] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft, wavy hairs and Carīna, which is Latin for a ships keel. It refers to the two lower petals on legume flowers, which come together and resemble a ships keel and are covered in soft wavy hairs. A good example is Senna pilocarina.

Pilosa: [pi-loh-sa] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft, wavy hairs. It refers to organs, which are covered in soft wavy hairs. A good example is Mitrasacme pilosa.

Pilose: [pi-lohs] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for soft wavy hairs. It refers to organs, which are covered in soft wavy hairs. A good example is Boronia pilosa.

Pilosella: [pi-lo-sel-la] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft, wavy hairs and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for a feminine form. It refers to organs, which are covered in soft wavy hairs that give the organ a more delicate feminine look. A good example is Velleia pilosella Velleia trinervis.

Pilosissima: [pi-lo-sis-si-ma] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft, wavy hairs and -Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in more, soft wavy hairs than other species in the genus. A good example is Phlebocarya pilosissima.

Pilostyles: [pi-lo-stahylz] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for short, soft, wavy hairs and Stígma/Stízein, which is Ancient Greek for the female reproductive organ upon the style which is receptive to receiving pollen. It refers to stigmas, which are surrounded in soft wavy hairs. A good example is Pilostyles collina.

Pilosula: [pi-lo-syoo-la] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for soft, wavy hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft wavy hairs.A good example is Ehretia pilosula

Pilosulum: [pi-lo-syoo-luh m] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for soft, wavy hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are sparse to moderately covered in soft wavy hairs. A good example is Microlepidium pilosulum.

Pilosum: [pi-loh-sum] From Pilōsum, which is Latin for soft, wavy hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft wavy hairs.A good example is Rytidosperma pilosum.

Pilosus: [pi-loh-sus] From Pilōsus, which is Latin for soft, wavy hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft wavy hairs. A good example is Oplismenus aemulus var. pilosus.

Pilotensis: [pi-lo-ten-sis] From Pilosus, which is Latin for soft, wavy hairs and Tense, which is Latin for intense. It may refer to the stems or outer organs, which are densely covered in soft white pilose hairs. A good example is Arachnorchis pilotensis.

Pilularia: [pil-yoo-lar-i-a] From Pilule, which is Latin for a pill, small globules or balls. It refers to roots, which have small globose tubers. A good example is Pilularia novae-hollandiae.

Pilularis: [pil-yoo-lar-is] From Pilule, which is Latin for a pill, small globules or balls. It refers to buds which resemble small globules. A good example is Eucalyptus pilularis.

Pilulifera: [pil-yoo-li-fer-a] From Pilule, which is Latin for a pill, small globules or balls and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to stigmas, which resemble small globular balls at the apex of the styles. A good example is Grevillea pilulifera.

Piluliferum: [pil-yoo-li-fer-um] From Pilule, which is Latin for a pill, small globules or balls and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to stigmas, which resemble small globular balls at the apex of the styles. A good example is the ball like flower heads on Cotula piluliferum, which is now known as Oncosiphon piluliferum.

Pimelea: [pim-e-lee-a] From Pimele, which is Ancient Greek for fat. It refers to the seeds, which are rather plump or chubby. A good example is Pimelia linearifolia.

Pimeleoides: [pim-e-leeoi-deez] From Pimele, which is Ancient Greek for fat and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the seeds, which are similar to those of the Pimelea genus which are rather more plump or chubby than other species in the genus. A good example is Olearia pimeleoides.

Pimelifolia: [pim-e-li-foh-li-a] From Pimele, which is Ancient Greek for fat and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble those of the Pimelea genus. A good example is Hemigenia pimelifolia.

Pimelioides: [pim-e-lioi-deez] From Pimele, which is Ancient Greek for fat and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to seeds, which are similar to those of the Pimelea genus which are rather more plump or chubby than other species in the genus. A good example is Leucopogon pimelioides which is an error in spelling seen in some older publications for Leucopogon pimeleoides.

Pimelodéndron: [pim-eloden-dron] From Pimele, which is Ancient Greek for fat and Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree. It refers to small trees/shrubs, which look similar to a Pimelea bush. A good example is Pimelodéndron amboinicum.

Pimenteliana: [Pi-men-te-li-a-na] From Pimenta, which is Spanish for to be coloured and Iana, which is Latin for to take after. It refers to flowers, which are very bold in that they have deep colours. A good example is Flindersia pimenteliana.

Pimpinellifolia: [pim-pinel-li-foh-li-a] From Pimpinella, which is Latin for the Scarlet Pimpinell and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which turn scarlet red. A good example was Trachymene pimpinellifolia, which is now known as Trachymene incisa.

Pimpinellifolium: [pim-pinel-li-foh-lium] From Pimpinella, which is Latin for the Scarlet Pimpinell and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to foliages, which turn scarlet red. A good example is the commercial tiny tim tomatoes, Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium.

Pimpinellifolius: [pim-pinel-li-foh-li-us] From Pimpinella, which is Latin for the Scarlet Pimpinell and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to foliages, which turn scarlet red. A good example is the yellow flowered native buttercup Ranunculus pimpinellifolius.

Pimpiniana: [pim-pin-i-a-na] From Pimpini, which is Greek/Latin for the female genitalia especially on a young girl and Ana, which is a Greek suffix for each. It refers to plants, which resemble other plants but are much smaller thus the reference to a young girl. A good example is Eucalyptus pimpiniana.

Pinaster: [pin-a-ster] From Pinaster, which is Latin for the name Pliny gave to a pine tree known as Pinaster sylvestris. It refers to plants, which resemble Pinaster sylvestris in the juvenile stage or mature stage of its life. A good example of the juvenile stage is Allocasuarina pinaster.

Pinastroides: [pin-a-stroi-deez] From Pinaster, which is Latin for the name Pliny gave to a pine tree known as Pinaster sylvestris and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have leaves that resemble the Pinaster genus. A good example is the leaves on Lechenaultia pinastroides, which is now known as Lechenaultia tubiflora.

Pindan Soils: [pin-dan, soilz] From Pindan, which is the local Aboriginal (Kymberley District in northern Western Australia) name for the soils and associated flora. It refers to those soils that are rich, red, with high clay content and suffer from severe cracking during drought/dry conditions and are water logged in the wet season.

Pindanica: [pin-da-ni-ka] From Pindan, which is the local Aboriginal (Kymberley District in northern Western Australia) name for the soils and associated flora and Anicca which is Latinized from the Pali Buddhists for the cycle of birth, growth, decay, and death through which every living thing must pass. It refers to plants, which grow on soils that are rich, red, with high clay content and suffer from severe cracking during drought/dry conditions and are water logged in the wet season thus pass through the cycles of life and death on an annual or biannual basis. A good example of a plant which prefers to grow on Pindan soils is Glycine pindanica.

Pinetorum: [pi-ne-tor-um] From Pīnētum, which is Latin for a pine forest or a pine grove. It refers to plants, which resemble pine trees planted in a grove. A good example is Acacia pinetorum.

Pingrupense: [pin-gru-pens] From Pingrup, which is Latinized for the small township of Pingrup and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered around Pingrup which is 250 kilometres south east of Perth. A good example is Stylidium pingrupense.

Pinguiculosa: [pin-gwee-kyoo-loh-sa] From Pinguis, which is Latin for the small, fat one and Culosa which is Latin for emphasis. It refers to structures or organs, which are short and plump. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia pinguiculosa.

Pinguiculosum: [pin-gwee-kyoo-loh-sum] From Pinguis, which is Latin for the small, fat one and Culosa which is Latin for emphasis. It refers to Structures or organs, which are short and plump. A good example is the phyllodes on Racosperma pinguiculosum, which is now known as Acacia pinguiculosa.

Pinguifolia: [pin-gwee-foh-li-a] From Pinguis, which is Latin for the small, fat one and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to structures or organs, which are short and plump. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia pinguifolia.

Pinguifolium: [pin-gwee-foh-lium] From Pinguis, which is Latin for the small, fat one and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to Structures or organs, which are short and plump. A good example is the phyllodes on Racosperma pinguifolium, which is now known as Acacia pinguifolia.

Pinifolia: [pi-ni-foh-li-a] From Pinus, which is Latin for a pine tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves that resemble those of a typical pine tree. A good example is Persoonia pinifolia.

Pinifolium: [pi-ni-foh-lium] From Pinus, which is Latin for a pine tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves that resemble those of a typical pine tree. A good example is Astroloma pinifolium.

Pinifolius: [pi-ni-foh-lius] From Pinus, which is Latin for a pine tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves that resemble those of a typical pine tree. A good example is Ricinocarpos pinifolius.

Pinkiana: [pin-ki-a-na] Is named in honour of Pink but which Pink cannot be substantiated. A good example was Ficus pinkiana, which is now known as Ficus virgata.

Pinna 1: [pin-na] From Pinna, which is Latin for a feather. It refers to fronds, which have a number of pinnae along the pinna costa. A good example is Adiantum aethiopicum.

Pinna from Adiantum aethiopicum

Pinna 2: [pin-na] From Pinula, which is Latin for a pinna. It refers to one leaflet of a pinnate leaf. A good example is Grevillea robusta.

Pinna from Grevillea robusta

Pinnae: [pin-nee] From Pinula, which is Latin for a pinna. It refers to one leaflet of a pinnate leaf. A good example is Adiantum hispidulum.

Pinnacle rock: [pin-nakl, rok] From Pinnacle rock which is Latinized for where the district the type species was found. It refers to the area called Pinnacle Rock near Canberra. A good example is Psychotria sp. pinnacle rock.

Pinnata: [pi-na-ta] From Pinula, which is Latin for a pinna. It refers to one leaflet of a pinnate leaf. A good example is the leaves on Millettia pinnata or the pinnules on the fern Nephrolepis pinnata.

Pinnate 1: [pin-neit] From Pinna, which is Latin for a feather. It refers to leaves, which have the characteristic shape of a birds feather. It refers to one leaflet of a pinnate leaf. It refers to the leaves or fronds being deeply divided where the clefts reach the axis or main vein. A good example is the fronds on Nephrolepsis cordifolia.

Pinnate 2: [pin-neit] From Pinna, which is Latin for a pinnule. It refers to leaves, which have two or more leaflets or the description of having leaflets born on each side of the rachis in leafy plants. A good example is the leaf and leaflets on Senna clavigera as can be seen below.

Pinnatifida: [pin-nati-fahy-da] From Pinna, which is Latin for a feather and Bi, which is Latin for two or to double. It usually refers to leaves, which are deeply dividied. A good example is Grevillea pinnatifida.

Pinnatifidum: [pin-nati-fahy-dum] From Pinna, which is Latin for a feather and Bi, which is Latin for two or to double. It usually refers to leaves, which are deeply dividied. A good example is Eryngium pinnatifidum

Pinnatifolia: [pin-nati-foh-li-a] From Pinna which is Latin for a pinna and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to divided leaf sections, where the clefts do not reach the main vein and are usually greater than 50mm of their length. A good example is the leaves on Hicksbeachia pinnatifolia.

Pinnatifolium: [pin-nati-foh-li-um] From Pinna which is Latin for a pinna and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to divided leaf sections, where the clefts do not reach the main vein and are usually greater than 50mm of their length. A good example is the leaves on Solanum pinnatifolium, which is now known asSolanum laciniatum.

Pinnatifolius: [pin-nati-foh-li-us] From Pinna which is Latin for a pinna and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have divided leaf sections, where the clefts do not reach the main vein and are usually greater than 50mm of their length. A good example is the leaves on Senecio pinnatifolius.

Pinnatipartite(bi): [pin-nati-par-tahyt (bee)] From Pinna which is Latin for a birds feather and Partiri which is Latin for divided. It refers to divided leaves with no terminal leaflet and the sectional clefts reach 50mm to 90mm of the overall length and are divided equally. A good example is the leaves of Grevillea treueriana.

Pinnatisect: [pin-na-ti-sekt] From Pinna, which is Latin for a feather and Sectus, which is Latin for a section. It refers to leaves, which are divided into irregular sections where the clefts reach the main vein or almost reach the main vein. A good example is Pteris umbrosa.

Pinnatisecta: [pin-na-ti-sek-ta] From Pinna, which is Latin for a feather and Sectus, which is Latin for a section. It refers to leaves, which are divided into irregular sections where the clefts reach the main vein or almost reach the main vein. A good example is Banksia pinnatisecta.

Pinnatum: [pin-na-ti-sek-tum] From Pinna, which is Latin for a pinnule. It refers to leaves, which have several leaflets with those nearer the apex being the largest. A good example is the Chinese spice tree, Sichuan pepper known as Zanthoxylum pinnatum.

Pinnula: [pin-yoo-la] From Pinula, which is Latin for a pinna. It refers to the description of a singular section of a pinnate leaf or frond.

Pinnule: [pin-yool] From Pinula, which is Latin for a pinna. It refers to one leaflet of a pinnate leaf or frond. A good example is Acacia dealbata or Nephrolepsis cordifolia.

Pinoidea: [pi-noi-dee-a] From Pinus, which is Latin for a pine tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves, which are a little like short flattened pine needles. A good example is Epacris pinoidea.

Pinoides: [pi-noi-deez] From Pinus which is Latin for a pine tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves, which are a little like short flattened pine needles. A good example is Eriostemon pinoides.

Pinoniana: [pin-o-ni-a-na] Probably from Piñon, which is Latinized from the Spanish for a group of trees from north western America and Ana, which is a Greek suffix for each. It refers to plants, which vaguely to strongly resemble Pinus monophylla or Pinus edulis. A good example is Alyogyne pinoniana.

Pinonianus: [pin-o-ni-a-nus] Probably from Piñon, which is Latinized from the Spanish for a group of trees from north western America and Ana, which is a Greek suffix for each. It refers to plants, which vaguely to strongly resemble Pinus monophylla or Pinus edulis. A good example was Hibiscus pinonianus, which is now known as Alyogyne pinoniana.

Pinus: [pee-nus] From Pinus, which is Latin for a pine tree. It refers to trees, which resemble the exotic pine of America and Europe. A good example is the common plantation pine tree used in the building industry and paper manufacturing Pinus radiata.

Piper: [pahy-per] From Piper, which is Latin for the name given to the Pepper vine. It refers to plants, which are closely related to the commercial Pepper vine of Asia. A good Australian example is Piper hederaceum var. hederaceum.

Piperita: [pi-per-i-ta] From Piper, which is Latin for the name given to the Pepper vine. It refers to structures or organs, which exhibit a hot peppery taste similar to the commercial Pepper vine of Asia. A good Australian example is Tasmannia piperita.

Piptandra: [pip-tandra] From Pipptos, which is Ancient Greek for to fall and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower. It refers to stamens, which fall away shortly after anthesis. A good example was Piptandra spatulata, which is now known as Scholtzia spathulata.

Piptocalyx: [pip-to-kal-liks] From Pipptos, which is Ancient Greek for to fall and Kalyx, which is Ancient Greek for a cup. It refers to calyxes, which are deciduous before the flowers fully open or the fruits form. A good example was Piptocalyx moorei, which is now known as Trimenia moorei.

Piptomeris: [pip-to-me-ris] From Pipptos, which is Ancient Greek for to fall and Meros, which is Ancient Greek for a part or portion. It refers to flowers, which have equal numbers of parts like 5 sepals, 5 petals and 5 stamens that are discarded shortly after anthesis. A good example is Jacksonia piptomeris.

Pipto: [pip-to] From Pipptos, which is Ancient Greek for to fall and Stémma, which is Ancient Greek for a crown or garland. It refers to flowers, which appear to form garland. A good example was Piptostemma carpesioides, which is now known as Cephalosorus carpesioides.

Pipturus: [pip-tyoo-rus] From Pipptos, which is Ancient Greek for to fall and Oura, which is Ancient Greek for a tail. It refers to styles and stigmas, which are deciduous shortly after anthesis. A good example is Pipturus argenteus.

Piringa: [pi-rin-ja] From Piring, which is Latinized from the local Malay vernacular for a small plate or saucers. It refers to fungi which resemble small white plates or saucers. A good example is Mycena piringa.

Pisicarpa: [pi-si-kar-pa] From Pisi/Pisum, which is Latin for a pea and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits, which resemble those of peas. A good example was Vitis pisicarpa, which is now known as Tetrastigma pisicarpum.

Pisicarpum: [pi-si-kar-pum] From Pisi/Pisum, which is Latin for a pea and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits, which resemble those of peas. A good example is Tetrastigma pisicarpum.

Pisiform: [pi-si-form] From Pisi/Pisum, which is Latin for a pea and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to structures, which are typically those of the commercial legumes or peas.

Pisolithus: [pi-so-li-thus] May be is named in honour of Dr. William Piso; 15..-1648, who was a Dutch physician who worked in South America and noted the use of the plant Cephaelis Ipecacuanha in the treatment of dysentery or Píson which is Ancient Greek or later Pīsō/Pīsum which are Latin for a pea or pease and Lithos which is Ancient Greek for a stone. It refers to plants, which resemble stones or pebbles or refers to the seeds, which resemble small stones that are the size of peas. A good example is the fungus Pisolithus tinctorius.

Pisolithus tinctorius on road at The Pinnacles NSW

Pisonia: [pi-son-ni-a] Is named in honour of Dr. William Piso; 15..-1648, who was a Dutch physician who worked in South America and noted the use of the plantCephaelis Ipecacuanha in the treatment of dysentery. A good example is Pisonia umbellifera.

Pistia: [pis-ti-a] From Pistos, which is Ancient Greek for a liquid. It refers to habitat of the plants , which are in water. A good example is the invasive water weed that has been declared a noxious weed in all states Pistia statiotis.

Pistil: [pis-til] From Pistillum, which is Latin for the ovule, style and stigma collectively. It refers to all female reproductive organs within a flower. A good example is easily observed in the Malvaceae family including Hibiscus heterophyllus.

Pistillate: [pis-til-leit] From Pistillum, which is Latin for the ovule, style and stigma. It refers to a flower which has only female flowers. A good example is Soleirolia gaudich which has staminate (male flowers) and pistillate flowers (female flowers) born separately on the same tree.

Pisum: [pis-um] From Pisum, which is Latin for a pea. It refers to plants, which are related to the garden pea. A good example is the exotic edible table pea Pisum sativa.

Pitaviaster: [pi-ta-vi-a-ster] Maybe from Pita, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the Quechua Indians Pita or Aymara Indians P’ita for the fibre removed from the Aloe and Agave plants and Viasta, which is Latin for to approve, to okay, to endorse, or to stamp. It refers to seeds, which very strongly pitted and appear to have course fibre nets wrapped around them. A good example is Pitaviaster haplophyllus.

Pitcher: [pi-cher] From Picher, which is Latin for large jug or ewer. It refers to the specialized leaves of a ventricose to tubular form, which are mainly found on insectivorous plants. A good example is the modified leaves on Cephalotus follicularis.

Pitereka: [pi-ter-ee-ka] maybe from Pitereka, which is Latinised from the aboriginal vernacular for white (Reed’s Aboriginal words) or another source (Endacott’s) states Piringa means frosty. It refers to fungi which have frosty white pileus. A good example is Limacella pitereka.

Pith: [pith] From Pitha, which is Old English for a spongy central core. It refers to the spongy, central material of parenchymatous tissue in the hollow sections of stems, branches, culms or grasses and reeds or the pseudo bulbs of many orchids. A good example is Juncus effusus.

Pithecellobium: [pith-e-sel-lo-bi-um] From Pithecos, which is Ancient Greek for a monkey and Ellobion, which is Ancient Greek for ear rings. It refers to the coiled fruits looking similar to the rings on a monkey’s ears. A good example is Pithecellobium dulce which may have some potential as a food crop, in oil production, sweets or drinks in hot, semi-arid zones. The white arils are very sweet. It would need careful monitoring as it has shown signs of being an invasive tree in some countries outside its natural range.

Pithecurus: [pith-e-ku-rus] From Pithecos, which is Ancient Greek for a monkey and Auro, which is Ancient Greek for a tail. It refers to the pedicels of flowers, which resemble a monkey’s tail in that they are long or have long thin apendexis at the apexes of the leaves or flowers. A good example is Pararistolochia pithecurus.

Pithocarpa: [pith-o-kar-pa] From Pithos, which is Ancient Greek for a wide mouthed jar and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to flowers, which appear to have a concave dish in the middle or looking similar to a gaping mouth. A good example is Pithocarpa pulchella.

Pithogastrus: [pith-o-gas-trus] From Pithos, which is Ancient Greek for a wide mouthed jar or ewer and Gaster which is Ancient Greek for a belly. It refers to seeds, which are, at maturity swollen in the middle. A good example is Amphibromus pithogastrus.

Pithyoides: [pi-thay-oi-deez] From Pithos, which is Ancient Greek for a wide mouthed jar or ewer and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to structures or organs, which have spreading apexes. A good example is the flowers and fruits at maturity on Gonocarpus pithyoides.

Pitted: [pi-ted] From Pytted, which is Old English for marked or scared with small hollows. It refers to organ surfaces, which have small indentations as though pitted by hailstones. A good example is the seeds on Santalum acuminatum.

Pittosporoides: [pi-tos-por-oi-deez] From Pitta, which is Ancient Greek for resinous pitch, Spora, which is Ancient Greek for a seed and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to seeds, which resemble those of the Pittosporum genus. A good example is Denhamia pittosporoides subsp. pittosporoides.

Pittosporum: [pi-tos-por-um] From Pitta, which is Ancient Greek for resinous pitch and Spora, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which are held onto the fruits, when ripe by a sticky resin until retrieved by birds or other small animals. A good example is Pittosporum spinescens.

Pityiodes: [pi-ti-oi-deez] From Pítȳron, which is Ancient Greek for scurfy bran, husks. It refers to leaves, which are scaley and or rough to touch. A good example is Acacia pityoides, which is now known as Acacia orthocarpa.

Pityophylla: [pi-ti-o-fi/fahyl-la] From Pítȳron, which is Ancient Greek for scurfy bran, husks and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are scaly and or rough to touch. A good example is Grevillea pityophylla.

Pityrhops: [pi-ti/tahy-rops] From Pietās/Pietātēs, which is Latin for  piety or divinity and Rops which is Latin for a bush. It refers to shrubs which have true soft beauty. A good example is Verticordia pityrhops.

Pityrodia: [pi-ti-roh-di-a] From Pietās/Pietātēs, which is Latin for piety or divinity and Rrops, which is Latin for a bush. It refers to shrubs which have true soft beauty. A good example is Pityrodia salviifolia.

Placenta: [pla-sen-ta] From Plakoenta, which is Ancient Greek for a flat cake. It refers to the inside lining of ovaries, which has the ovules attached and feeds the developing seeds. Funiculus equates to the umbilical cord in animals and the seed to the embryo. See Below for more:

Placentation Apical: [pla-sen-teishon, a-pi-kul] From Plakoenta, which is Ancient Greek for a flat cake and Tio, which is Latin for the noun and Apic, which is Latin for the upper part or the end. It refers to placenta, which are at the apex of the ovary in either simple or compound carpels. A good example is Carpobrotus glaucescens.

Placentation Axile: [pla-sen-teishon, ak-sahyl] From Plakoenta, which is Ancient Greek for flat (cake) and Tio, which is Latin for the noun and Axil, which is Latin for in or of an axis. It refers to where the ovary is sectioned by radial spokes with a placenta/s in separate locules. Compound carpel. A good example is the seeds from Solanum ellipticum or see above diagram of the Solanum lycopersicum.

Placentation Basal: [pla-sen-tei-shon, ba-sal] From Plakoenta, which is Ancient Greek for flat (cake) and Tio, which is Latin for the noun and Basal, which is Latin for the lower part or the base. It refers to where the placenta is at the base of the ovary in either simple or compound carpels. A good example is the seeds on Thryptomene saxicola.

Placentation Central or Free: [pla-sen-teishon, sen-tral, or free] From Plakoenta, which is Ancient Greek for a flat cake and Tio, which is Latin for the noun and Central, which is Latin for in the middle. It refers to where the placentas are on a central column in a non-sectioned ovary. Compound carpel. A good example is the seeds on Melastoma malabathricum.

Placentation Marginal: [pla-sen-teishon, mar-jin-al] From Plakoenta, which is Ancient Greek for a flat cake and Tio which is Latin for the noun and Marginal, which is Latin for on the margin or edge. It refers to where there is only one elongated placenta and it is in a straight line on one side of the ovary. This is noticeable in the Order Fabales. (Legumes) Simple carpel. A good example is the seeds on Kennedia rubicunda.

Placentation Parietal: [pla-sen-tei-shon, par-i-ei-tal] From Plakoenta, which is Ancient Greek for a flat cake and Tio, which is Latin for the noun and Parietese, which is Latin for belong to a wall. It refers to the seeds being attached randomly or configured along the placentas walls in a non-sectioned ovary. Compound carpel. A good example is Maytenus bilocularis.

Parthenocarpic: [parthen-no-kar-pik] From Parthénos, which is Ancient Greek for a virgin or maiden and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are the natural or artificially induced production of fruits without fertilization of ovules, which makes the fruits seedless. A good example is the commercial orange Citrus sinensis. It is not to be confused with stenospermocarpy, which may also produce apparently seedless fruits, however the seeds here are actually aborted while they are still small. A good example is the commercial seedless watermelons Citrullus lanatus.

Placita: [pla-si-ta] From Placeō, which is Latin for pleasing or agreeable. It refers to the overall appearance of the plants, which are pleasing to the eye. A good example is Eucalyptus placita.

Placospermum: [pla-ko-sper-mum] From Plakos, which is Ancient Greek for flat and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the seeds, which are disce shaped. A good example is Placospermum coriaceum.

Placus: [pla-kus] From Plakos, which is Ancient Greek for flat. It refers to structures or organs, which are flat. A good example is the leaves on Placus solandri, which is now known as Blumea saxatilis.

Plaesiophylla: [plee-si-oh-fahyl-la] From Plakos, which is Ancient Greek for flat and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are unusually flat for species in the genus. A good example is Parsonsia plaesiophylla.

Plagianthera: [plei-ji-an-ther-a] From Plakos which is Ancient Greek for flat and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are flat and the anthers, which are much flatter that most other species in the genus. A good example was Plagianthera monoicus, which is now known as Ricinocarpos velutinus.

Plagianthus: [plei-ji-an-thus] From Plakos, which is Ancient Greek for flat and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are flat and the anthers, which are much flatter that most other species in the genus. A good example is the seeds on Plagianthus berthae, which is now known as Lawrencia berthae.

Plagio: [plei-ji-oh] From Plagios/Plagos, which is Ancient Greek for slanting, leaning or oblique to one side. It refers to an organ having an oblique structure.

Plagioanthus: [plei-ji-oh-an-thus] From Plagios/Plagos, which is Ancient Greek for slanting, leaning or oblique to one side and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to the petals, which are all being asymmetrical. A good example is Plagianthus regius.

Plagiobothrys: [plei-ji-ohbo-thris] From Plagios/Plagos, which is Ancient Greek for slanting, leaning or oblique to one side and Bothrys, which is Greek for pitted or a scar. It refers to organs, which are scared and are at an oblique angle. A good example is the seeds on Plagiobothrys elachanthus having oblique sides and obliquely pitted scars.

Plagiocarpa: [plei-ji-oh-kar-pa] From Plagios/Plagos, mwhich is Ancient Greek for slanting, leaning or oblique to one side and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are oblique and asymmetrical. A good example is Plagiocarpus axillaris.

Plagiocarpus: [plei-ji-oh-kar-pus] From Plagios/Plagos, mwhich is Ancient Greek for slanting, leaning or oblique to one side and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are oblique and asymmetrical. A good example is Plagiocarpus axillaris.

Plagiochila: [plei-ji-oh-chi-la] From Plagios/Plagos, which is Ancient Greek for slanting, leaning or oblique to one side and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to seeds, which are strongly oblique and have a thickened edge that resembles a pair of lips. A good example is Plagiochila biciliata, which is now known as Lawrencia berthae.

Plagioclase: [plei-ji-oh-kleis] From Plagios/Plagos, which is Ancient Greek for slanting, leaning or oblique to one side and Klasis, which is Ancient Greek for breaking. It refers to soils which are usually white and have high concentrations of feldsfar, Sodium Aluminium with Calcium silicates.

Plagiolobium: [plei-ji-o-loh-bi-um] From Plagios/Plagos, which is Ancient Greek for slanting, leaning or oblique to one side and Lobos/Lobī, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to leaf lobes which are oblique and asymmetrical. A good example was Plagiolobium chorizemifolium, which is now known as Hovea chorizemifolia.

Plagiophylla: [plei-ji-ohfi/fahyl-la] From Plagios/Plagos, which is a Greek prefix for slanting, leaning or oblique to one side and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have laminas that are more to one side of the mid vein. A good example is Acacia plagiophylla.

Plagiopogon: [plei-ji-opoh-gon] From Plagios/Plagos, which are a Greek prefix for slanting, leaning or oblique to one side and Pōgōníās, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to structures or organs, which have hairs like a  beard. A good example is the long whisky hairs on the awns of the seeds on Stipa mollis, which is now known as Austrostipa mollis.

Plagiosetum: [plei-ji-ohset-um] From Plagios/Plagos, which is a Greek prefix for slanting, leaning or oblique to one side and Saeta, which is Ancient Greek for bristles. It refers to the awns on the seeds, which have long bristles. A good example is Plagiosetum refractum.

Plagiotropis: [plei-ji-oh-tro-pis] From Plagios/Plagos, which are a Greek prefix for slanting, leaning or oblique to one side and Tropis, which is Ancient Greek for the keel of a ship. It refers to pods or the lower petals, which resemble a ship’s keel. A good example is Swainsona plagiotropis.

Plain 1: [plein] From Plānum, which is Latin for flat or level. It refers to laminas, which are flat, without folds, pleats or undulations. A good example is Eucalyptus globulus.

Plain 2: [plein] From Plānum, which is Latin for flat or level ground. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on terrains or habitats which are very flat. A good example is the many salt bushes and plants from central Australia like Maireana pyramidata.

Plana: [pla-na] From Plānum, which is Latin for flat or level ground. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on terrains or habitats which are very flat. A good example is the flat wet habitats of Eleocharis plana.

Planate: [pla-neit] From Plānum, which is Latin for flat or level. It refers to laminas, which are flat, without folds, pleats or undulations and are smooth. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia melanoxylon.

Planchonella: [plan-cho-nel-la] Is named in Honour of L. Planchon; 1858-1915, who was a French pharmacist and botanical author. A good example is Planchonella asterocarpon.

Planchonia: [plan-cho-ni-a] Is named in Honour of Jules Emile Planchon; 1823-1888, who was a professor of medicine and botany. A good example is Planchonia careya.

Planchoniana: [plan-cho-ni-a-na] Is named in Honour of Jules Emile Planchon; 1823-1888, who was a professor of medicine and botany. A good example is Eucalyptus planchoniana.

Planchonii: [plan-cho-ni-ahy] Is named in Honour of Jules Emile Planchon; 1823-1888, who was a professor of medicine and botany. A good example is Ewartia planchonii.

Planichloa: [pla-ni-kloh-a] From Plānum, which is Latin for flat or level and Chloa, which is Ancient Greek for a grass. It refers to grasses, which prefer flat, plains type environments. A good example is Planichloa nervilemma, which is now known as Ectrosia nervilemma.

Planicola: [pla-ni-koh-la] From Plānum, which is Latin for flat or level and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to reside at or dwell. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on flat, plain type of environments. A good example is Thelymitra planicola.

Planicosta: [pla-ni-kos-ta] From Plānum, which is Latin for flat or level and Costa, which is Latin for ribbed. It may refer to plants, which prefer to grow on relatively flat, plains with some undulation in the environment. A good example is Grevillea nematophylla subsp. planicosta.

Planiculmis: [pla-ni-kul-mis] From Plānum, which is Latin for flat or level and Kálamos, which is Ancient Greek or Culmus which is Latin for stalk, stem of grass ,hay straw or thatch. It refers to the plants, which have stalks, which resemble that of hay. A good example is Wahlenbergia planiflora subsp. planiflora.

Planiflora: [pla-ni-flor-a] From Plānum, which is Latin for flat or level and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to the petals which have a relatively flat surface. A good example is Wahlenbergia planiflora subsp. planiflora.

Planifolia: [pla-ni-foh-li-a] From Plānum, which is Latin for flat or level and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the laminas, which are flatter thus are without folds, pleats or undulations on this species. A good example is Frankenia planifolia.

Planifolium: [pla-ni-foh-lium] From Plānum, which is Latin for flat or level and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the laminas, which are flat, without folds, pleats or undulations. A good example is Haemodorum planifolium.

Planifolius: [pla-ni-foh-lius] From Plānum, which is Latin for flat or level and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the laminas, which are flat, without folds, pleats or undulations. A good example is Juncus planifolius.

Planipes: [pla-ni-pes] From Plānum, which is Greek Latin for flat or level ground. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on terrains or habitats which are very flat. A good example was Eucalyptus planipes, which is now known as Eucalyptus trachybasis.

Planitiicola: [pla-ni-ti-koh-la] From Plānum, which is Latin for flat or level and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on flat, plains type of environments. A good example is Senna planitiicola.

Planocarpa: [pla-no-kar-pa] From Plānō, which is Latin for flat or level and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are somewhat flattish on one side while the other side is convex. A good example is Planocarpa sulcata.

Plano-convex: [pla-noh-konveks] From Plānō, which is Latin for flat or level and Convexus, which is Latin for to bring together at a point. It refers to the laminas, which are flat on one side while the other side is somewhat convex in shape or bends out. A good example is the leaves on Kardomia granitica.

Planopetiolata: [pla-no-pe-ti-o-la-ta] From Plānō, which is Latin for flat or level and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators that are spread out in a flat position. A good example is Parahebe planopetiolata.

Planosperma: [pla-no-sper-ma] From Plānō, which is Latin for flat or level and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which are flat on one side while the other side is somewhat convex shaped or bends out. A good example is Nymphoides planosperma.

Plantaginea: [plan-ta-ji-nee-a] From Plantāgineum, which is Latin for the plantain or banana. It refers to leaves, which vaguely to somewhat resemble the plantain banana, Musa paradisiaca. A good example is the leaves on Lindernia plantaginea.

Plantaginella: [plan-ta-ji-nel-la] From Plantāgineum, which is Latin for the plantain or banana and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to the flower spikes, which vaguely to somewhat resemble the plantain banana, Musa paradisiaca. A good example is Dysphania plantaginella.

Plantagineum: [plan-ta-ji-nee-um] From Plantāgineum, which is Latin for the plantain or banana. It refers to leaves, which vaguely to somewhat resemble the plantain banana, Musa paradisiaca. A good example is the fronds on Antrophyum plantagineum.

Plantaginoides: [plan-ta-ji-noi-deez] From Plantāgineum, which is Latin for the plantain or banana and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to tubers, which somewhat resemble the plantain banana, Musa paradisiaca in flavour. A good example was the tubers on the water chestnut Eleocharis plantaginoides, which is now known as Eleocharis dulcis.

Plantago: [plan-teigoh] From Plantāgineum, which is Latin for the plantain or banana. It refers to leaves, which have a distinctive banana leaf shape. A good example is the native selium husk plant Plantago alpestris.

Plantago-aquatica: [plan-teigoh, a-kwo-ti-ka] From Plantāgineum, which is Latin for the plantain or banana. and Aqu which is Latin for water. It refers to plants, whichhave banana like foliage and grow in still, fresh water. A good example is Alisma plantago-aquatica.

Plantarum: [plan-tar-um] From Plāntā/Plantae which is Latin for a plant or a shoot. It refers to the first stages of life which are very typical of plants. A good example is Mantissa plantarum.

Planulata: [pla-nyoo-la-ta] From Plānum which is Latin for flat or level. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on flat ground or plains type of habitats. A good example is the native selium husk plant Pterostylis planulata.

Plashing: [pla-shing] From Plais, which is Latin for a hedge or woven fence. It refers to techniques of interweaving living and at times dead branches through a hedge or living fence originally to control stock. Trees planted in avenues are pleached to give them greater strength. This is created by the branches being woven or growing together usually above head height to make a shady avenue or to ground level to control stock. Also See Pleaching.

Plasmodesma: [plas-mo-des-ma] From Plásma, which is Ancient Greek for something happening and Désma, which is Ancient Greek for maybe a pledge or bond. It refers to a microscopic channel traversing the cell walls of plant cells and some algal cells, to enable transport and communication between the cells.

Platanthera: [pla-tan-ther-a] Is named in honour of Georg Everhard Rumpf/ Rumphius; 1627-1702, who was a German-born Dutch botanical author of Herbarium Amboinense. A good example was Platanthera rumphii, which is now known as Habenaria rumphii.

Platichila: [pla-ti-chi-la] Probably from Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip or a pair of lips. It refers to the labellum on orchids which are rather broad and flat. A good example was Mantissa plantarum, which is now known as Murraya paniculata.

Plastids: [plas-tidz] From Plaistid, which is Ancient Greek for to form or make. It refers to major organelles found in the cells of plants and algae which are the sites of manufacture and storage of important chemical compounds used by the cells. They often contain various types of pigments used in various types of sugar manufacturing during photosynthesis. The types of pigments present can change or determine the cell’s colour.

Platandra: [pla-tan-drh] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to the filaments or anthers, which are flat. A good example is Gomphrena platandra.

Platanoides: [pla-tan-oi-deez] From Platanus, which is Ancient Greek for the Platanus genus in Europe. It refers to the foliage and general appearance, which resembles the plane European tree. A good example was Brachychiton platanoides, which is now known as Brachychiton australis.

Platostoma: [pla-to-stoh-ma] From Planus, which is Latin for flat or level and Stoma, a small orifice or opening. It refers to stoma, which is remarkably flat with a rather conspicuous orifice. A good example is Platostoma longicorne.

Platy: [pla-ti] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad. It refers to any organ that is flat.

Platyacrus: [pla-ti-a-krus] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Across, which is Ancient Greek for an end or ends. It refers to leaves or phyllodes’ apexes, which are very flat and square. A good example is Acacai platyacrus.

Platycalyx: [pla-ti-ka-liks] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for specialized cupular leaves behind the petals. It refers to the calyx lobes which are much larger and flatter in this species than other members of the genus. A good example is Erimophila platycalyx.

Platycanthus: [pla-ti-kan-thus] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Akantha, which is Ancient Greek for a thorn. It refers to spines which are long and flat. A good example is the east Asian lawyer vine Calamus platycanthus.

Platycarpa: [pla-ti-kar-pa] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are very flat. A good example is Acacia platycarpa.

Platycarpidium: [pla-ti-kar-pi-di-um] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruiting pods, which are much flatter than other species in the genus. A good example was Platycarpidium validum, which is now known as Platysace valida.

Platycarpum: [pla-ti-kar-pum] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruiting pods, which are much flatter than other species in the genus. A good example is Myoporum platycarpum.

Platycarpus: [pla-ti-kar-pus] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are much flatter than other species in the genus. A good example is Scirpus platycarpus.

Platyceras: [pla-ti-se-ras] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and broad and Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn or spur. It refers to structures or organs, which have broad flat horn like prickles on the margins. A good example is the unwanted weeds in semi-arid areas known was Argemone platyceras which is now known as Argemone cientifica.

Platycerium: [pla-ti-se-rum] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Kēríon, which is Ancient Greek or later Cērium which is Latin for a bad swelling or ulcer. It usually refers to a group of ferns, which appear to have a large basal swelling that grows as a bulky, peaty sponge. A good example is Platycerium bifurcatum.

Platychaeta: [pla-ti-chee-ta] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Chaite, which is Ancient Greek for a bristles. It refers to seeds and/or pappus, which are flattish and have bristles. A good example is Austrostipa platychaeta.

Platychila: [pla-ti-chi-la] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to labellum on orchids, which are rather flattish. A good example is Chiloglottis platychila.

Platychilum: [pla-ti-chi-lum] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to organs, which are rather flat. A good example is the standard petals on Platychilum celsianum, which is now known as Hovea elliptica however standard petals are not known as lips.

Platychilus: [pla-ti-chi-lus] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to organs, which are rather flat. A good example is the ground orchid Calochilus platychilus.

Platycheiridia: [pla-ti-chei-ri-di-a] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat, Cherie, which is Ancient Greek for a hand and Idia, which is Greek/Latin suffix which changes a family name into a genus name. It may refer to plants, which are given a hand in pollination by the hover flies or Pollen fly that are in the Platycheirus genus. A good example is Calytrix platycheiridia.

Platychlamys: [pla-ti-kla-mis] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Chlamys, which is Ancient Greek for a cloak It refers to seeds and/or pappus which are flattish and have bristles. A good example was Hibiscus platychlamys, which is now known as Hibiscus sturtii var. platychlamys.

Platychorda: [pla-ti-kor-da] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and khordḗ, which is Ancient Greek or later khordḗ Chorda/Chordae, which are Latin for a cord, piece of string or intestine. It refers to leaves, which are long and flat. A good example is Platychorda applanata.

Platycorys: [pla-ti-kor-is] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Corys, which is Ancient Greek for a helmet. It refers to calyptras, which resemble little helmets. A good example is Eucalyptus platycorys.

Platydisca: [pla-ti-dis-ka] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Dískos, which is Ancient Greek for a thin plate. It refers to the discs on the hypanthiums, which are flat. A good example is Eucalyptus platydisca.

Platyglossa: [pla-ti-glos-sa] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Glôssa, which is Latin for a tongue. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a flat tongue. A good example is the ray petals on Eclipta platyglossa.

Platylepis: [pla-ti-le-pis] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Lepís, which is Ancient Greek for scaly or to have scales. It refers to the scale like patches between the veins on the leaves, which resemble flat green scales. A good example is Senecio platylepis.

Platylobioides: [pla-ti-lo-bi-oi-deez] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad, Lobos/Lobī, which is Ancient Greek or Llobus/Legula, which is Latin for a lobe and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the calyx lobes, which are much flatter in this species than other members of the genus. A good example is Mirbelia platylobioides.

Platylobium: [pla-ti-loh-bi-um] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Lobos/Lobī, which is Ancient Greek for a lobe or Lobus/Legula, which is Latin for an ear lobe. It most likely refers to standard petals, which appear to be flat, erect ear lobes. A good example is Platylobium formosum subsp. formosum.

Platyloma: [pla-ti-loh-ma] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Loma, which is Ancient Greek for an edge or fringe. It refers to structures or organs, which has an additional feature along the margins. A good example is the sori along the pinnules on Platyloma falcata, which is now known as Pellaea falcata.

Platynema: [pla-ti-nee-ma] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to anthers, which are broad and flat, almost petaloid. A good example is Brombya platynema.

Platynemus: [pla-ti-nee-mus] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to anthers, which are broad and flat, almost petaloid. A good example was Psychanthus platynemus, which is now known as Aphanopetalum clematideum.

Platypetala: [pla-ti-pe-ta-la] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for a thin metal plate or specialized, coloured leaves which spread out. It refers to petals, which are broad and flat. A good example is Pterostylis platypetala.

Platypetalum: [pla-ti-pe-ta-lum] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for a thin metal plate or specialized, coloured leaves which spread out. It refers to petals, which are broad and flat. A good example is Lepidium platypetalum.

Platyphylla: [plah-ti-fahyl-la] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are distinctly flat. A good example is Cycas platyphylla.

Platyphyllum: [pla-ti-fahyl-lum] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are flat in the type specimens from Africa. A good example from Australia is Antidesma platyphyllum which does not have flat leaves though the leaves are broad.

Platyphyllus: [pla-ti-fahyl-lus] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are flat in the type specimens from Africa. A good example was Pteropogon platyphyllus, which is now known as Rhodanthe stricta.

Platypoda: [pla-ti-poh-da] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to roots, which have flat surface as they spread over the trunks of other trees or boulders in their natural habitat. A good example is Ficus platypoda.

Platyptera: [pla-ti-te-ra] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to structures or organs, which have flat extension like a wings. Two good examples are the wings on the fruits of Dodonea platyptera, the beautiful flattened stems of Acacia alata var. platyptera.

Platypterum: [pla-ti-te-rum] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to structures or organs, which has an extension like a wing. A good example is wings on the fruits of Brachysema platypterum.

Platypterus: [pla-ti-te-rus] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to structures or organs, which has an extension like a wing. A good example is wings on the fruits of Tribulus platypterus.

Platypus: [pla-ti-poos] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to pedicels which are much flatter even compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus platypus.

Platyrhachis: [pla-ti-ra-shis] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Rháchis, which is Ancient Greek for a spine or ridge. It refers to leaf rachis’s, which are much flatter than other species in the genus. A good example is Macrozamia platyrhachis.

Platysace: [pla-ti-sa-ke] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Sakos, which is Ancient Greek for a shield. It refers to fruits, which are distinctly three dimensional shield shape. A good example is Platysace clelandii.

Platysperma: [pla-ti-sper-ma] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which are particularly flat even compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Hakea platysperma.

Platystemonea: [pla-ti-ste-mo-ne-a] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat or broad and Stōma, which was first used by the  Greeks for the male reproductive organs of the flowers but was originally Stāmen which was Ancient Greek/Latin for to stand. It refers to stamens which are exceptionally flat instead of the normal cylindrical shape. A good example is Baeckea platystemonea.

Platystemonum: [pla-ti-ste-mo-num] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat or broad and Stōma, which was first used by the Greeks for the male reproductive organ of the flowers but was originally. It refers to stamens which are exceptionally flat instead of the normal shape. A good example was Hypocalymma platystemonum, which is now known as Rinzia crassifolia.

Platystigma: [pla-ti-stig-ma] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat or broad and Stigma, which is Ancient Greek for the receptive female reproductive organ of the flowers. It refers to stigmas, which are exceptionally flat instead of the normal cylindrical shape. A good example is Myrsine platystigma.

Platystoma: [pla-ti-sto-ma] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat or broad and Stoma, which is Ancient Greek for a mouth or opening. It refers to openings on leaves, which are rather flat. A good example is Cyathodes platystoma.

Platystylis: [pla-ti-stahy-lis] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat or broad and Stízō, which is Ancient Greek for a spike, column or to mark with a sharp point. It refers to the female organ between the ovary and the stigma, which has a flat appearance. A good example is Cyathodes platystoma.

Platythamnos: [pla-ti-tham-nos] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat or broad and Thamnos, which is Ancient Greek for a shrub. It refers to shrubs, which have several ascending stems which all end at around the same height thus they give a flattish appearance. A good example is Eremophila platythamnos.

Platytheca: [pla-ti-the-ka] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Theke, which is Ancient Greek or Theca, which is Latin for a case or box. It refers to fruits capsules or sporangium, which are cubic or rectangular in shape. A good example is Platytheca juniperina.

Platytyrea: [pla-ti-tahy-ree-a] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Tyrem which is Latin for to adorn or attractive. It refers to overall appearance of the plants, which are rather attractive in the wild. A good example is Myrmecodia platytyrea.

Platyzoma: [pla-ti-zoh-ma] From Platy, which is Ancient Greek for flat and broad and Soma, which is Greek or Zoma, which is Latin for a body. It refers to the main part of ferns; the actual fronds, which are very erect and flat. A good example is the monotypic specie Platyzoma microphyllum.

Plautella: [plour-tel-la] From Plautus, which is Latin for broad shouldered and Ella, which is the feminine form. A good example is Acacia plautella which is very rare and listed as a priority 3 in Western Australia.

Plautellum: [plour-tel-lum] From Plautus, which is Latin for broad shouldered and Ella, which is the feminine form. A good example was Racosperma plautellum, which is now known as Acacia plautella which is very rare and listed as a priority 3 in Western Australia.

Pleaching: [plee-ching] From Plectere, which is Latin for to weave or plait. It refers to a technique of interweaving living and at times dead branches through a haedge or living fence originally to control stock. Trees planted in avenues are pleached to give them greater strength. This is created by the branches being woven or growing together usually above head height to make a shady avenue or to ground level to control stock. A good example is Syzygium australe.

Plebeia: [ple-bei-a] From Plebei, which is Latin for belong to the common people. It probably refers to the fact that plants in the genus were eaten as part of a staple diet by the poor or common people in arid locations. A good example is Ipomoea plebeia.

Plebeium: [ple-bei-um] From Plebei, which is Latin for belong to the common people. It probably refers to the fact that plants in the genus were eaten as part of a staple diet by the poor or common people in arid locations. A good example is Polygonum plebeium Ranunculus plebeius.

Plebeius: [ple-bei-us] From Plebei, which is Latin for belong to the common people. It probably refers to the fact that plants in the genus were eaten as part of a staple diet by the poor or common people in arid locations. A good example is Ranunculus plebeius.

Plebeya: [ple-bei-ya] From Plebei, which is Latin for belong to the common people. It refers to the fact that it was very common in association with rural diets in the past. A good example is Hydrocotyle plebeya.

Plectocarpa: [plec-to-kar-pa] From Plektos, which is Ancient Greek for plaited or to twist and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits usually pods, which are twisted. A good example is Acacia plectocarpa.

Plectocarpum: [plec-to-kar-pum] From Plektos, which is Ancient Greek for plaited or to twist and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits usually pods which are twisted. A good example is Racosperma plectocarpum, which is now known as Acacia plectocarpa.

Plectorrhiza: [plec-to-rahy-za] From Plektos, which is Ancient Greek for plaited or to twist and Rhiza, which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to the way the roots are aerially twisted. A good example is Plectorrhiza erecta.

Plectostele: [plec-to-steel] From Plektos, which is Ancient Greek for plaited or to twist and Stele, which is Ancient Greek for stand or to make a stand. It refers to  configuration of the central tissues of stems and roots which have xylem cores that twist and are often disconnected to each other as viewed in transverse section.

https: //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stele_(biology)

Plectrachne: [plec-tra-ak-ne] From Plektron, which is Ancient Greek for a spur and Achne, which is Ancient Greek for chaff and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Plectracne genus in that the lemmas usually have three spurs. All the Australian species of Plectrachne have been transferred to Triodia. A good example was Triodia plectrachnoides.

Plectranthus: [plec-tran-thus] From Plektron, which is Ancient Greek for a spur and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of the flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have a large basal spur. A good example is the flowers on Plectranthus graveolens which is now known as Coleus graveolens.

Plectonia: [plek-to-ni-a] From Plecto, which is Ancient Greek for twisted, plaited or woven. It usually refers to calyxes, which overlap each other. A good example was Plectronia schultzii, which is now known as Cyclophyllum schultzii.

Plectus: [plek-tus] From Plecto, which is Ancient Greek for twisted, plaited or woven. It refers to nematoads. A good example is Plectus geophilus.

Pleiadenia: [plei-a-de-ni-a] From Pleion, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to structures or organs, which have at least two glands. An example of the name is Marsdenia pleiadenia however I have been unable to locate any glands on the plants I have come into contact with.

Pleiadenium: [plei-a-de-ni-um] From Pleion, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to structures or organs, which have at least two glands. An example of the name is Gymnema pleiadenium, which is now known as Marsdenia pleiadenia however I have been unable to locate any glands on the few plants I have come into contact with.

Pleiantha: [plei-an-tha] From Pleion, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to inflorescenses, which have many styles and stamens. A good example is the Chinese garden annual Sida pleiantha.

Pleigynium: [plei-jahy-ni-um] From Pleion, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to styles, which have more than one ovary in each carple. A good example is Pleiogynium timorense.

Pleiobotrya: [plei-o-bo-trahy-a] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Botrya, which is Ancient Greek for a cluster or a bunch of grapes. It refers to the plants, which produce flowers, which are found in larger clusters than other sub species or varieties in the genus. A good example is Craspedia pleiocephala.

Pleiocephala: [plei-o-ke/se-fa-la] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to the plants, producing several offsets of flowers on each spike, especially under ideal conditions. A good example is Craspedia pleiocephala.

Pleiocephalus: [plei-oh-ke/se-fa-lus] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Kephalḗ,which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to the plants, producing several offsets of flowers on each spike, especially under ideal conditions. A good example is Pycnosorus pleiocephalus.

Pleiochaeta: [plei-o-chee-ta] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Khaete, which is Ancient Greek for a bristle. It refers to a cymule inflorescense, which has each axis produces additional lateral axis often in an open formation. A good example is the Chinese garden annual Epaltes pleiochaeta, which is now known as Pluchea baccharoides.

Pleiochaetum: [plei-o-chee-tum] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Khaete, which is Ancient Greek for a bristle. It refers to a cymule inflorescense, which has each axis produces additional lateral axis often in an open formation. A good example is the Chinese garden annual Erigerodes pleiochaetum, which is now known as Pluchea baccharoides.

Pleiochasia: [plei-o-kah-si-a] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Khasium, which is Ancient Greek for to be open. It refers to buds, which have several buds commence blooming at the same time. A good example is Pleiochasia dichotoma, which is now known as Utricularia dichotoma.

Pleiochasium: [plei-o-ka-si-um] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Khasium, which is Ancient Greek for to be open. It refers to buds, which have several buds commence blooming at the same time. A good example is the Chinese garden annual Dianthus barbatus.

Pleiococca: [plei-o-ko-ka] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Kokkos, which is Ancient Greek for a dried berry. It refers to plants, which produce more than one dried berry per leaf axil. A good example is Marsdenia pleiadenia.

Pleiogynium: [plei-o-jahy-ni-um] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to fruits which produce more than one seed. A good example is the five to twelve seeds that are on the outer edge of the fruits on Pleiogynium cerasiferum.

Pleiomerous: [plei-o-me-ros] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Meros, which is Ancient Greek for a share. It refers to flowers, which have equal numbers of parts – sepals, petals and stamens. Written as 3-meros, 4 meros or 5-meros etc. A good example is Acacia hispidula, which is 5 merous.

Pleiopetala: [plei-o-pe-ta-la] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to the brilliant pink specialized leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators that are often more than five which is normal in the genus. A good example is alandrinia pleiopetala.

Pleiorrhiza: [plei-o-rahy-za] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Rrhíza which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers plants, which have two or more roots. A good example was Lemna pleiorrhiza, which is now known as Landoltia punctata.

Pleiosperma: [plei-o-sper-ma] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to one seeds, which have more than one seed in each ovary. A good example is the six to ten loculars in each ovary of Agiortia pleiosperma.

Pleiospermus: [plei-o-sper-mus] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Spérma, which isAncient Greek for a seed. It refers to carples which have more than one seed. A good example is the six to ten loculars in each ovary of Leucopogon pleiospermus, which is now known as Agiortia pleiosperma.

Pleiostemoneus: [plei-o-ste-mo-ne-us] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Stḗmōn, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower that includes both the filament and anther. It refers to plants, which have many stamens. A good example is Schoenus pleiostemoneus.

Pleiostigma: [plei-o-stig-ma] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Stigma, which is Ancient Greek for the female receptive organ on a flower. It refers to flowers, which have more than one stigma on a style. A good example is Trichospermum pleiostigma.

Pleiotaxy: [plei-o-tak-si] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Taxis/Taxus, which is Ancient Greek for being arranged in order. It refers to where the whorls increase in number to the normal.

Plena: [plee-na] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one. It refers to flowers, which are double or appear to be doubles. A good example is Corymbia plena.

Plenissima: [plee-nis-sim-ah] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one Issima, which is Greek/Latin for the suppurlative or very. It refers to flowers, which a larger number of anthers than other species in the genus. A good example was Eucalyptus plenissima, which is now known as Eucalyptus kochii subsp. plenissima.

Pleogyne: [plei-o-jahyn] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to fruits, which have more than one carpel or seed per carpel. A good example is Pleogyne australis.

Pleomele: [plei-o-me-le] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Mele, which is Ancient Greek for an apple. It refers to plants, which produce many fruits that resemble small apples. A good example is Pleomele angustifolia.

Pleomorphic: [plei-o-mawr-fik] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for pertaining to change or to be different. It refers to the cells, which may vary in their size and shape.

Pleomorphism: [plei-oh-mor-fizm] (microbiology): From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for pertaining to change or to be different. It refers to the ability of some bacteria to alter their shape or size in response to environmental conditions.

Pleopeltis: [plei-o-pel-tis] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Péltē/Peltīs, which is Ancient Greek for a small crescent shape sheild. It refers to sori, which resemble a small crescent shape sheild. A good example was Pleopeltis irioides, which is now known as Microsorum punctatum.

Plesiagopus: [ple-si-ei-go-pus] From Plesium, which is Ancient Greek for to have a close relationship to, Lago, which is Latin for a hare and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a hare’s foot A good example is the fruits on Plesiagopus rotundifolia, which is now known as Ipomoea pes-caprae.

Plesiostákhus: [ple-si-oh-sta-kus] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for flower spike. It refers to plants, which have many flower spikes. A good example is Anigosanthus flavida.

Pleurandra: [ploo-ran-dra] From Pleíōn, which is Ancient Greek for more than one and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to flowers, which have relatively more stamens than other species in the genus. A good example was Pleurandra camforosma, which is now known as Hibbertia gracilipes.

Pleurandroides: [ploo-ran-droi-deez] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib, Andros which is Ancient Greek for a male and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to stamens, which have a longitudinal rib. A good example was Eriostemon pleurandroides, which is now known as Asterolasia phebalioides that has a longitudinal rib on the anthers.

Pleuranthodium: [ploo-ran-tho-di-um] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek foron the side or of a rib, ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower and Eîdos/Oides, which are Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers especially composite flowers, which havea longitudinal rib. A good example is Pleuranthodium racemigerum.

Pleurinervia: [ploo-ri-ner-vi-a] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Neûron, which is Ancient Greek or leater Nervus which is Latin for a nerve or vein. It refers to leaves, which have many veins with or without a prominent mid vein. A good example is Hakea plurinervia.

Pleurocarpa: [ploo-ro-kar-pa] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for fruit. It refers to the fruits, which have at least one very prominent rib. A good example is Eucalyptus pleurocarpa.

Pleurocarpaea: [ploo-ro-kar-pee-a] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for fruit. It refers to mosses, which have the archegonium or antheridium on a short side branch rather than the main stalk or leafy stems of non flowering plants. A good example is Pleurocarpaea denticulata.

Pleurocarpus: [ploo-ro-kar-pus] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for fruit. It refers to mosses, which have the archegonium or antheridium on a short side branch rather than the main stalk or leafy stems of non flowering plants. A good example was Gronophyllum pleurocarpus, which is now known as Hydriastele pleurocarpa.

Pleurocitrus: [ploo-ro-si-trus] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for fruit. It refers to mosses, which have the archegonium or antheridium on a short side branch rather than the main stalk or leafy stems of non flowering plants. A good example was Pleurocitrus inodora, which is now known as Citrus inodora.

Pleurocorys: [ploo-ro-kor-is] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Korys, which is Ancient Greek for a helmet. It refers to calyptras or operculums, which resemble little helmets sitting on one side of the hypanthiums. A good example is Eucalyptus pleurocorys.

Pleurogram of Seed: [ploo-ro-gram, seed] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Gram, which is Ancient Greek for a small weight. It refers to a fine groove or raised “u” shaped section on/in the testas, which are usually on each side of the seeds, which makes them lighter. A good example is the seeds of Senna acclinis.

Pleurogynoides: [ploo-ro-jahy-noi-deez] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib, Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to ovaries which have a rib/s on one side. A good example was Gentiana pleurogynoides, which is now known as Chionogentias gunniana.

Pleuromanes: [ploo-ro-meinz] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Mānēs, which is Latin for the good one. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which have an appeal. A good example was Pleuromanes pallidum, which is now known as Hymenophyllum pallidum.

Pleuropappus: [ploo-ro-pa-pus] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Páppos, which is Ancient Greek for a grandfather or Poppy. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in white or pale grey hairs like a poppy’s beard. A good example is Pleuropappus phyllocalymmeus.

Pleurophylla: [ploo-ro-fahyl-la] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which have very prominent mid veins and lateral veins on the lower laminas. A good example is Daviesia pleurophylla.

Pleurophyllum: [ploo-ro-fahyl-lum] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which have very prominent mid veins and lateral veins on the lower laminas. A good example is Australia’s most isolated flowering plant species that of Pleurophyllum hookeri which is found on Macquarrie Island.

Pleurosorus: [ploo-ro-sor-us] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Soros, which is Ancient Greek for a heap. It refers to fronds, which have more sporangium and spores along one side of the mid rib compared to the other side. A good example is Pleurosorus rutiFolium.

Pleurosperma: [ploo-ro-sper-ma] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which have more prominent ribs on one side compared to the other side. A good example is Cryptocarya pleurosperma.

Pleurostylia: [ploo-ro-stahy-li-a] From Pleuron, which is Ancient Greek for on the side or of a rib and Stele, which is Ancient Greek or Stylus, which is Latin for a column. It refers to styles which are off center in earlier named exotic species which could also be adjacent to a ridge or rib. An Australian example of the genus is Pleurostylia opposita.

Plexaure: [plek-sor-e] From Plexūrum, which is Latin for to be plaited, braided or inter woven. It refers to flower spikes which appear to have the flowers woven into the spikes. A good example was Plexaure limenophylax, which is now known as Phreatia limenophylax.

Plicata: [pli-ka-ta] From Plicatus, which is Latin for to be folded like a fan or pleated. It refers to the young leaves and the way they unfold as they mature. A good example is Spathoglottis plicata.

Plicate: [pli-kei t] From Plicatus, which is Latin for to be folded like a fan or pleated. It refers to organs, which have folded or pleated surfaces. A good example is the leaves folding together on Acacia plicata.

Plicatile: [pli-ka-tahyl] From Plicatus, which is Latin for to be folded like a fan or pleated. It refers to structures or organs, which have folded or pleated surfaces or margins. A good example is the leaves and petals on Solanum plicatile.

Plicatilis: [pli-ka-ti-lis] From Plicatus, which is Latin for to be folded like a fan or pleated. It refers to organs, which have folded or pleated surfaces. A good example is the pileus on Coprinus plicatilis.

Plicatulus: [pli-ka-tyoo-lus] From Plicatus, which is Latin for to be folded like a fan or pleated. It refers to petals creasing then splitting as they spreading out. A good example is the petals, which split then recurve strongly backwards on Loranthus plicatulus, which is now known as Amyema plicatula.

Plicatum: [pli-ka-tum] From Plicatus, which is Latin for to be folded like a fan or pleated. It refers to structures or organs, which fold together. A good example is the leaflets on Racosperma plicatum, which is now known as Acacia plicata.

Pliestesial: [pli-e-ste-si-al] From Pliesttesial, which is unknown. There are references to Monocarpic & hapaxianthic, which are Ancient Greek for a plant which can live for many years before it flowers and dies. It refers to a plant, which lives for several years or even decades before flowering, seeding and then dies. A good example is Doryanthes palmeri.

Plinthanthesis: [plin-than-the-sis] From Plinthos, which is Ancient Greek for a brick shaped slab or Plinthus, which is Latin for a square slab and Anthesis, which is Ancient Greek for reLating to the time of blooming or when a flower is most receptive and has received its pollen. It refers to flower buds, which, are somewhat brick shape and reddish as they become receptive. A good example is the glumes on Plinthanthesis paradoxa.

Plokiostigma: [plo-ki-o-stig-ma] From Plokios, which is Ancient Greek for to twine around or wrap around and Stígma/Stízein, which is Ancient Greek for the female reproductive organ upon the style which is receptive to receiving pollen. It refers to the corolla tube and or petals, which wrap around the style and stigma. A good example was Plokiostigma lehmannii, which is now known as Stackhousia monogyna.

Pluchea: [ploo-chee-a] Is named in honour of Noel Pluche; 1688-1761, who was a French teacher and author of Natural history articles. A good example is Pluchea baccharoides.

Plucheacea: [ploo-chee-a-se-a] Is named in honour of Noel Pluche; 1688-1761, who was a French teacher and author ofNatural history articles. A good example is Olearia plucheacea.

Plumatichilos: [ploo-ma-ti-chi-los] From Plumea, which is Latin for downy type short hairs and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a Lip. It refers to labellum on orchids which are covered in short very soft downy like hairs. A good example was Plumatichilos turfosa, which is now known as Pterostylis turfosa.

Plumbago: [plum-bei-goh] From Molybdaina, which is Ancient Greek for lead ore. It refers to the colour of the flowers of the earliest named species, which are pale grey-blue in colour.An Australian example is Plumbago zeylanica.

Plumea: [pluh-me-a] From Plumea, which is Latin for downy type short hair. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in short downy like hairs. A good example is Melaleuca plumea.

Plumeria: [plu-mer-i-a] Is named in honour of Charles Plumier; 1646-1704, who was a French botanist and illustrator. A good example is the exotic garden plant frangipanis, Plumeria rubra.

Plumerioides: [plu-mer-i-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Charles Plumier; 1646-1704, who was a French botanist and illustrator and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants leaves and stems resembling the Plumeria genus. A good example is Euphorbia plumerioides.

Plumiferus: [ploo-mi-fer-us] From Pluma, which is Latin for a birds downy feather or plume and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing.

Plumiforme: [ploo-mi-form] From Pluma, which is Latin for a birds downy feather or plume and Ferae/Ferārum which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in downy hairs or plume like appendages. A good example is the soft down on Prasophyllum plumiforme.

Plumiger: [plum-i-jer] Is named in honour of Charles Plumier; 1646-1704, who was a French monk, botanist and illustrator and Gera which is Latin for to bear. It refers to plants, which resemble the Plumieria genus. A good example is Styloncerus plumiger.

Plumigera: [plum-i-jer-a] Is named in honour of Charles Plumier; 1646-1704, who was a French monk, botanist and illustrator and Gera which is Latin for to bear. It refers to plants, which resemble the Plumieria genus. A good example is Austrostipa plumigera.

Plumosa: [ploo-moh-sa] From Pluma, which is Latin for a bird’s downy feather or plume. It refers to organs usually the leaves, which have fine hairs arranged like a feather. A good example is the feather like petals on Verticordia plumosa.

Plumose: [ploo-mohs] From Pluma, which is Latin for a bird’s downy feather or plume. It refers to organs, which have fine hairs like the down on a feather. A good example is the plume like pappus on Pterochaeta paniculata.

Plumosum: [ploo-moh-sum] From Pluma, which is Latin for a bird’s downy feather or plume. It refers to organs, which have fine hairs like the down on a feather. A good example is the feather like labellum margins on Genoplesium plumosum.

Plumosus: [ploo-moh-sus] From Pluma, which is Latin for a bird’s downy feather or plume. It refers to organs, which have fine hairs like the down on a feather. A good example is the feather like labellum margins on Schoenus plumosus.

Plumule: [ploo-myool] From Plumula, which is Latin for the embryonic shoot on seed bearing plants, which are still in the embryo stage. The growing shoots abobe the cotyledon leaves or the first true leaves.

Plumulifera: [ploo-moo-li-fer-a] From Pluma, which is Latin for a birds downy feather or plume and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to seeds, which are completely covered in long soft white down and plumed hairs A good example is Calotis plumulifera.

Plumulosa: [ploo-moo-lo/loh-sa] From Pluma which is Latin for a birds downy feather or plume and Ferae/Ferārum which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to seeds which are completely covered in long soft white downy hairs A good example is Calytrix plumulosa.

Plumulosum: [ploo-moo-lo/loh-sum] From Pluma which is Latin for a birds downy feather or plume and Ferae/Ferārum which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to seeds which are completely covered in long soft white downy hairs A good example is Thuidium plumulosum.

Pluriangulatus: [ploo-ri-an-gu-la-tus] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Angulātus, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which have many different angles. A good example is the individual fruit apexes on Pandanus pluriangulatus, which is now known as Pandanus cooki.

Pluricallata: [ploo-ri-kal-la-ta] From Plurimus, which is latin for most and Callus, which is Latin for to have a hard skin. It refers to the many glands on the labellum. A good example is the ground orchid Chiloglottis pluricallata.

Pluricaulis: [ploo-ri-kor-lis] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek or Caulus, which is Latin for a stick or later a stem or branch. It refers to plants, which have many rather twiggy stems. A good example is Eucalyptus pluricaulis.

Pluriflora: [ploo-ri-flor-a] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, from the Roman Goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which are prolific in flower. A good example is Sannantha pluriflora.

Plurifloris: [ploo-ri-flor-is] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, from the Roman Goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which are prolificin flower. A good example is Myriocephalus plurifloris.

Pluriflorum: [ploo-ri-flor-uhm] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, from the Roman Goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which are prolificin flower. A good example is Pseuderanthemum grandiflorum var. pluriflorum, which is now known as Pseuderanthemum variabile.

Plurijuga: [ploo-ri-joo-ga] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Juga, which is Latin for a yoke or joined together. It refers to flowers, leaves or at times other organs, which are are opposite or joined together. A good example is the anthers, which remain joined despite the filaments being free on Grevillea plurijuga.

Plurilocularis: [ploo-ri-lo-kyoo-lar-is] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Cularis, which is Latin for a compartment. It refers to fruits, which have many compartments. A good example is Acrotriche plurilocularis.

Pluriloculata: [ploo-ri-lo-kyoo-la-ta] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Cularis, which is Latin for a compartment. It refers to fruits, which have many compartments. A good example is Lissanthe pluriloculata.

Pluriloculatus: [ploo-ri-lo-kyoo-la-tus] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Cularis, which is Latin for a compartment. It refers to fruits, which have many compartments. A good example was Leucopogon pluriloculatus, which is now known as Lissanthe pluriloculata.

Plurinervata: [ploo-ri-ner-va-ta] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Neuron which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve or vein. It refers to leaves and phyllodes which have many prominent veins. A good example is Triodia plurinervata.

Plurinervia: [ploo-ri-ner-vi-a] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Neuron which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve or vein. It refers to leaves and phyllodes which have many prominent veins. A good example is Hakea plurinervia.

Plurinervis: [ploo-ri-ner-vis] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Neuron which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve or vein. It refers to leaves and phyllodes which have many prominent veins. A good example is Austrofestuca plurinervis.

Plurisepalea: [ploo-ri-se-pa-le-a] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum which is Latin for sepals. It refers to plants, which have more sepals than the standard number compared to other species in the genus. A good example was Rochelia plurisepalea, which is now known as Plagiobothrys plurisepaleus.

Plurisepaleus: [ploo-ri-se-par-le-useus] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum which is Latin for sepals. It refers to plants, which have more sepals than the standard number compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Plagiobothrys plurisepaleus.

Pluriseta: [ploo-ri-se-ta] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Sēta/Saēta, which is Latin for a bristle. It refers to plants, which have more bristles than other species in the genus. A good example is Leiocarpa pluriseta.

Pluritubulose: [ploo-ri-tyoo-byoo-lohs] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Tubulosus, which is Latin for tubes. It refers to organs which do not have perfect or a complete transverse septa/pith. They maybe interrupted, irregularly spaced or have longitudinal septas. A good example is Chorizandra cymbaria.

Pluteus: [ploo-te-us] From Pluteus, which is Latin to form a protective shed or breast work. It refers to fungi which have a relatively thicker pileus and margin. A good example is Pluteus atromarginatus.

Pluvisilvaticus: [ploo-vi-sil-va-ti-us] From Pluri/Plures, which is Latin for many and Silvāticum, which is Latin for of the woods or a forest. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in mixed woodlands or mixed forests. A good example was Pandanus pluvisilvaticus, which is now known as Pandanus monticola.

Pneumatophore: [nyoo-ma-to-for] From Pneumon, which is Ancient Greek for a lung, Mat which is English for a floor covering and Phoros, which is Ancient Greek for a bearer of. It refers to a description of vertical growing breathing roots usually associated with mangrove or other plants growing in waterlogged soils or in shallow water. A good example is the aerial roots of Avicennia marina.

Pneumatophorous: [nyoo-ma-to-for-os] From Pneumon, which is Ancient Greek for a lung, Mat, which is English for a floor covering and Phoros, which is Ancient Greek for a bearer of. It refers to a description of vertical growing breathing roots usually associated with mangrove or other plants growing in waterlogged soils or in shallow water. A good example is the aerial roots on Avicennia marina.

Pneumatophorous roots on Avicennia marina with the Royal Spoonbill, Platalea regia

Pneumatopteris: [nyoo-mat-to-te-ris] From Pneumon, which is Ancient Greek for a lung, Mat which is English for a floor covering and Pteris which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to description of vertical growing breathing roots usually associated with mangrove or other plants growing in waterlogged soils or in shallow water. A good example is the New Zealand tree fern Pneumatopteris pennigera.

Poa: [poh-a] From Poa, which is Ancient Greek for a type of fodder grass. It refers to the ancient name of grasses used to feed stock. A good example is Poa tenera.

Pertusaria: [per-tyoo-sar-i-a] Maybe from Pert, which is Latin for cheerful or well formed and Saria/Esse, which is Latin for to be. It refers to the overall shape having a better form than most Lichens with a pleasant warty appearance. A good example is the crustose, warty Lichen Pertusaria pocillaria.

Pocillaria: [po-sil-lar-i-a] From Pocillum, which is Latin for a little cup or a small cupful. It refers to the overall shape being like a broad, shallow cup. A good example is the lIchen Pertusaria pocillaria.

Pocillum: [po-sil-lum] From Pocillum, which is Latin for a little cup or a small cupful. It refers to the fruits, which resemble little cups. A good example is Corymbia pocillum.

Pod: [pod] From Pous/Podos, which are Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to the pods of some legumes appearing like socks or feet on the plants. A good example is the pods on Acacia granitica.

Podalyriifolia: [po-da-li-rahy-foh-li-a] From Podalyrius who was an ancient Greek physician and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the son of Aesculapius,who was a skillful physician in Greek mythology. It is believed that only he could design something as beautiful as the phyllodes on this Acacia. A good example is Acacia podalyrifolia.

Podalyriifolium: [po-da-li-rahy-foh-li-um] From Podalyrius who was an ancient Greek physician and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the son of Aesculapius,who was a skillful physician in Greek mythology. It is believed that only he could design something as beautiful as the phyllodes on this Acacia. A good example was Racosperma podalyriifolium, which is now known asAcacia podalyrifolia.

Podalyrina: [po-da-lahy-ri-na] From Podalyrius, who was an ancient Greek physician and Rina, which is Latin for sand. It refers to the son of Aesculapius,who was a skillful physician in Greek mythology. It is believed that only he could design something as beautiful as these plants to grow on sand habitats. A good example is Hemigenia podalyrina.

Podantha: [po-dan-tha] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have rather short, stocky pedicels. A good example was Thryptomene podantha.

Podanthum: [po-dan-thum] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have longer pedicels than most other species in the genus. A good example was Leptospermum podanthum, which is now known as Leptospermum oligandrum.

Podaxis: [po-dak-sis] From Pous/Podos, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Axis, which is Latin for the longitudinal support on which organs or parts are arranged; the stem and root; the central line of any body. It refers to fungi, which resemble puff balls on a long stalk or footing. A good example is Podaxis pistillaris.

Podenzanae: [po-den-za-nee] Is named in honour of G Podenzan who was a plant cpllector in the early 1890’s. A good example was Phyllanthus podenzanae, which is now known as Sauropus podenzanae.

Podiocarpa: [po-di-o-kar-pa] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits appearing like llittle feet along the stems. A good example is Melaleuca podiocarpa.

Podistra: [po-dis-tra] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruitsm which are like large feet along the stems. A good example is Morinda podistra.

Podo: [po-do] From Pous/Podosm which is Ancient Greek or Pedim which is Latin for a foot or feet.

Podocarpifolia: [po-do-kar-pi-foh-li-a] From Pous/Podosm which is Ancient Greek or Pedim which is Latin for a foot or feet and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to fruits, which appear like little feet hidden amongst the foliage. A good example is Ficus podocarpifolia.

Podocarpoides: [po-do-kar-poi-deez] From Pous/Podosm which is Ancient Greek or Pedim which is Latin for a foot or feet, Karpós which is Ancient Greek for a fruit and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Podocarpus genus. A good example was Phebalium podocarpus, which is now known as Phebalium squamulosum subsp. alpinum.

Podocarpus: [po-do-kar-pus] From Pous/Podos, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are like little feet from the apex of the swollen petioles. A good example is Podocarpus lawrencei.

Podocoma: [po-do-koh-ma] From Pous/Podos, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Kómē, which is Ancient Greek for a head hair or a comb. It refers to structures or organs usually the seeds are covered in long white hairy awns. A good example was Podocoma cuneifolia, which is now known as Ixiochlamys cuneifolia.

Podolepidium: [po-do-le-pi-di-um] From Pous/Podos, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Lepís, which is Ancient Greek for a scale. It refers to phyllaries, which overlap and resemble fish scales or laid roofing tiles. A good example is Anemocarpa podolepidium.

Podolepis: [po-do-le-pis] From Pous/Podos, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Lepís which is Ancient Greek for a scale. It refers to phyllaries, which overlap and resemble fish scales or laid roofing tiles. A good example is Podolepis arachnoidea.

Podolobium: [po-do-loh-bi-um] From Pous/Podos, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and lobus/Lobī, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to pods which have longer pedicels than other species in the genus. A good example is Podolobium humifusum.

Podopetala: [po-do-pe-ta-la] From Pous/Podos, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi which is Latin for a foot or feet and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators which have a distinct foot like taper to the ovary. A good example was Sida podopetala, which is now known as Sida platycalyx.

Podopetalum: [po-do-pet-a-lum] From Pous/Podos, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek or Petalum, which is Latin for a petal. It refers to petals in the bud stage, which have very prominent peicels little feet along the pedicle and the claws once in bloom. A good example was Podopetalum ormondi, which is now known as Ormosia ormondii.

Podophylla: [po-do-fi/fahy-la] From Pous/Podos, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which have very prominent petiole. A good example is Daviesia podophylla.

Podostemum: [po-do-ste-mum] From Pous/Podos, which are Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Stêma, which is Ancient Greek for the male stem that holds the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to stamens, which have the appearance of little feet. A good example is Podostemum queenslandicus though there is some confusion on the spelling of the name and possibility of having already had a name change.

Podotheca: [po-do-the-ka] From Pous/Podos, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Thḗkē, which is Ancient Greek for a case or box. It refers to the flower buds, which stand out like little boxes. A good example is Podotheca angustifolia.

Poecilodermis: [poh-e-si-lo-der-mis] From Poecil, which is Ancient Greek for quite variable and Dermis, which is Latin for the outer layer of skin. It refers to the outer layer of the leaves which is very variable in size, diameter, shape and thickness. A good example is the vein structure and fronds on Poecilodermis populnea, which is now known as Brachychiton populneus.

Poecilophlebia: [poh-e-si-lo-fle-bi-a] From Poecil, which is Ancient Greek for quite variable and Phlebos, which is Ancient Greek for veins. It refers to veins, which are very variable in size diameter and thickness. A good example is the vein structure and fronds on Lastreopsis poecilophlebia.

Poecilophlebium: [poh-e-si-lo-fle-bi-um] From Poecil, which is Ancient Greek for quite variable and Phlebos, which is Ancient Greek for veins. It refers to veins, which are very variable in structure, diameter and thickness. A good example was Thelypteris poecilophlebium, which is now known as Coveniella poecilophlebia.

Poeppigiana: [poh-ep-pi-ji-a-na] Is named in honour of E. F. Poeppig; 1798-1868, who was a German naturalist and explorer who was aprogious collector of south American plants. A good example is Grammitis poeppigiana.

Pogonanthera: [po-gon-an-ther-a] From Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to outside the corolla and anthers, which are covered in short to long white beard like hairs. A good example is Rostellularia adscendens var. pogonanthera.

Pogonatherum: [po-gon-an-ther-um] From Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers or awns, which have a thick beard of hairs. A good example is Pogonatherum crinitum.

Pogonetes: [po-go-ne-tes] From Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to labellum, which bear loose ciliate type beard with different length hairs. A good example was Pogonetes spinescens, which is now known as Scaevola spinescens.

Pogonia: [po-goh-ni-a] From Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to labellum, which bear loose ciliate type whiskers with different length hairs. A good example was Pogonia aragoana, which is now known as Nervilia aragoana.

Pogonocalyx: [po-goh-no-ka-liks] From Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for specialized leaves which surround the immature bud which are often cupular in shape – calyx. It refers to calyxes, which are covered in greyish hairs. A good example is Leucopogon pogonocalyx.

Pogonocarpum: [po-goh-no-kar-pum] From Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which just poke through the long, dense, white, flocose hairs. A good example is Cullen pogonocarpum.

Pogonolepis: [po-goh-no-le-pis] From Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard and Lepís, which is Ancient Greek for a scale. It refers to the flower’s phyllaries, which poke through long, dense, white, floccose hairs. A good example is Pogonolepis muelleriana.

Pogonophora: [po-goh-no-for-a] From Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard and Phóros, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are rather hairy. A good example was Calandrinia pogonophora, which is now known as Anacampseros australiana.

Pogonoloba: [po-goh-no-loh-ba] From Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard and Lobus/Lobī, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to lobes, which are rather hairy. A good example is the corolla lobes on Cryptandra pogonoloba.

Pogonolobus: [po-goh-no-loh-bus] From Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard and Lobus/Lobī, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to lobes, which are rather hairy. A good example is the corolla lobes on Pogonolobus reticulatus.

Pogostemon: [po-goh-no-ste-mon] From Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard and Stemon, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to fruits, which just poke through the long, dense, white, floccose hairs. A good example was Pogostemon verticillatus, which is now known as Pogostemon stellatus.

Pohlmaniana: [pol-ma-ni-ana] Is named in honour of Robert William Pohlman; 1811-1877, who was a Melbourne Judge and friend of Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Planchonella pohlmaniana var. pohlmaniana.

Pohlmanianum: [pol-ma-ni-anum] Is named in honour of Robert William Pohlman; 1811-1877, who was a Melbourne Judge and friend of Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example was Sideroxylon pohlmanianum, which is now known as Planchonella pohlmaniana var. pohlmaniana.

Poicilum: [poi-si-lum] From Poikílos, which is Ancient Greek for spotted, variegated or variable. It refers to structures or organs, which are quite variable. A good example is Stenanthemum poicilum.

Poiformis: [poi-for-mis] From Poikílos, which is Ancient Greek for spotted, variegated or variable and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to structures or organs, which are quite variable. A good example is Poa poiformis var. poiformis which varies considerably with height, colour and spike structure.

Poikilogyne: [poi-ki-lo-jahyn] From Poikílos, which is Ancient Greek for spotted, variegated or variable and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to female reproductive organs, which vary considerably in colour and the spotting and blotches. A good example is Poikilogyne cordifolia.

Poimena: [poi-me-na] From Poikílos, which is Ancient Greek for spotted, variegated or variable and maybe Minārī which is Latin for minor. It may refer to grass seeds which can be made into similar dishes but used in a minor way or with a slighlty inferior flavour. A good example is Luzula poimena.

Polakii: [po-la-ki-ahy] Is named in honour of Polak which may be a spelling error for Pollack. A good example was Trichinium polakii, which is now known as Ptilotus polakii.

Polandii: [po-lan-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Wilhelm Georg Friedrich Poland; 1866-1955, who was a Bulvarian missionary at Wujal Wujal who discovered the first plant at the missionary. A good example is Gnaphalium policaulon.

Policaulon: [po-li-kor-lon] From Polī, which is Ancient Greek for greyish and Kaulon, which is Ancient Greek or Caulus which is Latin for a stick or stems and branches. It refers to stems and small branches, which are pale grey or are covered in grey hairs. A good example is Gnaphalium policaulon.

Polifolia: [po-li-foh-li-a] From Polī, which is Ancient Greek for greyish and Folia, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are greyish in colour. A good example is Pultenaea polifolia.

Polifolium: [po-li-foh-li-um] From Polī, which is Ancient Greek for greyish and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are greyish in colour. A good example is the flower spikes and organs on Racosperma polifolium, which is now known as Acacia polifolia.

Poliochlorum: [po-li-oh-klor-rum] From Polī, which is Ancient Greek for greyish and Khlōris, which is Ancient Greek for the beautiful goddess of spring and flowers or the greenfinch. It refers to flowers or at times other organs, which are grey-green in colour. A good example is the flower spikes and other organs on Argyrotegium poliochlorum.

Poliochlorus: [po-li-oh-klor-rus] From Polī, which is Ancient Greek for greyish and Khlōris, which is Ancient Greek for the beautiful goddess of spring and flowers or the greenfinch. It refers to flowers, which are greyish-green in colour. A good example is the flower spikes and other organs on Euchiton poliochlorus, which is now known as Argyrotegium poliochlorum.

Poliochroa: [po-li-o-kroh-a] From Polī, which is Ancient Greek for grey and Krôma, which is Ancient Greek for colour or hues of a colour. It refers to foliages, which are variable hues of grey-green to bluish grey-green or at times purple-green. A good example is Acacia poliochroa.

Poliostemma: [po-li-o-stemma] From Polī, which is Ancient Greek for grey and Stemma, which is Ancient Greek for a wreath or garland. It refers to the fruits, which are pale greyish–white  while the type species bracts resemble a wreath around the flowers. A good example is Psychotria poliostemma.

Polita: [po-li-ta] From Polita, which is Latin for smooth and polished. It refers to the stems, branches and trunks which are somewhat glossy. A good example is Eucalyptus polita.

Politus: [po-li-tus] From Polita, which is Latin for smooth and polished. It refers to the foliages, which are somewhat glossy. A good example is Ranunculus pumilio var. politus.

Pollen: [pol-len] From Palē, which is Ancient Greek or Pollen which is Latin for mill dust (Flour). It refers to the individual anthers in flowers, which are covered in a pollen by young male gametophytes after anthesis. A good example is the brigt yellow pollen on Acacia filicifolia.

Pollen Grain: [pol-len, grein] From Palē, which is Ancient Greek or Pollen, which is Latin for mill dust (Flour). It refers to the individual anthers on flowers, which store the mature  pollen by young male gametophytes after anthesis.

Pollen Sac: [pol-len, sak] From Palē, which is Ancient Greek or Pollen, which is Latin for mill dust (Flour). It refers to  male sporangium which contain the pollen prior to dehiscing – being released.

Pollen Tube: [pol-len tyoob] From Palē, which is Ancient Greek or Pollen which is Latin for mill dust (Flour) and Tubus, which is Latin for a pipe, canal or conduit. It refers to the individual a pollen grain by young male gametophytes after anthesis growing a long tube down to the ovary and ovum to initiate fertilization. A good example is the bright yellow pollen on Acacia filicifolia. See Pollen grain.

Pollia: [pol-li-a] Is named in honour of Jan van der Poll who was a Dutch botanist. A good example is Pollia crispata.

Pollination: [pol-li-nei-shon] The time which occurs when the pollen touches the stigma. Types of pollination vary greatly accordingly to the type of flower

Pollinia: [pol-li-ni-a] From Palē, which is Ancient Greek or Pollen which is Latin for mill dust (Flour). A coherent mass of pollen found in Orchids.

Pollinium: [pol-li-ni-um] From Palē, which is Ancient Greek or Pollen which is Latin for mill dust (Flour). A coherent mass of pollen found in Orchids.

Polo: [poh-loh] From Pólos, which is Ancient Greek for rotation on an axis or Polus/Polī, which is Latin for an extreme point on an axis. It refers to racemes, which rotate along the axis with the upper raceme being at the extreme tip. A good example was Paspalum polo, which is now known as Paspalum scrobiculatum.

Polpha: [pol-fa] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and maybe from Morpha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a form or to change form. It refers structures or organs, which have many different forms. A good example is the leaves on Ipomoea polpha.

Poly: [po-li] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many.

Polyacantha: [po-li-kan-tha] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for prickly or thorny. It refers to plants, which are very prickly or are rather thorny. A good example is Acacia polyacantha.

Polyacanthum: [po-li-kan-thum] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for prickly or thorny. It refers to plants, which are very prickly or are rather thorny. A good example Racosperma polycanthum, which is now known as Acacia polyacantha.

Polyacida: [po-li-a-si-da] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Akis, which is Ancient Greek for very pungent tips. It refers to leaf lobes, which end in very pungent tips. A good example is Grevillea polyacida.

Polyad: [po-li-ad] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many.

Polyadenia: [po-li-a-de-ni-a] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Adena, which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to leaves and at times petioles, which have many glands. A good example is Macaranga polyadenia.

Polyadenium: [po-li-a-de-ni-um] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Adena, which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to leaves and at times petioles which have many glands. A good example was Racosperma polyadenium, which is now known as Acacia polyadenia.

Polyadenos: [po-li-ah-de-nos] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Adena, which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to the leaves and at times the petioles having many glands. A good example is Mallotus polyadenos.

Polyalthia: [po-li-ahl-thi-a] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Althaine, in which is Ancient Greek for to heal or healing. It refers to the apparent uses of the plants in cytoxology. A good example is Polyalthia australis.

Polyandra: [po-li-an-dra] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to flowers, which have more anthers than other species in the genus. A good example is Calandrinia polyandra.

Polyandrous: [po-li-an-dros] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to flowers, which have more anthers than other species in the genus.

Polyandrum: [po-li-an-drum] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to flowers, which have a lot more anthers than other species in the genus. A good example is Argyrodendron polyandrum.

Polyandrus: [po-li-an-drus] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to flowers, which have more anthers than other species in the genus.

Polyantha: [po-li-an-tha] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which have more flowers than other species in the genus. A good example is Lilaeopsis polyantha.

Polyanthema: [po-li-an-the-ma] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which have more flowers than most other species in the genus. A good example is the density rather than the quntity of flowers on Hakea polyanthema.

Polyanthemos: [po-li-an-the-mos] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which have more flowers than most other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus polyanthemos.

Polyanthemus: [po-li-ahn-the-mus] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which have many more flowers than other species in the genus. A good example is Juncus polyanthemus.

Polyanthon: [po-li-an-thon] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. Its reference to a fern is a little bewildering but may refer to the number of sporangia, which are more prolific than other species in the genus. A good example was Hymenophyllum polyanthon which is now known as  Hymenophyllum polyanthos.

Polyanthos: [po-li-an-thos] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. Its reference of a flower to a fern is a little bewildering but may refer to the number of fruiting bodies which are more prolific than most other species in the genus. A good example is Hymenophyllum polyanthos.

Polyanthum: [po-li-an-thum] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are at different stages of development at any one time. A good example is the exotic bedding plant Melastoma polyanthum.

Polyanthus: [po-li-an-thus] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which have more flowers at different stages of development at any one time than other species in the genus. A good example is the exotic commercial bedding plant Polyanthus crescendo.

Polyaulax: [po-li-or-laks] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Aûlax, which is Ancient Greek for a furrow. It refers to structures or organs, which have longitudinal furrow. A good example is the longitudinal furrow on the fruits of Polyaulax cylindrocarpa, which is now known as Meiogyne cylindrocarpa subsp. cylindrocarpa.

Polybotrya: [po-li-bo-trahy-a] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Botrys, which is Ancient Greek for a bunch of grapes. It refers to plants, which have more small bunches flowers than most other species in the genus. A good example Acacia polybotrya.

Polybotryum: [po-li-bo-trahy-um] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Botrys, which is Ancient Greek for a bunch of grapes. It refers to plants, which have more small bunches flowers than most other species in the genus. A good example was Racosperma polybotryum, which is now known as Acacia polybotrya.

Polybractea: [po-li-brak-tee-a] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Bractea, which is Latin for a thin plate of metal. It refers to plants, which have many small leaf-like structures at the base of another organ. A good example is Grevillea polybractea.

Polycalymma: [po-li-ka-lahym-ma] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Kaluma, which is Ancient Greek for a veil or covering. It refers to plants, which have many seeds; which totally cover the heads of the flowers, which are released like a floccose veil. A good example is Polycalymma stuartii.

Polycarpa: [po-li-kar-pa] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to plants, which have many fruits. A good example is Corymbia polycarpa .

Polycarpaea: [po-li-kahr-pee-a] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to plants, which have many fruits. A good example is Polycarpaea spirostylis.

Polycarpellate: [po-li-kar-pel-leit] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Carpellatus, which is Latin for having carpels or Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have many compartments or carpels. A good example is Diospyros australis.

Polycarpum: [po-li-kar-pum] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to plants, which have many fruits. A good example was Dendrobium polycarpum, which is now known as Durabaculum mirbelianum.

Polycarpus: [po-li-kar-pus] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to plants, which have many fruits. A good example is Desmos polycarpus.

Polycephala: [po-li-ke/se-fa-la] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to plants, which have many flower heads branching from a, single peduncle. A good example is the flower heads on Banksia polycephala.

Polycephalum: [po-li-ke/se-fa-lum] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and  Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to plants, which have many flower heads branching from each apex. A good example is the flower heads on Spyridium polycephalum.

Polycephalus: [po-i-ke/se-fa-lus] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to plants, which have many flower heads branching From A, single peduncle. A good example is the flower heads on Isopogon polycephalus.

Polychroma: [po-li-kroh-ma] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and From Khrôma, which is Ancient Greek for the saturation of colour or density of a hue in refraction of light from a, surface. It refers to plants, which have many colours. A good example is the flowers on Thelymitra polychroma which have many shades of deep purple, deep blue and deep pinkish purple.

Polyclada: [po-li-kla-da] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Klados, which is Ancient Greek or Cladus, which is Latin for a stem or branch. It refers to plants, which have many chaotic stems branching from near the ground and along the older stems. A good example is Eremophila polyclada.

Polyclades: [po-li-kla-des] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Klados which is Ancient Greek or Cladus, which is Latin for a stem or branch. It refers to plants, which have many chaotic stems branching from near the ground and along the older stems. A good example is Graphina polyclades where the lirella resemble many chaotic streams branching.

Polycladus: [po-li-klah-duh s] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Klados, which is Ancient Greek or Cladus which is Latin for a stem or branch. It refers to plants, which have many chaotic stems branching from near the ground and along the older stems. A good example was Phyllanthus polycladus, which is now known as Phyllanthus aridus .

Polyclonal: [po-li-klo-nal] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Klonos, which is Ancient Greek for being in turmoil. It refers to plants, which have been cloned from tissues to combat diseases. Annus comocus is often treated with a polyclonal antibody or at times with a monoclonal antibody to treat Pineapple bacilliform virus.

Polyclonus: [po-li-klo-nus] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Klonos, which is Ancient Greek for being in turmoil. It refers to the cloning of tissues to combat diseases.

Polycnemum: [po-li-ne-mum] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Knēmis/Knḗmē, which are Ancient Greek for to greive or a tibia. Its reference is not clear but may refer to the stems which are usually whitish and bare between the nodes especially during periods of drought. A good example was Polycnemum diandrum, which is now known as Surreya diandra.

Polycyclic: [po-li-sahy-klik] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Kyklikos, which is Ancient Greek or Cyclicus which is Latin for a whorl. It refers to; for example, in the chemistry of aromatherapy aromatic hydrocarbons may have many polycyclic whorls repeated to make very large chains.

Polydelphous: [po-li-del-fos] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Adelphos, which is Ancient Greek for a brother or sibling. It usually refers to plants, which have 3 or more bundles of stamens with part of the filaments or anthers being free. A good example is found in Melaleuca thymifolia where the stamens are in 5 budles.

Polyembryony: [po-li-em-bray-o-nee] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Embryum, which is Ancient Greek for the young one. It refers to where a single fertilized egg divides into many or in some cases thousands of individual embryos. It is commonly referred to; in human births, as identical twins or triplets. A good example is the seeds of the Citrus genus which includes Citrus australisica while some species of Syzygium seeds like Syzygium paniculatum occasionally display polyembryonic traits.

Polyfolia: [po-li-foh-li-a] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many or much and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have many leaves or have a denser foliage than other species or sub species in the genus. A good example is Pomaderris phylicifolia var. polyfolia.

Polygala: [po-li-ga-la] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many or much and Galon/Gála, which are Greek for milk. It refers to the belief people had for years that mammals which consumed these plants produced more milk. A good example is the comon milkwort Polygala japonica.

Polygalacea: [po-li-ga-la-se-a] From Polý, which is Greek many or much and Galon/Gála, which are Greek for milk. It refers to plants, which produce copious quantities of a milky sap or are of a pale milky colour. A good example is Coopernookia polygalacea.

Polygalifolia: [po-li-ga-li-foh-lia] From Polý, which is Greek many or much, Galon/Gála, which are Greek for milk and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to foliage plants, which are typical or similar to those of the milkworts in the Polygala genus that were thought to increase milk supply in cows and goats. A good example is Rhodanthe polygalifolia.

Polygalifolium: [po-li-ga-li-foh-li-um] From Polý, which is Ancient Greek for many or much, Galon/Gála, which are Greek for milk and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble those of the milkworts in the Polygala genus that were used to feed dairy cows. A good example is Leptospermum polygalifolium.

Polygalioides: [po-li-ga-li-oi-deez] From Polý, which is Greek many or much, Galon/Gála, which are Greek for milk and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble those of the milkworts in the Polygala genus. A good example is Bredemeyera polygaloides.

Polygama: [po-li-ga-ma] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Gamía, which is Ancient Greek for a partner or marriage. It refers to plants, which have both perfect flowers, some staminate or some pistillate flowers on the same plant. A good example was Grewia polygama, which is now known as Grewia retusifolia.

Polygamo dioecious: [po-li-ga-mo, dahy-ee-shos] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Gamous, which is Ancient Greek for a partner or marriage. From Di, which is Ancient Greek for two and Oikia, which is Ancient Greek for a house. It refers to plants, which have both perfect flowers, some staminate or some pistillate flowers on the same plant. A good example is Astonia australiensis.

Polygamo monoecious: [po-li-ga-mo, mon-ee-shos] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Gamous, which is Ancient Greek for a partner or marriage. It refers to monoecious plants, which may at times produce some perfect flowers. A good example is Dodonaea viscosa.

Polygamous: [po-li-ga-mos] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Gamous, which is Ancient Greek for a partner or marriage. It refers to plant, which have both perfect and imperfect flowers on the same tree. A good example is Mitrasacme polymorpha.

Polygamus: [po-lee-ga-mus] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Gamous, which is Ancient Greek for a partner or marriage. It refers to plants, which have both perfect and imperfect flowers on the same tree. A good example is Mitrasacme polymorpha.

Polygonifolium: [po-li-gon-i-foh-li-um] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many, Gonos, which is Ancient Greek or Gonium which is Latin for a knee joint or bent at an angle and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for aike or similar to. It refers to structures, which have many prominent joints resembling the Polygonum genus. A good example is Potamogeton polygonifolium, which is now known as Potamogeton parmatus which is not found in Australia and Potamogeton natans of which the Australian specie has since been renamed to Potamogeton drummondii.

Polygonifolius: [po-li-gon-i-foh-li-us] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many, Gonos, which is Ancient Greek or Gonium which is Latin for a knee joint or bent at an angle and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for aike or similar to. It refers to structures, which have many prominent joints resembling the Polygonum genus. A good example is Potamogeton polygonifolius.

Polygonoides: [po-li-gon-oi-deez] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many, Gonos, which is Ancient Greek or Gonium which is Latin for a knee joint or bent at an angle and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for aike or similar to. It refers to structures, which have many prominent joints similar to the Polygonum genus. A good example is Einadia polygonoides.

Polygonum: [po-li-gonum] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Gonos, which is Ancient Greek or Gonium which is Latin for a knee joint or bent at an angle. It refers to plants, which have many, prominent joints. A good example is the common Knotweed Polygonum plebeium.

Polygynous: [po-li-jahy-nos] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to plants, which have 3 or more styles and or ovaries. A good example is the flowers on Grevillea renwickiana.

Polyheterophytous: [po-li-he-te-ro-fahy-tos] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many, Heteros, which is Ancient Greek for the other or different and Phyton, which is Ancient Greek for a plant. It refers to plants, which have several different forms in different individuals even in the same area.

Polymeria: [po-li-me-ri-a] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Méris, which is Ancient Greek for a part. It refers to organs, which have several distinct parts. A good example is Polymeria pusilla which has several stigmas.

Polymerous: [po-li-mer-os] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Méros, which is Ancient Greek for parts of a whorl. It refers to how many segments are within a flower’s whorl. If a flower has 5 petals, 5 sepals and 5 or 10 stamens it is 5 pentamery or pentamerous. Flowers are either 2 dimery, 3 trimery, 4 tetramery, 5 pentamery or 6 hexamerous.

Polymorpha: [po-li-mor-fa] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for form or to change form. It refers to the organs taking on many different forms. A good example is the flowers on Mitrasacme polymorpha.

Polymorphic: [po-li-mor-fik] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for form or to change form. It refers to the organs, which have many different forms. A good example is the different shaped leaves on Brachychiton acerifolium even on the same tree.

Polymorphism: [po-li-mor-fiz-im] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Morphos, which is Ancient Greek forform or to change form. It refers to plants, which have taken on many different forms. A good example is Plectranthus graveolens.

Polymorphum: [po-li-mor-fum] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for form or to change form. It refers to plants, which have taken on many different forms. A good example is the flower colours and the shape of the standard petal, leaves and pedicels on Gompholobium polymorphum.

Polymorphus: [po-li-mor-fus] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for form or to change form. It refers to plants, which have taken on many different forms. A good example is the flower colours on Leucopogon polymorphus.

Polyodon: [po-li-oh-don] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Odontes, which is Ancient Greek for a tooth or teeth. It refers to fronds or leaves which have many teeth on each lobe. A good example is the fronds on Asplenium polyodon.

Polyosma: [po-li-os-ma] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Osme, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful scent. It refers to flowers, which emit distinctly different beautiful scents. A good example is Polyosma alangiacea.

Polyosmoides: [po-li-os-moi-deez] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Osme, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful scent and Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers, which emit a distinctly different but beautiful scents similar to Polyosma genus. A good example is Alangium villosum subsp. polyosmoides.

Polypetala: [po-li-pe-ta-la] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators, which appear in many rows like a double flower. A good example is the petals on Calandrinia polypetala.

Polyphragmon: [po-li-frag-mon] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and phragmós, which is Ancient Greek for a barrier, obstruction or at times a fence. It refers to plants, which at times can form impenatrable barriers. A good example is Polyphragmon sericeum of which the Australian specie is now known as Timonius timon var. timon.

Polyphlebium: [po-li-fle-bi-um] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Phlebium, which is Ancient Greek for a vein. It refers to leaves or other organs, which have prominent veins. A good example is the fronds on the filmy fern Polyphlebium venosum.

Polyphylla: [po-li-fi/fahyl-la] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which are densely clothed in leaves. A good example is Rhodanthe polyphylla.

Polyphyllum: [po-li-fi/fahyl-lum] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which are extremely densely clothed in leaves. A good example is Ophioglossum polyphyllum.

Polyphyllus: [po-li-fi/fahy-lus] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which are rather densely clothed in leaves. A good example is Enneapogon polyphyllus.

Polypodioides: [po-li-po-di-oi-deez] It refers to ferns, which have many rhizomes, which resemble little feet spreading out in all directionsas is found in the Polypodia genus. A good example is the exotic Madagascan collector’s fern Davallia polypodioides.

Polypodium: [po-li-pohdi-um] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to ferns which have many rhizomes which resemble feet spreading out in all directions. A good example is the exotic Asian collector’s fern Polypodium vulgare.

Polypompholyx: [po-li-pom-fo-liks] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Pompholyx, which is Ancient Greek for small bubbles. It refers to having many small bladders. A good example is Polypompholyx multifida.

Polypterygia: [po-li-te-rahy-ji-a] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Pterýgion/Ptéryx, which is Ancient Greek for a small wing or fin. It refers to seeds or at times other organs, which have a small or short wing that is much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example is the seeds on Maireana polypterygia.

Polyrhiza: [po-li-rahy-za] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Rrhíza, which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to plants, which produce many roots or rhizomes. A good example is Lemna polyrhiza, which is now known as Spirodela polyrhiza.

Polysciada: [po-li-ski-ei-da] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Scias, which is Ancient Greek for shade or an umbrella. It refers to flowers, which form in many umbels. A good example is Corymbia polysciada.

Polyscias: [po-li-ski-as] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Scias, which is Ancient Greek for shade or an umbrella. It refers to the flowers, which form in many umbels. A good example is Polyscias sambucifolia.

Polysiphonia: [po-li-sahy-fo-ni-a] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Siphonia, which is Latin for a long tube. It refers to branchlets, which wave around like many long thin plastic tubes in the ocean. A good example is the seaweed Polysiphonia abscissoides.

Polysperes: [po-li-sperz] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Spáō, which is Ancient Greek for to break or split in a manner that cannot be repaired or undone or Spērāre which is Latin for I hope, expect, I await in anticipation. It refers to flower buds, which are waited for in anticipation to break open into flower. A good example was Gentianella polysperes, of which the Australian species is now known as Chionogentias polysperes while all the Gentinanella species in Australian have been transferred to the Chionogentias genus.

Polysperma: [po-li-sper-ma] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to plants, which produce a lot of seeds. A good example is the legume Goodia polysperma.

Polyspermus: [po-li-sper-mus] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Spérma, which isAncient Greek for a seed. It refers to plants, which produce a lot of seeds. A good example is the legume Leucothamnus polyspermus, which is now known as Thomasia rugosa.

Polystachium: [po-li-sta-chi-um] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for a spike. It refers to plants, which have more than one spike growing from each leaf axis. A good example is Stylidium polystachium.

Polystachya: [po-li-sta-che-a] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for a spike. It refers to plants, which have two or spikes growing from each leaf axis. A good example is Acacia polystachyon.

Polystachyon: [po-li-sta-shahy-on] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for a spike. It refers to plants, which have two or more spikes growing from each leaf axis. A good example is Basilicum polystachyon.

Polystachyos: [po-li-sta-shi-os] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for a flower spike. It refers to plants, which have a lot more flowering spikes than other species in the genus. A good example is Cyperus polystachyos.

Polystachyum: [po-li-sta-shahy-um] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for a spike. It refers to the the plants, which have a lot more flowering spikes than other species in the genus. A good example is Gastrolobium polystachyum.

Polystachyus: [po-li-sta-shahy-us] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for a spike (Cob of corn). It refers to the the plants, which have a lot more flowering spikes than other species in the genus. A good example is Ptilotus polystachyus.

Polystemonea: [po-li-ste-mon-ee-a] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Stḗmōn, which is Ancient Greek or Stamen, which is Latin for consisting of a fliament. It may refer to plants which have more stamens than other species in the genus. A good example is Baeckea polystemonea.

Polystichum: [po-li-sti-chum] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Stíkhos, which is Ancient Greek for a row or file of soldiers. It usually refers to sporangia which are in two rows along the pinnae/pinnules. A good example is Polystichum fallax.

Polytoca: [po-li-toh-ka] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Tocca, which is Latin for to touch. It may refer to grasses, which have the upper and lower glumes just coming into contact with each other. A good example was Polytoca sclerachne, which is now known as Cleistochloa sclerachne.

Polytricha: [po-li-trahy-ka] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many, Tríchōma, which is Ancient Greek for a hair and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to grasses seed heads looking a little like the Polytrichum genus. A good example is Verticordia polytricha.

Polytrichoides: [po-li-trahy-koi-deez] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many, Tríchōma, which is Ancient Greek for a hair and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to grasses seed heads, which resemble the Polytrichum genus. A good example is Fymbristylis polytrichoides.

Polytrichum: [po-li-trahy-kum] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Tríchōma, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to organs, which are covered in long hairs. A good example is Polytrichum juniperinum.

Polyzone: [po-li-zohn] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and and Zona, which is Ancient Greek for a bolt or yoke. It refers to organs, which are joined together. A good example is Polyzone purpurea, which is now known as Darwinia purpurea.

Polyzyga: [po-li-zahy-ga] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Zygo which is Ancient Greek for bolt or yoke. It refers to organs, which joined together. A good example is Burtonia polyzyga, which is now known as Gompholobium polyzygum.

Polyzygum: [po-li-zahy-gum] From Polús, which is Ancient Greek for many and Zygo which is Ancient Greek for bolt or yoke. It refers to organs, which are joined together. A good example is the leaves pinnae on Gompholobium polyzygum.

Pomaderris: [pom-a-der-ris] From Poma, which is Ancient Greek for a lid and Derris, which is Ancient Greek for a fur or at times skin. It refers to membrane covering the fruits, which are covered in short hairs. A good example is Pomaderris argyrophylla.

Pomaderroides: [pom-a-der-roi-deez] From Poma, which is Ancient Greek for a lid and Derris, which is Ancient Greek for a fur or at times skin. It refers to plants, which resemble the Pomaderris genus. A good example is Bertya pomaderroides.

Pomatocalpa: [pom-at-okal-pa] From Pomatos, which is Ancient Greek for a drinking cup or mug and Kalpe, which is Ancient Greek for a pitcher. It refers to urn shaped labellum on the orchids. A good example is Pomatocalpa marsupiale.

Pomatoderris: [pom-ma-to-der-ris] From Poma, which is Ancient Greek for a lid and Derris, which is Ancient Greek for a fur or at times skin. Pomatoderris is a spelling mistake for the Pomaderris genus which appeared in some earlier writings. A good example is Pomatoderris lanigera is now known as Pomaderris lanigera.

Pomax: [pom-aks] From Poma, which is Ancient Greek for a lid and Axon, which is Ancient Greek for an axis. It refers to lids, which helps the plant dehisce in the releasing of its seed. A good example is Pomax umbellata.

Pome: [pom-ee] From Pome, which is Latin for the apple tree family. It refers to the fleshy fruits, which are derived from an inferior ovary where the receptacal becomes grossly swollen. A good example is the good old table pear Pyrus communis.

Pomifera: [pom-i-fe-ra] From Pome, which is Latin for the apple tree family and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which bear small apple like fruits. A good example is the good old table pear Kunzea pomifera.

Pomologist: [pom-ol-o-jist] From Pome which is Latin for the apple tree family, Ology which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to person who studies the cultivation of fruits, the storing of fruit and/or the processing of fruits.

Pomology: [pom-o-lojee] From Poma, which is Latin for the apple tree family and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the study of the branch of botany that deals with the cultivation of fruits and or the storing of and/or the processing of fruits.

Pomphostoma: [pom-fo-stoh-ma] From Pome, which is unknown and Stóma, which is Ancient Greek for a mouth or opening. Its reference is unclear. A good example is Melaleuca pomphostoma.

Ponceletia: [pon-se-le-ti-a] From Póntos, which is ancient Greek for an area on the southern coast of the Black Sea. It refers to plants, which resemble the Ponceletia genus found around the Black Sea. Its reference is unclear. A good example was Sprengelia ponceletia, which is now known as Sprengelia sprengelioides.

Ponceletioides: [pon-se-le-ti-oi-deez] From Póntos, which is ancient Greek for an area on the southern coast of the Black Sea and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Ponceletia genus. A good example was Sprengelia sprengelioides.

Pongamia: [pon-gei-mi-a] From Pongam, which is Latinized from the local Tamil vernacular name of the genus. A good example was Pongamia pinnata which is now know as Millettia pinnata.

Pontis: [pon-tis] From Póntos, which is Ancient Greek for an area on the southern coast of the Black Sea. Its reference is unclear. A good example was Eucalyptus pontis which is now know as Corymbia cliftoniana.

Pootia: [poo-ti-a] From Pootie which is Latin? for a slang name for lovers nick name for each other. Its reference maybe held in the beauty of the flowers. A good example was Pootia grandifolia, which is now known as Voacanga grandifolia.

Popinensis: [po-pin-en-sis] From Popina, which is Latin for to eat or eating and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the type species which were originally from near a café in south eastern Tasmania. A good example is Austrodanthonia popinensis.

Popowia: [po-po-wi-a] Is named in honour of Mikhail Grigorevich Popov;1893-1955, who was a Russian botanist. A good example was Popowia australis, which is now known as Polyalthia australis.

Populifolia: [po-pyoo-lifoh-li-a] From Popler, which is old English for the Poplar tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers toleaves which resemble the European Populus genus. A good example was Eucalyptus populifolia which is now defunct as it has been found to be a natural hybrid between Eucalyptus coolabah subsp. excerata and Eucalyptus populnea subsp. populnea.

Populifolium: [po-pyoo-lifoh-li-um] From Popler, which is old English for the Poplar tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the European Populus genus. A good example was Notoxylinon populifolium, which is now known as Gossypium populifolium.

Populifolius: [po-pyoo-lifoh-li-us] From Popler, which is old English for the Poplar tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the European Populus genus. A good example is Homalanthus populifolius.

Populnea: [po-pyool-neea] From Popler, which is old English for the Poplar tree. It refers to leaves, which resemble the European Populus genus. A good example is Eucalyptus populnea.

Populneoides: [po-pyool-neoi-deez] From Popler, which is old English for the Poplar tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves, which resemble the European Populus genus. A good example is Thespesia populneoides.

Populneum: [po-pyool-neum] From Popler, which is old English for the Poplar tree. It refers to structures or organs usually the leaves, which resemble the European Populus genus. A good example is Clerodendrum floribundum var. ovatum.

Populneus: [po-pyool-neas] From Popler, which is old English for the Poplar tree. It refers to structures or organs usually the leaves, which resemble the European Populus genus. A good example is Brachychiton populneus subsp. populneus.

Porana: [po-ra-na] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus which is Latin for a small aperture and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which have smaller pores and pollen for dehiscing pollen than other species in the genus. A good example is Porana commixta, which is now known as Duperreya commixta.

Poranthera: [por-an-the-ra] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which have smaller pores and pollen for dehiscing pollen than other species in the genus. A good example is Poranthera microphylla.

Porantheroides: [por-an-the-roi-deez] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture, ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to anthers, which have smaller pores and pollen than other species in the genus to dehisc, similar to the Poranthera genus. A good example was Monotaxis porantheroides, which is now known as Monotaxis occidentalis.

Porcata: [por-ka-ta] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture. It refers to plants, which have many pores or glands. A good example is Prostanthera porcata.

Porcatum: [por-ka-tum] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture. It refers to plants, which have many small pores or glands. A good example is Myriophyllum porcatum.

Pore 1: [por] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek for a small aperture or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture. It refers to anthers which have small openings to allow the pollen to pass when ripe.

Pore 2: [por] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture. It refers to any small openings, in the leaf of a plant which allows gasses and moisture to pass through during photosynthesis.

Poricidal: [por-i-sahy-dal] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture. It refers to anthers, which release their pollen through a small hole rather than splitting open. A good example is the anthers, on the tribe Porantherecae including Poranthera obovata or Senna acclinis.

Porifera: [por-i-fer-a] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to anthers, which release their pollen through a small hole rather than splitting open. A good example is the anthers on the tribe Porantherecae including Calandrinia porifera.

Porocarya: [por-o-kar-ahy-a] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture and karya which is Ancient Greek for a nut. It refers to nut like fruits which have a small opening to release the seeds. A good example was Lobelia porocarya, which is now known as Scaevola porocarya.

Porogamy: [por-o-ga-mi] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture and Gameo which is Ancient Greek for united as in marriage. It refers to pollen tube entrys, which are at the entrance of the micropyle.

Porongurupensis: [pawr-ron-gyoo-ruh-pen-sis] From Porongurup, which is Latinized for the Porongurup National Park and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered and grow in and around the Porongurup National Park north of Albany in southern Western Australia. A good example is Hibbertia porongurupensis.

Porophyllum: [por-o-fi/fahyl-lum] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which have many pores on the leaves. A good example was Leptospermum porophyllum, which is now known as Leptospermum polygalifolium subsp. polygalifolium.

Poros: [por-os] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture. It refers to any organ, which has an opening.

Porosa: [por-o-sa] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture. It refers to plants, which have a number of variable oil dots on the leaves. A good example is Myrsine porosa.

Porospermum: [por-o-sper-mum] From Poros, which is Ancient Greek or Porus, which is Latin for a small aperture and Spérma which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to plants, which have a small hole on the seeds (micropyle). A good example is Porospermum michieanum, which is now known as Delarbrea michieana.

Porphrya: [por-frahy-a] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple. It refers to structures or organs, which are a purplish-red in colour. A good example is the red coastal seaweed of Porphyra columbina.

Porphryocarpa: [por-frahy-o-kar-pa] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are a purplish-red in colour. A good example is Terminalia porphyrocarpa.

Porphryochila: [por-frahy-o-chi-la] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple and Chila, which is Ancient Greek for a lip or lips. It refers to petals which resemble a lip and are a purple-red in colour. A good example is Acacia porphyrochila, which is now known as Acacia camptoclada.

Porphryopetala: [por-frahy-o-pe-ta-la] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to petals which are deep purple-red in colour. A good example is Hedraianthera porphyropetala.

Porphyrea: [por-fahy-ree-a] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple. It refers to structures or organs, which is reddish-purple in colour. A good example is the throats of the corolla on Goodenia porphyrea.

Porphyreus: [por-fahy-re-us] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple. It refers to structures or organs, which is reddish-purple in colour. A good example is the labellums on Petalochilus porphyreus, which is now known as Caladenia quadrifaria.

Porphyrocephala: [por-fahy-ro-ke/se-fah-la] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads, which are pinkish-purple to deep purple-red in colour. A good example is Melaleuca porphyrocephala, which is now known as Phymatocarpus porphyrocephalus.

Porphyrocephalus: [por-fahy-ro-ke/se-fa-lus] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads, which are pinkish-purple to deep purple-red in colour. A good example is Phymatocarpus porphyrocephalus.

Porphyroclados: [por-fahy-ro-kla-dos] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple and  kládos which is Ancient Greek or Cladus which is Latin for a twig, stem or small branch. It refers to new growth stems, which are pinkish-purple to deep purple-red in colour. A good example is the culms on Poa porphyroclados.

Porphyroglossa: [por-fahy-ro-glos-sa] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple and Glossa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It usually refers to flowers, which are purple to deep purple-red in colour. A good example is the ray florets on Calotis porphyroglossa.

Porphyristachya: [por-fahy-ri-sta-sha] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for a spike. It refers to flowers, on a spike which are deep purple-red in colour. A good example is Achyranthes porphyristachya.

Porphyritica: [por-fahy-ri-ti-ka] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on deep red or purplish-red pophyry soils. A good example was Corymbia porphyritica, which is now known as Corymbia ellipsoidea.

Porphyroclados: [por-fahy-ro-kla-dos] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple and Kládos, which is Ancient Greek or Cladus which is Latin for a stick, stem or small branch. It refers to stems or culms, which are reddish-purple in colour. A good example is Poa porphyroclados.

Porphyrostrica: [por-fahy-ro-stri-ka] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple and Stic, which is Fruilian (Northern Italian romance language) for to stir up emotions. It refers to flowers, which are variably deep purple-red in colour with blotches that can stir the emotions. A good example was Thelymitra porphyrostica, which is now known as Thelymitra variegata.

Porpoloma: [por-po-loh-ma] From Porphyrītikós, which is Ancient Greek or Porphyria, which is Latin for reddish-purple and Loma, which is Ancient Greek for on the edge. It refers to fungi which often have deep purple-red pileus to or almost to the margin. A good example is Porpoloma penetrans.

Porracea: [por-ra-se-a] From Porrectus, which is Latin for leek green. It refers to leaves, which are deep leek green in colour. A good example is Dianella porracea.

Porrect: [por-rekt] From Porrectus, which is Latin for to stretch out horizontally. It refers to orchids, which grow outwards horizontally on the branches or trunks rather than up or down. A good example is the canes and flowers on Plectorrhiza tridentate.

Porrecta: [por-ek-ta] From Porrectus, which is Latin for to stretch out horizontally. It refers to the description where the growth habit grows outwards horizontally from a central point rather than up or down. A good example is the flower spikelets on Digitaria porrecta.

Porrectum: [por-ek-tum] From Porrectus, which is Latin for to stretch out horizontally. It refers to structures or organs, which have a growth habit of growing outwards horizontally on the branches or trunks rather than up or down. A good example is the ray florets or ligules on Helichrysum porrectum, which is now known as Chrysocephalum semipapposum.

Porrectus: [por-ek-tus] From Porrectus, which is Latin for to stretch out horizontally. It refers to structures or organs, which have a growth habit of growing outwards horizontally on the branches or trunks rather than up or down. A good example is the outstretched lateral petals and seplas on Plectorrhiza brevilabris.

Porrifolia: [por-i-foh-li-a] From Porri, which is Latin for leeks and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the leaves of a leek. A good example is Diuris porrifolia.

Porrigens: [por-ri-jenz] From Porrigeo, which is Latin for to spread out. It refers to the the stems spreading horizontally across the ground and over other objects.Two contrasting good examples are Galium porrigens which is a good bulk composting agent and soil improver and the exotic bedding plant Alternanthera porrigens.

Porroteranthe: [por-o-te-ran-the] From Porri, which is Latin for leeks and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which somewhat resemble the leaves of a leek. A good example is Porroteranthe drummondii.

Portae-tartari: [por-tee, tar-tar-i] Is named in honour of Porta-tartar. A good example is Cyperus portae-tartari.

Portenschlagia: [por-tens-kla-ji-a] From Portus, which is Latin for a port and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the plants, which were first discovered around ports in Western Australia. A good example was Portenschlagia integrifolia, which is now known as Elaeodendron australe var. australe.

Porteri: [por-ter-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Donald A. Porter. A good example is Darwinia porteri.

Portuensis: [por-tyoo-en-sis] From Portus, which is Latin for a port and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the original plants being discovered at Port Jackson. A good example is Allocasuarina portuensis.

Portulaca: [por-tyoo-la-ka] From Portulāca, which is Latin for a door or portal. It refers to fruits, which have a cover or membrane that peels back when the seeds are ripe and ready for dispersal. A good example is Portulaca oleracea.

Portulacastrum: [por-tyoo-la-kas-trum] From Portulāca, which is Latin for a door or portal and Castrum, which is Latin for a fort or castle. It refers to fruits, which have a cover or membrane that that protects the seeds until they are ready for dispersal. A good example is Sesuvium portulacastrum.

Portus-darwini: [por-tus, dar-wi-nahy] From Portus, which is Latin for a port and is named in honour of Charles Robert Darwin; 1809–1982, who was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist who is best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. A good example was Sideroxylon portus-darwini, which is now known as Planchonella arnhemica.

Poseidon: [po-sahy-don] From Poseidon, which is Ancient Greek for the God of the sea who had the power to inflict earthquakes. It refers to the plants, which have habitats close to or in coastal waters and which are often very unstable.

Posidonia: [po-si-do-ni-a] From Poseidon, which is Ancient Greek for the God of the sea who had the power to inflict earthquakes. It refers to the plants, which have habitats close to or in coastal watersand which are often very unstable. A good example is Posidonia australis.

Posterior: [pos-te-ri-or] From Posterior, which is Latin for situated at or to the rear. It refers to organs usually the leaves, which face the main axis or stem. A good example is Astartea fasicularis.

Postuera: [pos-tyoo-e-ra] Probably from Posterum, which is Latin for lesser or inferior. It refers to plants, which are somewhat more inferior than other species in the genus. A good example was Postuera longifolia, which is now known as Notelaea longifolia.

Potamica: [po-ta-mi-ka] From Potam/Potamós, which is Ancient Greek for a river. It refers to plants, which prefer habitats, which are in flood plains or flats beside rivers. A good example is Goodenia potamica.

Potamogeton: [po-ta-mo-ge-ton] From Potam/Potamós, which is Ancient Greek for a river and Geton, which is Ancient Greek for a neighbour. It refers to the habitats, which are in rivers but usually close to the banks. A good example is Potamogeton cheesemanii

Potamophila: [po-tah-mo-fil-a] From Potam/Potamós, which is Ancient Greek for a river and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for to be loved or loving. It refers to the plants, which have habitats along rivers especially backwaters and other wet environments. A good example is Potamophila parviflora.

Potamophilum: [po-ta-mo-fil-um] From Potam/Potamós, which is Ancient Greek for a river and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for to be loved or loving. It refers to the plants, which have habitats along rivers especially backwaters and other wet environments. A good example is Syzygium potamophilum.

Potassium: [po-tas-si-um] From Kalium, which is Ancient Greek for potash. Symbol K, Atomic Number 19

Potentilla: [po-ten-til-la] From Potens, which is Latin for small but powerful. It refers to medicinal properties of many of the species. A good example is the exotic strawberry Potentilla indica.

Potentilliflora: [po-ten-til-li-flor-a] From Potent ,which is Latin for small but powerful and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which isthe Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which display medicinal properties. A good example is Hibbertia potentilliflora.

Potentillina: [po-ten-til-li-na] From Potent, which is Latin for small but powerful. It refers to plants, which display medicinal properties. A good example is Warburtonia potentillina, which is now known as Hibbertia grossulariifolia.

Potentilloides: [po-ten-til-loi-deez] From Potens, which is Latin for small but powerful and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which resemble the Potentilla genus. A good example is Geranium potentilloides var. potentilloides.

Pothomorphe: [po-tho-morf] From Pothos, which is Latinized from the local Sinhalese venacular for the plant and Morphḗ, which is Ancient Greek for to take the shape or form of. A good example was Pothomorphe subpeltata, which is now known as Piper umbellatum.

Pothos: [po-thos] From Pothos, which is Latinized from the local Sinhalese venacular for the plant. A good example is Pothos longipes.

Potierae: [po-ti-er-ee] Probably from Potierea, which is Latinized from the Malay or New Guinee vernacular for the plant. Agood example was Costus potierae, which is now known as Cheilocostus potierae.

Pottsia: [pot-si-a] Is probably named in honour of J. W. Potts. A good example is Pottia brevicaulis which is now known as Microbryum brevicaulei.

Pottsii: [pot-si-ahy] Is probably named in honour of J. W. Potts. A good example is Hoya pottsii.

Pouch: [pour-ch] From Pouche, which is early British or Poche which is French for a small bag or pocket. It refers to structures or organs, which are shaped like a pocket. A good example is the structure of the spores’s sporangia appearing like small pockets on Gleichenia dicarpa.

Pouteria: [pour-ter-i-a] From Pourama or Pouteri, which is Latinized from the local Guiana venacular for the plants type specimen. A good Australian example is Pouteria xerocarpa.

Pouzolzia: [pou-zol-zi-a] Is named in honour of Pierre de poulz; 1785-1858, who was a Frenchman who wrote the flora of the local plants in France. A good Australian example is Pouzolzia zeylanica.

Powellii: [pour-wel-li-ahy] Is named in honour of John Wesley Powell; 1834-1902, who was an American explorer and ethnologist who raised the attention to the fruit of the new species. A good example is Amaranthus powellii.

Poweri: [pour-er-ahy] Is named in honour of R. D. Power who raised the attention to the fruit of the new species. A good example is Neisospermua poweri.

Pozopsis: [po-zop-sis] From Pozo, which is unknown and Opsis which is Ancient Greek for to appear to be. It refers to plants, which have leaves that resemble plants in another genus. A good example is the leaves on Pozopsis cordifolia which resemble Nymphoides indica and is now known as Diplaspis cordifolia.

Prae: [prei] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of or very tall.

Praealta: [prei-al-ta] From Praealta, which is Latin for very high. It refers to trees, which are the tallest when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Floydia praealta.

Praecelsa: [prei-cel-sa] From Prae, which is Latin for very high and Celsa, which is Latin for tall or lofty. It refers to plants, which are much taller than other species in the genus. A good example is Bredemeyera praecelsa.

Praecelsum: [prei-cel-sum] From Prae, which is Latin for very high and Celsa, which is Latin for tall or lofty. It refers to plants, which are much taller than other species in the genus. A good example is Comesperma praecelsum.

Praecipua: [prei-si-pyoo-a] From Praecipua, which is Latin for distinguished or preeminent. It refers to flowers, which are rather distinguished. A good example is Calytrix praecipua.

Praecocissima: [prei-ko-kis-si-ma] From Praecoci, which is Latin for early and -Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to flowers, which appear much earlier than other species in the genus. A good example is Pterostylis praecoccissima.

Praecox: [prei-koks] From Praecoci, which is Latin for early. It refers to the cocci or fruits, which develop early but can also include the flowers appearing before the leaves or the leaves appearing early or dropping early. A good example is the early flowering season on Leucospermum praecox which starts earlier in this species than other species in the genus.

Praefolia: [prei-foh-li-a] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have flowers that appear before the leaves. A good example is Drosera praefolia.

Praelonga: [pree-long-a] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Longitia/Longus, which are Latin for long and slender. It refers to funnicles on the seeds which are much longer and slenderer than other species in the genus. A good example is Lomatia praelonga, which is now known as Lomatia myricoides.

Praelongata: [pri-lon-ga-ta] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Longitia/Longus, which are Latin for long and slender. It refers to funnicles on the seeds, which are much longer and slenderer than other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia praelongata.

Praelongatum: [pree-lon-ga-tum] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Longum, which is Latin for long and slender. It refers to structures or organs, which are much longer and slenderer than other species in the genus. A good example is the leaves on Racosperma praelongatum, which is now known as Acacia praelongata.

Praelongatus: [prei-lon-ga-tus] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Longum which is Latin for long and slender. It refers to structures or organs, which are much longer and slenderer than other species in the genus. A good example is the leaves on Schoenoplectus praelongatus.

Praelongipes: [prei-long-i-pes] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of, Longum, which is Latin for long and slender and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to stems, which are much longer and slenderer than other species in the genus. The reference to a petiole is that the stems are often misidentified as a rachis with leaflets. A good example is Phyllanthus praelongipes.

Praemorsa: [prei-mor-sa] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Morsus, which is Latin for fastening. It refers to leaves, which look as though they have been nibbled on as a small morsal. A good example is the apex of the leaves on Banksia praemorsa.

Praemorse: [pree-mors] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Morsus, which is Latin for fastening. It refers to leaves, which look as though they have been nibbled on as asmall morsal. A good example is the apex of the leaflets on Hydriastele wendlandiana.

Praemorsum: [pree-mor-sum] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Morsa, which is Latin for to be bitten off. It refers to structures or organs, which appear to be bitten off near the apexes. A good example is Brachysema praemorsum.

Praeruptorum: [prei-rup-tor-um] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Ruptorum, which is Latin for violation or violent. It refers to structures or organs, which appear to be violently ripped off at the apexes. A good example is Cullen praeruptorum.

Praestans: [prei-stanz] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Stans, which is Latin for to stand erect or stand out. It refers to plants, which stand out in a group that is they are very distinguished. A good example is Kunzea praestans.

Praetermissa: [pree-ter-mis-sa] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Missa, which is Latin for to miss or miss out on. It refers to plants, which do not stand out in the crowd, often being overlooked or missed. A good example is Persicaria praetermissa.

Praetermissum: [prei-ter-mis-sum] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Missa, which is Latin for to miss or miss out on. It refers to the plants, which do not stand out in the crowd, often being overlooked or missed. A good example is Polygonum praetermissum.

Praetermissus: [prei-ter-mis-sus] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Missa, which is Latin for to miss or miss out on. It refers to the plants, which are overlooked or missed. A good example is the ground orchid Oligochaetochilus praetermissus.

Praetervisa: [prei-ter-vi-sa] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Tervisa, which is . A good example is Urochloa praetervisa.

Praetervisum: [pree-ter-vi-sum] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Vīsum, which is Latin for to have a vision of or a mental image. It refers to the plants, which are worth a second look. A good example is the filmy fern Hymenophyllum praetervisum which is presently listed as unresolved awaiting further investigation as to which genus or species name should be allocated.

Praevenosa: [prei-ve-noh-sa] From Prae, which is Latin for before or in front of and Venosa, which is Latin for veins. It refers to vines, which are placed in front of all the other species with the prominence of the mid vein, lateral veins and reticulated veins all being strongly prominent when compared to other species in the genus and other similar genre. A good example is Pararistolochia praevenosa.

Prainii: [prei-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Sir David Prain; 1857-1944, who was a Scottish botanist and professor of botany in Calcutta. A good example is Acacia prainii.

Prasina: [pra-sin-a] From Prason, which is Ancient Greek for a leek. It usually refers to structures and or organs, which are bright green. A good example is Grevillea prasina.

Prasinus: [pra-si-nus] From Prásinos, which is Ancient Greek for leek green. It refers to structures and or organs, which are deep bright bluish-green similar to the colour of a leeks leaf. A good example is Ranunculus prasinus.

Prasophyllum: [pra-so-fi/fahyl-lum] From Prason, which is Ancient Greek for a leek and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are bright green. A good example is Prasophyllum canaliculatum.

Pratensis: [pra-ten-sis] From Pratens, which is Latin for a meadow and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plant habitats, which are meadow like or plants that prefer to grow out in the open. A good example is Hypoxis pratensis.

Pratia: [pra-ti-a] Is named in honour of Charles Prat-Bernon; 17..-1817, midshipman on the Freycinet voyage to Australia. A good example is Pratia concolor.

Pratiodes: [pra-ti-oh-des] Is named in honour of Charles Prat-Bernon; 17..-1817 midshipman on the Freycinet voyage and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which are similar to those of the Pratia genus. A good example is Lobelia pratioides.

Pratioides: [pra-ti-oi-deez] is named in honour of Ch. L. Prat-Bernon, French naval officerand plants collector and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves and habit of growths or at times the flowers, which resemble those of the Pratia genus. A good example Lobelia pratioides.

Pravifolia: [pra-vi-foh-li-a] From Pravis, which is Latin for crooked or twisted and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are at different angles and or twisted along the stems. A good example Acacia pravifolia.

Pravifolium: [prar-vi-foh-li-um] From Pravis, which is Latin for crooked or twisted and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are at different angles and or twisted along the stems. A good example was Racosperma parvifolium which is now known as Acacia pravifolia.

Pravissima: [prar-vis-si-ma] From Pravis, which is Latin for crooked or twisted and -Issima, which is Latin for the superlative of. It refers to leaves phyllodes and or stems, which are at different angles and or strongly to severely twisted. A good example is Acacia pravissima.

Pravissimum: [prar-vis-si-mum] From Pravis, which is Latin for crooked or twisted and -Issima, which is Latin for the superlative of. It refers to leaves phyllodes and or stems, which are at different angles and or strongly to severely twisted. A good example is Racosperma pravissimum, which is noq known as Acacia pravissima.

Precaria: [pree-kar-i-a] From Precari, which is Latin for to pray or be prayful. It refers to leaves and or leaflets, which hang down on the stems. A good example is Pomaderris precaria.

Precatorius: [pree-kat-or-i-us] From Precari, which is Latin for to pray or be prayful. It refers to leaves and or leaflets, which hang down on the stems. A good example is Abrus precatorius.

Precocious 1: [pree-koh-shos] From Prae which is Latin for before and Coquere which is Latin for to cook, mature or ripen. It refers to flowers, which appear before the leaves or the leaves that appear early or drop earlier than other species in the vicinity. A good example is the flowers appearing before the leaves on Cocklospermum gillivraei.

Precocious 2: [pree-koh-shos] From Prae which is Latin for before and Coquere which is Latin for to cook, mature or ripen. It refers to plants, which develop or mature with flowers unusually early. A good example is the genetic freak found on Sterculia quadrifida which flowered at just six weeks of age instead of the normal 5 to 7 years.

Predatory: [pre-da-tor-ee] From Praedātor originally from praedor, which is Latin for to loot or pillage or Praeda  which is Latin for the spoils or war or to prey on. It refers to any carnivore that feeds on herbivores. A good example is the Lace wing Drepanacra binocular which have a voracious apetite for mealy bugs aphids and other sap sucking insects.

Left: Probably unnamed Lace Wing. However Lace wing eggs usually hang by a thread from the underside of leaves or stems.
Right Mealy bugs prey for lace wing. Photos -andi Mellis

Preformed Shoots: [pree-formd, shoots] From Praeformare, which is Latin for to form before hand and Skeotan, which is Old English for a terminal or lateral apical growths. It refers to normal shoots, which develop from winter or dry season dormant buds which contain primordia of all leaves that will expand on the onset of warmer weather or rain. A good example is Cochlospermum fraseri which normally flowers with the onset of the wet season.

Preissia: [preis-si-a] Is named in honour of Johann Ludwig Preis; 1811-1883, who was a German born Englishman who migrated to Australiaand collected plants from Western Australia. A good example is the lichen Preissia quadrata.

Preissiana: [prei-si-a-na] Is named in honour of Johann Ludwig Preis; 1811-1883, who was aGerman born Englishman who migrated to Australiaand collected plants from Western Australia. A good example is Eucalyptus preissiana.

Preissianum: [prei-si-ei-num] Is named in honour of Johann Ludwig Preis; 1811-1883, who was a German born Englishman who migrated to Australia and collected plants from Western Australia. Aaood example is the red seaweed Plocamium preissianum.

Preissianus: [prei-si-a-nus] Is named in honour of Johann Ludwig Preis; 1811-1883, who was aGerman born Englishman who migrated to Australia collector of plants from Western Australia. A good example is Cymbonotus preissianus.

Preissii: [pree-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Johann Ludwig Preis; 1811-1883, who was a German born Englishman whoh migrated to Australia collector of plants from Western Australia. A good example is Lepilaena preissii.

Preminghana: [pre-ming-ha-na] From Premingh, which is Latinized for Premingh Bay in Tasmania and An/Ensis which are Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which are only found in the Premingh Bay area in north western Tasmania. A good example is Craspedia preminghana.

Premna: [prem-na] From Premna, which is Latin for a bole, trunk or stump of a tree. It refers to the short stumpy bole of one species. A good example is Premna lignum-vitae.

Prenanthoides: [pree-nan-thoi-deez] From Prenes, which is Ancient Greek for face down, ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Prenanthes genus in that the flowers are bent downwards. A good example is Senecio prenanthoides.

Prenticeanum: [pren-ti-see-a-num] Is named in honour of Charles Brightly Prentice; who was an Australian surgeon, naturalist, botanist, medical board member who collected native orchids and studied native ferns. A good example was Panicum prenticeanum, which is now known as Panicum incomtum.

Prenticei: [pren-ti-se-ahy] Is named in honour of Charles Brightly Prentice; who was an Australian surgeon, naturalist, botanist, medical board member who collected native orchids and studied native ferns. A good example is Cheilanthes prenticei.

Pres-caprae: [pres-ka-pree] From Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet from the misspelling of Pres, which maybe the local vernacular name for a foot and or the plant Caprae. A good example is Ipomoea pes-caprae subsp. brasiliensis.

Priceana: [prahy-se-a-na] Is named in honour of Price but which Price cannot be substantiated. A good example is Hibbertia priceana.

Priceanus: [prahy-se-ei-nus] Is named in honour of Price but which Price cannot be substantiated. A good example was Calocephalus priceanus, which is now known as Gnephosis angianthoides.

Prickle: [pri-kl] From Pricel which is Old English for a sharp point. These are NOT modifications of any existing organ of a plant. A prickle is an entirely new organ. It is found any where and indiscriminately on the plant stems, leaves or flower organs. They develop from epidermal tissue only. Therefore, they break off easily and are usually hooked. A good example is the prickles on the leaves and fruits of Lepidozamia peroffskyana.

Primary: [prahy-mar-ee] From Primarius which is Latin for the first rank. It refers to being number one or coming first.

Primocane: [prahy-mo-kein] From Primarius, which is Latin for the first rank and Kanna, which is Ancient Greek for the stem of the Rubus genus or Canna which is Latin for the stem of the Rubus genus. It refers to the first year fruiting canes. A good example is the fruiting canes of Rubus microphylla.

Primordium: [prahy-mor-di-um] From Primus, which is Latin for the first rank and Ord, which is Latin for to begin or commence. It refers to the differentiated stage in the development of organs from the earliest stage. They are any embryonic cells in the seed or budswhich develop into roots, leaves or flowers.

Primulacea: [pri-myoo-la-se-a] From Primula, which is Latin for first flowering. It refers to plants, which are generally the first to flower in the genus each year. A good example is the sundew Drosera primulacea.

Primulaceus: [pri-myoo-la-se-us] From Primula, which is Latin for first flowering. It refers to plants, which are generally the first to flower in the genus each year. A good example is Dipteracanthus primulaceus.

Primuliflora: [pri-myoo-li-flor-a] From Primula, which is Latin for first flowering and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman Goddess for Spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are generally the first to bloom in the genus each year. A good example is Calandrinia primuliflora.

Princeps: [prin-seps] From Princeps, which is Latin literally for “easilly the first”. It refers to plants, which are easilly recognised as being the best, most noticable or most beautiful in the genus. A good example was Blandfordia princeps which was a variety of Blandfordia flammea and is now known as Blandfordia grandiceps.

Pringlei: [pring-le-ahy] Is named in honour of Cyrus Guernsey Pringle; 1838–1911, who was an American botanist nurseryman who then spent the next 35 years cataloguing the plants of North America. A good example is the leaves on Acmenosperma pringlei.

Prinoides: [pri-noi-deez] From Princeps, which is Latin literally for “easilly the first” and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which are easilly recognised as being the best, most noticable or most beautiful in the genus. A good example was Salacia prinoides, which is now known as Salacia chinensis.

Prinophyllum: [pri-no-fi/fahyl-lum] From Princeps, which is Latin literally for “easilly the first” and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are easily recognised as being the best, most noticable or most beautiful in the genus. A good example was Solanum prinophyllum.

Prinsepiana: [prin-se-pi-a-na] From Princeps, which is Latin literally for “easilly the first”. It refers to plants, which are easilly recognised as being the best, most noticable or most beautiful in the genus. A good example was Casuarina prinsepiana, which is now known as Allocasuarina acutivalvis subsp. prinsepiana.

Prionanus: [pri-o-na-nus] From Prionotos, which is Ancient Greek for to have jagged teeth and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaf margins, which resemble a saws cutting edge. A good example was Hibiscus prionanus, which is now known as Alyogyne pinoniana.

Prionochilum: [pri-on-o-chi-luh m] From Prionotos, which is Ancient Greek for to have jagged teeth and Cheîlos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip or a pair of lips. It refers to labellums which have rough saw tooth margins. A good example is the labellum on Dendrobium prionochilum, which is now known as Durabaculum mirbelianum.

Prionophylla: [pri-on-oh fi/fahyl-la] From Prionotos, which is Ancient Greek for to have jagged teeth and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaf margins, which resemble a saws cutting edge. A good example is the leaves on Banksia prionophylla.

Prionosepalum: [pri-no-se-pa-lum] From Prionotos, which is Ancient Greek for to have jagged teeth. It refers to lsepal or calyx lobe margins, which resemble teeth on a saw. A good example is the leaves on Prionosepalum gilbertii which is now know as Chaetanthus leptocarpoides.

Prionotes: [pri-o-noh-tes] From Prionotos, which is Ancient Greek for to have jagged teeth. It usually refers to the leaf margins resembling a saws cutting edge. A good example is the leaves on Banksia prionotes.

Prisca: [pris-ka] From Prîsma, which is Ancient Greek for a prism. It refers to leaves, which are extremely glossy resembling a mirror or prism. A good example is the leaves on Coprosma prisca.

Prismatic: [priz-mat-ik] From Prîsma, which is Ancient Greek for a prism. It refers to the description of how light enters and is utilized in the chloroplasts within the leaves.

Prismatica: [priz-ma-ti-ka] From Prîsma, which is Ancient Greek for a prism. It refers to apical caps, attraction of light and reflection of certain wave lengths. A good example is the caps on the Western Australian seaweed known as Gymnophlaea prismatica.

Prismaticum: [priz-ma-ti-kum] From Prîsma, which is Ancient Greek for a prism. It refers to the the shape of the upper sepal and possibly to the array of colour tones found in the orchids sepals and petals. A good example is Bulbophyllum prismaticum.

Prismatocarpus: [priz-ma-to-kar-pus] From Prîsma, which is Ancient Greek for a prism and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which take a prismatic form. A good example is Juncus prismatocarpus.

Prismatotheca: [priz-ma-to-the-Ka] From Prîsma, which is Ancient Greek for a prism and Theka, which is Ancient Greek for a case. It refers to fern or moss sporeangia or capsules, which are completely surrounded like being in a small box. A good example is Roepera prismatotheca.

Prismatothecum: [priz-ma-to-the-kum] From Prîsma, which is Ancient Greek for a prism and Theka, which is Ancient Greek for a case. It refers to fern or moss sporeangia or capsules, which are completely surrounded like being in a small box. A good example is Zygophyllum prismatothecum.

Prismifolia: [priz-mi-foh-li-a] From Prîsma, which is Ancient Greek for a prism and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which somewhat resemble a prism shape. A good example is Acacia prismifolia.

Prismifolium: [priz-mi-foh-li-um] From Prîsma, which is Ancient Greek for a prism and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which somewhat resemble a prism shape. A good example was Racosperma prismifoliaum, which is now known as Acacia prismifolia.

Pritzelia: [prit-ze-li-a] Is named in honour of Ernest G. Pritzel; 1875-1946, who was a German who accompanied Diels on his collecting expedition to Australia in 1900-1902 and was a noted phytogeographer and taxonomist. A good example is Pritzelia didiscoides, which is now known as Trachymene pilosa.

Pritzeliana: [prit-ze-li-a-na] Is named in honour of Ernest G. Pritzel; 1875-1946, who was a German who accompanied Diels on his collecting expedition to Australia in 1900-1902 and was a noted phytogeographer and taxonomist. A good example is Acacia pritzeliana.

Pritzelianum: [prit-ze-li-a-num] Is named in honour of Ernest G. Pritzel; 1875-1946, who was a German who accompanied Diels on his collecting expedition to Australia in 1900-1902 and was a noted phytogeographer and taxonomist. A good example is Stylidium pritzelianum .

Pritzelianus: [prit-ze-li-a-nus] Is named in honour of Ernest G. Pritzel; 1875-1946, who was a German who accompanied Diels on his collecting expedition to Australia in 1900-1902 and was a noted phytogeographer and taxonomist. A good example is Thysanotus triandrus var. pritzelianus.

Pritzeliella: [prit-ze-li-el-la] Is named in honour of Ernest G. Pritzel; 1875-1946, who was a German who accompanied Diels on his collecting expedition to Australia in 1900-1902 and was a noted phytogeographer and taxonomist. A good example is the white fungus Pritzeliella caerulea, which grows on the skins of mandarines and often completely encircles them.

Probstii: [prob-sti-ahy] Maybe is named in honour of Darryl Probst who was an American plant breeder. A good example was Chenopodium probstii of which the Australian species are now known as Chenopodium album.

Probus: [proh-bus] From Probus, which is Latin for good, serviceable, excellent, superior, able. It usually refers to fruits, which are of superior quality for eating. A good example is Rubus probus.

Procera: [proh-se-ra] From Procera, which is Latin for very tall. It refers to plants, structures or organs, which are much taller or longer than other species in the genus. A good example is Gahnia procera.

Proceriflora: [proh-ker-i-flor-a] From Procerum, which is Latin for very tall and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which much taller than other species in the genus and or having much longer flower spikes. A good example is Cycnogeton procerum.

Procerum: [proh-se-rum] From Procerum, which is Latin for very tall. It refers to the plants, which are very much taller than other species in the genus and or having much longer flower spikes. A good example is Cycnogeton procerum.

Procerus: [proh-se-rus] From Procerus, which is Latin for tall. It refers to the plants, which are much taller than other species in the genus. A good example is Juncus procerus.

Process: [proh-ses] From Processus, which is Latin for an extension or appendage. It refers to organs or structures, which have an apendage.

Procris: [proh-kris] From Prókris, which is Ancient Greek for the daughter of Erechtheus the king of Athens and his wife Praxithea. It refers to her loyalty and fidelity being questioned. A good example is Procris pedunculata.

Procumbens: [proh-kum-benz] From Procumbent, which is Latin for bending forward. It refers to plants, which lay across the ground but do not root easily at the nodes or axis. A good example is Melichrus procumbens.

Procumbent: [proh-kum-bent] From Procumbent, which is Latin for bending forward. It refers to a plants, which lay across the ground but does not root easily at the nodes or axis. A good example is Grevillea thelmanniana.

Producta: [proh-duk-ta] From Prōductum, which is Latin for to bring forth. It refers to culms, which are elongated. A good example is Isolepis producta.

Producer: [proh-dyoo-ser] From Prōdūcō, which is Latin for to lengthen or elongate. An organism that produces complex organic compounds from simple molecules and an external source of energy.

Producto: [proh-duk-toh] From Prōductum, which is Latin for to lengthen or elengate. It refers to culms, which are elongated. A good example is Dianella caerulea subsp. producto.

Productum: [pro-duk-tum] From Prōductum, which is Latin for to lengthen or elengate. It refers to flowering spikes on this species, which are much longer than other species in the genus. A good example is Stylidium productum.

Productus: [pro-duk-tus] From Prōductus, which is Latin for to lengthen or elengate. It refers to flower pedicels, which are elongated compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Ranunculus productus.

Profusa: [proh-fyoo-sa] From Profūsum, which is Latin for lavish, extravigant or abundant. It refers to plants, which bear a profusion of flowers. A good example is Acacia profusa.

Profusum: [proh-fyoo-sum] From Profūsum, which is Latin for lavish, extravigant or abundant. It refers to plants, which bear a profusion of flowers. A good example was Racosperma profusum, which is now known as Acacia profusa.

Proiantha: [proi-an-tha] From Proi, which is Latin for early and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which seem to flush and bloom prematurely. A good example is Acacia proiantha.

Proianthum: [proi-an-thum] From Proi, which is Latin for early and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which seem to flush and bloom prematurely. A good example was Racosperma proianthum, which is now known as Acacia proiantha.

Proiphys: [proi-fis] From Proi, which is Latin for early and Phyo, which is Latin for to bring forth. It refers to the premature germination of the seeds. A good example is Proiphys cunninghamii.

Projected: [proh-jek-ted] From Projectus, which is Latin for to jut out or protrude. It refers to structures or organs, which protrudes outwards.

Prolata: [proh-a-ta] From Prōlāta/Prōlātum, which are Latin for in front of or to appear. It refers to organs, which are held towards the front of the structure it is attached thus appears to be on a pedical or in the limelight. A good example is Eremophila prolata.

Prolatum: [poh-la-tum] From Prōlāta/Prōlātum, which are Latin for in front of or to appear. It refers to organs, which are held towards the front of the structure it is attached thus appears to be on a pedicel or in the limelight. A good example is Conostephium prolatum.

Prolatus: [proh-la-tus] From Prōlātus/Prōlātum, which are Latin for in front of or to appear. It refers to organs, which are held towards the front of the structure it is attached thus appears to be on a pedical or in the limelight. A good example is Petalochilus prolatus.

Proleptic Shoots: [pro-lep-tik, shoots] From Prolepsis, which is Ancient Greek for to take before. It refers to abnormal late seasonal shoots that develop from the lateral buds immediately beneath the terminal bud. The proleptic shootsdevelop from previously dormant buds in the present season.

Prolifera: [pro-li-fer-a] From Proles, which is Latin for offspring and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear. It refers to production of new daughter plants from offshoots, which are close to the ground or at the seed heads. A good example is Isolepis prolifera.

Proliferum: [proh-li-fer-um] From Proles, which is Latin for offspring and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to the production of new daughter plants from offshoots close to the ground on seed heads, leaves or fronds. A good example is Polystichum proliferum.

Proliferus: [proh-li-fer-us] From Proles, which is Latin for offspring and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to the production of new daughter plants from offshoots close to the ground on seed heads, leaves or fronds. A good example is the tassel fern Phlegmariurus proliferus.

Prolifica: [proh-li-fi-ka] From Prolificus, which is Latin for bearing a lot of offspring. It refers to plants, which produce massive amounts of fruit. A good example is Syzygium leuhmannii.

Prolinius: [proh-li-ni-us] From Prolinius, which is unknown. A good example is Boletus prolinius.

Prolixa: [pro-liks-a] From Prolificus, which is Latin for to bear or bearing a lot of offspring. It refers to plants, which produce massive amounts of fruit. A good example is Eucalyptus prolixa.

Prolixum: [pro-liks-um] From Prolificus, which is Latin for to bear or bearing a lot of offspring. It refers to plants, which produce massive amounts of fruit. A good example is Racosperma heteroneurum var. prolixum, which is now know as Acacia heteroneura var. prolixa.

Prolixus: [pro-liks-us] From Prō which is Ancient Greek towards or forward, or later Per which is Ancient Greek/Latin for in favour of or on behalf and Leípō which is Ancient Greek and later Linquō which is Ancient Greek and later Lixum which is Latin for I am liquid, transparent or courteous and favourable. It refers to plants, which can have translucent properties or are very pleasing to the eye. A good example is Arthrochilus prolixus.

Prolongata: [pro-lon-ga-ta] From Prōlongātus/Prōlongāre, which is Latin for to prolong or make longer in time or physical length. It refers to culms or stems, which are very long. A good example is Isolepis prolongata, which is now known as Schoenoplectiella articulata.

Proluta: [pro-lyoo-ta] From Prōlāta, which is Latin for to bring forward. It refers to plants, which appear out of the blue or offer support in friendship as in are good pasture grasses. A good example is Walwhalleya proluta.

Prolutum: [pro-lyoo-tum] From Prōlātum, which is Latin for to bring forward. It refers to plants, which appear out of the blue or offer support in friendship as in are good pasture grasses. A good example is Panicum prolutum, which is now known as Walwhalleya proluta.

Promeristem: [pro-mer-i-stem] From Pro/Prodrome, which is Greek, for in favour of, before or after in time and Repens which is Latin for creeping forward and Meristos which is Ancient Greek for to divide into parts. It refers to embryonic tissue cells in plants, which are dividing actively.

Prominens: [pro-min-nenz] From Prōminēns, which is Latin for to stand out as to be seen easily. It refers to plants, which have outstanding beauty especially when in flower. A good example is Acacia prominens.

Prominent 1: [pro-min-nent] From Prominens, which is Latin for to stand out as to be seen easily. It refers to outstanding beauty of the plants, especially when in flower. A good example is Blandfordia grandiflora.

Prominent 2: [pro-min-nent] From Prōminēns, which is Latin for to stand out as to be seen easily. It refers to of organs, which displays great beauty. A good example is the fronds on Asplenium australis.

Prominula: [pro-mi-nyoo-la] From Prōminēns, which is Latin for to stand out as to be seen easily or to be very prominent. It refers to trees, which have overall beauty. A good example was Eucalyptus prominula, which is now known as Eucalyptus youmanii.

Prominulatus: [pro-min-yoo-lei-tus] From Prōminēns, which is Latin for to stand out as to be seen easily or to be very prominent. It refers trees, which have an overall beauty that is outstanding. A good example is Phyllanthus prominulatus.

Prona: [proh-na] From Prēnḗs/Prānḗsm which is Ancient Greek or Prōnam which is Latin for turn or bend in a direction. It refers to structures or organs, which bends in a nice arch in some other direction. A good example is the awns on the glumes of Triodia prona.

Pronaya: [proh-nei-a] Is named in honour of L. von Pronay; 1???-1868, who was a Hungarian naturalist in Europe. A good example was Pronaya fraseri, which is now known as Billardiera fraseri.

Pronephrium: [pro-ne-fri-um] From Pro, which is Latin for to be in favour of and Nephrós, which is Ancient Greek for a kydney. It refers to rows of spores, which resemble a kydney in shape in some species. A good example is Pronephrium asperum.

Proniflora: [proh-ni-flor-a] From Prēnḗs/Prānḗs, which is Ancient Greek or Prōnus, which is Latin for turn or bend in a direction. It refers to structures or organs, which bends in a nice arch in some other direction. A good example is Selaginella proniflora.

Prop: [prop] From Proppe, which is middle English or Dutch for a support. It refers to adventitious roots, which grow downwards from an aerial position to the ground which are used to support plants usually growing in unstable or mobile soils. They usually arise from nodes lower down on the stem, trunk or existing roots. A good example of prop roots are seen on Rhizophora stylosa.

Propolis: [pro-po-lis] From Própolis, which is Ancient Greek for an aromatic glue-like substance produced by honeybees from tree resin, waxes, and their own secretions, used in the construction of their hives. It refers to a specially modified bract like leaf surrounding a raceme or panicle. Good quantities are found in the resins of Lepidosperma amansiferrum.

Prophylla: [proh-fahyl] From Pro/Por, which is Latin for a on behalf of, for, alike, befitting or about and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. A good example is leaves of Drosera prophylla.

Prophyllum: [pro-fahyl-lum] From Pro/Por, which is Latin for a on behalf of, for, alike, befitting or about and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to species which look similar to several other species in the genus. A good example is Stylidium prophyllum.

Propinqua: [proh-pin-kyoo-a] From Propinqua, which is Latin for a close kinship or near to. It refers to species which look similar to several other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus propinqua.

Propinquior: [proh-pin-kyoo-or] From Propinqua, which is Latin for a close kinship or near to. It refers to species, which look similar to several other species in the genus. A good example is Habenaria propinquior.

Propinquum: [proh-pin-kyoo-um] From Propinqua, which is Latin for a close kinship or near to. It refers to species, which look similar to several other species in the genus. A good example is Galium propinquum.

Propinquus: [proh-pin-kyoo-us] From Propinqua, which is Latin for a close kinship or near to. It refers to species, which look similar to several other species in the genus. A good example is Ptilotus propinquus.

Propulsator: [pro-pul-sa-tor] From Pro, which is Latin for in favour of and Pulso, which is Latin for to beat, strike or pulsate. It probably refers to flowers,which strike a beat with who ever sees them. A good example is Hibiscus propulsator.

Prorepens: [proh-re-penz] From Pro/Prodrome, which is Greek, for in favour of, before or after in time and Repens, which is Latin for creeping forward. It refers to prostrate plants, which root at the nodes or at times along the stems. A good example is Kennedia prorepens.

Prosaptia: [pro-sap-ti-a] From Pro, which is Latin for before, ahead of or for and Sāpia, which is Italian borrowed from Sero, which is early Latin for to sow or eírō, which is Ancient Greek for to join together or unite. It may refer to the way the plants self propagate or sow themselves uniting rhizomes with the surface trunks or rocks they grow upon. A good example is Prosaptia contigua.

Prosopis: [pro-so-pis] From Prosopis, which is Ancient Greek for Burdock. It refers to the ancient name for Burdock, which is now known as Arctium lappa. A good example now of Prosopis velutina.

Prostanthera: [pro-stan-ther-a] From Prostheke, which is Greek, for an appendage and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers or stamens which have an appendage attached. A good example is Prostanthera ovalifolia.

Prostantheroides: [pro-stan-ther-oi-deez] From Prostheke, which is Greek, for an appendage, ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for a like or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Prostanthera genus in that they have anthers or stamens that have an appendage attached. A good example is Wrixonia prostantheroides.

Prosthecochaeta: [pros-the-ko-chee-ta] From Prostheke, which is Greek for an appendage and Chaita/Khaita, which is Ancient Greek for a bristle. It refers to fruits, which have several spine like bristles. A good example is Maireana prosthecochaeta.

Prostrata: [pro-strei-ta] From Prōstrātum, which is Latin for to throw on the ground or lie on the ground. It refers to plants, which grow flat on the ground. A good example is Persicaria prostrata.

Prostrate: [pro-streit] From Prōstrātum, which is Latin for to throw on the ground or lie on the ground. It refers to plants, which grow flat on the ground. A good example for hot, coastal sands is Carpobrotus glaucescens, a good example on heavier soils is Acacia cultriformis prostrate form or a good example for shady mixed soils is Viola hederacea.

Prostratoscaposa: [proh-strei-to-ska-pos-a] From Prōstrātum, which is Latin for to throw on the ground or lie on the ground and Sképē which is Latin for to bear many scapes. It refers to plants, which have many flowering scapes that lie relatively flat along the ground. A good example is the sundew Drosera prostratoscaposa.

Prostratum: [pro-strei-tum] From Prōstrātum, which is Latin for to throw on the ground or lie on the ground. It refers to plantswhich grow flat on the ground. A good example is Rhytidosporum prostratum.

Prostratus: [proh-strei-tus] From Prōstrātum, which is Latin for to throw on the ground or lie on the ground. It refers toplantswhich grow flat on the ground. A good example is Isopogon prostratus.

Protandrous: [pro-tan-dros] From Pro/Prodrome, which is Greek, for in favour of, before or after in time and Andros which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to where the anthers mature before the stigmas or the male gametes are produced before the female gametes are produced eliminating the chances of self pollination. Two good examples arefound on the Malvaceae family including Hibiscus splendens and the Ramaceae family including Alphitonia excelsa.

Protantherous: [pro-tan-ther-os] From Pro, which is a Latin prefix derived from the Greek, Prodrome, for in favour of or for before or after in time and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to leaves,which begin to appear on deciduous plants or at times flush on evergreen plants before the flowers bloom. A good example isthe flowers on Cocklospermum fraseri.

Protasparagus: [pro-tas-pa-ra-gus] From Proteus, which is Greek for the mythical sea god who had the ability to change form and to prophesy. It refers to plants, especially the flowers, which appear in many variable forms. A good example is Protasparagus racemosus var. subacerosus, which is now known as Asparagus racemosus.

Protea: [proh-tee-a] From Proteus which, is Greek for the mythical sea god who had the ability to change form and to prophesy. It refers to plants, especially the flowers, which appear in many variable forms. A good example is Isopogon protea.

Proteaceae: [proh-tee–ei-se-e] From Proteus, which is Latin for taking a large number of different forms and Aceae, which is a Latin suffix for a family. It refers to the family grouping of plants,which have great diversification in height, shape and form. Good examples are found in comparing genre and species like Banksia serrata, Macadamia integrifolia and Grevillea juniperina.

Protected Primordium: [proh-tek-ted, prahy-mor-di-um] From Pro/Prodrome, which is Ancient Greek for in favour of, before or after in time, Teger which is Latin for to cover, Pimary which is Latin for first and Mordium, which is Latin for stages. It refers to the first recognizable stage in the development of an organ from the cells embryo.

Protensa: [proh-ten-sa] From Prōtensum, which is Latin for to stretch out or reach out. It may refer to the flowers, which reach out away from the culms. A good example is Amperea protensa.

Proteoides: [proh-te-oi-deez] From Proteus, which is Greek for the sea god and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers, which resemble the Protea genus from Africa. A good example is Banksia Proteoides.

Prothalli: [proh-thal-li] From Pro/Prodrome, which is Ancient Greek for in favour of, before or after in time and Thallus, which is Ancient Greek for a young shoot. It refers to small living gametophytes, which bear the reproductive organs in ferns, clubmosses and other bryophytes. They are either the green surface disc, the transluscent disc or the colourless subterranean discs that develop before the first true leaf or frond emerges. It is the plural of prothallus. A good example is Pteris tremula.

Prothallus: [proh-thal-lus] From Pro/Prodrome, which is Ancient Greek for in favour of, before or after in time and Thallus, which is Ancient Greek for a young shoot. It refers to small living gametophytes, which bear the reproductive organs in ferns, clubmosses and other bryophytes. They are either the green surface disc, the transluscent disc or the colourless subterranean discs that develop before the first true leaf or frond emerges.

Protium: [proh-ti-um] From Prôtos, which is Ancient Greek or Protium/Protia, which is Latin for the sea god and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers, which are typical of the Proteacea family from Africa. A good example was Protium australasicum, which is now known as Canarium australasicum.

Protogynous: [proh-toh-jahy-nos] From Pro/Prodrome, which is Ancient Greek for in favour of, before or after in time and from Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to where the stigmas mature before the anthers or where the female gametes are produced before the male gametes are produced eliminating the chances of self pollination. Two good example are the flowers on Planchonella australis and Pouteria australis.

Prototrophe: [proh-to-tro-fee] From Pro/Prodrome, which is Ancient Greek for in favour of, before or after in time and Trophikos, which is Ancient Greek for nutrition. It refers to certain organisms usually bacteria, which only feed on inorganic matter thus they require no organic matter to survive.

Prototrophic: [proh-to-tro-fik] From Pro/Prodrome, which is Ancient Greek for in favour of, before or after in time and Trophikos, which is Ancient Greek for nutrition. It refers to certain organisms usually bacteria which only feed on inorganic matter, thus they require no organic matter to survive.

Protracta: [proh-trak-ta] From Pruinosus, which is Latin for frosty or to be covered in frost and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruit surfaces, which appear to be covered in a powdery or waxy substance resembling frost. A good example is Sarcotoechia protracta.

Protractum: [proh-trak-tum] From Pruinosus, which is Latin for frosty or to be covered in frost and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to surfaces, which appear to be covered in a powdery or waxy substance resembling frost. A good example is the lower laminas of Bupleurum protractum, which is now known as Bupleurum lancifolium.

Protuberans: [pro-tyoo-ber-anz] From Prōtūberāns, which is Latin for frosty or to be covered in frost and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to surfaces, which appear to be covered in a powdery or waxy substance resembling frost. A good example is the lower laminas of Triglochin protuberans.

Provecta: [proh-vek-ta] From Pruinosus, which is Latin for frosty or to be covered in frost and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to a surface appearing to be covered in a powdery or waxy substance resembling frost. A good example is the lower laminas of Eucalyptus provecta.

Proventriculus: [proh-ven-tri-kyoo-lus] From Pro/Prodrome, which is Ancient Greek for in favour of, before or after in time and Ventriculus, which is Latin for a little stomache. It refers to a segment of the stomach that may store andor commence digestion of food before the partially digested food progresses to the gizzard in birds and the digestive tract in insects for further breakdown and digestion. It is an important function which removes the outer often nutritious surfaces of many seeds and allows the fertile section to pass through for quick germination.

Provincialis: [pro-vin-si-a-lis] From Prōvinciāle, which is Latin for a province. It refers to plants, which grow on provineces or peninsular like provinces. A good example Acacia provincialis.

Proxima: [prok-si-ma] From Proximus, which is Latin for the origin of a point of attachment. It refers to any organ’sbasal portion but not the base. A good example is shown here with the flowers of Acacia proxima.

Proximum: [prok-si-mum] From Proximus, which is Latin for the origin of a point of attachment. It refers to any organ’sbasal portion but not the base. A good example is the grey Lichen Stereocaulon proximum.

Proximal: [prok-si-mal] From Proximus, which is Latin for the origin of a point of attachment. It refers to any organ’s basal portion but not the base. A good example is shown here with the flowers of Coleus scutellarioides.

Proximal and Distal Plectranthus scutellarioides.

Proximate: [prok-si-meit] From Proximus, which is Latin for to be near to or aproximately. It refers to being very near as in before or after in time or reality and is fairly accurate.

Pruiens: [proo-ri-enz] From Pruinosus, which is Latin for frosty or to be covered in frost. It refers to fruits, which appear to be covered in a powdery or waxy substance that resemble frost. A good example is Davidsonia pruriens.

Pruiniramis: [proo-ni-ra-mis] From Prunina, which is Latin for resembling a plum. It refers to plants, which resemble the plum tree, have leaves similar to the plum tree or colour of the plum tree leaves. A good example is Eucalyptus pruiniramis.

Pruinocarpa: [proo-no-kar-pa] From Pruinosus, which is Latin for frosty or to be covered in frost and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are covered in a powdery or waxy substance resembling frost. A good example is the pyllode laminas on Acacia pruinocarpa.

Pruinocarpum: [proo-no-kar-pum] From Pruinosus, which is Latin for frosty or to be covered in frost and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to a surface appearing to be covered in a powdery or waxy substance resembling frost. A good example is the phyllode laminas on Racosperma pruinocarpa, which is now known as Acacia pruinocarpa.

Pruinosa: [proo-noh-sa] From Pruinosus, which is Latin for frosty or to be covered in frost. It refers to organs, which are covered in a powdery or waxy substance resembling frost. A good example is the lower laminas of Eucalyptus pruinosa subsp. pruinosa.

Pruinose: [proo-nos] From Pruinosus, which is Latin for frosty or to be covered in frost. It refers to organs, which are covered in a powdery or waxy substance looking similar to frost. A good example is the lower laminas of Acacia dealbata.

Pruinosum: [proo-noh-sum] From Pruinosus, which is Latin for frosty or to be covered in frost and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits or pods, which are covered in a powdery or waxy substance resembling frost. A good example is the phyllode laminas on Racosperma pruinosum, which is now known as Acacia pruinosa.

Pruinosus: [proo-noh-sus] From Pruinosus, which is Latin for frosty or to be covered in frost and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits or pods, which are covered in a powdery or waxy substance resembling frost. A good example is the phyllode laminas on Isopogon pruinosus.

Prumnopitys: [prum-nopi-teez] From Prymnos, which is Ancient Greek for to the stern or behind and Pytis, which is a Greek for a pine tree. It refers to the location of the resin ducts on conifers. A good example is to be found on Prumnopitys ladei.

Prunella: [proo-nel-la] From Brunella, which is Latin for a smooth twill made from composite materials and wool. The reference is unclear to the author. A good example of the genus is the introduced weed Prunella vulgaris.

Prunelloides: [proo-nel-loi-deez] From Brunella, which is Latin for a smooth twill made from composite materials and wool and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves, which resemble those of the Prunella genus. A good example is Prostanthera prunelloides.

Prunifera: [proo-ni-fera] From Prūnus, which is Latin for to resemble a plum and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which bear fruits that resemble plums. A good example is Niemeyera prunifera.

Pruniferum: [proo-ni-fer-um] From Prūnus, which is Latin for resembling a plum and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which appear like plum tree leaves or those of the Prunella genus. A good example is Amorphospermum pruniferum.

Prunifolia: [proo-ni-foh-lia] From Prūnus, which is Latin for resembling a plum and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which appear like plum tree leaves or those of the Prunella genus. A good example is Pomaderris prunifolia var. prunifolia.

Prunifolius: [proo-ni-foh-lius] From Prūnus, which is Latin for resembling a plum and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which appear like plum tree leaves or those of the Prunella genus. A good example is Croton prunifolius, which is now known as Croton habrophyllus.

Prunina: [proo-ni-na] From Prūnus, which is Latin for resembling a plum. It refers to plants, which resemble the plum tree or have leaves similar to the plum tree or colour of the plum tree leaves. A good example is Dianella prunina which has leaves which resemble the colour of the plum trees leaves.

Prunus: [proo-nus] From Prūnus, which is Latin for a plum. It refers to plants, belonging to the plum genus including the almond tree. A good example is Prunus brachystachya.

Pruriens: [proo-ri-enz] From Pruria, which is Latin for to itch or itching. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in stiff hairs that may cause some discomfort or irritation. A good example is the leaves and stems on Davidsonia pruriens.

Pryoriana: [prahy-or-i-a-na] From Pruria, which is Latin for to itch or itching. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in stiff hairs that may cause some discomfort or irritation. A good example is Eucalyptus pryoriana.

Psammagrostis: [sahm-a-gros-tis] From Psamnos, which is Ancient Greek for sand and Agrostis, which is Ancient Greek for a native grass. It refers to grasses looking similar to the Agrostis genus with a preference for sandy soils. A good example is Psammagrostis wiseana.

Psammiphila: [sam-mi-fi-la] From Psamnos, which is Ancient Greek for sand and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for to love or loving. It refers to plants, which have a strong preference for moist, sandy soils. A good example is Hygrophoropsis psammiphila.

Psammitica: [sam-mi-ti-ka] From Psamnos, which is Ancient Greek for sand and Geiton, which is Greek/Latin for a neighbour. It refers to  plants that have a preference for growing in sandy soils. A good example is Eucalyptus psammitica.

Psammogeton: [sam-mo-ge-ton] From Psamnos, which is Ancient Greek for sand and Geiton, which is Greek/Latin for a neighbour. It refers to plants which have a preference for sandy soils and grow in communities with other sand loving plants. A good example is Euphorbia psammogeton.

Psammomoya: [sam-mo-moi-a] From Psamnos, which is Ancient Greek for sand and Moya, which is Latin for flowing mud associated with a volcanic eruption especially formed when snow or a nearby lake are involved. It refers to plants, which have a preference for sandy soils formed by volcanic flows with water or ice. A good example is Psammomoya choretroides.

Psammophila: [sam-mo-fi-la] From Psamnos, which is Ancient Greek for sand and Phílos which is Ancient Greek for to love or loving. It refers to plants, which have a strong preference for moist, sandy soils. A good example is Acacia psammophila.

Psammophilae: [sam-mo-fi-lee] From Psamnos, which is Ancient Greek for sand and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for to love or loving. It refers to plants which have a strong preference for moist, sandy soils. A good example was Styphelia psammophilae, which is now known as Leucopogon psammophilus.

Psammophilum: [sam-mo-fi-lum] From Psamnos, which is Ancient Greek for sand and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for to love or loving. It refers to plants which have a strong preference for moist, sandy soils. A good example is Genoplesium psammophilum.

Psammophilus: [sam-mo-fi-lus] From Psamnos, which is Greek for sand and Phílos, which is Greek for to love or loving. It refers to plants, which have a strong preference  for moist, sandy soils. A good example is Juncus psammophilus.

Psathyrella: [sa-thahy-rel-la] From Psathyros, which is Ancient Greek for fragile or weak and Ella which is Greek/Latin for to be more femine. It refers to fungi which are more fragile than other closely related genre. A good example is Psathyrella bambra.

Psednus: [sed-nus] Maybe from Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false. It may refer to plants, which are closely related to another specie thus it is the false species. A good example is Calochilus psednus and Calochilus caeruleus.

Pseudalangium: [soo-da-lan-ji-um] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Alangium, which is Latinized from the Malabar vernaculatr for a plant found there. It refers to plants, which resemble the Alangium genus in India. A good example was Pseudalangium polyosmoides, which is now known as Alangium villosum subsp. polyosmoides.

Pseudalepyrum: [soo-da-le-pahy-rum] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and maybe Pȳramis/Pȳramidēs, which is Latin for pyramidal in shape. It refers to plants, which stand out like the pyramids in Eygypt. A good example was Pseudalepyrum monogynum, which is now known as Centrolepis monogyna.

Pseudalhagi: [soo-dal-ha-ji] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Alhagi, which is Latinized from the Hebrew vernacular for a wonderer or nomad. It refers to plants, which are seen sporadically over a range within their environmenal habitat. A good example was Alhagi pseudalhagi, which is now known as Alhagi maurorum.

Pseudanastomosans: [soo-da-na-sto-moh-sanz] From Pseudos which is Ancient Greek for false and Anastomosis which is English for rejoining or re connecting. It refers to veins which part near the midvein then reconnect near the apex or margins. A good example is the leaf veins on Jasminum pseudanastomosans, which is now known as Jasminum longipetalum.

Pseudanthia: [soo-dan-thi-a] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to some or at times all the anthers, which are sterile. A good example is found on the flowers of Centrolepis banksii.

Pseudanthus: [soo-dan-thus] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to the male flowers, which have a rudimentary or false ovary. A good example is Pseudanthus divaricatissimus.

Pseudaphylla: [soo-da-fahyl-la] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which appear to be extensions of the stems. A good example is Daviesia pseudaphylla.

Pseudarabidella: [soo-da-ra-bi-del-la] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false, Rabida, which is Latin for fierce, savage or furious and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for to be more femine. It refers to structures or organs, which has very sharp thorns or prickles. A good example is the savage thorns in the leaf axils of Pseudarabidella filifolia, which is now known as Arabidella filifolia.

Pseudatalaya: [soo-da-ta-lei-ya] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Attalea, which is Latinized from the Spanish word for a watch tower. It refers to earlier trees, which were tall and made good vantage trees for locating prey. A good example was Pseudatalaya multiflora which is now known a Atalaya multiflora.

Pseudelephantopus: [soo-de-le-fan-to-pus] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false, possibly Deleo which is Latin for a violent death, Phántasma which is Ancient Greek for a dream, vision or phantom and Pous which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It may refer to the leaves, whicah are attached to the petioles that can cause death if eaten. A good example is the sleeper weed Pseudelephantopus spicatus.

Pseuderanthemum: [soo-der-an-the-mum] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which resemble the Anthemum genus. A good example is Pseuderanthemum variabile.

Pseudevax: [soo-de-vaks] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Evax, which is Latin for joy or overwhelmed. It refers to plants, which have flowers that resemble the Evax genus. A good example is Chthonocephalus pseudevax.

Pseudo: [soo-do] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false.

Pseudoacrotricha: [soo-doh-a-kro-trahy-ka] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false, Akros, which is Ancient Greek for the highest point and Tricha, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to grasses, which resemble the Acrotricha. A good example is Eriochloa pseudoacrotricha.

Pseudocaespitosum: [soo-doh-ses-pi-toh-sum] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Caespitosum, which is Latin for a tuft. It refers to plants, which grow in small clumps that somewhat, superficially resemble small tufts. A good example is Stylidium pseudocaespitosum.

Pseudocampanulata: [soo-doh-kam-pan-yoo-la-ta] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Campanulatus, which is Latin for a bell. It refers to an organ, which has a poorly formed or false bell shape. A good example is the fruits on Atriplex pseudocampanulata.

Pseudocarpa: [soo-doh-kar-pa] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to aggregation of achenes, which are embedded in a fleshy receptacle. A good example is the fruits on Fragaria vesca.

Pseudocephalozia: [soo-doh-se-fa-lo-zi-a] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Cephalozia, which is Greek/Latin? for leafy liverwarts. It refers to liverwarts, which have many thin walled leaf like structures. A good example is Pseudocephalozia paludicola.

Pseudococcidae: [soo-doh-kok-si-dee] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Coccidium, which is Latin for digestive parasites in the Coccidia genus. In biology it refers to a group of sap sucking pests that live on our beloved plants but then they do supply a food source to many small honeyeaters and wrens which keep them in control in a biologically balanced garden. A good example of is Pseudococcus xanthorrhoeae which is found on several of the grasstree species including Xanthorrhoeae latifolia.

Pseudocolus: [soo-doh-ko-lus] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Kúklos, which is Ancient Greek for a wheel. It refers to fungi, which resemble the Colus genus in that they have the beautiful formation or the arms which form wheels or networks. A good example is Pseudocolus fusiformis.

Pseudocopulation: [soo-doh-kop-yoo-lei-shon] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Copulation which is Latin for the act of sexual intercourse. It refers to a plants ability to mimic an insect visually or by scent to entice male insects. The male insects in turn try to have sex with the flower which releases its pollen. A good example is Stylidium graminifolium.

Pseudocymosa: [soo-doh-sahy-moh-sa] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Kŷma, which is Ancient Greek or Cȳma, which is Latin for a cluster of flowers. It refers to flower clusters, which open from the center first then in succession outwardly towards the periphery. A good example is Billardiera pseudocymosa.

Pseudodrummondii: [soo-doh-drum-mon-di-ahy] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Is probably named in honour of Thomas Drummond; 1780-1835, who was a Scottish botanist and curator of the Belfast Botanic Gardens. It refers to plants, which very closely resemble the Drummondia genus. A good example is the fruits on Acacia pseudodrummondii.

Pseudodrupe (Involucre): [soo-doh-droop, in-vo-loo-ker] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Drupa/Dryppa, which are Ancient Greek for a type of fruit. It refers to anut or drupe which is surrounded by a fleshy perianth and a tough skin. A good example is the fruits on Dendrocnide excelsa.

Pseudofastigiatum: [soo-doh-fa-sti-ji-a-tum] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Fastīgātum, which is Latin for clustered together. It refers to plants, which have erect, parallel branches clustered together that often form a column. A good example is Syzygium pseudofastigiatum.

Pseudoferrugineum: [soo-doh-fe-ru-ji-ne-um] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Flābellum, which is Latin for a fan. It refers to structures or an organs, which somewhat resemble a fan. A good example is the leaves on Helichrysum pseudoferrugineum, which is now known as Cassinia aculeata.

Pseudoflabellata: [soo-doh-fla-bel-la-ta] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Flābellum, which is Latin for a fan. It refers to a structure or an organ, which somewhat resembles a fan. A good example is the leaves on Frankenia pseudoflabellata.

Pseudoglobulus: [soo-doh-glo-byoo-lus] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Globus, which is Latin for a poor spherical or orb shape, more like a light globe. It refers to fruits which have a shape similar to the old light globes. A good example is Eucalyptus pseudoglobulus.

Pseudognaphalium: [soo-doh-na-fa-li-um] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Gnaphaliu, which is Ancient Greek for tufts of wool. It refers to plants, which resemble the European genus that has large, soft, white leaves. The leaves were used to stuff pillows whereas the Australian Compositaeae genus has small leaves and stems, which are also densely covered in soft white floccose hairs and were used in a similar way by early settlers. A good example is Pseudognaphalium luteoalbum.

Pseudograminicolor: [soo-doh-gra-mi-ni-ko-lor] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false, Gaminae, which is Latin for grass like, Krôma, which is Ancient Greek, Colores, which is Greek or Colōr, which is Latin for the visual measurement of a hue, saturation and brightness of the reflected light as the saturation or chroma of the hue or tone. It refers to fungi, which have a grass green colour but is not necessarily chlorophyll. A good example is Hygrocybe pseudograminicolor.

Pseudohelipteroides: [soo-doh-he-lip-te-roi-deez] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false, Helios, which is Ancient Greek for the sun, Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for a like or similar to. It refers to flowers, which resemble the Helipteron genus in that they are the false Helipteron paper daisies. A good example is Ptilotus pseudohelipteroides.

Pseudohyssopifolium: [soo-doh-his-so-pi-foh-li-um] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false, Hyssop, which is Ancient Greek for the European mint bush in the Hyssop genus and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves which are very similar to the real Hyssop genus. A good example is Lepidim pseudohyssopifolium.

Pseudohirsutum: [soo-doh-her-soo-tum] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Hīrsūtum, which is Ancient Greek for short bristly hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are either sprsely covered in bristly hairs or the hairs are less than bristly and maybe somewhat longer. A good example is Stylidium pseudohirsutum.

Pseudojambosa: [soo-doh-jam-bos-a] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Jambos, which is Latinized from the local vernacular word for the Jambos fruit. It refers to the leaves or fruits being similar to the real Syzygium jambosa. A good example is the red fruits on Tapeinosperma pseudojambosa.

Pseudojunceus: [soo-doh-joon-see-us] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Junceus, which is Latin for a reed or to be rush like. It refers to leaves or plants, which resemble a rush or reed in their growth habit. A good example is the red fruits on Thysanotus pseudojunceus.

Pseudolittoralis: [soo-doh-lit-tor-a-lis] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Lītorālis/Lītus which is Latin for along the shoreline. It refers to plants, which grow on the back dunes away from the frontal dunes and the shore line. A good example was Hoya pseudolittoralis, which is now known as Hoya anulata.

Pseudomicrophyllum: [soo-doh-mahy-kro-fahyl-lum] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false, Mikrós, which is Ancient Greek for small or tiny and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are somewhat smaller than other species in the genus. A good example is Chenopodium pseudomicrophyllum.

Pseudomonomerous: [soo-doh-mon-o-mer-os] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false, Monos, which is Ancient Greek for one and Meros, which is Ancient Greek for a whorl with given parts. It refers to whorls, which are seemingly with one member that is actually a fusion of two or more parts. A good example is the flowers on Dendrocnide excelsa.

Pseudomorus: [soo-doh-morus] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Morus which is Latin for the Mulberry tree. It refers to leaves, flowers and or fruits which are similar to the commercial fruiting Mulberry from China Morus australis. A good example is the flowers on Pseudomorus brunonianus, which is now known as Streblus brunonianus.

Pseudoneurachne: [soo-doh-nyoo-rak-ne] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false, Neûron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve or vein and Achne, which is Ancient Greek for chaff. It refers to glumes, lemma, and or palea, which have a very indistinct longitudinal ridge like vein. A good example is the flowers on Panicum pseudoneurachne, which is now known as Zygochloa paradoxa.

Pseudomorus: [soo-doh-morus] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Morus, which is Latin for the Mulberry tree. It refers to leaves, flowers and or fruits being similar to the commercial fruiting Mulberry from China Morus australis. A good example is the flowers on Pseudomorus brunonianus, which is now known as Streblus brunonianus.

Pseudopanax: [soo-doh-pa-naks] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Panákeia, which is Ancient Greek for to cure all. It refers to plants, which have some characteristics that resemble the Chinese Gingseng which is widely used as a herbal remedy. A good example is the leaves on Pseudopanax gunnii.

Pseudopapillosum: [soo-doh-pap-il-loh-sum] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Papula, which is Latin for a pimple or small lumps. It refers to fruits or at times stems, which are covered in small lumps. A good example is Lepidium pseudopapillosum.

Pseudopholidia: [soo-doh-fo-li-di-a] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Pholid, which is Ancient Greek for horny or scaly. It refers to the bracts which resemble horny like scales. A good example is the bracts on Pseudopholidia brevifolia, which are now known as Eremophila brevifolia.

Pseudo-piperita: [soo-doh-pi-per-i-ta] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Piperita, which is Latin for mentha. It refers to leaves, which have a somewhat peppermint fragrance. A good example is Eucalyptus pseudo-piperita.

Pseudoplumosa: [soo-doh-ploo-moh-sa] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Plumosa, which is Latin for a a feather. It refers to flowers, which appear to have plumes or feathers. Agood example is Banksia pseudoplumosa .

Pseudoplumosa: [soo-doh-ploo-moh-sum] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Plumosa, which is Latin for a a feather. It refers to flowers, which appear to have plumes or feathers. Agood example was Hypnum pseudoplumosum, which are now known as Brachythecium plumosum.

Pseudopodium: [soo-doh-poh-di-um] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to not having real pedicels or petioles or feet. A good example is the temporary protrusion of the surface of an amoeboid cell for movement and feeding. A good example is the fresh water        Naegleria fowleri.

Pseudopogonatherum: [soo-doh-po-go-na-ther-um] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false, Pṓgōn, which is Ancient Greek for a beard and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to grasses, which closely resemble the Pogonatherum genus. A good example is Pseudopogonatherum contortum.

Pseudoraphis: [soo-doh-ra-fis] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Raphis, which is Ancient Greek for a needle. It refers to plants, which have false needles like the Raphis palm. A good example is Pseudoraphis paradoxa.

Pseudorhus: [soo-doh-rus] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Rhus, which is Latin for the Sumac tree. It refers to trees, which have similar foliage to the false Rhus or Sumac tree. A good example is the local foam bark tree Jagera pseudorhus var. pseudorhus.

Pseudoruderale: [soo-doh-ru-der-a-le] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Rūderālis/Rūdus, which is Latin for rubble or wasteland. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on waste land or very gravelly soild. A good example is Lepidium pseudoruderale Pseudos which is Ancient Greek for false and Hermaphroditos which is Ancient Greek or Hermaphroditus which is Latin for an individual which has both male and female sexual organs. It refers to a flower that has the sexual organs of one sex internally and the other sex externally and vice versa with one set usually being malformed.

Pseudosacculatum: [soo-doh-sak-kyoo-la-tum] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Sacculus/Sacculī, which is Latin for a small purse. It refers to flower buds, which resemble a small purse. A good example is Stylidium pseudosacculatum.

Pseudostygia: [soo-doh-sti-ji-a] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Stygia, which is Ancient Greek for dark and gloomy. It refers to flower heads on culms, which resemble the spider Stygium. A good example is Mesomelaena pseudostygia.

Pseudotasmanicum: [soo-doh-taz-man-i-kum] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Tasmania which is Latin for from Tasmania. It refers to the incorrect assumption that it was only found in Tasmania prior to official listing and naming. A good example is Lepidium pseudotasmanicum.

Pseudotenellum: [soo-doh-te-nel-lum] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Tenellum, which is Latin for tender or delicate. It refers to leaves, which resemble the Helanthium tenellum. A good example is the finer features on the flowers of Stylidium pseudotenellum, which is now known as Stylidium fissilobum.

Pseudo-terminal: [soo-doh-ter-mi-nal] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Terminalis which is Latin for at the end. It refers to where a bud appears to be the apical shoot but is in fact a lateral bud near the apex.They develop with the on set of death or nondevelopment of terminal bud.

Pseudotunbridgense: [soo-doh-tun-brid-jens] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Tunbridge which is Latinized for the township of Tunbridge Wells and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered around the township of Tunridge Wells which is about half way between Hobart and Launceston in Tasmania. A good example is Hymenophyllum pseudotunbridgense which is presently listed as unresolved awaiting further investigation as to which genus or species name should be allocated.

Pseudovanilla: [soo-doh-va-nil-la] From pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Vainilla, which is Spanish for a little pod or sheath or from modern Latin for Vagina for a sheath. It refers to pods, resemble the pods of the real Vanilla genus. A good example is Pseudovanilla foliate.

Pseudovellea: [soo-doh-vel-lee] From pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and maybe from Vele, which is Latinized from the Spanish for I prefer. If so It refers to plants, which are a little more beautiful than other species in the genus. A good example is Cheilanthes pseudovellea.

Pseudoweinmannia: [soo-doh-wei-man-ni-ah] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Weinmannia which is named inhonour of Johann Wilhelm Weinmann; 1683-1741, whowas a German botanist and apothecaryist. It refers to the trees, which were once members of the Weinmannia genus and being closely related thus it was a false representative of that genus. A good example is Pseudoweinmannia lachnocarpa.

Pseuduvaria: [soo-duh-var-i-a] From Pseudos, which is Ancient Greek for false and Varius, which is Latin for various or variable or miscellaneous. It refers to trees which were once members of the Mitrephora genus and also have a close relationship to the Uvaria genus. Thus a false representative of the two genre so the present use of false in the name was used. The plants physically are more representative to the Mitrephora genus but DNA sampling is required to place the plants in their correct genus. A good example is Pseuduvaria froggattii.

Psidioides: [si-di-oi-deez] From Pisidium, which is Ancient Greek for the pomegranate fruit and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the fruits being similar to the exotic guavas in appearance and in taste. A good example is Rhodomyrtus psidioides.

Psidium: [si-dium] From Pisidium which is Ancient Greek for the pomegranate fruit. It refers to the fruits being similar to the cultivated fruits originally from Iran. A good example is the Lord Howe Island guava Psidium cattleyanum var. cattleyanum which may become a weed problem on the east coast of Australia.

Psilantha: [si-lantha] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are smooth and glabrous. A good example is Grevillea psilantha.

Psilanthus: [si-lanthus] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers being smooth and glabrous. A good example is Psilanthus brassii.

Psilo: [si-lo] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous.

Psilobasis: [si-loba-sis] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Basis, which is Ancient Greek for a base. It refers to base of any organ, which is smooth and glabrous. A good example is Styphelia psiloclada.

Psilocalyx: [si-loka-liks] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Ancient Greek for specialized leaves behind the petals that are cupular. It refers to small branches and stems, which are smooth and glabrous. A good example is Eremophila psilocalyx.

Psilocarpa: [si-lokar-pa] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are smooth and glabrous. A good example is Hibbertia psilocarpa.

Psilocarpus: [si-lokar-pus] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are smooth and glabrous. A good example is Senecio psilocarpus.

Psilocaulon: [si-lokor-lon] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Káulos, which is Ancient Greek for stick, stem or branch. It refers to stems and branches which are smooth and leafless. A good example is Eremophila psilocalyx.

Psiloclada: [si-lo-kla-da] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a branch or stem. It refers to branches and stems which are smooth and glabrous. A good example is Dimeria ornithopoda var. psilobasis.

Psilocladus: [si-lo-kla-dus] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a branch or stem. It refers to branches and stems which are smooth and glabrous. A good example is Ricinocarpos psilocladus.

Psilocybe: [si-lo-sahy-be] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to the pileus on fungi which are glabrius and very glossy. A good example is Psilocybe aggregata.

Psilopus: [si-lo-poos] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to petioles or pedicels which are glabrous. A good example is Leucopogon psilopus.

Psilorhegma: [si-lor-eg-ma] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Rhegma which is Ancient Greek for to rupture or to fracture. It refers to pods or cocci which are smooth, glabrous and rupture along the edge quickly to disperse the seeds. A good example is the pods on Psilorhegma gaudichaudii, which is now known as Senna gaudichaudii.

Psilorrhiza: [si-lo-rahy-za] From Psilo which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Rhíza which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to roots which have a smooth, glabrous surface. A good example is Scleria psilorrhiza.

Psilorrhyncha: [si-lo-rin-ka] From Psilo which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a branch or stem. It refers to fruits, which have a smooth, glabrous nose like appendage at the apex. A good example is Hakea psilorrhyncha.

Psilotoides: [si-lo-toi-deez] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to structures or organs, which are very smooth and glabrous similar to the Psilotum genus. A good example was Omphacomeria psilotoides, which is now known as Exocarpos strictus.

Psilotrichodes: [si-lo-trahy-ko-deez] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous, Trichos, which is Ancient Greek for a hair and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Psilotrichum genus in that they have hairs which are straight, smooth and glabrous. A good example was Hemisteirus psilotrichodes, which is now known as Ptilotus gaudichaudii.

Psilotrichoides: [si-lo-trahy-koi-deez] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous and Tríchōma, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to plants, which resemble the Psilotrichum genus in that they have hairs which are straight, smooth and glabrous. A good example is the hairs and awns on Ptilotus psilotrichoides.

Psilotrichum: [si-lo-trahy-kum] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous, Tríchōma, which is Ancient Greek for a hair and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have straight, smooth and glabrous. A good example is Psilotrichum helichrysoides.

Psilotum: [si-lohtum] From Psilo, which is Ancient Greek for bare, naked or glabrous. It refers to the rachis, rhyzomes and fronds, which are very smooth and glabrous. A good example is Psilotum complanatum.

Psittacina: [si-ta-si-na] From Psittakos, which is Ancient Greek for to be parrot like. It refers to the beautiful colours of a parrot. A good example is the strikingly bright, parrot green pileus and stalk on Hygrocybe psittacina.

Psittacoram: [si-ta-kor-am] From Psittakos, which is Ancient Greek for a parrot and maybe Decorum, which is Latin for decore or furniture. It refers to organs, which have red and green colours of a parrot. A good example is was Gahnia psittacoram, which is now known as Gahnia filifolia.

Psittacorum: [si-ta-kor-um] From Psittakos, which is Ancient Greek for a parrot and maybe Decorum, which is Latin for decore or furniture. It refers to organs, which have red and green colours of a parrot. A good example is was Cladium psittacorum, which is now known as Gahnia grandis.

Psittacoschoenus: [si-ta-ko-shoo-nus] From Psittakos, which is Ancient Greek for a parrot and Skhoînos, which is Ancient Greek for a rush or reed. It refers to plants, which resemble the rushes or are reed like. A good example was Psittacoschoenus erythrocarpus, which is now known as Gahnia grandis.

Psoralea: [sor-a-lee-a] From Psoraleos, which is Ancient Greek for mangy or scabby or to be affected by leprosy. It refers to the black glandular dots on the calyxes. A good example is the African weed in southern Australia known as Psoralea pinnata.

Psoraliifolia: [sor-a-li-foh-li-a] From Psoraleos, which is Ancient Greek for mangy or scabby or to be affected by leprosy and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have a mangy appearence compared to other species in the genus. A good example was Cissus psoraliifolia, which is now known as Cayratia trifolia.

Psoraleifolium: [sor-a-lei-foh-li-um] From Psoraleos, which is Ancient Greek for mangy or scabby or to be affected by leprosy. It refers to calyxes, which are covered in black dots. A good example was Gompholobium psoraleifolium, which is now known as Gompholobium latifolium.

Psoralioides: [sor-a-li-oi-deez] From Psoraleos, which is Ancient Greek for mangy or scabby or to be affected by leprosy and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to calyxes which have black glandular dots on the. A good example was Clidanthera psoralioides, which is now known as Glycyrrhiza acanthocarpa.

Psychophily: [sahy-ko-fi-li] From Psychodes, which is Ancient Greek for the mythical winged fairies known as butterflies and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for to be loved or loving. It refers to plants, which are pollinated by butterflies. A good example is found on the flowers of Citrus australasica and Pittosporum undulatum which are butterfly attractive.

Psychotria: [sahy-ko-tri-a] From Psyche, which is Ancient Greek for the human mind of soul and Treis, which is Ancient Greek for three. Its reference is not however many of the earlier species in the genus were used by South American Indians for hallucinatory induced states. A good example is Psychotria loniceroides.

Psychotriifolia: [sahy-ko-tri-foh-li-a] From Psyche, which is Ancient Greek for the human mind of soul and Treis, which is Ancient Greek for three. It refers to trees , which have trifoliate foliage and were used as a medication. A good example is Ficus psychotriifolia, which is now known asFicus virens var. virens.

Psychotriifolium: [sahy-ko-tri-foh-li-uh m] From Psyche, which is Ancient Greek for the human mind of soul and Treis, which is Ancient Greek for three. It refers to trees , which have trifoliate foliage and were used as a medication. A good example was Urostigma psychotriifolium, which is now known as Ficus virens.

Psychotrioides: [sahy-ko-tri-oi-deez] From Psyche, which is Ancient Greek for the human mind of soul, Treis, which is Ancient Greek for three and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Psycotria genus. A good example is Wendlandia psychotrioides.

Psychrocharis: [sahy-kro-ka-ris] From Psyche, which is Ancient Greek for the human mind of soul and Kharis, which is Ancient Greek for pleasantly graceful. It refers toplants which have an overall beauty of their own in the forests. A good example is Astelia psychrocharis.

Psychrophila: [sahy-kro-fil-a] From Psyche, which is Ancient Greek for the human mind of soul and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for to love or loving. It refers to the plant’s beautiful flowers drawing your mind in as they appear to lie on the ground. A good example is Psychrophila introloba.

Psychrophilum: [sahy-kro-fil-um] From Psyche, which is Ancient Greek for the human mind of soul and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for to love or loving. It refers to this microscopic fungus when seen under a microscope. A good example is Trichoderma psychrophilum.

Psydrax: [sahy-dracks] From Psydrax, which is Ancient Greek for a lump or bump. It refers to the fruits and or seeds of some of the original species, which have lumps on the fruits and or seeds. A good example is Psydrax lamprophyllum.

Psyllium: [si-li-um] From Psýllion/Psyllíon/Psýlla, which are Greek for a flea. It refers to seeds, which resemble fleas. A good example is Conostylis psyllium.

Ptarmicifolia: [tar-mi-si-foh-li-ah] From Ptarmics, which is Latin for a substance that causes sneezing and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have the ability to cause some people to start sneezing. A good example is Dodonaea ptarmicifolia.

Ptarmicoides: [tar-mi-koi-deez] From Ptarmics, which is Latin for a substance that causes sneezing and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for a like or similar to. It refers to plants, which have resemblance to other species that cause (some) people to start sneezing. A good example is Ixodia ptarmicoides.

Pteridifolia: [te-ri-di-foh-li-a] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing or feather or fern and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the fronds of many ferns. A good example is Grevillea pteridiifolia.

Pteridium: [te-ri-di-um] From Ptéris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to plants, which is any seedless, nonflowering vascular plant of the class Filicinae, of tropical to temperate regions, characterized by true roots produced from a rhizome, with fronds that uncoil upward and have a branching vein system, and reproduction by spores contained in sporangia that usually appear as brown or yellow grains or powder from on the underside of the fronds. A good example is the world wide fern of Pteridium esculatum.

Pteridoblechnum: [te-ri-do-blek-num] From Ptéris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to plants, which is any seedless, nonflowering vascular plant of the class Filicinae, of tropical to temperate regions, characterized by true roots produced from a rhizome, with fronds that uncoil upward and have a branching vein system, and reproduction by spores contained in sporangia that usually appear as brown or yellow grains or powder from on the underside of the fronds, and Blechnum, which is Ancient Greek for the ferns found in Greece. It refers to ferns which have typical Blechnum characteristics. A good example is Pteridoblechnum neglectum.

Pteridography: [te-ri-do-gra-fee] From Ptéris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern, which is any seedless, nonflowering vascular plant of the class Filicinae, of tropical to temperate regions, characterized by true roots produced from a rhizome, with fronds that uncoil upward and have a branching vein system, and reproduction by spores contained in sporangia that usually appear as brown or yellow grains or powder from on the underside of the fronds and Graphos, which is Ancient Greek for written or to draw. It refers to the scientific study of the systematic descriptions of ferns.

Pteridoides: [te-ri-doi-deez] From Ptéris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern, which is any seedless, nonflowering vascular plant of the class Filicinae, of tropical to temperate regions, characterized by true roots produced from a rhizome, with fronds that uncoil upward and have a branching vein system, and reproduction by spores contained in sporangia that usually appear as brown or yellow grains or powder from on the underside of the fronds and Graphos, which is Ancient Greek for written or to draw. and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves, which resemble those of a typical fern. A good example is Asplenium pteridoides.

Pteridologist: [te-ri-do-lo-jist] From Ptéris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern, which is any seedless, nonflowering vascular plant of the class Filicinae, of tropical to temperate regions, characterized by true roots produced from a rhizome, with fronds that uncoil upward and have a branching vein system, and reproduction by spores contained in sporangia that usually appear as brown or yellow grains or powder from on the underside of the fronds and Graphos, which is Ancient Greek for written or to draw., Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies the science of ferns.

Pteridology: [te-ri-do-lo-jee] From Ptéris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science of studying ferns.

Pterigoidea: [ter-i-goi-de-a] From Pterigo, which is Ancient Greek for a wing shape and goides which is Ancient Greek for to indicate a large group. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which have a wing shape. A good example was Acacia pterigoidea, which is now known as Acacia anceps

Pterigosperma: [te-ri-go-sper-ma] From Pterigo, which is Ancient Greek for a wing shape and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which have a typical bird’s wing shaped wing. A good example is Goodenia pterigosperma.

Pterigospermus: [te-ri-go-sper-mus] From Pterigo, which is Ancient Greek for a wing shape and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which have a typical bird’s wing shaped wing. A good example is Scirpus pterygospermus, which is now known as Fimbristylis pterigosperma.

Pteris: [te-ris] From Ptéris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern, which is any seedless, nonflowering vascular plant of the class Filicinae, of tropical to temperate regions, characterized by true roots produced from a rhizome, with fronds that uncoil upward and have a branching vein system, and reproduction by spores contained in sporangia that usually appear as brown or yellow grains or powder from on the underside of the fronds and Graphos, which is Ancient Greek for written or to draw. It refers to plants, which is very typical of a fern. A good example is Pteris umbrosa.

Pternandra: [ter-nan-dra] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to the stamens, filaments or anthers, which are flattened out like a wing. A good example is the filaments on Pternandra caerulescens.

Ptero: [teer-o] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing.

Pterocalycina: [te-ro-ka-lahy-si-na] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Kályx/Kalýptein which is Ancient Greek or Calycina, which is Latin for a husk, veil or cover. It refers to the specialized leaves which surround the bud and protect the developing sexual organs and ovaries that have distinct wings. A good example was Utricularia pterocalycina, which is now known as Utricularia involvens.

Pterocarpa: [te-ro-kar-pa] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits which have two distinct wings. A good example is Hydrocotyle pterocarpa.

Pterocarpum: [te-ro-kar-pum] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It usually refers to pods or dry fruits, which have a distinct wing down each side. A good example is the pods on Peltophorum pterocarpum.

Pterocarpus: [te-ro-kar-pus] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a distinct wing down each side. A good example is the the pods and seeds of Pterocarpus australis, which is now known as Callerya australis.

Pterocarya: [te-ro-kar-ee-a] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Káryon, which is Ancient Greek for a nut. It refers to nuts, which have a distinct wing down each side. A good example is the nuts on Terminalia pterocarya which have very large wings down each side and a smaller wing set at 90 degrees to the two major wings.

Pterocaulon: [te-ro-kor-lon] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek or Caulus, which is Latin for a branch or a stem. It refers to stems or smaller branches, which have a very distinct wing that runs down each side. A good example is Pterocaulon redolens.

Pterocauly: [te-ro-kor-lee] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek or Caulus, which is Latin for a branch or stem. It refers to stems or smaller branches which have wings. A good example is Acacia alata.

Pteroceras: [te-ro-ser-as] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Keros, which is Ancient Greek for a horn. It refers to labellum, which have two very distinct vertical winged horns. A good example is Pteroceras spathulatus.

Pterochaetae: [te-ro-chee-te] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing or feather and Kheita, which is Ancient Greek for a bristle. It refers to the pappus on the seeds which have a row of bristles that resemble a birds plume. A good example is Pterochaeta paniculata.

Pterochaetum: [te-ro-chee-tum] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing or feather and Kheita, which is Ancient Greek for a bristle. It refers to pappus on the seeds, which have a row of bristles that resemble a birds feather. A good example is Chrysocephalum pterochaetum.

Pteroclada: [te-rokla-da] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Klados, which is Ancient Greek or Cladus for a stem or branch. It refers to stems and branches which have wings. A good example is Acacia pteroclada.

Pterocladum: [te-rokla-dum] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Klados, which is Ancient Greek or Cladus which is Latin for a stem or branch. It refers to stems and branches which have wings. A good example was Racosperma pterocladum, which is now known as Acacia pteroclada.

Pterocoellion: [te-ro-koh-el-li-on] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing or feather and maybe Coellon, which is Latin for a pair of testicles. Its reference is unclear as neither the fruits nor the seeds resemble a pair of winged testicles, although the fruits do have a pair of sheath like wings surrounding each ovary. A good example was Pterocoellion javanicum, which is now known as Berrya javanica.

Pterolobium: [te-ro-loh-bi-um] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Lobos/Lobī, which is Ancient Greek for a pod or capsule. It refers to pods, which have wings however the native species pods are wingless and covered in hooked spines. Again many species worldwide have been moved to the Caesalpinia genus with the Australian species being transferred from the Guilandina genus or remaining in the Caesalpinia genus. A good example is Caesalpinia bonduc which had the synonym of Caesalpinia bonducella and before that of Guilandina bonduc.

Pterosperma: [te-rosper-ma] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which have wings. A good example is the beautiful shaped and coloured wings on the burr seed Calotis pterosperma Gymnomyces pterospermus.

Pterospermus: [te-rosper-mus] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which have wings. A good example is winged spores when seen under a microscope from the fungus Gymnomyces pterospermus.

Pterostylis: [te-rostahy-lis] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a part of the female reproductive organ between the ovaries and the stigma. It refers to styles which are flattish or have wings. A good example is Pterostylis prasina.

Pterygopappus: [te-ri-go-pap-pus] From Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s wing and Pappos, which is Ancient Greek for a grandfather or poppy. It refers to wings usually on the leaves or stems which covered in a white scruffy beard similar to a poppy. A good example is Pterygopappus lawrencei.

Ptilanthelium: [ti-lan-the-li-um] From Ptílon, which is Ancient Greek for downy as in a duck’s downy feathers and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to flower heads and anthers, which are covered in soft white or pale grey hairs which resemble down. A good example was Ptilanthelium chauvinii, which is now known as Schoenus turbinatus.

Ptilothrix: [ti-lo-thriks] From Ptílon, which is Ancient Greek for downy as in a duck’s downy feathers and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for a long hair. It refers to hairs, which emerge through a mass of downy hairs or resemble a duck’s downy feathers. A good example is the flower heads on Ptilothrix deusta.

Ptilotus: [ti-lous] From Ptílon, which is Ancient Greek for downy as in a duck’s downy feathers and Lōtus, which is Latin for lavish, elegant and luxurious. It refers to flowers, which resemble the Lotus flowers of the east in colour and have petals cloaked in the luxury of down. A good example is Ptilotus pseudohelipteroides.

Ptychocarpa: [tahy-kohkar-pah] From Ptycho, which is Ancient Greek for a fold or crease and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have very distinct longitudinal creases. A good example was Corymbia ptychocarpa.

Ptychocarpum: [tahy-kohkahr-pum] From Ptycho, which is Ancient Greek for a fold or crease and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have very distinct longitudinal creases. A good example was Dysoxylum ptychocarpum, which is now known as Dysoxylum klanderi.

Ptychophylla: [tahy-kofi/hahyl-la] From Ptycho, which is Ancient Greek for a fold or crease and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the upper petals on leguminous flowers, which have a distinct longitudinal fold or crease. A good example was Racosperma ptychophylum, which is now known as Acacia ptychophylla.

Ptychophyllum: [tahy-kofi/fahyl-lum] From Ptycho, which is Ancient Greek for a fold or crease and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the upper petals on leguminous flowers, which have a distinct longitudinal fold or crease. A good example is Acacia ptychophylla.

Ptychosema: [tahy-kose-ma] From Ptycho, which is Ancient Greek for a fold or crease and Sema, which is Ancient Greek for a standard or a type of flag. It refers to the upper petals on leguminous flowers, which have a distinct longitudinal fold or crease. A good example was Ptychosema trifoliolatum, which is now known as Muelleranthus trifoliolatus.

Ptychosperma: [tahy-kosper-ma] From Ptycho, which is Ancient Greek for a fold or crease and Spérma, which isAncient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which have a distinct longitudinal fold or crease. A good example is the seeds Ptychosperma elegans.

Pubens: [pyoo-benz] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short, very soft hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in short, soft, white or pale grey hairs. A good example is Cryptocarya triplivervis subsp. pubens.

Puberulum: [pyoo-ber-yoo-lum] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short, very soft hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft white or pale grey hairs. A good example is Syzygium puberulum.

Puberulus: [pyoo-ber-yoo-lus] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short, very soft hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft white or pale grey hairs. A good example is Corchorus puberulus.

Pubescens: [pyoo-bes-sens/z] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short, very soft hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft, white or pale grey hairs. A good example is Acacia pubescens.

Pubescent: [pyoo-bes-sent] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short, very soft hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft, white or pale grey hairs. A good example is Psychotria pubescent.

Pubigera: [pyoo-bi-jer-a] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short, very soft hairs and Gera/Gerum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft white or pale grey hairs. A good example is Urochloa pubigera.

Pubicosta: [pyoo-bi-kos-ta] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short soft hairs and Cōnsuētūdinem, which is Latin for a custom or habit. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft white or pale grey hairs. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia pubicosta.

Pubicostum: [pyoo-bi-kos-tum] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short soft hairs and Cōnsuētūdinem, which is Latin for a custom or habit. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft white or pale grey hairs. A good example wasthe phyllodes on Racosperma pubicostum, which is now known as Acacia pubicosta.

Pubifolia: [pyoo-bi-foh-li-a] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short soft hairs and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which are covered in soft white or pale grey hairs. A good example is the soft white pubulent hairs on Acacia pubifolia.

Pubifolium: [pyoo-bi-foh-li-um] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short soft hairs and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which are covered in soft white or pale grey hairs. A good example is the soft white pubulent hairs on Racosperma pubifolium, which is now known as Acacia pubifolia.

Pubigera: [pyoo-bi-jer-a] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short, very soft hairs and Gera/Gerum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft white or pale grey hairs. A good example is Daviesia pubigera.

Pubigerum: [pyoo-bi-jer-um] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short, very soft hairs and Gera/Gerum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft white or pale grey hairs. A good example is Panicum pubiflorum, which is now known as Urochloa pubigera.

Pubinodis: [pyoo-bi-noh-dis] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short soft hairs and Nōdīs, which is Latin for a knot. It refers to nodes, which are covered in short, very soft hairs. A good example is Austrostipa pubinodis.

Pubirachis: [pyoo-bi-ra-shis] From Pūbēscēns, which is Latin for short soft hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft white or pale grey hairs. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia pubirhachis.

Puccinellia: [pu-kin-el-li-a] Is named in honour of B. Puuccinelli; 1808-1850, who was an Italian professor of Botany. A good example is the grass Puccinellia perlaxa.

Puccinia: [pu-kin-ni-a] Is named in honour of B. Puuccinelli; 1808-1850, who was an Italian professor of Botany. A good example is the rust fungus Puccinia psidii which greatly affects the Myrtaceae family including Eucalyptus, Corymbia and Melaleuca, and many native under-storey and amenity species. Fortunately it is not present in Australia at the present time.

Pudica: [pyoo-di-ka] From Pudicus, which is Latin for modest. It refers to leaves, which close up when touched or disturbed. A good example is Mimosa pudica.

Pueraria: [pyoo-er-a-ri-a] Is named in honour of Marc Nicholas Puerari; 1766-1845, who was a Swiss botanist and teacher. A good example is Pueraria montana var. lobata.

Pugioniforme: [pyoo-gwee-o-ni-form] From Pugnus, which is Latin for clenched and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to branchlets which are short finishing similar to a clenched hand. A good example is Dendrobium pugioniforme.

Pugioniformis: [pyoo-gwee-o-ni-for-mis] From Pugnus, which is Latin for clenched and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the branchlets which a re short finishing similar to a clenched hand. A good example was Acacia pugioniformis, which is now known as Acacia quadrilateralis.

Pugiunculiferum: [pyoo-ji-un-ku-li-fe-rum] From Pūgiō/Pūgiōnēs, which is Latin for a dagger, Culum, which is Latin for little and Ferum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which bear short, dagger like spines. A good example is the stems, leaves and clayxes on Solanum pugiunculiferum.

Pulassarium: [pu-las-sar-i-um] Probably from Pulessee, which is Ancient Greek for to be smitten or infatuated with or smited or lacerated. It refers to flowers, which are very hard not to be attracted to despite the risk of being scratched or pricked by the foliage. A good example was Pulassarium ruscifolium, which is now known as Alyxia ruscifolia.

Pulchella: [pull-che-la] From Pulchella which is Latin for pretty. It usually refers to flowers, which are pink and rather attractive. A good example is Melaleuca pulchella.

Pulchellum: [pull-che-lum] From Pulchellum, which is Latin for pretty. It refers to the pretty pink flowers, which are very attractive. A good example is Eranthemum pulchellum.

Pulchellus: [pull-che-lus] From Pulchellus, which is Latin for pretty. It refers to flowers, which are very pretty or attractive. A good example is Calochilus pulchellus.

Pulcherrima: [pull-cher-ri-ma] From Pulchellum, which is Latin for pretty. It refers to the masses of flowers, which are pretty or attractive. A good example is Levenhookia pulcherrima.

Pulcherrimum: [pull-cher-ri-mum] From Pulchellum, which is Latin for pretty. It refers to the masses of flowers, which are pretty or attractive. A good example is Balaustion pulcherrimum.

Pulcherrimus: [pull-cher-ri-mus] From Pulchellum, which is Latin for pretty. It refers to the masses of flowers, which are pretty or attractive. A good example is Thelychiton pulcherrimus.

Pulchra: [pull-kra] From Pulchra which is Latin for handsome or pretty. It refers to flowers, which are very attractive. A good example was Bromheadia pulchra, which is now known as Bromheadia finlaysoniana.

Pullea: [pull-lee-a] Is named in honour of August Pulle; 1878-1955, who was a Dutch botanist who studied Indonesian and Dutch Guiana plants. A good example is Pullea stutzeri.

Pulleinei: [pull-lei-ne-ahy] Is named in honour of Robert Henry Pulleine; 1869-1935, who was a new Zealand born Australian physician and naturalist who had a keen interest in growing arid plants in his garden and sending many to outback schools throughout Australia. Pulleine lacked the grosser racism associated with the anthropology of Australian aboriginals and wrote Physiology and Mental Observations on the Australian Aborigines. (Adelaide 1930), He refuted contemporary publications degrading the Aborigine as being unintelligent. A good example is the succulent he discovered in Sarcozona pulleinei, which is now known as Sarcozona praecox.

Pullenii: [pull-le-ni-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Royal Pullen (Roy); 1925-2009, who was an Austrlian botanist and plant collector but I have been unable to substantiated it. A good example is Desmodium pullenii.

Pullula: [pull-loo-la] From Pullulò, which is Latin for to grow, to increase or to spread out. It refers to plants, which have a sreading growth habit. A good example is Hibbertia pullula which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to its real or correct classification.

Pultenaea: [pull-ten-ee-a] Is named in honour of Richard Pulteney; 1730-1801, who was an English surgeon and botanist who studied the plants of Lecestershire. A good example is Pultenaea alea.

Pulverulenta: [pull-ver-yoo-len-ta] From Pálē, which is Ancient Greek or Pulvis, which is Latin for dust or powder and Ulenta, which is Latin for plenty, full of or abound. It refers to organs or structures, which are densely covered in a white waxy film. Here it refers to the leaves, flower buds and fruits being covered in the white waxy film. A good example is Eucalyptus pulverulenta.

Pulverulentum: [pull-ver-yoo-len-tum] From Pálē, which is Ancient Greek or Pulvis, which is Latin for dust or powder and Ulenta, which is Latin for plenty, full of or abound. It refers to organs or structures, which are densely covered in a white waxy film. Here it refers to the leaves, flower buds and fruits being covered in the white waxy film. A good example is the fungus Lachnum pulverulentum.

Pulvigera: [pull-vi-jer-a] From Pálē, which is Ancient Greek or Pulvis, which is Latin for dust or powder and Ulenta, which is Latin for plenty, full of or abound. It refers to organs or structures, which are densely covered in a white waxy film. Here it refers to the leaves, flower buds and fruits being covered in the white waxy film. A good example is the phylode pulvinus on Eucalyptus pulvigera, which is now known as Eucalyptus pulverulent.

Pulvinal: [pull-vin-al] From Pulvīnus, which is Latin for a cushion or pillow. It refers to a swelling near or at the base the petioles which act as a mechanism to lower the angle of the leaves to help reduce evaporation and transpiration in hot dry weather. A good example is the phylode pulvinus on Acacia longifolia.

Pulvinaris: [pul-vin-ar-is] From Pulvīnus which is Latin for a cushion or pillow. It refers to a swelling which is near or at the baseof the petioles which act as a mechanism to lower the angle of the leaves or phyllodes to help reduce evaporation and transpiration in hot dry weather. A good example is the phylode pulvinus on Acacia longifolia and the leaves of Stackhousia pulvinaris.

Pulvinata: [pul-vin-a-ta] From Pulvīnus which is Latin for a cushion or pillow. It refers to a swelling which is near or at the base the petioles which act as a mechanism to lower the angle of the leaves or phyllodes to help reduce evaporation and transpiration in hot dry weather. A good example is the phylode pulvinus on Dentella pulvinata.

Pulvinate: [pul-vin-eit] From Pulvīnus which is Latin for a cushion or pillow. It refers to a swelling which is near or at the base the petioles which act as a mechanism to lower the angle of the leaves or phyllodes to help reduce evaporation and transpiration in hot dry weather. A good example is the phylode pulvinus on Dipogon lignosus.

Pulvinatum: [pul-vin-a-tum] From Pulvīnus which is Latin for a cushion or pillow. It refers to a swelling which is near or at the base the petioles which act as a mechanism to lower the angle of the leaves or phyllodes to help reduce evaporation and transpiration in hot dry weather. A good example is the pulvinus on the leaves on Sphagnum novozelandicum var. pulvinatum, which is now known asSphagnum novozelandicum.

Pulvinatus: [pul-vin-a-tus] From Pulvīnus which is Latin for a cushion or pillow. It refers to a swelling which is near or at the base the petioles which act as a mechanism to lower the angle of the leaves or phyllodes to help reduce evaporation and transpiration in hot dry weather. A good example is the phylode pulvinus on Colobanthus pulvinatus.

Pulvinifera: [pul-vi-ni-fe-ra] From Pulvīnus which is Latin for a cushion or pillow and Ferra which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which have a swelling near or at the base of the petioles which act as a mechanism to lower the angle of the leaves to help reduce evaporation and transpiration in hot dry weather. A good example is Hakea pulvinifera.

Pulvinifica: [pul-vi-ni-fi-ka] From Pulvīnus which is Latin for a cushion or pillow and Sûkon, which is Ancient Greek or Fīcus, which is Latin for a fig. It refers to fruits, which resemble small figs. A good example is Oreomyrrhis pulvinifica.

Pulviniforme: [pul-vi-ni-form] From Pulvīnus, which is Latin for a cushion or pillow and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to an organs, which have a swelling near or at its base which acts as a mechanism to change the angle of the organ to aid in pollination by insects. A good example is Stylidium pulviniforme.

Pulviniformis: [pul-vi-ni-for-mis] From Pulvīnus, which is Latin for a cushion or pillow and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to an organs, which have a swelling near or at its base which acts as a mechanism to change the angle of the organ to aid in cooling and water retention within the leaves or phyllodes. A good example is Acacia pulviniformis.

Pulvinifinica: [pul-vi-ni-fi-ni-ka] From Pulvīnus, which is Latin for a cushion or pillow and Finica, which is Latin for a fleshy fruit. It refers to a swelling near or at the base of an organ, which acts as a mechanism to lower the angle of the organ to help reduce evaporation and transpiration in hot dry weather, aid in pollination or to protect the organ. A good example is the fleshy fruits on Oreomyrrhis pulvinifica.

Pulvinorum: [pul-vi-nor-um] From Pulvīnus, which is Latin for a cushion or pillow. It refers to a swelling near or at the base the leaves or phyllodes, which act as a mechanism to lower the angle of the leaves to help reduce evaporation and transpiration in hot dry weather. A good example is Rytidosperma pulvinorum.

Pulvinus: [pul-vi-nus] From Pulvīnus, which is Latin for a cushion or pillow. It refers to a swelling near or at the base leaves or phyllodes, which act as a mechanism to lower the angle of the leaves to help reduce evaporation and transpiration in hot, dry weather. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia complanata.

Pulvinus on Acacai complanata. Note the horizontal grooves which allow the movement.

Pumila: [pyoo-mil-a] From Pumila, which is Latin for small or dwarf. It refers to structures, organs or growth habit of the plants, which are considered small when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Pentachondra pumila.

Pumilio: [pyoo-mi-li-oh] From Pumila, which is Latin for small or dwarf. It refers to leaves, flowers and growth habit of plants, which are very small. A good example is Mazus pumilio.

Pumilo: [pyoo-mi-loh] From Pumila, which is Latin for small or dwarf. It refers to the plants, which have a small growth habit. A good example was Pumilo argyrolepis, which is now known as Siloxerus multifloris.

Pumilum: [pyoo-mil-um] From Pumila, which is Latin for small or dwarf. It refers to the leaves, flowers and growth habit of the plants being small. A good example is the filmy ferns fronds on Hymenophyllum pumilum or Genoplesium pumilum.

Pumilus: [pyoo-mil-us] From Pumila, which is Latin for small or dwarf. It refers to  leaves, flowers and growth habit of the plants being small. A good example is Centunculus pumilus , which is now known as Lysimachia ovalis.

Punca: [pun-sa] From Punctatus, which is Latin for small dots or small depressions. It refers to surfaces of any organ, which has small dots or small depressions. A good example is the exotic horticultural pomegranite tree Punca granatum.

Punctata: [punk-ta-ta] From Pūnctāta, which is Latin for small dots or small depressions. It refers to surfaces or organs, which have small dots or small depressions on the surface. A good example is Labichea punctata var. lanceolata.

Punctate: [punk-teit] From Pūnctātum, which is Latin for small dots or small depressions. It refers to surfaces of any organ, which has small dots or small depressions. A good example is the lower lamina on Clerodéndron inerme.

Punctatum: [punk-ta-tum] From Pūnctātum, which is Latin for very tiny dots or very tiny depressions. It refers to surfaces or organs, which have minute dots or minute depressions. A good example is Dipodium punctatum.

Punctatus: [punk-ta-tus] From Pūnctātum, which is Latin for very tiny dots or very tiny depressions. It refers to surfaces or organs, which have minute dots or minute depressions. A good example is Schoenus punctatus.

Puncticulata: [punk-ti-kyoo-la-ta] From Pūnctātum, which is Latin for very tiny dots or very tiny depressions. It refers to surfaces of any organ, which has minute dots or minute depressions. A good example is Acacia puncticulata.

Puncticulatum: [punk-ti-kyoo-la-tum] From Pūnctātum, which is Latin for very tiny dots or very tiny depressions. It refers to surfaces of any organ, which has minute dots or minute depressions. A good example is Racosperma puncticulatum which is known as Acacia puncticulata.

Pungens: [pun-jenz] From Pungens, which is Latin for sharp or piercing. It usually refers to leaves, which have a sharp acrid smell or taste. A good example is the leaf apexes on Hemiandra pungens which are sharp to touch.

Pungent: [pun-jent] From Pungens, which is Latin for sharp or piercing. It refers to leaves, which have a sharp acrid smell or taste or sharp needle like thorns. A good example is the taste of the leaves on Tasmannia lanceolata.

Pungentifolium: [pun-jen-ti-foh-li-um] From Pungēns, which is Latin for sharply pointed and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have a sharply pointed or pungent apex. A good example was Dendrobium pungentifolium which is known as Dockrillia pugioniformis.

Pungetium: [pun-je-ti-um] From Pungēns, which is Latin for sharply pointed. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in long sharp needle like thorns. A good example is Solanum pungetium.

Punica: [pyoo-ni-sa] From Punicus, which is Latin for Phoenicus. It refers to the ancient lands of Persia, Iraq and Lybia. A good example is the horticultural pomegranate Punica granatum.

Punicea: [pyoo-ni-si-a] From Punicus, which is Latin for Phoenicus. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered in the ancient lands of Persia, Iraq and Lybia. A good example was Aletris punicea which is known as Blandfordia grandiflora subsp. punicea.

Punicella: [pyoo-ni-sel-la] Maybe from; Φοῖνιξ, Phoînix which is Ancient Greek for Tyrian purple, however there has been some debate as to whether the ethnonym was derived from the name of a plant dye or vice versa. It appears likely that both are influenced by the genuinely older Ancient Greek adjective; φοινός, Phoinós for blood-red. The ethnonym was already recorded in Mycenaean Greek at a much earlier date. Whole on the course the suffix Ella, has been cited as Greek/Latin for feminine but has its roots in Classical Latin for one that nurses as in breast feeding or to suck or suckle. I have maintained the later meaning which covers the word more accurately to have a femine form in todays use. It refers to plants, usually the flowers, which are deep purple or crimson-red, however here it is toned down or bright and happy with the feminine approach to mean a bright mid purple or scarlet-red. A good example was the bright orange-red flowers on Punicella carinata which is known as Balaustion pulcherrimum.

Purdiea: [per-di-a] Is named in honour of William Purdie; 1817-1857,who was an English Botanist and curator of the Trinidad Botanic Gardens. A good example is Diuris purdiei.

Purdieana: [per-di-a-na] Is named in honour of William Purdie; 1817-1857, who was an English Botanist and curator of the Trinidad Botanic Gardens. A good example is Boronia purdieana.

Purpurapetalum: [per-per-a-pe-ta-lum] From Purpurea, which is Latin for purple and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to petals, which have a distinct puplish, deep reddish-puple or purple colour or sheen. A good example is Acacia purpurapetalum.

Purpurascens: [per-per-a-senz] From Purpurea, which is Latin for purple. It refers to organs usually the flowers or leaves, which are puplish, deep reddish-puple or purple. A good example is the colour of the flowers on Orthocarpus purpurascens.

Purpurata: [per-per-a-ta] From Purpurea, which is Latin for purple. It refers to organs usually the flowers or leaves, which are puplish, deep reddish-puple or purple. A good example is the colour of the spots and markings on the flowers of Thelymitra purpurata.

Purpuratus: [per-per-a-tus] From Purpurea, which is Latin for purple. It refers to organs usually the flowers or leaves, which are puplish, deep reddish-puple or purple. A good example is the colour of the spots and markings on the flowers of Schistotylus purpuratus.

Purpurea: [per-per-re-a] From Purpurea, which is Latin for purple. It refers to organs usually the flowers or leaves, which are puplish, deep reddish-puple or purple. A good example is the colour of the flowers on Dampiera purpurea.

Purpureapetala: [per-per-ree-a-pe-ta-la] From Purpurea, which is Latin for purple Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators that are purplish, deep reddish-puple or purple. A good example is the colour of the flowers on Acacia purpureapetala.

Purpureapetalum: [per-per-ree-a-pe-ta-lum] From Purpurea, which is Latin for purple Petánnumi which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators that are purplish, deep reddish-puple or purple. A good example is the colour of the flowers on Racosperma purpureapetalum, which is now known as Acacia purpureapetala.

Purpureo-flava: [per-per-ree-o, fla-va] From Purpurea, which is Latin for purple and Flavum which is Latin for yellow. It refers to organs, which are purplish, deep reddish-puple or purple and yellow. A good example is the pileus on Acacia purpureapetala which is purplish-red and white below turning yellow with age.

Purpureus: [per-per-ree-us] From Purpurea, which is Latin for purple. It refers to organs, which are purplish, deep reddish-puple or purple. A good example is the flowers on Calothamnus purpureus which are red and turn purplish-red on aging.

Pursaetha: [per-see-tha] Maybe from Prōsequor, which is Latin for to pursue. It may refer to the plants pursuit of higher places in the canopy. A good example was Entada pursaetha, which is now known as Entada rheedei.

Pusilla: [pu-sil-la] From Pusilla, which is Latin for insignificant or weak. It refers to this species, which is insignificant compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Allocasuarina pusilla.

Pusilliflora: [pu-sil-li-flor-a] From Pusilla, which is Latin for insignificant or weak and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to a species which has insignificant flowers compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Goodenia pusilliflora.

Pusilliflorus: [pu-sil-li-flor-us] From Pusilla, which is Latin for insignificant or weak and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to a species which has insignificant flowers compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Croton pusilliflorus, which is now known as Croton choristadenius.

Pusillifolium: [pu-sil-li-flor-um] From Pusilla, which is Latin for insignificant or weak and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are smaller and fewer than other species in the genus. A good example was Phyllanthus pusillifolium, which is now known as Phyllanthus microcladus.

Pusillifolius: [pu-sil-li-flor-us] From Pusilla, which is Latin for insignificant or weak and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are smaller and fewer than other species in the genus. A good example was Phyllanthus pusillifolius, which is now known as Phyllanthus microcladus.

Pusillum: [pu-sil-lum] From Pusilla, which is Latin for insignificant or weak. It refers to species which are rather insignificant compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Ptychosema pusillum.

Pusillus: [pu-sil-lus] From Pusilla, which is Latin for insignificant or weak. It refers to species, which are rather insignificant compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Juncus pusillus.

Pustula: [pus-tyoo-la] From Pustularis, which is Latin for blisters. It refers to a structure or organ, which has small blister like mounds. A good example is Acacia pustula.

Pustular: [pus-tyoo-lar] From Pustularis, which is Latin for blisters. It refers to structures or organs, which has small blister like mounds.

Pustulata: [puhs-tyoo-la-ta] From Pustularis, which is Latin for blisters. It refers to a structure or organ, which has small blister like mounds. A good example is Vittadinia pustulata.

Pustulate: [pus-tyoo-leit] From Pustularis, which is Latin for blisters. It refers to organs, which have blister like swellings on the surface.

Pustulatum: [pus-tyoo-lei-tum] From Pustularis, which is Latin for blisters. It refers to organs, which have blister like swellings on the surface. A good example is Microsorum pustulatum.

Pustules: [pus-toolz] From Pustularis, which is Latin for blisters. It refers to structures or organs, which has blisterlike swellings on the surface.

Putaminosa: [pyoo-tah-min-oh-sah] From Putāmen/Putāmina, which is Latin for the shell of a nut or the stone of a drupe. It refers to fruits, which have a woody like endocarp. A good example is Antirhea putaminosa.

Puteala: [poo-te-a-la] From Putridus, which is Latin for fowl smelling or putrid. It refers to flowers, or organs, which have an unpleasant smell. A good example was Helichrysum puteale, which is now known as Chrysocephalum puteale.

Putida: [poo-ti-da] From Putridus, which is Latin for fowl smelling or putrid. It refers to flowers, or other organs, which have an unpleasant smell. A good example is Coprosma putida.

Pycn: [pahys] From Phychos which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact.

Pycnantha: [pahy-kan-tha] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which densely cover the plants. A good example is Acacia pycnantha.

Pycnanthum: [pahy-kan-thum] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which densely cover the plants. A good example was Viscum pycnanthum, which is now known as Korthalsella rubra subsp. rubra.

Pycnarrhena: [pahy-nar-re-na] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact. It refers to foliage which is rather dense on the lianes. A good example is Pycnarrhena novoguineensis.

Pycnium: [pik-ni-um] From Pycnium, which is Latin for flask shape or conical sporangium. It refers to fungi’s sporangium, which developes below the epidermis of its new host. A good example is Pycnarrhena novoguineensis.

Pycnoblasta: [pik-no-bla-sta] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Blastos, which is Ancient Greek for a germ cell. It refers to the central dactively divison cells, which are very dense and thick. A good example is the sundew Drosera pycnoblasta.

Pycnobotrys: [pik-no-bo-trahys] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Botrys which is Ancient Greek for a buch of grapes. It refers to the flowers, which resemble small buches of grapes. A good example was Hakea pycnobotrys, which is now known as Hakea nitida.

Pycnocephala: [pik-no-ke/se-fa-la] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to terminal, flower heads, which are dense. A good example is Pultenaea pycnocephala.

Pycnocephalum: [pik-no-ke/se-fa-lum] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to terminal flowers heads, which are very dense. A good example was Racosperma pycnocephalum, which is now known as Acacia pycnocephala.

Pycnolachne: [pik-no-lak-ne] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Achne, which is Ancient Greek for chaff like appendages. It refers to flower heads which produce a lot of chaff. A good example was Pycnolachne ledifolia, which is now known as Lachnostachys eriobotrya.

Pycnoneura: [pik-no-nyoo-ra] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Neûron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus which is Latin for a nerve or vein. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have a rather thick mid vein and often thickened margins. A good example is Hakea pycnoneura.

Pycnophylla: [pik-no-fi/fahyl-la] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have a very thick feel. A good example is Acacia pycnophylla.

Pycnophylloides: [pik-no-fi/fahyl-loi-deez] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are typical of leaves representing other species of Pycnophylla. A good example is Roycea pycnophylloides.

Pycnoporus: [pik-no-por-us] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Póros which is Ancient Greek or later Porus which is Latin for a pore or a passage way. It refers to structures or organs which have a lot of pores. A good example is Pycnoporus coccineus.

Pycnosorus: [pik-no-sor-us] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Sorus which is Ancient Greek for a heap or a pile. It refers to the spores which form in dense compact heaps or piles. A good example is Pycnosorus chrysanthes.

Pycnospora: [pik no-spor-a] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Spora which is Greek/Latin for sowing or akin to to sow spore or seeds. It refers to plants which sow their seeds in large numbers. A good example is Pycnospora lutescens.

Pycnostachya: [pik –no-sta-shee-a] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for a spike. It refers to spikes which are very long, thick and prolific with flowers. A good example Acacia pycnostachya.

Pycnostachys: [pik-no-sta-shis] From Phychos which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek for a spike. It refers to spikes, which are very long, thick and prolific with flowers. A good example Mallotus pycnostachys, which is now known as Mallotus mollissimus.

Pycnostachyum: [pik-no-sta-shum] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Stachyus, which is Ancient Greek for a spike. It refers to spikes, which are very long, thick and prolific with flowers. A good example is the compact flower heads on Gastrolobium pycnostachyum.

Pycnostachyus: [pik-no-sta-shus] From Phychos which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact and Stachyus, which is Ancient Greek for a spike. It refers to spikes which are very long, thick and prolific with flowers. A good example is the compact flower heads on Gonocarpus pycnostachyus.

Pycnotrichum: [pik-no-trahy-kum] From Phychos, which is Ancient Greek for thick, dense and compact, Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for a hair and Um, which is Ancient Greek for a degree of. It refers to plants, which are very hairy. A good example is the compact flower heads on Desmodium pycnotrichum.

Pycreus: [pi-kre-us] From Pycreus, which is unknown, but could be an anagram for Cyperus. A good example was Pycreus unioloides, which is now known as Cyperus unioloides.

Pygeum: [pi-jee-um] From Pyge, which is Ancient Greek for the buttocks. It refers to fruits, which are shaped like a woman’s buttocks. A good example is pygeum turnerianum.

Pygmaea: [pig-mee-a] From Pygamaea, which is Ancient Greek for very tiny or dwarfed. It refers to the size of plants, which are very small compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Drosera pygmaea.

Pygmaeopremna: [pig-mee-o-sprem-na] From Pygamaea, which is Ancient Greek for very tiny or dwarfed and Premnon, which is Ancient Greek for a bole, trunk or stump. It refers to the type species which has a very short, thick stumpy like trunk. A good example was Pygmaeopremna subacaulis, which is now known as Premna herbacea.

Pygmaeum: [pig-mee-um] From Pygamaea, which is Ancient Greek for very tiny or dwarfed. It refers to plants, which are very small. A good example is Panicum pygmaeum.

Pygmaeus: [pig-meeus] From Pygamaea, which is Ancient Greek for very tiny or dwarfed. It refers to plants, which are very small. A good example is Myriocephalus pygmaeus.

Pygmalum: [pig-ma-lum] From Pygamaea, which is Ancient Greek for very tiny or dwarfed. It refers to plants, which are rather small. A good example is Lasiopetalum pygmalum, which is now known as Thomasia pygmaea.

Pymacum: [pi-ma-kum] From Pygamaea, which is Ancient Greek for very tiny or dwarfed. It refers to plants, which are rather small. This species is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to which genus or species name should be allocated. A good example maybe Lasiopetalum pymacum.

Pyramidal: [pi-ra-mi-dahl] From Pyramidalis, which is Latin for a pyramid. It refers to trees, which have a broad base then to taper to a point. A good example is the shape of Araucaria bidwillii.

Pyramidale: [pi-ra-mi-dal] From Pyramidalis, which is Latin for a pyramid. It refers to flowers, which have a narrow conical or pyramid like shape. A good example is Gastrolobium pyramidale.

Pyramidalis: [pi-ra-mi-da-lis] From Pyramidalis, which is Latin for a pyramid. It refers to flowers, which have a broad conical or pyramid like shape. A good example is Codonocarpus pyramidalis.

Pyramidata: [pi-ra-mi-da-ta] From Pyramidalis, which is Latin for a pyramid. It refers to fruits, which have a broad inverted cone shape sitting on widely open sepals. A good example is the fruits of Maireana pyramidata.

Pyramidatum: [pi-ra-mi-da-tum] From Pyramidalis, which is Latin for a pyramid. It refers to flower heads, which have a broad inverted cone shape sitting on widely open sepals. A good example isthe fruits of Eriocladium pyramidatum, which is now known as Angianthus cunninghamii.

Pyramidatus: [pi-ra-mi-da-tus] From Pyramidalis, which is Latin for a pyramid. It refers to structures or organs, which have a broad inverted cone or pyramid shape. A good example is the shape of the flower heads on Ptilotus pyramidatus.

Pyramidifera: [pi-ra-mi-di-fe-ra] From Pyramidalis, which is Latin for a pyramid and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which bear numerous pyramid shaped warts or scales. A good example is the pileus on Amanita pyramidifera.

Pyrene: [pahy-reen] From Pyren, which is Ancient Greek or Pyrena, which is Latin for a stone fruit. It refers to nuts or nutlets which are within a drupe or a typical stone fruit.

Pyrenocollema: [pahy-re-no-kol-le-ma] From Pyrenoides, which is Latin for any of several transparent structures found in the chloroplast of certain byrophytes which are responsible for the fixation of carbon dioxide and the formation of starch and Collema which is unknown but refers to a genus of Jelly Fungi. It refers to Lichens, which are somewhat resemble jelly fungi. A good example is the sporangia on the lichen Pyrenocollema montanum.

Pyrethrum: [pahy-ree-thrum] From Pyrethron, which is Ancient Greek for a fever or Pellitory, which is Latin for a fever. It refers to a genus of several Old World plants, which are now classified as Chrysanthemum or Tanacetum which are cultivated as ornamentals for their showy flowers and insecticidal properties. The word Pyrethrum is still commonly used for many members of the daisy family as a natural targeted insecticide. A good example is Chrysanthemum cinerariifolium.

Pyrethrum oil: [pahy-ree-thrum, oil] From Pyrethron, which is Ancient Greek or Pellitory, which is Latin for a fever. It refers to a genus of several Old World plants, which are now classified as Chrysanthemum species and Tanacetum species, which are cultivated as ornamentals for their showy flowers and insecticidal properties. The word Pyrethrum is still commonly used for many members of the daisy family as a natural targeted insecticide. It is extracted commercially from the dried flowers of Chyrsanthemum cinerariifolium and Chyrsanthemum coccineum.

Pyrifolia: [pahy-ri-foh-li-a] From Pyros, which is Ancient Greek for a pear and Folia, which is Latin for foliage. It refers tocommercially grown brown pear tree. A good example is Pyrus pyrifolia.

Pyrifolium: [pahy-ri-foh-li-um] From Pyros, which is Ancient Greek for a pear and Folia, which is Latin for foliage. It refers tocommercially grown brown pear tree. A good example is Racosperma pyrifolium Acacia pyrifolia.

Pyriforme: [pahy-ri-form] From Pyros, which is Ancient Greek for a pear and Forme, which is Latin for a shape or take the form of. It refers to fruits, which are pear shaped. A good example is Prasophyllum pyriforme.

Pyriformis: [pahy-ri-for-mus] From Pyros, which is Ancient Greek for a pear and Forme, which is Latin for a shape or take the form of. It refers to fruits, which are pear shaped. A good example is Mischocarpus pyriformis.

Pyrifolia: [pahy-ri-foh-li-a] From Pyros, which is Ancient Greek for a pear and Forme, which is Latin for a shape or take the form of. It refers to fruits, which are pear shaped. A good example is Acacia pyrifolia.

Pyrifolium: [pahy-ri-foh-li-um] From Pyros, which is Ancient Greek for a pear and Forme, which is Latin for a shape or take the form of. It refers to plants, which have leaves or phyllodes that resemble the pear tree. A good example is Racosperma pyrifolium, which is now known as Acacia pyrifolia.

Pyrocarpa: [pahy-ro-kar-pa] From Pyros, which is Ancient Greek for a pear and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a pear shape. A good example is Eucalyptus pyrocarpa.

Pyrophila: [pahy-ro-fil-a] From Pyros, which is Ancient Greek for fire and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which have adapted to fire. A good example is Swainsona pyrophila.

Pyrophora: [pahy-ro-for-a] From Pyros, which is Ancient Greek for a pear and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for bearing. It refers to plants, which have adapted to fire. A good example is Eucalyptus pyrophora.

Pyrophyte: [pahy-ro-fahyt] From Pyros, which is Ancient Greek for fire and Phytos, which is Ancient Greek for a plant. It refers to plants, which have adapted to fire. A good example is Xanthorrhea latifolium.

Pyrophytic: [pahy-ro-fi-tik] From Pyros, which is Ancient Greek for fire and Phytos, which is Ancient Greek for a plant. It refers to plants, which have adapted to fire. A good example is Macrozamia communis.

Pyrorchis: [pahy-ror-kis] From Pyros, which is Ancient Greek for fire and Orchis, which is Ancient Greek for an orchid. It refers to the fact that the whole plant turns black like charcoal after they set seed and die. A good example is Pyrorchis nigricans.

Pyrrhias: [pahy-ri-as] From Pyrros, which is Ancient Greek for a flame or flame colour and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are reddish-yellow in colour. A good example is Dryophila pyrrhocarpa.

Pyrrhocarpa: [pahy-ro-kar-pa] From Pyrros, which is Ancient Greek for a flame or flame colour and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are reddish-yellow in colour. A good example is Dryophila pyrrhocarpa.

Pyrrhophylla: [pahy-ro-fi/fahyl-la] From Pyrros, which is Ancient Greek for a flame or flame colour and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are reddish-yellow in colour. A good example is Dryophila pyrrhocarpa.

Pyrrosia: [pahy-roh-si-a] From Pyrros, which is Ancient Greek for a flame or flame colour. It refers to the colour of the dead or dieing fronds, which often turn yellow or reddish-yellow before dropping. A good example is Pyrrosia confluens.

Pyrus: [pahy-rus] From Pyrros, which is Ancient Greek for a flame or flame colour. It refers to the colour of the dead or dieing leaves or fronds turning yellow or reddish-yellow. A good example is the parents to the horticultural apple and pear trees Pyrus malus.

Pythara: [pahy-thar-a] From Pythara, which is unclear but maybe named in honour of Pythargoras a noted Greek Phílosophor. A good example is Grevillea pythara.

Pyxidaria: [pik-si-dar-i-a] From Pyxídion, which is Ancient Greek for a little box with a lid. It refers to a seed vessels, which open transversely with the top part acting as a lid. A good example was Pyxidaria alsinoides, which is now known as Lindernia alsinoides.

Pyxidata: [pik-si-da-ta] From Pyxídion, which is Ancient Greek for a little box with a lid. It refers to seed vessels, which open transversely with the top part acting as a lid. A good example is the sporangia on Davallia solida var. pyxidata.

“Qua – Qui”

Quadang: [kwo-dang] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Angulāris, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which are square in cross section. A good example is the stems on Loranthus quandang which is now known as Amyema quandang var. quandang.

Quadangus: [kwo-dan-gus] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Angulāris, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which are square in cross section. According to the earlier publicaltion of “Flora of South Australia” page 276 in 1828 the draft copy used the spelling ‘Quadangus where as the official copy used the spelling Quadang.’ A good example is the stems on Loranthus quandangus which is now known as Amyema quandang var. quandang.

Quadrangular: [kwo-drang-gyoo-lar] From Quad, which is Latin for four and Angulāris, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which are square in cross section. A good example is the culms Restio tetraphyllus.

Quadrangulare: [kwo-drang-gyoo-lair] From Quad, which is Latin for four and Angulāris, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which are square in cross section. A good example is the corrola tube on Rapuntium quadrangulare which is now known as Lobelia quadrangularis.

Quadrangulis: [kwo-drang-gyoo-lis] From Quad, which is Latin for four and Angulāris, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which are square in cross section. A good example is the corrola tube on Lobelia quadrangularis.

Quadrangulata: [kwo-drang-gyoo-la-ta] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Angulāris, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to stems, which are squarish. A good example isthe stems on Eucalyptus quadrangulata.

Quadrangulatum: [kwo-drang-gyoo-la-tum] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Angulāris, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which are square in cross section. A good example is the stems on Lepidosperma quadrangulatum.

Quadrans: [kwo-dranz] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Angulāris, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which are square in cross section. A good example is the stems on Eucalyptus quadrans.

Quadrate: [kwo-dreit] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Angulāris, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which are square in cross section. A good example is the fruiting capsules on Melaleuca squamea, which are squarish in cross section.

Quadriaurita: [kwo-dri-or-i-ta] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Angulāris, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which are square in cross section. A good example is the shape of the fronds on Pteris quadriaurita.

Quadricallosa: [kwo-dri-kal-loh-sa] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Angulāris, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which are square in cross section. A good example is the stems on Rhynchosia quadricallosa which is now known as Cajanus acutifolius.

Quadricauda: [kwo-dri-kor-da] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek for a branch or stem. It refers to stems or small branches, which are square in cross section. A good example is the stems on Grevillea quadricauda.

Quadricolor: [kwo-dri-ku-lor] From Quād, which is Latin for four, Krôma, which is Ancient Greek, Colores, which is Greek or Colōr, which is Latin for the measurement of a hue, saturation and brightness of the reflected light emitted or reflected from or within a surface. It refers to structures or organs, which have four distinct or grading colours. A good example is Hibbertia quadricolor which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to its real or correct classification.

Quadricostata: [kwo-dri-ko-sta-ta] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Costata, which is Latin for a rib or ribs. It refers to fruiting capsules, which have a squarish shape and four distinct wings. A good example is Eucalyptus quadricostata.

Quadridentata: [kwo-dri-den-ta-ta] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Angulāris, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs, which have a squarish cross section. A good example is the teeth on the articles of Casuarina quadridentata, which is now known as Allocasuarina verticillata.

Quadridentatus: [kwo-dri-den-ta-tus] From Quād which is Latin for four and Angulāris which is Latin for an angle. It refers to structures or organs which are square in cross section. A good example is the buds and calyx tube Senecio quadridentatus.

Quadrifaria: [kwo-dri-far-i-a] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Pharos, which is Greek for a lighthouse or beacon. It refers to flowers which have four petals and stand out like beacons in the field. A good example is Melaleuca quadrifaria.

Quadrifarium: [kwo-dri-far-i-um] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Pharo’s which is Greek for a lighthouse or beacon. It refers to structures or organs, which are square in cross section. A good example is Myrtoleucodendron quadrifarium which is now known as Melaleuca quadrifaria.

Quadrifarius: [kwo-dri-far-i-us] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Pharos, which is Greek for a lighthouse or beacon. It refers to flowers, which stand out like beacons in the field. A good example is Petalochilus quadrifarius.

Quadrifida: [kwo-dri-fi/fahy-da] From Quād which is Latin for four and Findere which is Latin for to divide, split or cut. It refers to structures or organs which split into four. A good example is the fruits on Sterculia quadrifida which split into four sections when ripe.

Quadrifidum: [kwo-dree-fi/fahy-dum] From Quād which is Latin for four and Findere which is Latin for to divide, split or cut. It refers to structures or organs which split into four. A good example is the awns on Sesuvium quadrifidum which is now known as Gunniopsis quadrifida which are most noticable when the fruits are ripe.

Quadrifidus: [kwo-dri-fi/fahy-dus] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Findere, which is Latin for to divide, split or cut. It refers to structures or organs ,which split into four. A good example is the awns on Pentagon quadrifidus which split into four prominent awns.

Quadrifolia: [kwo-dri-foh-li-a] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves which have a square or rhomboic shape. A good example is the four pinnae on each frond of Marsilea quadrifolia.

Quadrifurcatum: [kwo-dri-fer-ka-tum] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Findere, which is Latin for to divide, split or cut. It refers to structures or organs, which split into four. A good example is the fruits on Stylidium quadrifurcatum.

Quadrilata: [kwo-dri-la-ta] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Lateralis, which is Latin for the side. It refers to structures or organs, which have four parts. A good example is the petals and calyx lobes on Boronia quadrilata.

Quadrilatera: [kwo-dri-la-ter–a] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Lateralis, which is Latin for the side. It refers to stems, which have four distinct sides. A good example is Daviesia quadrilatera.

Quadrilateralis: [kwo-dri-la-ter–a-lis] From Quadratus, which is Latin for to make square and Lateralis, which is Latin for the side. It refers to stems which are distinctly square in shape. A good example is Acacia quadrilateralis.

Quadriloba: [kwo-dri-loh-ba] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Lobos/Lobī, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to structures or organs which have four lobes. The actual reference is unclear as the flowers have five petals and the seeds have a single wing or lobe surrounding the seed. A good example for the name is Nymphoides quadriloba.

Quadriloculare: [kwo-dri-lok-yoo–lar] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Locularis, which is Latin for a case or a box. It refers to fruits, which have four locules or compartments. A good example is Petalostigma quadriloculare.

Quadrilocularis: [kwo-dri-lok-yoo–lar-is] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Locularis, which is Latin for a case or a box. It refers to fruits which have four locules or compartments. A good example is Ziziphus quadrilocularis.

Quadriloculatum: [kwo-dri-lok-yoo–la-tum] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Locularis, which is Latin for a case or a box. It refers to fruits, which have four locules or compartments. A good example is Solanum quadriloculatum.

Quadrimarginea: [kwo-dri-mar-ji-ne-a] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Margo, which is Latin for a margin or border. It refers to any organ, which has four faint wings along the margins. A good example is Acacia quadrimarginea.

Quadripartita: [kwo-dri-par-ti-ta] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Partita, which is Latin for a part. It refers to individual florets, which have a square cross section. A good example is Adriana quadripartita.

Quadripetalum: [kwo-dri-pe-ta-lum] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Pétalon/Pétalos, which are Ancient Greek for a thin metalic plate later used for the description of specialized coloured leaves surrounding the bud of a flower – the petals. It refers to plants, which have four petals. A good example is Conospermum quadripetalum.

Quadrisepala: [kwo-dri-se-pa-la] From Quadratus, which is Latin for to make square and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum which is Latin for specialized leaves, which surround the immature bud which are free and usually cupular in shape – the sepals. It refers to the four sepals, which are squarish to rhomboic. A good example isBertya quadrisepala.

Quadriseta: [kwo-dri-se-ta] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Seta/Setae, which are Latin for a bristle. It refers to individual florets, which hahave four stiff hairs or bristles. A good example is Deyeuxia quadriseta.

Quadrisetum: [kwo-dri-se-tum] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Seta/Setae, which are Latin for a bristle. It refers to florets, which have four stiff hairs or bristles. A good example was Bromidium quadrisetum which is known as Bromidium quadriseta.

Quadrisiculata: [kwo-dri-si-kyoo-la-ta] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Sulcate, which is Latin for a furrow. It refers to structures, which have four furrows or grooves. A good example is Acacia quadrisulcata.

Quadristaminea: [kwo-dri-sta-mi-nee-a] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Stḗmōn, which is Ancient Greek or Stāmen which is Latin for a stamen or stamens. It refers to flowers, which have four stamens. A good example was Linociera quadristaminea which is now known as Chionanthus quadristamineus.

Quadristamineus: [kwo-dri-sta-mi-nee-us] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Stḗmōn, which is Ancient Greek or Stāmen which is Latin for a stamen or stamens. It refers to flowers, which have four stamens. A good example is Chionanthus quadristamineus.

Quadrivalvata: [qwo-dri-val-va–ta] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Valva/Volvo, which is Latin for the leaves of a door. It refers to flowers, which have four compartments in the carpels. A good example is Atriplex quadrivalvata var. quadrivalvata.

Quadrivalvatum 1: [qwo-dri-val-va–tum] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Valva/Volvo, which is Latin for the leaves of a door. It refers to a type of lid or cover, which opens to allow the anthers to dehisce. A good example is Atriplex quadrivalvatum, which is now known as Atriplex quadrivalvata var. quadrivalvata.

Quadrivalvatum 2: [kwo-dri-val-va–tum] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Valva/Volvo, which are Latin for the leaves of a door. It refers to a type of membrane between seeds in a pod or capsule. A good example is Haloxanthium quadrivalvatum.

Quadrivalvia: [kwo-dri-vahl-vi-a] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Valva/Volvo, which are Latin for the leaves of a door. It refers to a type of membrane between seeds in a pod or capsule. A good example is Parakeelya quadrivalvia, which is known as Calandrinia quadrivalvis.

Quadrivalvis: [kwo-dri-val-vis] From Quād, which is Latin for four and Valva/Volvo, which are Latin for the leaves of a door. It refers to a type of membrane between seeds in a pod or capsule. A good example is Ackama quadrivalvis which is now known as Caldcluvia australiensis.

Quairading: [kw-air-a-ding] Probably from Quair, which is Latin for the leaves or pages as set out for a book before binding – a book and Addere, which is Latin for to add to. It probably refers to plants, which have branches or stems that appear to have been layered on top of each other on the ground. A good example is Jacksonia quairading.

Quamoclit: [kwo-mo-klit] From Quadratus, which is Latin for to make square and Kleitoris, which is Ancient Greek for a small hill or the goddess of divinity or to be goddess like. It refers to seeds, which resemble a somewhat rectangular shaped clitoris or the vague appearance of the anthers and stigma protruding like a clitoris A good example is the exotic weed from North and South America Ipomoea quamoclit, which has the anthers just protruding from the red tubular corolla.

Quamoclita: [kwo-mo-kli-ta] From Quadratus, which is Latin for to make square and Kleitoris, which is Ancient Greek for a small hill or the goddess of divinity or to be goddess like. It refers to seeds, which resemble a somewhat rectangular shaped clitoris or the vague appearance of the anthers and stigma just protruding like a clitoris A good example is Quamoclita denticulata, which is known as Xenostegia tridentata.

Quandang: [kwon-dang] From Quandong, which is Latinised from the local vernacular of the Wiradjuri for the nuts from the quangdong tree. The name as spoken with an “a” is considered obsolete as the pronunciation is with an “o”. A good example is Amyema quandang var. quandang.

Quandong: [kwon-dong] From Quandong, which is Latinised from the local vernacular of the Wiradjuri for the nuts from the quangdong tree. A good example is Santalum accuminatum.

Quartzitica: [kwawr-tsi-ka] From Quartzite, which is Latin for quartz sands. It refers to sands and gravels, which comprise almost entirely of quartz. A metamorphic rock made from the transformation of sandstones under heat and pressure. A good example is the leaves on Synaphea quartzitica.

Quasicalva: [kwar-zi-kal-va] From Quasi, which is Latin for to resemble the virtual thing and Calva which is Latin for to be bald. It refers to an organ which is glabrous. A good example is Guichenotia quasicalva.

Quasilibera: [kwar-zi-li-ber-a] From Quasi, which is Latin for almost, as if it was or were and Beru, which is Latin for a small clearing. It may refer to plants which prefer to grow almost alone or in small groups in small clearings. A good example is Goodenia quasilibera.

Quassia: [kwar-zi-a] Is named in honour of a Dutch slave who discovered the medicinal properties of the plant. A good example is Quassia amara.

Quaterna: [kwo-ter-na] From Quarterna, which is Latin for four at a time. It refers to organs which are in groups or whorls of four. A good example is the leaves and flowers on Westringea quarterna which is now known as Werstringea angustifolia.

Quaternifolia: [kwo-ter-ni-foh-li-a] From Quarterna, which is Latin for four at a time and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are in groups or whorls of four. A good example is the leaves on Amyema quaternifolia.

Quaternifolium: [kwo-ter-ni-foh-li-um] From Quarterna, which is Latin for four at a time and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are in in groups or whorls of four. A good example was Amyema quaternifolium, which is now known asAmyema quaternifolia.

Quatrefagesii: [kwo-tre-fa-ge-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Quartrefages. A good example is Quintinia quatrefagesii.

Queeneanum: [kwee-nee-num] From Queensland, which is Latinised for the state of Queensland and Iana/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered in Queensland. A good example was Cymbidium queeneanum which is now known as Cymbidium madidum.

Queenslandica: [kween-z-lan-dik-ka] From Queensland, which is Latinised for the state of Queensland. It refers to species which were first discovered in Queensland or are restricted to Queensland. A good example is Pouteria queenslandica.

Queenslandicum: [kween-z-lan-dikkum] From Queensland, which is Latinised for the state of Queensland. It refers tospecies which were first discovered in Queensland. A good example is Dichanthium queenslandicum.

Queenslandicus: [qween-z-lan-dikkus] From Queensland, which is Latinized for the state of Queensland. It refers to species which were first discovered in Queensland. A good example is Aponogeton queenslandicus.

Queenslandiella: [kween-z-lan-di-kel-la] From Queensland, which is Latinised for the state of Queensland and Ella which is Latin for the feminine form or a young girl. It refers tospecies which were first discovered in Queensland. A good example is Queenslandiella hyalina.

Quercifolia: [kwer-si-foh-li-a] From Quercus, which is Latin for an oak tree and Folium which is Latin for foliage. It refers leaves, which resemble the European oak tree. A good example is Drynaria quercifolia.

Quercifolium: [kwer-si-foh-li-um] From Quercus, which is Latin for an oak tree and Folium which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves which are similar to the European oak tree. A good example was Lasiopetalum quercifolium which is now known as Thomasia quercifolia.

Quercifolius: [kwer-si-foh-li-uhs] From Quercus, which is Latin for an oak tree and Folium which is Latin for foliage. It refers leaves, which resemble the European oak tree. A good example is Eriostemon quercifolius, which is now known as Chorilaena quercifolia.

Quezelii: [kw-e-ze-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Quezel. A good example is the Australian fungus Ascobolus quezelii, which is considered to be exotic while the the native fungus is Ascobolus calesco.

Quiescence: [