The Botanary from “The Bible of Botany”

2nd Rate/Rank Leaf: In reference to leaves-if a line is drawn from the first leaf along the stem to the second leaf then to the third leaf the line would have completed a full circle around the stem. That is the leaves are alternate. A good example is the decussate leaves on Melaleuca alternifolia.

3rd Rate/Rank Leaf: In reference to leaves-if a line is drawn from the first leaf along the stem to the second leaf then to the third leaf and to the fourth leaf the line would have completed a full circle around the stem. A good example is the leaves of Melaleuca hinchinbrook.

“A – B”

A: [ah] From “a” which is Greek & Latin for without or not having.

Abarema: [ah-bahr-ee-ma] From Abarema which is Latinized from the local South American name for the trees. The native plants have been moved to the following genre Archidéndron and Parachidéndron. A good example was Abarema hendersonii, which is now known as Archidéndron hendersonii.

Abata: [a-ba-ta] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Batos, which is Ancient Greek for accessible. It refers to the plant’s habitats as being not readily accessible.

Abaxial: [a-bak-si-al] From Abaxia, which is Latin for away from the main axis of the structure to which it is attached to or the lower surface. A good example is the lower lamina of the pinnae on Archontophoenix maxima. (antonym adaxial)

Abaxianthus: [ah-bak-si-an-thus] From Abaxia, which is Latin for away from the main axis and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are face away from the spike. A good example is Abaxianthus convexus.

Abbottia: [ah-bo-tee-a] Is named in honour of Francis Abbott; 1834-1916, who was an English born Australian gardener and superintendent of the Hobart Botanic Garden. A good example was Abbottia singularis, which is now known as Timonius singularis.

Abbreviata: [ah-bree-vee-a-ta] From Abbreviata, which is Ancient Greek for to make shorter. It refers to species, which are much shorter than other members of the genus. A good example is Eugenea abbreviata.

Abbreviatum: [ah-bree-vee-a-tum] From Abbreviāta, which is Ancient Greek for to make shorter. It refers to species, which are the shortest species in the genus. A good example is Stylidium adnatum var. abbreviatum.

Abbreviatus: [ah-bree-vee-a-tus] From Abbreviāta, which is Ancient Greek for to make shorter. It refers to the species, which are much shorter than other members of the genus. A good example is the exotic weevil Diaprepes abbreviatus which fortunately is so far has not found its way to Australia.

Abdita: [ahb-dee-ta] From Abditus which is Latin for concealed or hidden. It refers to the fruits being concealed by the leaves. A good example is Eucalyptus abdita.

Abditum: [ab-di-tum] From Abditus which is Latin for concealed or hidden. It refers to fruits, which have similar colour and texture as the leaves thus being difficult to see. A good example is Geranium potentilloides var. abditum.

Abditus: [ab-di-tus] From Abditus, which is Latin for concealed or hidden. It refers to plants, which are difficult to see amongst the foliage of other plants. A good example is the ground orchid Corybas abditus.

Abdomen: [ab-do-men] From Abdomen, which is Latin for a belly. It refers to the rear segment of the three segments of an insect’s body.

Abdominea: [ab-do-min-ee-a] From Abdomen, which is Latin for a belly. It refers to lips, which resemble an insect’s abdomen. The rear segment of the three segments of an insect’s body.

Abellianus: [ah-bel-li-ei-nuh s] Abell is named in honour of brothers Warren Wilbow Abell, 1926-1983, and Thomas Abell, 1913-2000 and Anus, which is Latin for of or from. A good example is the ground orchid Corybas abellianus.

Abelmoschus: [a-bel-mos-kus] From Abelmoska, which is Latinized from the Arabic word for musk. It refers to the name of the original plants, which musk was extracted. A good example is the Asian horticultural root vegetable Abelmoschus moschatus subsp. tuberosus, which is now known as Abelmoschus manihot.

Abergiana: [ah-ber-ji-ei-nuh] Is named in honour of Ernesti Georg Aberg, 1823–1907 who was a Swedish physician who was the first to cultivate Eucalyptus sp. in the regions other than the La Plata-River, subjected numerous species to his observations there and published a fruitful book, “Irrigacion y Eucalyptus, Buenos Aires, 1874″ and Anus, which is Latin for of or from. A good example is Corymbia abergiana.

Aberrans: [ah-ber-anz] From Aberrant, which is Latin for to deviate. It may refer to the shape of the fruits deviating from the normal shape from other species of the genus. A good example is Acronychia aberrans.

Aberrant: [ah-ber-ant] From Aberrant, which is Latin for to deviate. It refers to organs or structures, which deviate from what is normal in the genus.

Abies: [a-bi-es] From Abies, which is Latin for silver. It refers to the silver foliage of the European fir trees. A good example is the exotic conifer Picea abies.

Abietinus: [a-bi-e-ti-nus] From Abies, which is Latin for silver. It refers to the silver foliage of many species resembling the fir tree Abies genus. A good example is the exotic conifer Agaricus abietinus, which is now known as Gloeophyllum abietinum.

Abilgaardia: [ah-bil-gahr-di-a] Is probably named in honour of Peder Christian Albigaard; 1740-1801, who was a Danish botanist and entomologist. A good example is Abildgaardia vaginata.

Abjecta: [ab-jek-ta] From Abjectus, which is Latin for to be thrown away or discarded.

Abjectum: [ab-jek-tum] From Abjectus, which is Latin for to be thrown away or discarded.

Abjectus: [ab-jek-tus] From Abjectus, which is Latin for to be thrown away or discarded. Its reference is unclear. A good example is Juncus abjectus.

Abnormalis: [ab– nor-ma-lis] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Normalis, which is Latin for usual or normal. It refers to structures or organs, which is different when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Agonis abnormalis.

Abnorme: [ab-norm] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Normalis, which is Latin for usual or normal. It refers to structures or organs, which is different when compared to other species in the genus. A good example was Leptospermum abnorme, which is now known as Leptospermum brachyandrum.

Abnormis: [ab-nor-mis] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Normalis which is Latin for usual or normal. It refers to structures or organs, which is different when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Cortinarius abnormis.

Aboll: [a-bol] An ancient Greek garment which, is draped over the shoulder.

Abollatum: [ah-bol-lei-tuh m] From Aná, which is Ancient Greek for upwards and Bállō, which is Ancient Greek for to throw (anabolḗ wich is Ancient Greek for a mantle,). It refers to structures or organs, which somewhat resembles an abolla. A good example is Lysiosepalum abollatum.

Aboriginal: [a-bor-i-jin-ahl] From Aborigineum, which is Latin, for original in the strictest sense. It refers to plants, or animals which are native to a particular place, habitat or environment.

Aborigine: [a-bor-i-ji-nee] From Aborigine, which is Ancient Greek for the original one.

Aborigineum: [a-bor-i-ji-nee-um] From Aborigine, which is Ancient Greek for the original one.

Abortiva: [a-bor-ti-va] From Abortivus, which is Latin for to abort or to be incomplete. It refers to being barren or to become unproductive or to cease development. A good example is Heterachne abortiva.

Abortive: [a-bor-tiv/teev] From Abortivus, which is Latin for to abort or to be incomplete. It refers to being barren or to become unproductive or to cease development.

Abortivum: [a-bor-ti-vum] From Abortivus, which is Latin for to abort or to be incomplete. It refers to being barren or to become unproductive or to cease development. A good example is Panicum abortivum, which is now known as Pseudoraphis spinescens.

Abortivus: [a-bor-ti-vus] From Abortiva, which is Latin for to abort or to be incomplete. It refers to being barren or to become unproductive or to cease development. A good example is Oplismenus abortivus, which is now known as Pseudoraphis spinescens.

Abrodictyum: [a-bro-dik-tahy-um] From Abron, which is Ancient Greek for delicate or pretty and Dictymia, which is Ancient Greek for a net. It refers to the venation network being like a fish net. A good example is Abrodictyum obscurum.

Abroma: [ab-ro-ma] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Broma, which is Ancient Greek for food. It refers to the plants, which are mildly toxic. A good example is the exotic fern Abroma mollis.

Abronia: [a-bro-ni-a] From Habrós, which is Ancient Greek for graceful and delicate. It refers to the individual flowers, which are rather delicate. A good example is the exotic weed Abronia ameliae.

Abrophyllum: [ab-ro-fahy-lum] From Habrós, which is Ancient Greek for graceful or delicate and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaves, which are hang down rather gracefully. A good example is Abrophyllum ornans.

Abros: [a-bros] From Habrós which is Ancient Greek for delicate or pretty. A good example is Abrophyllum ornans.

Abrosperma: [a-bro-sper-ma] From Habrós, which is Ancient Greek for graceful and delicate and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which are very beautiful. A good example is the Tasmanian cushion moss Adenanthera abrosperma.

Abrotanella: [a-bro-ta-nel-la] From Habrós, which is Ancient Greek for graceful and delicate and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to the overall habit of the plants, which are more feminine like. A good example is the Tasmanian cushion moss Abrotanella forsteroides.

Abrotaniforme: [ah-broh-tey-ne-luh] From Habrós, which is Ancient Greek for graceful and delicate and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the overall habit of the plants, which somewhat have the form of the Abrotanum genus. A good example is the Tasmanian cushion moss Helichrysum abrotaniforme, which is now known as Chrysocephalum semipapposum.

Abrotanoides: [ah-broh-ta-noi-des] From Habrós, which is Ancient Greek for graceful and delicate and Eîdos/Oides, which are Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Abrotanum genus. A good example is the foliage on the exotic garden perennial Stirlingia abrotanoides.

Abrotanum: [a-bro-ta-num] From Habrós, which is Ancient Greek for graceful and delicate. It refers to plants, which somewhat resemble the Abrotanum genus. A good example is the foliage on the exotic garden perennial Artemisia abrotanum.

Abrumpere: [a-brum-peer] From Abrumpēns, which is Latin for to breaking off, separating, severing; terminating or ending suddenly. It often refers to leaves or petals, which appear to broken off at the apexes.

Abrupta: [a-bru-ta] From Abrumpēns, which is Latin for to breaking off, separating, severing; terminating or ending suddenly. It usually refers to leaves, which appear as though they have been cut or torn off at the apexes. Good examples are Acacia abrupta or Ipomoea abrupta.

Abruptum: [a-brup-tum] From Abrumpēns, which is Latin for to breaking off, separating, severing; terminating or ending suddenly. It usually It refers to leaves, which appear as though they have been cut or torn off at the apexes. A good example was Racosperma abruptum, which is now known as Acacia abrupta.

Abruptus: [a-brup-tus] From Abrumpēns, which is Latin for to breaking off, separating, severing, terminating or ending suddenly. It usually refers to the leaves, which appear as though they have been cut or torn off at the apexes.

Abrus: [a-brus] From Abrin, which is Ancient Greek for a potent poison or Abrus, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the Arabic word for the plant. It refers to plants, which contain the most toxic natural poison known to man, especially in the seeds. A good example is Abrus prectorius.

Abscida: [ab-si-da] From Abscision, which is Latin for to cut off or have removed. It refers to leaves, which appear to have been cut off at the apexes. A good example is the fern Gleichenia abscida.

Abscissa: [ab-sis-sa] From Abscision which is Latin for to cut off or have removed. It refers to leaves, which appear to be cut off at the apexes. A good example is the southern seaweed Melanthalia abscissa.

Abscissile: [ab-sis-si-le] From Abscision, which is Latin for to cut off or have removed. It refers to leaves, which appear to be cut off at the apexes. A good example is Livistona benthamii.

Abscission: [ab-si-jon] From Abscision, which is Latin for to cut off or have removed. It refers to fruits or other organs, which appear to be cut off at the apexes.

Absconditum: [ab-skon-di-tum] From Abscond, which is Ancient Greek for to be concealed hidden from view or a secret. It usually refers to flowers or fruits, which are hidden amongst the leaves. A good example is Bulbophyllum absconditum.

Absconditus: [ab-skon-di-tus] From Abscond, which is Ancient Greek for to be concealed hidden from view or a secret. It usually refers to flowers or fruits, which are hidden amongst the leaves. A good example is Schoenus absconditus.

Absconsa: [ab-skon-sa] From Abscond, that is Ancient Greek for to be concealed hidden from view or a secret. It refers to a flowers or fruits, which are hidden amongst the leaves.

Absimili: [ab-si-mi-li/lee] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without and Simili, which is Ancient Greek for similar to. It refers to physical organs, which are not the same. A good example is the internodes on Psilocaulon absimile.

Absimilis: [ab-si-mi-lis] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without and Simili, which is Ancient Greek for similar. It refers to physical organs, which are not the same. A good example is the blue butterfly Candalides absimilis, which is very similar to the southern species and feeds on Harpullia hillii in far north Queensland.

Absita: [ab-si-ta] From Absitum, that is Greek/Latin for lying away from or a distance from. It refers to the habitats, which are well away from other communities. A good example is Eucalyptus absita.

Absolutum: [ab-so-loo-tum] From Absolutum, which is Latin for to be finished or concluded.

Abundiflora: [ab-bun-di-flor-a/u] From Abundus, which is Latin for to be plentiful, abundant or profuse and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower, or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to a profusion of flowers. A good example is Alpinia abundiflora.

Abundifloris: [ab-bun-di-flor-is] From Abundus which is Latin for to be plentiful, abundant or profuse and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower, or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to a profusion of flower. A good example is Rhodasphera rhodanthera.

Abundiflorum: [hb-bun-di-flor-um] From Abundus, which is Latin for to be plentiful, abundant or profuse and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower, or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to having the most profusion of flower.

Abundus: [a-bun-dus] From Abundus, which is Latin for to be plentiful, abundant or profuse. It refers to the flowers, which are born in profusion. A good example is Boronia ledifolia.

Abutiloides: [a-byoo-ti-loi-deez] From Abutilon, which is Latinized from the Arabic word for a mallow, and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves, which resemble the European mallows. A good example is Solanum Abutiloides.

Abutilon: [a-byoo-ti-lon] From Abutilon, which is Latinized from the Arabic word for a mallow. It refers to plants, which are related to the Eurasian mallows. A good example is Abutilon oxycarpum.

Acacaeaforme: [a-kahy-see-a-form] From ἀκακία, which is Ancient Greek or Acanthium, which is Latin for to have a sharp point and Forme, which is Latin for a form. It refers to a plants, which take the form or shape of an Acacia.

Acacallis: [a-kal-lis] From Akakallis, which is Ancient Greek for a nymph in Greek mythology and includes Kallis which is Ancient Greek for beautiful. It refers to shrubs, which have a delicate beauty and alluring features like a nymph. A good example is the exotic orchid with delicate tones Acacallis cyanea.

Acacia: [a-kahy-sha] From ἀκακία, which is Ancient Greek or Acanthium, which is Latin for to have a sharp point. It refers to the first species named by Dioscorides the Greek Botanist for the Egyptian plant Acacia arabica, which has very sharply pointed spines. A good Australian example is Acacia alata or our National Floral emblem Acacia pycnantha.

Acaciformis: [a-kee-form-mis] From ἀκακία, which is Ancient Greek or Acanthium, which is Latin for to have a sharp point and Forme which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which have a structure or organ usually the foliage, which is typically found on many Acacia specie. A good example is the leaves on Eucalyptus acaciformis.

Acacioides: [a-ka-ki-oi-deez] From κακία, which is Ancient Greek or Acanthium which is Latin for to have a sharp point and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have many characteristics of the Acacia genus. A good example Dendrophthoe acacioides subsp. acacioides

Acaena: [a-kee-na] From κακία, which is Ancient Greek or Acanthium which is Latin for to have a sharp point. It refers to fruits, which have thorns. A good example is Acaena echinata.

Acalypha: [a-ka-lahy-fa] From Acalypha, that is Latin for a nettle. It refers to many plants, which have leaves that resemble nettles. A good example is Acalypha capillipes

Acalyphacea: [a-ka-lahy-fua-see-a] From Acalypha, which is Ancient Greek for nettle and Acea which is Ancient Greek for a family. It refers to plants, which are in the same family as many of the European stinging nettles of the old world. A good example of the genus in the family is Urtica incisa.

Acampe: [a-kam-pe/pee] From Akampe, which is Ancient Greek for inflexible or brittle. It refers to stems, which are inflexible and brittle including the flower stems. A good example is the popular exotic orchid Acampe praemorsa.

Acantha: [a-kan-tha] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. A good example is the common two spine butterfly Geitoneura acantha.

Acanthacea: [a-kan-tha-see-a] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine, ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower and Acea, which is Ancient Greek for a family. It refers to flowers, which have a curved blunt spine similar to a snail shell. A good example of a genus typical of the Acanthacea family is the native oyster plant Acanthus ebracteatus.

Acanthaster: [a-kan-thas-ter] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine, ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower and Astḗr, which is Ancient Greek for a star. It refers to flowers, which are star shape and have prominent anthers. A good example is Acacia acanthaster.

Acanthella: [a-kan-thel-la] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Ella, which is Ancient Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to plants, with spines, which have an overall more feminine or dainty look. A good example is the marine sponge Acanthella pulcherrima.

Acanthifolia: [a-kan-thi-foh-li-a] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have spines. A good example is Grevillea ananthifolia.

Acanthifolium: [a-kan-thi-foh-li-um] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Folium, which is Latin for leaves. It refers to leaves, which have spines. A good example is Senecio acanthifolium.

Acanthium: [a-kan-thi/thee-um] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Folium, which is Latin for leaves. It refers to leaves, which have thorny margins. A good example is Onopordum acanthium.

Acanthocalyces: [a-kan-tho-Kal-ahy-seez] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Ancient Greek or Calycina, which is Latin for a husk, veil or cover. It refers to specialized leaves, which surround the bud and protect the developing sexual organs and ovaries that are thorny.

Acanthocalycium: [a-kan-tho-Kah-lahysee-um] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for a covering or to be covered in. It refers to Calyxes, which have thorns and/or spines. A good example is the exotic cactus Acanthocalycium aurantiacum.

Acanthocalyx: [a-kan-tho-kaliks] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Ancient Greek or Calycina, which is Latin for a husk, veil or cover. It refers to specialized leaves, which surround the bud and protect the developing sexual organs and ovaries that are spiny. A good example is the spiny calyxes on Solanum ellipticum.

Acanthocarpa: [a-kan-tho-kar-pa/pu] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits, which are thorny. A good example is Glycyrrhiza acanthocarpa.

Acanthocarpos: [a-kan-tho-kar-pos] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have thorns or spines.

Acanthocarpum: [a-kan-tho-kar-pum] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits, which are very thorny. A good example is the exotic horticultural plant Sargassum acanthocarpum.

Acanthocarpus: [ah-kan-tho-kar-pus] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are rather thorny. A good example is Acanthocarpus preissii.

Acanthocephalum: [ah-kan-tho-se-fa-lum] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Kephalum, which is Ancient Greek or Cephalum, which is Latin for a head. It refers to the flower heads, which are surrounded by short or long spines. A good example is Erodiophyllum acanthocephalum.

Acanthochiton: [ah-kan-tho-kahy-ton] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have thorns or spines and khiton, which is Ancient Greek for a skirt. It refers to structures, which have thorny or spiny sepals. A good example of spiny sepals is Isopogon dubius.

Acanthoclada: [ah-kan-tho-klad-a] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a young branch. It refers to stems, which have short spines. A good example is Acacia acanthoclada.

Acanthocladium: [a-kan-tho-kla-di-u m] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Klados, which is Ancient Greek or Cladus, which is Latin for a young branch. It refers to stems, which have very sharp thorns. A good example is Acanthocladium dockeri.

Acanthocladum: [a-kan-tho-kla-dum] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and klados, which is Ancient Greek or Cladus, which is Latin for a young branch. It refers to stems, which have very sharp thorns. A good example is Desmodium acanthocladum.

Acanthoclona: [ah-kan-tho-klo-na] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Klṓn/klṓne, which is Ancient Greek for snippet or twig. It refers to plants, which appear to be all identical as if clones of each other. A good example is Daviesia acanthoclona.

Acanthoneura: [ah-kan-tho-nyoo-ra] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve. It refers to to veins, which have a row of thorns.

Acanthoneuron: [a-kan-tho-nyoo-ron] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve. It refers to veins, which have a row of thorns. A good example is the umbrella moss Leucolepis acanthoneuron.

Acanthopanax: [ah-kan-tho-pan-aks] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Panaces, which is Latin for to heal. It refers to plants, which have healing qualities similar to the Asian Ginseng. A good example was the exotic Acanthopanax senticosus, which is now known as Eleutherococcus senticosus.

Acanthophoenix: [a-kan-tho-fee-niks] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Phoinix, which is Ancient Greek for a mythical bird. It refers to palms, which have a large thorn or blunt spine like a helmet. A good example is the leaf colours on Acanthophoenix rubra having long spines.

Acanthophylla: [a-kan-tho-fahy-la] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Greek for leaves. It refers to leaves, which have thorns. A good example is Hakea acanthophylla.

Acanthophyllum: [a-kan-tho-fahy-lum] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Phullon/Phýllon, the Greek word for leaves. It refers to leaves, which are covered in thorns. A good example is the Sichuan pepper genus like Zanthoxylum acanthophyllum.

Acanthophyllus: [a-kan-tho-fahy-lus] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Phullon/Phýllon, the Greek word for leaves. It refers to leaves, which have thorns. A good example is Adenanthos Acanthophyllus.

Acanthopoda: [a-kan-tho-po-da] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to rhizome or root flanges, which have thorns. A good example is Dryandra acanthopoda.

Acanthopodia: [a-kan-tho-po-di-a] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to rhizome or root flanges, which have thorns.

Acanthopodum: [a-kan-tho-po-di-um] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to petioles or pedicels, which have thorns from the foot of the plants through to their tips. A good example is the exotic Condamine Sichuan pepper known as Zanthoxylum acanthopodium.

Acanthopodius: [a-kan-tho-poh-di-us] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thorn or spine and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to the rhizomes, which have thorns. A good example is the exotic Condamine Sichuan pepper known as Zanthoxylum acanthopodius.

Acanthorrhiza: [a-kahn-thoh-rahy-zuh] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have thorns or spines and Rrhyza, which is Latin for a root. It refers to the rhizomes having thorns.

Acanthos: [ah-kan-thos] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have thorns or spines. It refers to plants, which are spinier than other species in the genus.

Acanthospermum: [a-kan-tho-sper-um] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have thorns or spines and Sperma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which are covered in spines. A good example is Acanthospermum hispidum.

Acanthostachya: [a-kan-tho-sta-kai-a] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have thorns or spines and Stachya, which is Ancient Greek for a flower spike. It refers to flower spikes, which are long and narrow with many short spines. A good example is Xanthorroea acanthostachya.

Acanthus: [a-kan-thus] From ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for to have thorns or spines. It refers to leaves, which are covered in thorns. A good example is the mangrove oyster plant Acanthus illicifolia.

Acarologist: [a-kar-ol-o-jist] From Acaros which is Ancient Greek for a mite or a tick, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies mites and ticks found in our gardens.

Acarology: [a-kar-ol-o-jee] From Acaros, which is Ancient Greek for a mite or a tick, and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the zoological science of studying mites and ticks found in our gardens.

Acarpous: [a-kar-pus] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to individual plants, which do not produce fruits.

Acaulescent: [a-kor-les-sent] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having, and kaulos, which is Ancient Greek or Caulus, which is Latin for a twig, stem or branch. It refers to plants, which are without stems above the ground or apparently without true stems.

Acaulis: [a-kor-lis] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek or Caulus, which is Latin for a twig, stem or branch. It refers to plants, which do not have stems or branches. A good example is the trunkless grass tree Xanthorrhoea acaulis.

Accedens: [ak-se-denz] From Accedens/Accēdō, which is Latin for approaching or advancing. It may refer to plants, which are approaching extinction. A good example is Deyeuxia accedens, which is now known as Deyeuxia frigida.

Accessory Bud: [ak-se-sor-ee-bud] From Accessorius, which is Latin for in addition to. It refers to buds, which are lateral to or above the axillary buds.

Acclinis: [a-kli-nis] From Acclīne/Acclīnis, which is Latin for to lean against or to be inclined. It refers to plants, which, appear to be weak and have a tendancy to lean up against other stronger plants. A good example is Senna acclinis.

Accrecent: [a-kres-uh nt] From Accrēscentia, which is Ancient Latin for to grow or enlarge. It refers to flowers, which, continue to grow in size after anthesis. A good example is the calyxes on Vitex melicopea.

Accrescens: [ah-kres-senz] From Accrēscentia, which is Ancient Latin for to grow or enlarge. It refers to flowers, which continue to grow in size after anthesis. A good example is the calyxes on Eremophila accrescens.

Accumbent: [a-kum-bent] From Akoumpós which is Greek for to lie against. It refers to structures or organs, which lies against another structure or organ, in distinction to incumbent, which is lying upon.

Acellerata: [a-sel-ler-a-ta] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and probably Scelerātum, which is Latin for vicious or hurtful. It refers to plants, which have somewhat pungent leaves or phyllodes. A good example is Acacia acellerata.

Acelleratum: [a-sel-ler-a-tum] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and probably Scelerātum, which is Latin for vicious or hurtful. It refers to plants, which have somewhat pungent leaves or phyllodes. A good example is Racosperma acelleratum, which is now known as Acacia acellerata.

Acephala: [a-sef-a-la] From A, is Ancient Greek for without and kephala which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers plants, which do not have heads of flowers. A good example is the secunds on Drosera binata.

Acerata: [a-ser-a-ta] From Acertus, that is Latin for a distinct point. It refers to the fruits, which have a distinct acicula or needle like point at the apex. A good example is Grevillea acerata.

Aceratium: [a-sera-tium] From Acertus, which is Latin for a distinct point. It refers to the fruits, which have a distinct acicula or needle like point at the apex. A good example is Aceratium ferrugineum.

Aceratium ferrugineum note the distinct tip on the end of the fruit.

Acerba: [a-serba] From Acerbus, which is Latin for harsh sour or astringent. It refers to fruits which are apparently sour. A good example is Omphacomeria acerba.

Acerbic: [a-serbik] From Acerbus, that is Latin for harsh sour or astringent. It usually refers to fruits, which are sour or acidic to the taste. A good example is the fruits on Acronychia litoralis.

Acerbus: [ah-serbus] From Acerbus, which is Latin for harsh sour or astringent. It refers to fruits, which have a sour or acidic to the taste. A good example is Clitopilus acerbus.

Acerifolia: [ah-serrifoh-li-a] From Acer, which is Latin for the Maple tree, and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the exotic maple tree. A good example was Clompanus acerifolia, which is now known as Brachychiton acerifolius.

Acerifolium: [ah-seriyfoh-li-um] From Acer, which is Latin for the Maple tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the exotic maple tree. Brachychiton acerifolium is a spelling error often encountered in books, magazines and the web for Brachychiton acerifolius. A good example is Brachychiton acerifolius.

Acerifolius: [a-ser-rifoh-li-us] From Acer, which is Latin for the Maple tree and Folius, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to structures or organs usually the leaves, which resemble the exotic maple tree. A good example is Brachychiton acerifolius.

Acerina: [a-ser-ri-na] From Acerina, which is Latin for needle wood conifers. It refers to leaves, which are similar to those found on the maple tree. A good example is Eucalyptus pauciflora subsp. acerina.

Acerosa: [a se-roh-sa] From Acerina, which is Latin for a needle. It refers to leaves, which are more acicular or needle like than other species in the genus or stems, which are covered in sharp spines. A good example is Persoonia acerosa.

Acerose: [a-ser-rohz] From Acerina, which is Latin for a needle. It refers to leaves, which are more acicular or needle like than other species in the genus or stems, which are covered in sharp spines. A good example is Persoonia acerosa.

Acerosifolium: [ah-ser-ro-si-foh-li-um] From Acer, which is Latin for the Maple tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are more acicular or needle like than other species in the genus or have a sharp needle like apex. A good example is Thysanotus acerosifolium.

Acerosifolius: [a-ser-ro-si-foh-li-us] From Acer, which is Latin for the Maple tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are more acicular or needle like than other species in the genus or have a sharp needle like apex. A good example is Brachychiton acerosifolius.

Acerosus: [a-ser-oh-suhs] From Acer, which is Latin for the Maple tree. It refers to leaves or other organs, which are needle like. A good example is Calothamnus quadrifidus var. acerosus.

Acerroides: [a-ser-oi-deez] From Acer, which is Latin for the Maple tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves, which resemble the maple tree.

Acervula: [a-ser-vu-la] From Acervula which is unknown. A good example was Eucalyptus acervula which is probably now known as Eucalyptus gunnii var. acervula.

Acetosa: [a-setoh-sa] From Acetosus, which is Latin for the

Achaeta: [a-kee-ta] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and khaítē, which is Ancient Greek for a mane. It refers to structures or organs, which are rather smooth to glabrous when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Calytrix achaeta.

Achasma: [a-kahs-ma] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Chainein/Chasma which is Greek/Latin for a gap, gape or to yawn. It refers to flowers, which have a very large opening at the mouth of the corolla. A good example was Achasma australasica, which is now known as Etlingera australasica.

Achene: [ah-keen] From achaenium, which is Latin for a hard, one seeded, indehiscent nut or nutlet. It refers to fruits, which have a hard shell. Two good examples are the achenes on Ptilotus exaltatus and Cyperus flaccidus.

achenes on Ptilotus exaltatus

Achenecetum: [a-ke-ne-see-tum] From Achaenium, which is Latin for a hard, one seeded, indehiscent nut or nutlet and Cetum which is Latin for an aggregation. It refers to there being many achenes grouped together. A good example is the achenes in the Ranunculus lappaceus.

Achillae: [a-ki-lee] Is named in honour of Achilles who used the plants to assist in the wounds of soldiers at the battle of Troy. It refers to a plant’s flowers, which are similar to the yarrow in appearance and trodden on to make flat. A good example is the exotic yarrow Achillae distans.

Achillaeoides: [a-ki-leeoi-deez] Is named in honour of Achilles who used the plants to assist in the wounds of soldiers at the battle of Troy and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers, which resemble the yarrow in appearance and trodden on to make flat. A good example is Ixodia achillaeoides.

Achilleopsis: [a-ki-lee-o-pis] Is named in honour of Achilles who used the plants to assist in the wounds of soldiers at the battle of Troy and Opsis, which is Latin for to resemble. It refers to flowers, which resemble the yarrow in appearance and trodden on to make flat. A good example was Achilleopsis densiflora, which is now known as Rulingia densiflora.

Achlaena: [a-klee-na] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Chlaena, which is Ancient Greek for a cloak or covering. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a cloak and are glabrous. A good example is Odixia achlaena.

Achlamydeous: [a-kla-mahy-dee-us] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Khlamys, which is Ancient Greek for a cloak. It refers to flowers, which do not have a calyx or perianth. A good example is the old favourite in the cut flower industry the pussy willow or Salix caprea.

Achnatherum: [ak-na-ther-um] From Achne, which is Ancient Greek for chaff and Ather, which is Ancient Greek for a stalk. It refers to stalks on the florets, which are very long. A good example is Amelichloa Caudātus, which is also known as both Achnatherum caudatum, are declared noxious weeds in some states of Australia.

Achnophora: [ak-no-for-u] From Achne, which is Ancient Greek for chaff, and Phoros, which is Ancient Greek forto bear or bearing. It refers to glumes, lemmas and pappus, which all have conspicuous scales. A good example is Achnophora tatei.

Achradifolia: [ak-ra-di-foh-li-a] From Achnos, which is Ancient Greek for to bear chaff and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are chaff like and close to the leaf bases. A good example is Myrsine achradifolia.

Achras: [ak-ras] From Achras, which is Ancient Greek for the Sapodilla tree. It refers to the old name for trees, which have similar characteristics to the old Sapodilla genus. A good example is Achras chartacea, which is now known as Planchonella chartacea.

Achyranthes: [a-kahy-ran-theez] From Achnos, which is Ancient Greek for to bear chaff and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or flower. It refers to the petals on the flowers, which resemble chaff. A good example is Achyranthes aspera.

Acianthella: [a-ki-an-thel-la] From Acus/Acicula, which is Latin for needle or sharp and Ella, which is Greek for a the feminine form. It refers to anthers being needle like. A good example is Acianthella amplexicaulis.

Acianthus: [a-ki -an-thus] From Acus/Acicula, which is Latin for needle or sharp and Anthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to sepals, which taper to needle thickness. A good example is the orchid Acianthus fornicatus.

Acicola: [a-ki-koh-la] From Acus/Acicula, which is Latin for needle or sharp and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to mosses or fungi which prefer to grow on needle like leaves of conifers and at times other evergreen trees and shrubs.

Aciculare: [a-sk-kyoo-lar] From Acius, which is Greek/Latin for a needle or sharp. It refers to leaves, which are similar to those of a pine tree. A good example was Conchium aciculare, which is now known as Hakea sericea.

Acicularis: [a-ki-kyoo-lar-is] From Acus/Acicula, which is Latin for needle or sharp, and Laris which is Latin for a shape. It refers to organ, which are like a needle. A good example is the leaves on Orites acicularis.

Aciculate: [a-ki-kyoo-lahyt] From Acus/Acicula, which is Latin for needle or sharp. It refers to structures or organs, which have needle like appendages. A good example of a grass, which has needle sharp leaves, is Triodia scariosa

Aciculiferum: [ah-ki-kyoo-li-fer-um] From Acus/Acicula, which is Latin for needle or sharp and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which have needle like appendages. A good example of a grass, which has needle sharp leaves, is Oxylobium aciculiferum.

Aciculifera: [ah-ki-kyoo-li-fer-a] From Acus/Acicula, which is Latin for needle or sharp and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which have needle like appendages. A good example of a grass, which has needle sharp leaves, is Callistachys aciculifera, which is now known as Podolobium aciculiferum.

Acida: [ah-si-da] From Acidus, which is Latin for acidity or sour. It refers to the fruits having a sweet and sour taste. A good example is Leptomeria acida.

Acidonia: [ah-si-do-ni-a] From Acidus, which is Latin for acidity or sour. It refers to fruits, which have a sweet and sour taste. A good example is Acidonia microcarpa.

Acidula: [ah-si-dyoo-la] From Acidus which is Latin for acidity or sour. It refers to fruits, which have a sweet and sour taste. A good example is Owenia acidula.

Acies: [ah-si-es] From Acies, which is Latin for to have sharp edges. It refers to structures or organs, which have relatively sharp edges. A good example is Eucalyptus acies.

Acifolia: [ah-si-fo-li-a] From Acies, which is Latin for to have sharp edges and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have needle sharp apexes. A good example is Grevillea acifolia.

Acinacea: [a-si-na-see-a] From Acinacea, which is Latin for to be shaped like a scimitar. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble a scimitar where the upper side of the leaves or phyllodes are larger than the lower side. A good example is Acacia acinacea.

Acinaceum: [a-si-na-see-um] From Acinacea, which is Latin for to be shaped like a scimitar. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble a scimitar where the upper side of the leaves or phyllodes are larger than the lower side. A good example was Racosperma acinaceum, which is now known as Acacia acinacea.

Acinacifolium: [a-si-na-si-foh-li-um] From Acinacea, which is Latin for to be shaped like a scimitar and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble a scimitar where the upper side of the leaves or phyllodes are larger than the lower side. A good example is Conospermum acinacifolium.

Acinaciforme: [a-si-na-si-form] From Acinacea, which is Latin for to be shaped like a scimitar and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble a scimitar where the upper side of the leaves or phyllodes are larger than the lower side. A good example was Saccharum acinaciforme, which is now known as Dimeria acinaciformis.

Acinaciformis: [a-si-na-si-for-mis] From Acinacea, which is Latin for to be shaped like a scimitar and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble a of. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble a scimitar where one side of the leaf or phyllode is larger than the other side. A good example is Dimeria acinaciformis.

Aciphylla: [a-si-fahyl-la] From Acis, which is Ancient Greek for a point, and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaf apex’s having a fine point. A good example is Aciphylla gracialis.

Aciphyllum: [a-ki-ti-fahyl-lum] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for bearing rays and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllodes. It refers to a moss which is found on both sides of the Drake Passage and has the capability to suspend life indefinately. A 16,000 year old core sample of ice taken in Antarctica of the moss were bought up from the greater pressures of ice from above were then subjected to stable temperatures of just above freezing were placed under normal growing conditions saw the plants revive and grow normally. A good example is the moss Chorisodontium aciphyllum.

Ackama: [a-kar-muh] From Ackama, which is Latinised from the vernacular of the Maori name of the Makamaka tree in New Zealand. A good Australian example is Ackama paniculosa.

Aclinis: [a-kli-nus] From A, which is Greek &Latin for without or not having and Klinis, which is Ancient Greek for a bed or couch. It refers to leaves, which lie on top of each other or on the ground. A good example is Senna aclinis.

Aclisia: [a-kli-si-a] From Aclisos, which is Ancient Greek for a place to lie down. It refers to the habit of plants, which are somewhat prostrate. A good example are Aclisia crispata which is now known as Pollia crispata.

Acmella: [ak-mel-la] From Acmellus, which is Latin for a tiny point. It refers to flowers, which form small round domes or points at the apexes. A good example is Acmella grandiflora.

Acmena: [ak-me-na] From Acmenae, which is Ancient Greek for the beautiful nymph of Venus. It refers to the fruits, which are orbicular and whitish. A good example is Acmena smithii.

Acmeniodes: [ak-men-ioi -deez] From Acmenae, which is Ancient Greek for the beautiful nymph of Venus and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which are similar to those of the Acmena genus. A good example is the leaves on Eucalyptus acmeniodes which is incorrectly spelt and still seen in some literature as Eucalyptus acmenoides.

Acmenosperma: [ak-me-no-sper-ma] From Acmenae, which is Ancient Greek for the beautiful nymph of Venus and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It usually refers to fruits, which have great beauty. A good example was Acmenosperma claviflorum, which is now known as Syzygium claviflorum.

Acolytantha: [a-ko-lahy-tan-tha] From Akólouthos, which is Ancient Greek or Acolythus, which is Latinized for a follower or sidekick and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to the stamens, which follow the same line as the corolla tube lobes. A good example is the very rare plant Opercularia acolytantha.

Acoma: [ah-koh-ma] From Acoma, which is Latinized for a Pueblo Indian village in Mexico. The reference is unclear to the author. A good example is Acomis acoma.

Acomis: [a-komis] From Acoma, which is Latinized for a Pueblo Indian village in Mexico. The reference is unclear to the author. A good example is Acomis acoma.

Aconitiflorus: [a-ko-ni-ti-flor-us] From Akónīton, which is Ancient Greek or Aconītum, which is Latin for a leopard’s mane or a Monk’s hood and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which was the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which resemble a Monks cape. A good example is Corybas aconitiflorus.

Acorifolia: [ak-o-ri-foh-li-a] From Acoris, which is Ancient Greek for an aromatic rooted plant named by Theophrastus, and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble some of the plants in the Acoris genus. A good example is Helmholtzia acorifolia.

Acoroides: [ak-o-roi-deez] From Acoris, which is Ancient Greek for an aromatic rooted plant named by Theophrastus and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves, which resemble some of the plants in the Acoris genus. A good example is Enhalus acoroides.

Acrachne: [a-krak-nee] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge, and Achne, which is Ancient Greek for chaff. It refers to the lemma or glumes having a sharp edge nearer the apex. A good example is Acrachne racemosa.

Acradenia: [a-kra-de-ni-a] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end, or on the edge and Adenia, which is Latin for glandular or warty. It refers to edges, which are glandular or warty. A good example is Acradenea euodiiformis.

Acrionastes: [a-kri-on-as-teez] From Acris, which is Latin for locust, and maybe nasty, which is Old English for unpleasant or disagreeable. It refers to legumes, which have a very straight bole. A good example is where it may have a straight trunk as a tree or tangled branches and stems as a shrub. A good example is Acacia acrionastes, which may have a straight trunk as a tree or tangled branches and stems as a shrub.

Acriopsis: [ah-kri-op-sis] From Acris, which is Latin for locust, and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for to resemble. It refers to the shape of a column or a legume tree with a very straight bole. A good example is Acriopsis emarginata.

Acris: [a-kris] From Acrid, which is Latin for sharp or acidic. It usually refers to the taste of the fruits or seeds, which have an acidic flavour. A good example is Poa labillardierei subsp. acris.

Acrobotyra: [a-kro-bo-tahy-ra] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the apex or upper most point, and Bótryose which is Ancient Greek for a bunch of grapes. It refers to fruits, which form like grapes and are produced at the apexes of the stems. A good example is Grevillea acrobotrya.

Acrocaroli: [ah-kroh-si-lee-ei/ahr-tuh] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the extremity or at the apex, and Carol, which is named in honour of Carol. Its reference is unknown. A good example is Gastrolobium acrocaroli.

Acrocarpa: [ah-kroh-kar-pa] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the extremity or at the apex, and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are held at the extremities of the limbs. A good example is Monogramma acrocarpa.

Acrocaulous: [ah-kroh-cor-lus] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek for a branch or stem. It refers to having all the branches near the terminal points.

Acrocidal Capsule: [ah-kro-sahy-dal] From ákros,  which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge of and Capsula, which is Latin for a box. It refers to a capsules, which dehisce through terminal slits or fissures.

Acrociliata: [ah-kro-si-li-a-ta] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the extremity or at the apex, and Ciliata, which is Latin for to have a fringe. It refers to structures or organs, which has a hairy fringe or margin. A good example is Austrostipa acrociliata.

Acrohyalinus: [a-kro-hahy-li-nus] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge of and Hualinos, which is Ancient Greek for glass. It refers to structures or organs, which have an apparent transparency or near-transparency on the margins and or apexes. A good example is the leaves of Angianthus acrohyalinus.

Acroleuca: [ah-kro-loo-ka] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge of and Leukos, which is Ancient Greek for white. It refers to structures or organs, which is stark white in colour. A good example is the trunks and major branches on Eucalyptus acroleuca.

Acrolopha: [ah-kro-loh-fa] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge of and Lophos, which is Ancient Greek for a crest or mane. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a crest. A good example is the way the stamens form a small crest or crown in the center of the petals on Philotheca acrolopha.

Acronychia: [a-kroh-ni-chi-a] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge, and Onyx, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s claw. It refers to petals, which resemble a bird’s claw. A good example is Acronychia litoralis.

Acronychioides: [ah-kroh-ni-chi-oi-deez] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge, Onyx, which is Ancient Greek for a bird’s claw and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Acronychia genus. A good example is the leaves of Acronychia acronchioides.

Acropetal: [a-kro-pe-tal] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge, and Pétalon, which is Latin for a petal. It refers to specialized leaves, which surround the plants sexual organs and assist in attracting pollinators. A good example is Crotalaria brevis.

Acrophilus: [a-kro-fi-lus] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaves, which are near the end of the stems. A good example is Ranunculus acrophilus.

Acrophylla: [a-kro-fahyl-lah] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are clustered along the stems. A good example is the moss Barbula acrophylla.

Acropogon: [a-kro-poh-gon] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge and Pōgōnās, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to organs, which has a beard or hairy fringe. A good example is Grevillea acropogon.

Acroptera: [ah-kro-teer-a] From Aákros, which is Ancient Greek for the extremity or at the apex and Pteron, which is Greek/Latin for feathery or to have a wing. It refers to structures or organs, which has wing. A good example is the seeds on Babbagia acroptera is now known as Osteocarpum acropterum.

Acropterum: [a-kro-ter-um] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge and Pteron, which is Greek/Latin for a wing. It refers seeds, which have a relatively large wing at one end. A good example is Osteocarpum acropterum.

Acroramous: [a-kro-ra-mos] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the highest point or the extreme point and Rāmōsum, which is Latin for a branch or branching. It refers to plants, which only have leaves near the very tips of the branches. A good example is the costular on Polyscias murrayi.

Acroscopic: [a-kro-sco-pik] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge, and Scopic, which is Latin for to see. It refers to an organs part facing the apex. A good example is the costular on Drynaria sparsisora.

Acrostichum: [a-kro-sti-chum] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge, and Stichum, which is Ancient Greek for a row. It refers to sporangia, which are positioned on the apical leaflets in a row near the apex. A good example is Acrostichum speciosum.

Acrothamnus: [a-kro-tham-nus] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge and Thamnos, which is Ancient Greek for a shrub. It refers to shrubs, which are generally found at the highest points in their environments. A good example is the subalpine shrub of Acrothamnus macraei.

Acrotriche: [a-kro-trahy-ke] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge of and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for hair or tuft of hairs. It refers to floral tubes or fruits, which are covered in tufts of hairs at the mouth of the corolla or apex. A good example is Acrotriche serrulata.

Acrotrichion: [a-kro-trahy-chi-on] From ákros, which is Ancient Greek for the end or on the edge, Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for hair or tuft of hairs. It refers to the floral tubes or fruits, which are covered in tufts of hairs at the mouth of the corolla or at the apex. A good example is Hibbertia acrotrichion which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to its real or correct classification.

Acsmithia: [ak-smi-thee-a] Is named in honour of Albert Charles Smith; 1906-1999, who was an outstanding botanist around the Pacific Rim. A good example is Acsmithia davidsonii.

Actensis: [ak-ten-sis] From ACT, which is Latin for the Australian Capital Territory and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the ACT. A good example is Pomaderris betulina subsp. Actensis.

Actephila: [ak-te-fi-la] From Actē, which is Ancient Greek for the sea front and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for a lover or to love. It refers to plants, which prefer habitats near or by the sea. A good example is Actephila grandifolia.

Actinidia: [ak-ti-ni-di-a] From Actinidia, which is Ancient Greek for a ray. It refers to styles, which spread out like beams of light or the spokes of a wheel. A good example is the Chinese Gooseberry (奇异果 qi yi guo), which was marketed as Kiwi Fruit during the cold war against China by New Zealand who saw the opportunity to market the fruits of Actinidia deliciosa in America.

Actinoble: [ak-ti-noh bel] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray and Noble which is Latin for royal. It refers to flowers, which resemble little crowns lying on the ground. A good example is Actinoble ulignosum.

Actinobole: [ak-ti-noh bol] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray and Noble which is Latin for royal. It refers to flowers, which resemble little crowns at the apex of the stems. A good example is Actinobole condensata.

Actinocarpa: [ak-ti-noh-kahr-puh] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray in a spoke of a wheel, and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers fruits, which have five or six spiraling ribs, or spokes radiating out from the main body of the fruit. A good example is Gardenia actinocarpa.

Actinocarpus: [ahk-ti-noh-kar-pus] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray in a spoke of a wheel and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers fruits, which have many spiraling ribs, or spokes radiating out from a central axis or the apexes. A good example is Damasonium minus.

Actinoclada: [ahk-ti-noh-klad-a] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray as in a spoke of a wheel and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a young, shoot. It refers to stems, which are arranged in whorls. A good example is Agrostis actinoclada, which is now known as Sporobolus actinocladus.

Actinodium: [ahk-ti-noh-di-um] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray as in a spoke of a wheel and Obolus, which is Greek/Latin for a small coin. It refers to rays of the flowers, which resemble coins in the center. A good example is the flowers on Actinodium cunninghamii.

Actinodromous: [ak-ti-noh-dro-mus] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray as in a spoke of a wheel and Dromous, which is Greek to form the adjective of the prefix. It refers to veins, which diverge radially from a single point at or above the base of the lamina and run towards the margin without reaching it.

Actinomorphic: [ak-ti-noh-mor-fik] From Actinos,   which is Ancient Greek for a ray as in a spoke of a wheel and Morphic, which is Ancient Greek for to take the shape or form of. It refers to organs, which have the shape of rays radiating out from a central position. A good example is the flowers of Boronia umbellata.

Actinophloeus: [ak-ti-noh-flo-ee-us] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray as in a spoke of a wheel and Phlóos, which is Ancient Greek for, bark. It refers to the layer below the bark, which often has a ray like pattern. A good example was Actinophloeus bleeseri, which is now known as Ptychosperma macarthurii.

Actinophora: [ak-tin-oh-for-ra] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray and Phora/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to leaves or flowers, which radiate out from a central point. A good example is the leaves and flowers on Brassaia actinophora, which is now known as Schefflera actinophylla.

Actinophylla: [ak-tin-oh-fahyl-la] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray, and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves or flowers, which radiate out from a central point. A good example is the leaves and flowers on Schefflera actinophylla.

Actinophyllum: [ak-tin-oh-fahyl-lum] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which radiate out from a central point. A good example is Argyrodéndron actinophyllum subsp. diversifolium.

Actinoscirpus: [ahk-ti-noh-sker-pus] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray and Scirpos, which is Latin for a rush or bulrush. It refers to spiklets, which radiate out from the pedicels. A good example is Actinoscirpus grossus.

Actinostachys: [ak-ti-noh-stah-shus] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek or later Stachys which is Latin  for a spike. It refers to rachis on fronds, which have the fronds radiate out near the apex like a hand. A good example is Actinostachys digitata.

Actinostele: [ahk-ti-noh-steel] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray and Stele, which is Ancient Greek for stand or to make a stand. It refers to the configuration of the central tissues in stems and roots in having a xylem core in the form of radiating ribs, as viewed in transverse sections.

Actinostrobus: [ak-ti-noh-stroh-bus] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for a ray and strobus, is a fruiting cone. It refers to the arrangement of scales on cones, which radiate outwards when ripe and the seeds are discharged. A good example is Actinostrobus pyramidalis.

Actinotis: [ak-ti-noh-tis] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for bearing rays. It refers to the rays on a flower, which are very prominent. A good example is the ligules or ray petals on Actinotis helianthi.

Actinotis Helianthi.

Actites: [ak-ti-teez] From Actinos, which is Ancient Greek for bearing rays. It refers to the rays on a flower, which are very prominent. A good example is the ligules or ray petals on Actites megalocarpus.

Actuliatis: [ak-tyoo-li-a-tis] From Acūleātum, which is Latin for prickly or barbed. It refers to the stiff hardened usually hirsute type hairs.

Acuaria: [a-kyoo-a-ri-a] From Acūleātum, which is Latin for prickly or barbed. It refers to leaves, which have needle sharp apexes. A good example is Grevillea acuaria.

Aculeata: [ah-kyoo-lee-ei-ta] From Acūleāta, which is Latin for prickly or barbed. It refers to leaves, which have short, sharp points. A good example is Templetonia aculeata.

Aculeate: [ah-kyoo-li-ahyt] From Acūleātum, which is Latin for prickly or barbed. It refers to leaves, which have short, sharp points. A good example is Cassinia aculeata.

Aculeatissima: [a-kyoo-lis-si-ma] From Acūleātum, which is Latin for prickly or barbed, and Simma, which is Latin for the most. It refers to leaves, which are very prickly. A good example is Acacia aculeatissima.

Aculeatissima: [a-kyoo-lee-a-tis-si-ma] From Aculeatus, which is Latin for a sharp point, and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative of or the most. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have the most pungent needle like apexes. A good example is Acacia aculeatissima.

Aculeatissimum: [ah-kyoo-li-a-tis-si-mum] From Acūleātum, which is Latin for prickly or barbed and Simma, which is Latin for the superlative or most. It refers to leaves, which are the prickliest in the genus. A good example is Racosperma aculeatissimum, which is now known as Acacia aculeatissima.

Aculeatum: [ah-kyoo-li-a-tum] From Acūleātum, which is Latin for prickly or barbed. It refers to leaves or other organs, which have short, sharp points. A good example is Leptosema aculeatum.

Aculei: [ah-kyoo-lee-ahy] From Aculeus, which is Latin for a short needle. It refers to organs, which are stiff and hard. A good example is the hairs on our little echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus.

Aculeiformis: [ah-kyoo-lahy-for-mis] From Aculeus, which is Latin for a short needle, and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to organs, which are stiff and hard. A good example is our little echidna Acacia aculeiformis.

Aculeolata: [a-kyoo-li-a-ta] From Aculeatus, which is Latin for a sharp point. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have a needle like apex. A good example is Grevillea aculeolata, which is now known as Grevillea acuaria.

Acuminata: [a-kyoo-mi-na-ta] From Acūmināta, which is Latin for being contracted or concave on the sides before protracting to a sharp point. It refers to apexes on the leaves or phyllodes, which have short sharp points. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia acuminata.

Acuminatissima: [a-kyoo-mi-na-tis-si-ma] From Acūminātum, which is Latin for being contracted or concave on the sides before protracting to a sharp point and Isimma, which is Latin for the superlative or the most. It refers to apexes on the leaves or phyllodes, which have short sharp points. A good example is Rhynchosia acuminatissima.

Acuminatum: [a-kyoo-mi-na-tum] From Acūminātum, which is Latin for being contracted or concave on the sides before protracting to a short, sharp point. It refers to apexes on the leaves or phyllodes, which have short sharp points. A good example is Myoporum acuminatum.

Acuminatus: [a-kyoo-mi-na-tus] From Acūminātus, which is Latin for being contracted or concave on the sides before protracting to a sharp point. It refers to apexes on the leaves or phyllodes, which have short sharp points. A good example is the leaves on Melaleuca acuminatus.

Acuminigera: [a-kyoo-mi-ni-jer-a] From Acūminātum, which is Latin for being contracted or concave on the sides before protracting to a sharp point. It refers to apexes on the leaves or phyllodes, which have short sharp points. A good example is the leaves on Chionanthus acuminigera, which is now known as Chionanthus axillaris.

Acuta: [ah-kyoo-tuh] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened, or to sharpen. It refers to apexes on leaves, phyllodes, calyxes or sepals, which taper to a definite point. A good example is found on Micromyrtus acuta.

Acutangula: [a-kyoo-tan-gyoo-la] From Acūtum which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Angula which is Latin for an angle. It refers to apexes on leaves, phyllodes, calyxes or sepals, which taper to a definite point. A good example is the fruits on Barringtonia acutangula.

Acutangulum: [ah-kyoo-tan-gyoo-lum] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Angula which is Latin for an angle. It refers to apexes on leaves, phyllodes, calyxes or sepals,which taper to a definite point. A good example is the leaves on Dysoxylum acutangulum.

Acutangulus: [a-kyoo-tan-gyoo-lus] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Angula, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to apexes on leaves, phyllodes, calyxes or sepals,which taper to a definite point. A good example is the leaves on Corchorus acutangulus.

Acutata: [ah-kyoo-ta-ta] From Acutata, which is Latin for sharpened, or to sharpen. It refers to apexes on leaves, phyllodes, calyxes or sepals, which taper to a definite point. A good example is the phyllodes Acacia acutata.

Acutatum: [ah-kyoo-tei-tuh m] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen. It refers to apexes on leaves, phyllodes, calyxes or sepals, which taper to a definite point. A good example is the leaves on Racosperma acutatum, which is now known as Acacia acutata.

Acute: [ah-kyoot] From Acutatum which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen. It refers to apexes on leaves, phyllodes, calyxes or sepals, which taper to a definite point. A good example is Astroloma humifusum.

Acutibracteum: [ah-kyoo-ti-brak-tee-um] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Bractea which is Latin for a leaf like structure or organ. It refers to leaf like organs, which are behind a calyx that has an acute apex. A good example is the bracts on Atriplex acutibractum, which is now known as Atriplex acutibractea subsp. acutibractea.

Acuticarinata: [ah-kyoo-ti-ka-ri-na-ta] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Carīnātus, which is Latin for a ships keel. It refers to flowers, especially legume flowers, which have a very prominent keel. A good example is the keel on Swainsona acuticarinata, which is much more prominent than other species in the genus.

Acutifidis: [ah-kyoo-ti-fi-dis] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Fidus, which is Latin for to cut. It refers to leaves, which are very sharp. A good example is Elaeocarpus acutifidus.

Acutiflora: [ah-kyoo-ti-flor-a] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to petals, which taper gradually to their base and/or the lobes tapering gradually to their apexes. A good example is Plagiochloa acutiflora, which is now known as Tribolium acutiflorum.

Acutiflorus: [a-kyoo-ti-flor-us] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to petals, which taper gradually to their base and/or the lobes tapering gradually to their apexes. A good example is Melodinus acutiflorus.

Acutifolia: [a-kyoo-ti-foh-li-a] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which evenly, taper or gradually taper towards their apex. A good example is Luzula acutifolia.

Acutifolium: [ah-kyoo-ti-foh-li-um] From Acutatum which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which taper gradually to a point. A good example is Leptospermum acutifolium, which is now known as Leptospermum polygalifolium subsp. polygalifolium

Acutifolius: [a-kyoo-ti-foh-l-us] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which taper gradually to a point or blunt point. A good example is Cajanus acutifolius.

Acutigluma: [a-kyoo-ti-gloo-ma] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Glūma, which is Latin for chaff. It refers to the outer and usually the longest chaff, which taper gradually towards their apexes. A good example is Hymenachne acutigluma, which is now known as Hymenachne amplexicaulis.

Acutilobum: [a-kyoo-ti-loh-bum] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek or Lobus which is Latin for a round appendage on an organ. It refers to appendages, which resemble ear lobes that taper gradually towards their apexes. A good example is the red seaweed Cheilosporum acutilobum.

Acutispiculae: [a-kyoo-ti-spi-kyoo-lahy] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Spīculum, which is Latin for a spīculum spearhead, arrowhead or bee stinger. It refers to grass seeds, which resembles a potent arrowhead or spear. A good example is Triodia acutispiculae.

Acutiuscula: [a-kyoo-ti-u-sku-la] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Skula, which is Hebrew/Greek and later Saetra/Caetra, which is Latin for a small round shield also known as a buckler held in the hand. It refers to leaves, which resembles a buckler that gradually tapers to a point. A good example is Austromyrtus acutiuscula.

Acutiusculum: [a-kyoo-ti-u-skuh-lum] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Skula, which is Hebrew/Ancient Greek and later Saetra/Caetra, which are Latin for a small round shield held in the hand. It refers to nodes on some grasses, which resembles a buckler. A good example is Dichanthium acutiusculum.

A Hebrew or Greek hand held buckler known as an acutiusculum

Acutivalvis: [a-kyoo-ti-va-vis] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen and Valvae, which is Latin for a door leaf. It refers to the valves on the seed cones, which gradually taper to a long point. A good example is Allocasuarina acutivalvis.

Acutum: [a-kyoo-tum] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen. It refers to apexes on leaves, phyllodes, calyxes or sepals, which taper to a definite point. A good example is Gastrolobium acutum.

Acutus: [a-kyoo-tus] From Acutatum, which is Latin for sharpened or to sharpen. It refers to apexes on leaves, phyllodes, calyxes or sepals, which are taper to a definite point. A good example is Corybas acutus.

Adae: [a-dahy] Is named in honour of Adae. A good example is Dendrobium adae.

Adamii: [ad-am-see-ahy] Is named in honour of Diasperus adamius. It was originally described by Ferdinand Von Mueller as Synostemon glaucus and was found in the dry plains and hills of Arnhem’s Land, close to the Mac Adam Range, Point Pearce and Providence Hill.” A good example was Diasperus adamii, which is now known as Sauropus glaucus.

Adamsiana: [ad-am-si-a-na] Was named in honour of Mary Annie Adams,, 1874-1931) a native born Western Australian who collected specimens for Mueller including the type specimen. A good example is Boronia adamsiana.

Adamsii: [ad-am-see-ahy] Named in honour of Laurence George Adams, 1929-2014, who was an Australian botanist and a self-taught authority in botanical Latin in which his collegues respected and turned to on Latin. A good example is Micraira adamsii.

Adansonia: [ah-dan-so-nee-a] Is named in honour of Michel Adanson; 1727-1806, who was a French naturalist who discovered the tree in African. A good example from Australia is Adansonia gregorii.

Adaxial: [ah-dak-s-al] From Adaxial, which is Latin for a surface facing towards the main axis of the structure to which it is attached or the upper surface. (Antonym abaxial)

Adelae: [ah-de-lee] From Adele, which is Latinized from the German for noble. It refers to plants, which have a more regal or noble appearance compared to other species in the genus. A good example Drosera adelae

Adeliopsis: [ah-de-li-op-sis] From Adele, which is Germanic for noble and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants which have a regal or noble appearance. A good example was Adeliopsis decumbens, which is now known as Hypserpa decumbens.

Adelonenga: [a-del-o-nen-ga] From Adelo, which is Ancient Greek for unknown, a secret or hidden, and Arenga, which is Latinized from the Malaysian vernacular for the palms, found there. It refers to palms, which are hidden deep in the rainforests. A good example was Adelonenga kasesa, which is now known as Hydriastele kasesa.

Adelopetalum: [a-de-lo-pe-ta-lum] From Adelo, which is Ancient Greek for unknown, a secret or hidden and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to orchid petals, which are indistinguishable until one looks closely. A good example is Adelopetalum boonjee.

Adenantha: [a-de-nan-thum] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to prominent nectaries, which are at the base of the anthers within the flower. A good example is Persoonia adenantha.

Adenanthera: [a-de-nan-ther-a] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland, and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to prominent nectaries, which are at the base of the anthers within the flower. A good example is Adenanthera pavonina.

Adenantheroides: [a-de-nan-ther-oi-deez] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland, ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for a like or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Adenanthera genus, which has prominent nectaries at the base of the anthers within the flower. A good example is Isopogon adenanthoides.

Adenanthoides: [a-de-nanth-oi-deez] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland, ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for a like or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Adenanthera genus, which has prominent nectaries at the base of the anthers within the flower. A good example is Isopogon adenanthoides.

Adenanthos: [a-den-nan-thos] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland, and ántha/ánthos, which are  Greek the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to prominent nectaries, which are at the base of the anthers within the flower. A good example is Adenanthos acanthophyllus.

Adenia: [a-de-ni-a] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a gland/s. A good example is Adenia heterophylla.

Adenocalyx: [a-de-no-ka-liks] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland, and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for a veil or cover. It refers to the specialized leaves, which surround the bud and protect the developing sexual organs and ovaries. It refers to calyxes, which are rather prominent. A good example was Verticordia adenocalyx, which is now known as Verticordia helmsii.

Adenochilus: [a-de-noh-chi-lus] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a for a lip. It refers to the centre of the labellum, which have distinct glands. A good example is Adenochilus nortoni.

Adenodonta: [a-de-no-don-ta] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland and Odonta, which is Ancient Greek for a for a tooth. It refers to very prominent glands, which protrude like small teeth. A good example is found on the leaves of Zieria adenodonta.

Adenogonia: [a-de-no-go-ni-a] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland, and Pōgōníās, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in (usually quite sticky) glandular tipped hairs. A good example is Acacia adenogonia.

Adenogonia: [a-de-no-goh-nee-uh] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland and Pōgōníās which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in (usually quite sticky) glandular tipped hairs. A good example was Racosperma adenogonium, which is now known as Acacia adenogonia.

Adenogyna: [a-de-no-jahy-na] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland, and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to ovaries, which are usually glandular or at times are sticky. A good example is Keraudrenia adenogyna.

Adenogyrus: [a-de-no-jahy-rus] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland and Gyro/Gyrus, which is Ancient Greek for to be twisted around. It refers to glands, which have a twisted appearance. A good example was Adenogyrus braunii which is now known as Scolopia braunii.

Adenolasia: [a-de-no-lah-si-a] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland, and Lasios, which is Ancient Greek for unkempt, shaggy hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in unkempt shaggy hairs. A good example is Keraudrenia adenolasia.

Adenondota: [a-de-no-doh-ta] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland, and Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for a tooth. It refers to leaves or calyxes, which have teeth. A good example is Zieria adenodonta.

Adenopetala: [a-de-no-pe-ta-la] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland, and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to the petals having a gland at the base. A good example is Gillbeea adenopetala.

Adenophora: [a-de-no-for-a] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland, and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which have glands. A good example is the leaves of Zieria adenophora, which are covered in glands.

Adenophorum: [a-de-no-for-um] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to a structure or organ, which has glands. A good example is the leaves of Coronidium adenophorum.

Adenosperma: [a-de-no-sper-ma] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland, and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to glands, which somewhat resemble the appearance of a seed. A good example is Ficus adneodperma.

Adenostemma: [a-de-no-stem-ma] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland and Stephos, which is Ancient Greek for a garland or Stephein, which is Ancient Greek for a crown. It refers to late flowering stages and fruits, which are held erect and appear like a crown or wreath. A good example is Adenostemma macrophylum.

Adenostephanus: [a-de-no-ste-fah-nus] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland and Stephos, which is Ancient Greek for a garland or Stephein, which is Ancient Greek for a crown. It refers to late flowering stage, and fruits, which are held erect and appearing like a crown or wreath. A good example was Adenostephanus bleasdalei, which is now known as Gevuina bleasdalei.

Adenostyla: [a-de-no-stahy-la] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek for a gland, and Stylos, which is Ancient Greek for a post, pillar or column. It refers to female reproductive organs on flowers, which are between the carpel and the stigma. A good example Melaleuca adenostyla.

Adenotrichum: [a-den-trahy-kum] From Aden, which is Ancient Greek/Latin for glands or a gland and Trichos, which is Ancient Greek for to have hair. It refers to flowers, which form a ring around the stems and are hairy within the corolla tube. A good example is Lasiopetalum adenotrichum.

Adenthena: [a-den-thee-na] From Aden, which is a Greek/Latin prefix pertaining to the presence of glands or a gland and Anthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to the basifixed anthers, which have a gland at their apex.

Adesmiifolia: [a-de-smi-foh-li-a] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Desmos, which is Ancient Greek for a band, bracelet, chain or bundle, and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaflets, which are attached to what appears to be bands around the stems. A good example is Indigofera adesmiifolia.

Adhaerens: [ad-hay-renz] From Adhaereō, which is Latin for to cleave or to stick to. It refers to spores, which adhere to the inside of the pileus breaking down slowly as the pileus splits with a small hole at the apex to release the spores intermittently. A good example is Tulostoma adhaerens.

Adherent: [ad-heer-ent] From Adhaereō, which is Latin for to adhere to. It refers to descriptions of unlike parts or organs, which appear to being joined together.

Adhering: [ad-heer-ing] From Adhaereō, which is Latin for to adhere to. It refers to descriptions of unlike parts or organs, which appear to being joined together. A good example is the filaments of Oxalis radicosa.

Adiantifolia: [a-di-an-ti-foh-li-a] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having, Diantos, which is Ancient Greek for to moisten or moistened and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which resemble those of the Adiantum genus, in that they have the ability to repel water. A good example is the fronds of Petrophile adiantifolia, which is now known as Petrophile diversifolia

Adiantiformis: [a-di-an-ti-for-mis] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having, Diantos, which is Ancient Greek for to moisten or moistened and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to fronds, which resemble those of the Adiantum genus, in that they have the ability to repel water. A good example is the fronds of Rumohra adiantiformis.

Adiantoides: [ah-di-an-toi-deez] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having, Diantos, which is Ancient Greek for to moisten or moistened and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to fronds, which resemble those of the Adiantum genus, in that they have the ability to repel water. A good example is the fronds of Asplenium adiantoides.

Adiantum: [a-di-an-tum] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Diantos, which is Ancient Greek for to moisten or moistened. It refers to the structures or organs, which have the ability to repel water. A good example is the fronds on Adiantum capillaries.

Adinophylla: [a-di-no-fahy-la] From Adinos, which is Ancient Greek for crowded, and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which have an abundance of leaves, phyllodes or fronds. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia adinophylla.

Adinophyllum: [a-di-no-fahy-lum] From Adinos, which is Ancient Greek for crowded and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which have an abundance of leaves, phyllodes or fronds. A good example is the phyllodes on A good example was the fronds of Racosperma adinophyllum, which is now known as Acacia adinophylla.

Adjacens: [ad-ja-senz] From Adjacentia, which is Latin for to be next to, close to or adjacent to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble some other species in the genus. A good example is Persoonia adjacens, which is now known as Persoonia juniperina.

Adjuncta: [ad-junk-ta] From Adjuncta, which is Latin for to be added to another but not essentially the other. It refers to a plant which is closely related to another species in the same genus. A good example was Eucalyptus adjuncta, which is now considered to be a hybrid of Eucalyptus longifolia.

Admirabilis: [ad-mahy-ra-bi-lis] From Admirabilis, which is Latin for admirable or noteworthy. It refers to the overall beauty of the plant. A good example is Drosera admirabilis.

Admixta: [ad-miks-ta] From Mixta, which is Latin for a mixture. It refers to plants, which have a mixture of properties of other species in the genus. A good example is Dianella admixta.

Adnata: [ad-nei-ta] From Agnātus/Adnātus, which are Latin for replacing or being congenitally attached to. It refers to organs, which are partially or wholly attached to a dissimilar part. A good example is Acacia adnata.

Adnate: [ad– naet] From Agnātus/Adnātus, which are Latin for replacing or being congenitally attached. It refers to organs, which are partially or wholly attached to a dissimilar part. A good example is the anthers on Hibiscus tiliaceus.

Adnatum: [ahd-nei-tum] From Agnātus/Adnātus, which is Latin for replacing or being congenitally attached. It refers to organs, which are partially or wholly attached to a dissimilar part. A good example is Helichrysum adnatum, which is now known as Ozothamnus adnatus.

Adnatus: [ad-nei-tus] From Agnātus/Adnātus, which is Latin for replacing or being congenitally attached. It refers to organs, which are partially or wholly attached to a dissimilar part. A good example is Ozothamnus adnatus.

Adonidiforme: [a-do-ni-di-form] From Ádōnis, which is Ancient Greek for the god and goddess of plants or latter a handsome man and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which have flowers that are very bold and beautiful. A good example was Helichrysum adonidiforme, which is now known as Chrysocephalum semipapposum.

Adonis: [a-do-nis] From Ádōnis, which is Ancient Greek for the god and goddess of plants or latter a handsome man. It usually refers to flowers, which are hugging the stems or a flowers are very bold and beautiful. A good example is the exotic garden and horticultural flower Adonis microcarpa.

Adoxa: [a-dok-sa] From A, which is Ancient Greek/Latin for without or not having and Dóxa, which is Ancient Greek for glorious or glory. It refers to plants, which are less glorious in flower than other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia adoxa.

Adoxum: [a-dok-sum] From A, which is Ancient Greek/Latin for without or not having and Dóxa, which is Ancient Greek for glorious or glory. It refers to plants, which are less glorious in flower than other species in the genus. A good example was Solanum adoxum.

Adpressa: [ad-pres-sa] From Adpressa, which is Greek/Latin for sitting or fitting close to. It usually refers to leaves or hairs, which hug the stems or leaves or a plants habit of hugging the ground. A good example is Muehlenbeckia adpressa.

Adpressum: [ad-pres-sum] From Adpressa, which is Greek/Latin for sitting or fitting close to. It usually refers to leaves or hairs, which hug the stems or leaves or a plants habit of hugging the ground. A good example is the leaves on Stylidium adpressum.

Adpressus: [ad-pres-sus] From Adpressa, which is Greek/Latin for sitting or fitting close to. It usually refers to leaves or hairs, which hug the stems or leaves or a plants habit of hugging the ground. A good example is the leaves on Melichrus adpressus.

Adrastaea: [a-dra-stee-a] From Adrastaea, which is Ancient Greek for inescapable. It refers to the goddess nymph; Adrastaea, who was charged by Rhea with nurturing the infant Zeus in secret in the Dictaean cave, to protect him from his father Cronus, subsequently she stands for the righteousness and saviour of the individual. A good example was Adrastaea salicifolia, which is now known as Hibbertia salicifolia.

Adriana: [ad-ri-a-na] Is named in honour of Adrien de Jussie; 1797-1853, who was a French botanist. A good example is Adriana quadripartita.

Adscendens: [ad-sen-denz] From Ascend, which is Greek/Latin for to rise obliquely rather than vertical or being off the horizontal. It refers to growth habits of plants, which are not vertical or horizontal. A good example is Rostellularia adscendens var. adscendens.

Adsurgens: [ad-ser-jenz] From Adsurgēns/Adsurgentēs, which is Latin for to eventually become erect. It refers to the growth habit of the plants, which are somewhat straggly in the early stages before becoming erect. A good example is Acacia adsurgens.

Adult 1: [a-dult] From Adultus, which is Latin for mature or fully grown. It refers to plants. which are fully mature and able to reproduce.

Adult 2: [a-dult] From Adultus, which is Latin for mature or fully grown. It refers to the final growth stage of leaves opposed to juvenile leaves or coppice leaves.

Aduncum: [a-dun-kum] From Aduncus, which is Latin for hooked. It refers to the apex of a leave, phyllodes, sepals or petals, which have a distinct hooked. A good example is the phyllodes on Leucobryum aduncum var. aduncum.

Aduncus: [a-dun-kus] From Aduncus, which is Latin for hooked. It refers to apex of leaves, sepals or petals which are hooked.

Advena: [ad-vee-na] From Advena, which is Latin for a stranger, foreigner or alien. It refers to the grasses, which only have one species in Australia thus it is a stranger or alien here. A good example is Thellungia advena.

Adventitious: [ad-ven-ti-sh-us] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Venticius, which is Latin for coming. It refers to new shoots or roots, which sprout, grow or come from unusual places, such as roots originating from a stem, or buds appearing about wounds. A good example is Ficus watkinsonia.

Adventive plant: [ad-ven-teev, plahnt] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Venticius, which is Latin for coming. It refers to plants, which have been introduced to a new geographical region. A good example is Cyathea cooper, which has been introduced to south western, Western Australia.

Adversus: [ad-ver-sus] From Adversus, which is Latin for hostile. It usually refers to environment, which are hostile or inhospitable to the majority of plants for good growth. A good example is Carpobrotus glaucescens, which grows in the hostile weather conditions on the frontal dunes.

Aedeagi: [ee-dee-ji] Aidoîa, which is Ancient Greek for privy parts, pudenda (genetials or to feel shame) and Agós, which is Ancient Greek for a leader for ágō, which is Ancient Greek for I lead. It refers to the phallus section or the reproductive organs of male arthropods through which they secrete sperm from the testes during copulation with a female insect. Very loosely, it can be thought of as the insect equivalent of a mammal’s penis, though the matter is actually quite more complex and is of interest to gardens as mites can increase in population very rapidly despite few males being in the populations. A good example is Tetranychus urticae or Balaustium medicagoense.

Aedeagus: [ee-dee-gus] Aidoîa, which is Ancient Greek for privy parts, pudenda (genetials or to feel shame) and Agós, which is Ancient Greek for a leader for ágō, which is Ancient Greek for I lead. It refers to the phallus section or the reproductive organs of male arthropods through which they secrete sperm from the testes during copulation with a female insect. Very loosely, it can be thought of as the insect equivalent of a mammal’s penis, though the matter is actually quite more complex and is of interest to gardens as mites can increase in population very rapidly despite few males being in the populations. A good example is the South African grass mite Balaustium medicagoense which is causing much damage to the grain industry.

Aegeridantennatus: [ee-jer-i-dahn-ten-nei-tuh s] From Aegerum which is Ancient Greek for I lead, Dāns which is latin for giving or offering and Gnātos which is Ancient Greek for to produce or give birth to. It refers to species, which are very difficult not to include it in another closely related genus. A good example is Acianthus aegeridantennatus.

Aegialitis: [ee-ji-a-li-tis] From Aigaios, which is Ancient Greek or Aegaeus, which is Latin for the sea, and Islands (Between the Greek and Italian coastlines). It refers to the habitats of plants, which prefer coastlines and small Islands. A good example is Aegialitis annulata.

Aegiceras: [ee-ji-ser-as] From Aigaios, which is Ancient Greek or Aegaeus, which is Latin for the sea and Islands (Between the Greek and Italian coast lines) and Keros, which is Ancient Greek for a horn. It refers to plants, which prefer environments along the coastlines, small Islands and saline estuaries that have a long narrow horn like appendage on the fruits. A good example is Aegiceras corniculatum.

Aegilops: [ee-ji-lops] From Aigaios, which is Ancient Greek or Aegaeus which is Latin for the sea and Islands (Between the Greek and Italian coast lines). It refers to plants, which prefer environments along the coastlines, small Islands and saline estuaries. A good example was Aegilops muricata, which is now known as Eremochloa muricata.

Aegyptiaca: [ee-jip-ti-a ka] From Aegyptiakos, which is Ancient Greek or Aegytiacus, which is Latinised for Eygyptian. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in Egypt. A good example is vegetable sponge Luffa aegyptiaca.

Aegyptium: [ee-jip-ti-um] From Aegyptiakos, which is Ancient Greek or Aegytiacus which is Latinised for Egyptian. It refers to the plants, which were first discovered in Egypt. A good example is Dactyloctenium aegyptium.

Aellenii: [eel-le-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Paul Aellen; 1896-1973, who was a Swiss teacher and botanist who dedicated his life to the Chenopodiaceae and Amaranthaceae and the flora of western Asia, especially the Flora of Iranica. A good was Sclerolaena aellenii, which is now known as Sclerolaena alata.

Aemula: [ee-myoo-la] From Aemulus, which is Latin for emulative or to compete with. It refers to plants, which resemble another species or genus. A good is Banksia aemula, which resembles Banksia serratifolia.

Aemulum: [ee-myoo-lum] From Aemulus which is Latin for emulative or to compete with. It refers to plants, which appear similar to another species or genus. A good example is Dendrobium aemulum which resembles Dendrobium odontochilum from New Caledonia.

Aemulus: [ee-myoo-lus] From Aemulus, which is Latin for emulative or to compete with. It refers to the plants appearance being similar to another species or genus. A good example is Oplismenus aemulus which superficially resembles Commelina cyanea.

Aenea: [ee-nee-a] From Aenea, which is Latin for bronze. It refers to old barks, which have bright bronze colours. A good example is Eucalyptus aenea.

Aeneifolia: [ee-nee-foh-li-a] From Aenea, which is Latin for bronze, and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which have a bronzy colour. A good example was Alsophila aeneifolia, which is now known as Cyathea aeneifolia.

Aenictophyton: [ee-nik-to-fahy-ton] From Aenea, which is Latin for bronze, and Phyton, which is Ancient Greek for a plant. It refers to plants which have bright bronze coloured stems with bronze sheens on the foliage. A good example is Aenictophyton reconditum.

Aenigma: [ee-nig-ma] From Aínigma/Ainik, which are Greek or later Aenigma, which is Latin for to have a puzzling or contradictory character. It refers to plants, which set very few if any mature fruits, which has always been a puzzle leading to how the species repopulated an area or reproduced itself. A good example is Hakea aenigma.

Aeolian: [ee-o-li-an] From Aioleîs, which is Ancient Greek for caused by the wind, windblown, derived from the Greek god of the four winds. It often refers to soils that mainly consist of quartz crystals from fine to course with limestone, which have been deposited by the wind. A good example is the soils found around Geraldton in which Eucalyptus pyriformis prefer.

Aeolioides: [ee-o-lee-ahn/uh n] From Aioleîs, which is Ancient Greek for caused by the wind, windblown, derived from the Greek god of the four winds and Eidḗs, which is Ancient Greek or later Oides, which is Latin for alike or similar to. It often refers to soils that mainly consist of quartz and have been deposited by the wind. A good example of a plant, which grows in such soils is Stylidium aeonioides.

Aephynsa: [ee-fahyn-sa] Maybe from Aioleîs, which is Ancient Greek for caused by the wind, windblown derived from the Greek god of the four winds and Phynsa, which is unknown. It may refer to the soils, which mainly consist of quartz crystals from fine to gravelly pebbles with ironstone, which have been deposited by the wind. A good example is Synaphea aephynsa.

Aequalis: [ee-kwo-lis] From Aequalis, which is Latin for equal to. It refers to flowers, which are equal to any other flower in the genus or family around in beauty. A good example is Sarcochilus aequalis.

Aequata: [ee-kwo-lis] From Aequātus/Aequāre, which is Latin for to make equal. It refers to structures or organs, which are equal in all respects. A good example is the two glumes, two lemmas and two palea, which are all equal in every respect on Lachnagrostis aequata.

Aequinoctialis 1: [ah-kwi-nok-ti-a-lis] From Aequinoctiāle, which is Latin for pertaining to an equinox. It refers to plants, which are most prevalent in areas close to the tropic of Capricorn where day and night time hours are more even. A good example is Lemna aequinoctialis.

Aequinoctialis 2: [ah-kwi-nok-ti-a-lis] From Aequinoctiāle, which is Latin for pertaining to an equinox. It refers to plants, which are most floriferous around the equinox when day and night time hours are more even as in an equinox. A good example is the spring and autumn flowering of Melaleuca viminalis that coincides with the migration of the scarlet honeyeater (Myzomela sanguinolenta) from northern Australia to southern Australia in spring and back again in Autumn along the east coast.

Aequioperta: [ee-kwi-o-per-ta] From Aequalis, which is Latin for equal to and Aperta, which is Latin for open. It refers to the flowers, which are equal in size throughout the species. A good example is Eucalyptus aequioperta.

Aequisegmentosa: [ei-kwi-seg-men-toh-sa] From Equatus, which is Latin for equal to or to be even, and Segmentum which is Latin for to cut. It refers to leaves, which have been cut into equal segments. A good example is the leaves on Bacularia aequisegmentosa, which is now known as Linospadix palmerianus.

Aequisepala: [ei-kwi-se-pa-la] From Equatus, which is Latin for equal to or to be even and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or later Sepalum, which is Latin for specialized leaves which surround the immature bud which are free – sepals. It refers to sepals, which are exactly the same size and shape or equivelant size with the petals as the petals. A good example is the sepals being the same size on Ipomoea aequisepala, which is now known as Operculina aequisepala.

Aerating knee: [air-rei-ting, nee] From Aerios, which is Ancient Greek or Aerius, which is Latin for an air movement and Knie, which is Latinised from the Dutch/German or Kne which is Nordic for a joint. It refers to having vertical or horizontal above ground roots. A good example is Rhizophora stylosa.

Aereiflora: [air-rei-flor-a] From Aerios, which is Ancient Greek or Aerius, which is Latin for an air movement and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are held well above the foliage. A good example is Verticordia aereiflora.

Aerial Epigenous: [air-ree-al, e-pi-jee-nus] From Aerios, which is Ancient Greek or Aerius, which is Latin for an air movement, Epi, which is Ancient Greek for on or upon and Genous, which is Ancient Greek for yielding or generating. It refers to stems or roots, which are produced from an above ground structure as either a root or a horizontal shoot. A good example is Dendrobium speciosum.

Aerial: [air-ree-ahl] From Aerios, which is Ancient Greek or Aerius, which is Latin for an air movement. It refers to structures or organs, which develop above the ground. A good example is the roots, stems and leaves of Ficus macrophylla.

Aerial roots: [air-ree-ahl, roots] From Aerios, which is Ancient Greek or Aerius, which is Latin for an air movement, Rrhyza which is Ancient Greek or Radix, which is Latin for a root. It refers to roots, which start on branches or the trunks of trees and hang down. They are common on some rain forest trees. A good example is Ficus watkinsianna.

Aerocaulous: [ee-ro-kor-lus] From Aerios, which is Ancient Greek or Aerius, which is Latin for an air movement and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek for a twig, stem or small branch. It refers to plants, that have aerial stems.

Aerochila: [ee-roh-chi-la] From Aero, which is Ancient Greek for aerial, and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to labellum, which appear to stick out into the air. A good example was Calonema aerochila, which is now known as Caladenia versicolor.

Aerochilum: [ee-roh-chi-lum] From Aero which is Ancient Greek for aerial and Cheilos which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to labellum, which appear to stick out into the air. A good example was Calonema aerochilum, which is now known as Caladenia versicolor.

Aerophylla: [ee-roh-fi-la] From Aero, which is Ancient Greek for aerial and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to a group of insects in the Phasmatodea order, which are commonly known as stick insects. A good example is the Australian giant insect Acrophylla titan.

Aeruginosa: [air-roo-ji-noh-sa] From Aerūginōsus, which is Latin for to be covered in coppery or rusty-red rust. It refers to leaves or at times other organs, which appear or are covered in a rust fungus. A good example is Pimelea aeruginosa.

Aeruginosa: [ee-ru-ji-noh-sa] From Aerūginōsus, which is Latin for to be covered in coppery or rusty-red rust. It refers to leaves or at times other organs, which appear or are covered in a rusty hairs or powder. A good example is the fungus Calostoma aeruginosum or the mossBryum aeruginosum, which is now known asRosulabryum billarderii.

Aeruginosus: [ee-ru-ji-noh-sus] From Aerūginōsus, which is Latin for to be covered in coppery or rusty-red rust. It refers to leaves or at times other organs, which appear or are covered in a rusty hairs or powder. A good example is the fungus Mitremyces aeruginosus, which is now known as Calostoma fuscumi.

Aerva: [ee-ar-va] From Aerva, which is Latinized from the Arabic name for the plant. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Arabic regions of South west Asia. A good example is Aerva lanata.

Aervoides: [eer-voi-deez] From Aerva, which is Latinized from the Arabic name for the plant, and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Mediterranean Aeva genus. A good example is Leucophyta aervoides, which is now known as Calocephalus aervoides.

Aeschynomene: [ee-skahy-noh-me-ne] From Aeschyn, which is Ancient Greek for ugly, to cause shame to or to be modest, and Mene, which is Ancient Greek for to set in concrete. It refers to the fact that the leaves close up in shame of hiding their ugliness. A good example is Aeschynomene americana, which is the American joint vetch that is grown extensively in norther Australia as a pasture regeneration crop.

Aestiva: [ees-ti-va] From Aestivalis, which is Latin for a summer. It refers to plants, which flower during the summer months. A good example is Arachnorchis aestiva.

Aestival: [ees-ti-vahl] From Aestivalis, which is Latin for a summer. It refers to plants, which flower during the summer months. A good example is Hibiscus splendens.

Aestivalis: [ees-ti-va-lis] From aestivalis, which is Latin for a summer. It refers to plants, which flower during the summer months. A good example is Blandfordia grandiflora.

Aestivation: [ees-ti-va-shon] From Aestivalis which is Latin for a summer. It refers to plants, which flower during the summer months. A good example is Blandfordia nobilis.

Aestivum: [ees-ti-vum] From Aestivalis, which is Latin for a summer. It refers to plants, which flower at the height of the summer months. A good example is Podolobium aestivum.

Aestuans: [ees-ti-vu-shuns] From Aestivalis, which is Latin for a summer. It refers to plants, which flower during the summer months. A good example is Corchorus aestuans.

Aethiopicum: [ee-thee-oh-pi-kum] From Aethio, is Ancient Greek for coming from Ethiopia, an Ethiopean or African. It refers to ferns, which were first discovered in Ethiopia. A good example is Adiantum aethiopicum.

Aethiopicus: [ee-thee-oh-pi-kus] Is Ancient Greek for coming from Ethiopia or an Ethiopean or African. A good example is the exotic weed Asparagus aethiopicus where as the native Asparagus, Asparagus racemosus, is actually more attractive.

aff: [ahf] From Affine which is Latin for a boundary or neighbour. It refers to the taxonomic terminology in zoology and botany. In open nomenclature it indicates that available material or evidence suggests that the proposed species is related to, has an affinity to, but is not identical to, the species with the binomial name that follows. The aff. name precedes the species name as in Russula aff. rosacea.

Affine: [ah-feen] From affinis, which is Latin for being allied to another species. It refers to plants, which resemble another specie in the genus. A good example is Melastoma affine, which is closely related to and resembles Tibouchina grandiflora.

Affinis: [ah-fin-is] From affinis, which is Latin for being allied to another species. It refers plants, which resemble another specie in their genus or another genus in their family. A good example is the south west, Western Australia Kunzea, kunzea affinis, which is closely related to and resembles the east coast plant, Kunzea ambigua.

Affonsea: [a-fon-see-a] From Affonsea, which is Latinized From A, Malay word for the trees growing there. A good example is Affonsea lucyi.

Afoliatus: [a-foh-li-a-tus] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without; not having and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have few or no leaves. A good example is Acacia pterocaulon.

Afrum: [a-frum] Maybe From A, which is Greek /Latin for without or not having and Frum which is Yiddish for a religious observer. It may refer to flowers, which are observed hanging downwards as if in prayer. A good example is Ischaemum afrum.

Afzelia: [af-ze-li-a] Is named in honour of Dr. Afzelius; 1750-1836, who was a Swedish Botanist and student of Linneus. A good example is the exotic timber tree Afzelia xylocarpa whose timber is used fro outdoor velodromes and sporting surfaces.

Agallocha: [a-gahl-loh-ka] From Agallocha, which is Latinized from the ancient word for a resinous or an aromatic tree. It refers to woods, which is rather aromatic. An example is Excoecaria agallocha.

Agamandrous: [ah-gah-mahn-druh s] From Agamous, which is Ancient Greek for incapable of reproduction by sexual means and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to inflorescences, which have neuter flowers inside or above and staminate outside or below. (agamo androcephalous)

Agamo Hermaphroditic: [ah-gah-moh, her-mahf-ro-di-tic] From Agamous, which is Ancient Greek for incapable of reproduction by sexual means and Hermaphrodites, which is Ancient Greek for a to have both male and female sexual organs. It refers to inflorescences, which have neuter flowers inside or above and staminate outside or below. (agamo androcephalous)

Agamous: [a-ga-mos] From Agamous, which is Ancient Greek for incapable of reproduction by sexual means. It refers to plants, which are incapable of reproduction by sexual means.

Agapetes: [a-gu-pee-teez] From Agapetus, which is Ancient Greek for beloved. It refers to flowers, which are very beautiful. A good example is found in Australia’s only representative Agapetes meiniana.

Agaricus: [a-ga-ri-kus] From Agarikos, which is Ancient Greek or Agaricus, which is Latin for a town in Sarmatis. It refers to an old name for the edible mushroom which was originally found around the town that was probably derived from the Greek word Agarikon. A good example is Agaricus augustus.

Agasta: [a-ga-sta] From Agan, which is Ancient Greek for numerous. It refers to the abundance of flowers on a corymb not being a few or plentiful just numerous. A good example was Agasta asiatica, which is now known as Barringtonia asiatica.

Agastachys: [ah-ga-sta-shus] From Agan, which is Ancient Greek for numerous and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek or later Stachys which is Latin  for a flower spike. It refers to the numerous flower spikes, which are found near the apexes of the stems. A good example is Agastachys odorata.

Agathis: [a-ga-this] From Agathos, which is Ancient Greek for a ball of threads. It refers to the catkins of the female flowers which are more cylindrical than other gymnosperms. A good example is the female flowers on Agathis robusta.

Agathodaemonis: [a-gah-tho-dee-mo-nis] From Agathos, which is Ancient Greek for a ball of threads and maybe from Daemonizāre/Daemon, which is Latin for a to demonize or to make out as thouh a demon is present. It refers to the colour and size of the flowers compared to the leaves and canes. A good example is the female flowers on Dendrobium agathodaemonis, which is now known as Dendrobium cuthbertsonii.

Agathomeris: [a-gah-tho-mer-is] From Agathos, which is Ancient Greek for a ball of threads, and Merios, which is Ancient Greek for a part. It refers to the panicles, which resemble large balls. A good example is the female flowers on Agathomeris amaranthoides.

Agathosma: [a-guh-thos-ma] From Agathos, which is Ancient Greek for a ball of threads and Osma, which is Ancient Greek for a sweet fragrance. It refers to flowers, which have a sweet scent or fragrance. A good example is the female flowers on Agathosma apiculata.

Agathosmoides: [a-ga-thos-moi-deez] From Agathos, which is Ancient Greek for a ball of threads, and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flower heads, which somewhat resemble the cones of the Agathis genus. A good example is the female flowers on Genetyllis agathosmoides, which is now known as Darwinia vestita.

Agavoides: [a-ga-voi-deez] From Agave, which is Ancient Greek for noble and handsome and Eîdos/Oides, for alike or similar to. It refers to the similarity to the exotic Agave genus. A good example is the common exotic Aloe often grown in dry rockeries Echeveria agavoides.

Agent Orange was one of a class of color-coded herbicides that US forces sprayed over the rural landscape in Vietnam to kill/defoliate trees, shrubs and food crops over large areas. Agent Orange was a 50/50 mixture of two individual herbicides, 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T. It remained toxic over a short period—a scale of days or weeks—and then degraded. The production of Agent Orange was halted in the 1970s, existing stocks were destroyed and it is no longer used. Production of the 2,4,5-T component of Agent Orange was also halted in the 1980s in most countries. However, 2,4-D is still produced by Dow Agro science and is a common component of over 70 products, including Scott’s Weed and Feed, Miracle-Grow Weed and Feed, Weed B Gone and many others. The effects of Agent Orange do, however, persist in the form of ecologically degraded landscapes in parts of the hilly and mountainous areas of Vietnam. The pre-war forests that existed in most of these areas took hundreds/thousands of years to reach an ecologically-balanced mixture of large numbers of species of flora and fauna. Natural regeneration would take centuries to reproduce those landscapes. In addition, in some of the sprayed areas soil erosion and landslides have sharply lowered soil nutrient levels and altered the topographical features of the landscape. These changes have encouraged a few species of invasive grasses of low value to thrive. Active replanting with species of trees and shrubs which are ecologically viable and have economic value will require substantial and sustained long term investment. Pictures at the time depict the reality of the lies of petrochemical companies and Governments which aid in the distribution of poisonous, toxic foods around the world and have been used extensively by most countries in war including America which has used more chemicals on citizens than any other country in killing, maiming and scarring innocent people including children for their own narrow self-interested profits. agent Orange was also linked to prostrate cancer in males in North Vietnam. Hindsight to me shows that double strength Vinegar would have done the same job in defoliating the forests without the long term damage.

Ageratum: [a-ger-ei-tum] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Geraton, which is Greek/Latin for old age. It refers to flowers, which are long lasting. A good example is Ageratum conyzoides.

Agglomerata: [a-glom-er-a-ta] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Glomus, which is Latin for a ball of yarn. It refers to structures or organs, which are crowded together without adhering to each other. A good example is the fruits of Eucalyptus agglomerata.

Agglomerate: [a-glom-er-eit] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and glomus which is Latin for a ball of yarn. It refers to organs, which are crowded together without adhereing to each other. A good example is the way the flowers bloom in a dense head without adhering of Morinda citrifolia.

Aggregata 1: [a-gre-ga-ta] From Aggregātum, which is Latin for a flock of birds or clustered together. It refers to flower buds and fruits, which are clustered close together without being cohering like a flock of birds. A good example is Eucalyptus aggregata.

Aggregata 2: [a-gre-ga-ta] From Aggregātum, which is Latin for a flock of birds or clustered together. It refers to flowers, which are densely clustered together without actually cohering as in daisies. A good example is Brachyscome multifida.

Aggregata 3 : [a-gre-ga-ta] From Aggregātum, which is Latin for a flock of birds or clustered together. It refers to fruits and carples, which are clustered together, cohering and from the same flower. A good example is Rubus moluccanus.

Aggregata 4: [a-gre-ga-ta] From Aggregātum, which is Latin for a flock of birds or clustered together. It refers to flowers, which are crowded together without adhereing to each other. A good example is Acrotriche aggregata.

Conglomerate rocks a form of Aggregate – andi Mellis

Aggregate: [ah-gre-geit] From Aggregātum, which is Latin for a flock of birds or clustered together. It refers to organs, which are crowded together without adhereing to each otheras in a fruit with many drupelets joined together. A good example is the way the flowers bloom in a dense head without adhering of Morinda citrifolia.

Aggregated: [ah-gre-gei-ted] From Aggregātum, which is Latin for a flock of birds or clustered together. It refers to organs, which are crowded together without adhering to each other as in a fruit with many drupelets joined together. A good example is Rubus parvifolia.

Aggregatum: [a-gre-ei-tum] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Gregarius, which is Latin for a flock of birds. It refers to structures or organs, which are crowded together without adhereing to each other as in the fronds or leaves. A good example is the flowers of Blechnum aggregatum.

Aggregatus: [a-gre-ey-tus] From Aggregātum, which is Latin for a flock of birds or clustered together. It refers to organs, which are crowded together without adhereing to each otheras in a fruit with many drupelets joined together. A good example is the flowers of Eucalyptus aggregata which has been recorded in some old literature as Eucalyptus aggregatus.

Agiortia: [a-jee-or-ti-a] From Agiotus, which is Ancient Greek for twisted. It refers to stems or branches, which are twisted. A good example is Agiortia cicatricata.

Aglabrifolia: [a-gla-bri-foh-lia] From Aglaios, which is Ancient Greek for one of the three graces of Greek Mythology, namely the goddess of fertility and charm and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have charm and a pleasant scent. A good example is Zieria arborescens subsp. glabrifolia.

Aglaia: [a-glahy-a] From Aglaios, which is Ancient Greek for one of the three graces of Greek Mythology, namely the goddess of fertility and charm. It refers to flowers, which have a distinctly splendid charm about them. A good example is the small but quaint flowers on Aglaia australiensis.

Aglossa: [a-glos-sa] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Glôssa, which is Latin for a tongue. It may refer tothe ray petals which are not joined together. A good example is Olearia aglossa.

Agnata: [ag-nei-ta] From Agnatae, which is Latin for a complicated relationship. It refers to plants, which are related on the paternal (father’s) side in a complicated taxonomic relationship. A good example was Eucalyptus agnata which is now known Eucalyptus occidentalis but in the past was considered to be closely related.

Agnipila: [ag-ni-pi-la] From Agni, which is Latinized for the Sankrist word for their fire god, and Pilose, which is Latin forshort, soft hairs. It refers to a fruits which have a long spear like barbs on pilose spikes which may have a burning sensation when piercing the skin. A good example is Acaena agnipila.

Agonis: [a-goh-nis] From Agon, which is Ancient Greek for gathering of clusters. It refers to flowers, which form in small clusters along the outer stems. A good example is Agonis flexuosis.

Agrifolia: [ag-ri-foh-li-a] From Agrós, which is Ancient Greek or later Agros, which is Latin for a field or pasteur or ágō, which is Ancient Greek for to lead often by example and Folium which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants which have much rougher leaves than other species in the genus as all farmers have rougher hands than their city counterparts. A good example is Grevillea agrifolia.

Agropyron: [ag-roh-pahy-ron] From Agrós, which is Ancient Greek or later Agros, which is Latin for a field or pasteur or ágō, which is Ancient Greek for to lead often by example and Puros, which is Ancient Greek for a grain of wheat. It refers to grasses, which resemble wheat in the field. A good example is the Russian plains grass Agropyron cristatum.

Agrostidea: [a-gro-sti-dee-a] From Agrós, which is Ancient Greek or later Agros, which is Latin for a field or pasteur or ágō, which is Ancient Greek for to lead often by example. It refers to grasses, which grow in mass where they are found naturally. A good example is Eriachne agrostidea.

Agrostis: [a-gro-stis] From Agrós, which is Ancient Greek or later Agros, which is Latin for a field or pasteur or ágō, which is Ancient Greek for to lead often by example It refers to a type of grasses, which prefer growing on open plains and fields. A good example is Agrostis australiensis.

Agrostocrinum: [ag-ro-stoh-krahy-num] From Agrós, which is Ancient Greek or later Agros, which is Latin for a field or pasteur or ágō, which is Ancient Greek for to lead often by example and Krinon, which is Ancient Greek for a lily. It refers to plants, which have typical grass like leaves and lily like flowers. A good example is Agrostocrinum hirsutum.

Agrostoides: [ag-ro-stoi-deez] From Agrós, which is Ancient Greek or later Agros, which is Latin for a field or pasteur or ágō, which is Ancient Greek for to lead often by example and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to grasses, which resemble those of the Agrostis genus. A good example is Agrostocrinum hirsutum.

Agrostologist: [a-gro-stol-o-jist] From Agrós, which is Ancient Greek or later Agros, which is Latin for a field or pasteur or ágō, which is Ancient Greek for to lead often by example Ology, which is Greek to study, and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies grasses.

Agrostology: [a-gro-stol-o-jee] From Agrós, which is Ancient Greek or later Agros, which is Latin for a field or pasteur or ágō, which is Ancient Greek for to lead often by example and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to a branch of botany, which studies grasses.

Agrostophylla: [a-gro-sto-fahy-la] From Agrós, which is Ancient Greek or later Agros, which is Latin for a field or pasteur or ágō, which is Ancient Greek for to lead often by example and Phyllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants which have much rougher leaves than other species in the genus as all farmers have rougher hands than their city counterparts. A good example is Agrostocrinum hirsutum.

Agrostophyllum: [ag-ro-stoh-fahy-lum] From Agrós, which is Ancient Greek or later Agros, which is Latin for a field or pasteur or ágō, which is Ancient Greek for to lead often by example and Phyllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants which have much rougher leaves than other species in the genus as all farmers have rougher hands than their city counterparts. A good example is Dendrobium agrostophyllum.

Agustraliana: [a-guh-strah-li-ei-na] From Agrostis, which is Ancient Greek for a field grass and Australis, which is Latin for southern. It refers to plants, which resemble grasses and originate from Australia. A good example is Cossinia agustraliana.

Ahbyae: [a-bahy-ahy] Is named in honour of Alyson Marjorie Ashby; 1901-1987, who was an Australian floral artist and distributor of Native plants. A good example is Acacia ashbyae.

Aidia: [ahy-di-a] From Ai which is Latinised from the Chinese word for love 爱 or lovely 可爱的 and Dis which is Ancient Greek or Di which is Latin for two. The meaning is unclear but may refer to the scent of the flowers being twice as lovely as that of the Jasmine. A good example is Aidia racemosa the native cherry.

Ailanthus: [ahy-lan-thus] From Ailantha which is Latinized from the Malay word for the tree of heaven and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which stand erect as though moving towards the heavens. A good example is Ailanthus triphysa.

Aira: [air-a] From Aira, which is Ancient Greek for an ancient name of a species of grass. It refers to plants, which resemble the ancient Aira genus, of which the Australian species have now been relocated to the Lolium genus. A good example is the local grass Lolium perenne.

Airoides: [ahy-roi-deez] From Aira, which is Ancient Greek for an ancient name of a species of grass and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the ancient Aira plants. A good example is the local grass Whiteochloa airoides.

Aithocheilum: [ahy-tho-chei-lum] From Aithós, which is Ancient Greek for reddish-brown of grass and Khrṓs, which is Ancient Greek or later Kroma, which is Greek for a colour. It refers to structures or organs, which have a distinct reddish-brown colour. A good example is the local grass Peplidium aithocheilum.

Aitonis: [ahy-to-nis] Maybe From Ádōnis, which is Ancient Greek for the god and goddess of plants or latter a handsome man. It refers to plants, which exhibit very showy flowers. A good example is Mesembryanthemum aitonis.

Aizoon: [ahy-zoon] From Aei which is Ancient Greek for always or forever and zoon, which is Ancient Greek for a living thing. It refers to plants, which live in the harshest of conditions and never seem do die or wilt thus they seem to live forever. A good example was Aizoon quadrifidum, which is now known as Gunniopsis quadrifida.

Ajuga: [a-joo-ga] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Jugum, which is Latin for a yoke. It refers to organs, which are unequal and not necessarilly equally positioned and joined at the base like a yoke. A good example is the calyx on Ajuga australis.

Akakia: [ah-kah-ki-a] From Akakia, which is Ancient Greek for to have a sharp point. It refers to the first species named by Dioscorides a Greek Botanist for an Egyptian plant Acacia Arabica which has very sharply pointed spines. A good example in Australia is Acacia illicifolia.

Akania: [a-ka-ni-a] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Kania, which is Latin for bracts. It refers to flowers, which have no bracts. A good example is Akania bidwillii.

Alangiacea: [a-lan-jee-a-kee-a] From Alangi, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the Malabar word for a local tree in the same genus. A good example is Polyosma alangiacea.

Alangium: [a-lan-jee-um] From Alangi, which is Latinized for the vernacular of the Malabar word for a local tree in the same genus. A good example is Alangium villosum subsp. tomentosa.

Alania: [a-la-ni-a] Is named in honour of Allan Cunningham; 1791-1839, who was a British born Australian explorer and collector of Australian flora. Alania was used as his given name had already been used for naming another genus. A good example is Alania endlicheri.

Alata: [a-la-ta] From Alatus, which is Latin for to have a wing or wings. It refers to stems, which have distinct longitudinal wings. A good example is Acacia alata.

Alaticaulis: [a-la-ti-kor-lis] From Alatus, which is Latin for to have a wing or wings and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek or Caulus, which is Latin for a twig, stem or small branch. It refers to stems, which have wings extending down to the smaller branches. A good example is Acacia alaticaulis.

Alatisemina: [a-la-ti-se-min-a] From Alatus, which is Latin for to have a wing or wings and Semina, which maybe Latiniesed from the Danish word for their sun goddess. It may refer to flowers, which face upwards and have petals joined with wing like extensions. A good example is Bonamia alatisemina.

Alatisepala: [a-la-ti-se-pa-la] From Alatus, which is Latin for to have a wing or wings and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum, which is Latin for the specialized leaves behind the petals know as the sepals. It refers to sepals, which have a wing like extension. A good example is Eremophila alatisepala.

Alatocarpa: [a-lah-to-kar-pa] From Alatus, which is Latin for to have a wing or wings and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have wings. A good example is Eclipta alatocarpa.

Alatoramulum: [a-lah-tor-a-myoo-lum] From Alatus, which is Latin for to have a wing or wings and Ramulus, which is Latin for to have many small twigs or stems. It refers to small stems, which have very prominent wings. A good example is Syzygium alatoramulum.

Alatum: [a-la-tum] From Alatus, which is Latin for to have a wing or wings. It refers to structures or organs, which has a wing or wings. A good example is the fruits on Microlepidium alatum.

Alatus: [a-la-tus] From Alatus, which is Latin for to have a wing or wings. It refers to labellum or columns on orchids, which have wings or at times the smaller stems. A good example is the stem wings on Dipterocarpus alatus.

Alba: [al-ba/bu] From Albēns, which is Latin for white. It usually refers to the flowers, which are white. A good example is the flowers on Eucalyptus alba.

Alba-compacta: [al-ba-kom-pak-ta] From Albēns, which is Latin for white, and Compāctus, which is Latin for joined or packed closely together, dense to make solid, as in the compacted soil. It refers to the density and colour of the floccose hairs, which are pure white. A good example is Epacris alba-compacta.

Alba-odorata: [al-ba, oh-dor-a-ta] From Albēns, which is Latin for white and Odōrus, which is Latin for fragrant. It refers to white flowers, which are sweetly scented. A good example is Epacris alba-odorata.

Albens: [al-benz] From Albēns, which is Latin for white. It usually refers to the flowers, which are snow white. A good example is the flowers on Eucalyptus alba.

Albertsiana: [al-ber-see-a-na] Is named in honour of Luigi Maria D’Albertis; 1841–1901, who was a flamboyant Italian naturalist and explorer who charted the Fly River in Papua New Guinea in 1876. A good example is the New Guinea palm Linospadix albertisiana.

Albicans: [al-bi-kahnz] From Albus, which is Latin for white. It refers to the flowers, which are whitish in colour. A good example is Leucochrysum albicans.

Albicaule: [al-bi-kor-lee] From Albus, which is Latin for white, and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek for a branch or stem. It refers to stems and small branches, which are distinctly white. A good example is Teucrium albicaule.

Albicaulis: [al-bi-kawr-lis] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek or Caulus, which is Latin for a twig, stem or small branch. It refers to stems and small branches, which are distinctly white. A good example is the trunk and branches on Eucalyptus albicaulis.

Albida: [al-bi-da] From Albus, which is Latin for white. It refers to structures or organs, which are white, or off white in colour. A good example is the flower heads on Scaevola albida.

Albidocapillaris: [al-bi-do-kah-pil-lar-is] From Albus, which is Latin for white, and Capillāris, which is Latin for hair like or a fine tube. It refers to fungi, which have very fine hair like stalksor the pores are white. A good example is Mycena albidocapillaris.

Albidus: [al-bi-dus] From Albus, which is Latin for white. It refers to structures or organs, which are white, or off white in colour. A good example is the flower heads on Ptilotus albidus.

Albiflora: [al-bi-flor-a] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are pure white. A good example is Hernandia albiflora.

Albiflorum: [al-bi-flor-um] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are pure white. A good example is Limnanthemum albiflorum, which is now known as Ornduffia albiflora.

Albiflorus: [al-bi-flor-us] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are pure white. A good example is Sauropus albiflorus.

Albiglans: [al-bi-dus] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Glans which is Latin for an acorn. It refers to a structure or organ, which is white or off white in colour and produces a secretion. A good example is the leaf spikes and fruits on Prasophyllum albiglans.

Albipila: [al-bi-pi-la] From Albus, which is Latin for white, and Pilos, which is Ancient Greek or Pilosa, which is Latin for long soft velvety, white hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in soft, long white hairs. A good example is Ficus albipila.

Albissima: [al-bi-si-muh] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Issima, which is Greek/Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to plants, which have the most brilliant white organs. A good example is the lichen Graphis albissima.

Albissimus: [al-bi-si-muhs] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Issima, which is Greek/Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to plants, which have the most brilliant white organs. A good example is the fungus Graphis albissima, which is now known as Agaricus albissimus.

Albizia: [al-bi-zee-a] Is named in honor of Fillippo delgi Albizzia, 17..-17.., who introduced the silktree to Tuscany, Italy. A good example is Albizia thozetiana, which is now known as Archidendropsis thozetiana.

Albizioides: [al-biz-i-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Albiz an Italian botanist and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Albizia genus in one or more of its characteristics. A good example is the leaves and flowers on Senegalia albizioides.

Albofibrillosa: [al-bo-fi-bril-loh-sa] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Fibrillose, which is Latin for to be covered with hair like appendages. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in tuft hair like appendages. A good example is the stalk on the fungus, Lepiota albofibrillosa.

Albohirta: [al-bo-her-ta] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Hirta/Hirtella, which is Latin for hairy. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in white hairs. A good example is the stens and calyxes on Prostanthera albohirta.

Albolanata: [al-bo-lan-a-ta] From Albus, which is Latin for white, and Lanata, which is Latin for woolly. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in white floccose hairs. A good example is the fruits and lowere laminas on Malacocera albolanata.

Albomontis: [al-bio-mon-tis] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Mōns/Montēs, which is European/ Mediterranean for mountains. It refers to plants, which related to the European plants. A good example is the habitats along the coast and associated hills in southern Western Australia of Stylidium albomontis.

Albonitens: [al-bo-ni-tenz] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Nitens, which is Latin for shiny. It refers to structures or organs, which is white and semi glossy. A good example is Graphis albonitens.

Albopictus: [al-bo-pik-tus] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Pictus, which is Latin for a picture. It refers to black and white tiger mosquitoes, which look like a picture and feeds on both nectar and blood. Fortunately, it has not been seen in Australia yet. A good example is Aedes albopictus.

Albosetosa: [al-bo-se-toh-sa] From Albus, which is Latin for white, and Setosa, which is Latin for short stiff hairs. It refers to short stiff hairs, which are white. A good example is Grammitis albosetosa, which is now known as Polypodium albosetosum.

Albosetosum: [al-bo-se-toh-sum] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Setosum, which is Latin for short stiff hairs. It refers to short stiff hairs, which are white. A good example is Polypodium albosetosum.

Albovillosa: [al-bo-vil-oh-sah] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Villosum, which is Latin for long scruffy hairs. It refers to the colour of the long, soft, scruffy hairs, which are pure white. A good example was Dryopteris albovillosa, which is now known as Lastreopsis microsora subsp. microsora.

Albovillosum: [al-bo-vil-loh-sum] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Villosum, which is Latin for long scruffy hairs. It refers to the colour of the long, soft, scruffy hairs, which are pure white. A good example is Paspalidium albovillosum.

Alboviolaceus: [al-boh-vil-oh-sum] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Violaceus, which is Latin for purple or violet. It refers to structures or organs, which are white to violet. A good example is the stalk and pileus on Cortinarius alboviolaceus.

Albuca: [al-bu-ka] From Albus, which is Latin for white. It refers to organs, which are distinctly white or whitish. A good example is the bracts on Albuca bracteata.

Albuciflorum: [al-bu-ki-flor-um] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are distinctly white or whitish. A good example was the flowers on Cymbidium albuciflorum which has since been included with Cymbidium madidum.

Album: [al-bum] From Albus, which is Latin for white. It refers to flowers, which are white or off white. A good example of colour is Ripogonum album.

Albumen: [al-byoo-men] From Album, which is Latin for the white of an egg or embryo. It refers to the white starchy nutrient stored between the outer seed coat and the perisperm or at times in the endosperm, that is the matter that is interposed between the skin of a seed and the embryo.

Albuminous: [al-byoo-min-us] From Album, which is Latin for white. It refers to food reserves, which are within the endosperm or albumen that is the matter that is interposed between the skin of a seed and the embryo. It is derived following the fertilized polar nuclei.

Albus: [al-bus] From Albus, which is Latin for white. It refers to fruits, which are snow white. A good example is Symphoricarpos albus.

Alceifolium: [al-see-foh-li-um] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the lower laminas of leaves, which are white or whitish in colour. A good example is the incorrect spelling for Rubus alceifolium which should be Rubus alceifolius.

Alceifolius: [al-see-foh-li-us] From Albus, which is Latin for white and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the lower laminas of leaves, which are white or whitish in colour. A good example is Rubus alceifolius.

Alchemilla: [a-le-ke-mil-la] From Alchemilla, which is Latin for a plant valued for its use in Alchemy. It refers to a European species, which was extensively used in the science of alchemy to manufacturing of gold. A good example is Alchemilla australiana.

Alchornia: [al-korr-ni-a] Is named in honour of Stanesby Alchorne; 1729-1800; who was a German botanist who collected and studied British plants. A good example is Alchornia rugosa.

Alcockiae: [al-ko-kee-a] Is named in honour of Alcock but which Alcock is unknown. A good example is Triglochin alcockiae.

Alcockii: [al-ko-ki-ahy] Is named in honour of Alcock but which Alcock is unknown. A good example is Acacia alcockii.

Aldrovanda: [ahl-dro-van-da] Is named in honour of D. Aldrovandi; 1522-1605, who was an Italian botanist. A good example is Aldrovanda vesiculosa.

Alea: [a-lee-a] From Alea, which is Latin for taking a risk or uncertainty. It refers to habitats, which are on the edge or in harsh transitional zones. A good example is Pultenaea alea.

Alectryon: [ah-lek-trahy-on] From Lectron, which is Greek mythology for the figurine of a rooster. It refers to; with some imagination, flowers, which look somewhat like a cocks comb. A good example is Alectryon reiculatus.

Aleifolium: [a-lee-foh-li-um] From Aletris, which is Ancient Greek for to grind and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which were once dried and ground up as a herbal medicine. A good example is Rubus alceifolium.

Alepyroides: [a-le-pahy-roi-deez] From Alepy, which is unknown, and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which has one or more characteristics that resemble the Alepryon genus, which are snow white. A good example is Centrolepis alepyroides.

Aleutris: [a-li-oo-tris] From Aletris, which is Ancient Greek for female slaves, who ground wheat flour. It refers to the appearance of the herbs, which look as though they are covered in flour. A good example is Aletris punicea.

Aleuites: [a-li-yoo-i-teez] From Aletris, which is Ancient Greek for female slaves, who ground wheat flour. It refers to the appearance of the herbs, which look as though they are covered in flour. A good example is Aleurites rockinghamensis.

Aleurone Layer: [a-li-yoo-rohn, lahy-er] From áleuron, which is Ancient Greek for flour or meal. It is the minute particles of protein content in the embryo of grains, found in the outer layer of the endosperm. A good example is the seeds of Themeda triandra.

Alexandrae: [a-leks-an-dree] Is named in honour of Alexandra Caroline Marie Charlotte Louise Julia of Denmark; 1844–1925, who was always elegantly dreesed. A good example is the very elegant alexander palm Archontophoenix alexandrae.

Alexandri: [a-leks-an-dri] Is named in honour of Doctor R.C. Alexander, was a Scottish Physician and botanist. A good example is Juncus alexandri subsp. Alexandri.

Alexfloydia: [ah-leks-floi-di-a] Is named in honour of a good friend of mine and everyone at the Friends of the North Coast Botanic Gardens, Coffs Harbour, Alexander Geoffrey Floyd; April 1 1926-2022, who is an exceptionally talented botanist on rainforest species of Australia and had a strong passion for saving endangered native species. He has been recognized with two genus named after him and six species. A good worthy example is Alexfloydia repens.

Alexgeorgea: [a-leks-jor-jee-a] Is named in honour of Alexander Segger George; 1939-20.., who was an Australian botanist who researched the Banksia and Dryandra genre extensively. A good example is Alexgeorgea nitens.

Algarobia: [al-gar-oh-bi-a] From Alkharrūbah, which is Arabic/Spanish for carob. It refers to trees are related to the commercial carob tree. A good example is Algarobia dulcis , which is now known as Prosopis laevigata.

Algens: [al-jenz] From Agida, which is Latin for high, and Cold. It refers to plants, which prefer cold habitats on mountain peaks. A good example is Gingidia algens.

Algida: [al-ji-da] From Agida, which is Latin for high, and Cold. It refers to plants, which prefer cold habitats on mountain peaks. A good example is Olearia algida.

Algologist: [al-go-lo-jist] From Algos, which is Ancient Greek for an algae, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies seaweeds.

Algology: [al-go-lo-jee] From Algos, which is Ancient Greek for an algae, and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science of studying seaweeds and algae.

Alicae: [a-li-see] Is named in honour of Alicae who is thought to have discovered the halo type and forwarded it to Mueller. A good example was Nepenthes alicae, which is now known as Nepenthes mirabilis.

Alicia: [a-li-si-a] Is named in honour of Donna Alicia who apparently was a former first lady of the Philippines. A good example is Senna artemisioides subsp. alicia.

Alcornis: [al-kor-nis] From Alicornos which is Latin for the unicorn, Kéras which is Ancient Greek or Cornus, which is Latin for a horn. It refers to a misunderstanding of the mythological creature, a mixture of Pegasus and Unicorn, the winged horse with a single horn on its head and the gift to the Holy Roman Emperor of the Narwhal horn from South America which is a single horned mammal. A good example is Isopogon alcicornis.

Alifer: [a-li-fer] From Alifer is Latin for Winged. The reference is unclear. It probably refers to the seeds or the shape and position of the leaflets which somewhat resemble a wing. A good example is Tribulopis homalococca var. alifer.

Alisma: [a-lis-ma] From Alisma, which is Greek for an ancient water loving plant. It refers to most plants, which prefer a watery habitat. A good example is Alisma plantago-aquatica.

Alismifolium: [al-lis-mi-foh-li-a] From Alisma, which is Greek an ancient water loving plant, and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are similar to that of the Alisma genus. A good example is Typhonium alismifolium.

Alismorkis: [a-li-mor-kis] From Alis which is Latinised from the Old German word for noble and maybe the small dogs known as Morkis which have a face somewhat like the calanthe orchids. A good example is Alismorkis aristulifera, which is now known as Calanthe australasica.

Allagocha: [al-la-go-cha] From Allogocha, which maybe the Latinized form of the local Indonesian, Malay or Thai word for this tree. It probably refers to “Beware Ally Gotch a in the eye” as temporary blindness and pain is associated with the milky sap but early botanists took it incorrectly as the name of the tree. A good example of the poisonous sap which can be found on Exceocaria agallocha.

Allagostemonous: [al-la-go-stei-mon-os] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for other and Stemon, which is Ancient Greek for stamens. It refers to the stem, which holds the male reproductive organ on flowers. It refers to stamens, which are attached to a petal and torus alternately.

Allamanda: [al-la-man-da] Is named in honour of – for Frédéric Louis Allamand, 1735-1809, Swiss-born physician and botanist, who collected it during a Dutch expedition to Surinam. Later a physician to the Grand Duke of Russia and nephew of Jean-Nicholas Sebastien Allamand, 1713-1787, who was a Swiss physician, botanist and naturalist. A good example is the somewhat troublesome exotic plant Allamanda cathartia.

Allantodia: [al-lan-toh-di-a] From Allantoeides, which is Ancient Greek for a sausage, shape. Its reference is unclear. Agood example was Allantodia australis, which is now known as Diplazium australis.

Allantoid: [al-lan-toyd] From Allantoeides, which is Ancient Greek for a sausage shape, and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to structures or organs, which resembles the Allantodia genus.

Allantoidea: [al-lan-toy-dee-a] From Allantoeides, which is Ancient Greek for a sausage shape, and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to structures or organs, which resembles the Allantodia genus. Agood example is Pterostylis allantoidea.

Allautogamy: [al-loo-to-ga-mee] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having, Autum, which is Latin for for self and Gameo, which is Ancient Greek for to marry. It refers to flowers, that can be self-pollinated. A good example is the flowers on Viola betonicifolia.

Alleleomorph/allele: [al-le-loh-maof, al-leel] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for other and Morphus, which is Ancient Greek for a shape or form. It is when one of a number of genes have alternative forms of the same gene.

Allelopathic Plant: [al-le-loh-pah-thik, plant] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for other and Páthos, to be toxic or to cause illness, misery or suffering. It refers to plants, which release a beneficial or harmful chemical substance into the soil to aid or suppress the growth of surrounding vegetation. A good example is the leaves of many Eucalyptus species or the articles on all the Cassuarina and Allocassuarina species and the fronds and rhizomes of Pteridium esculentum which all restrict or suppress the growth of competition.

Allelopathy: [al-le-loh-pah-thee] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for other and Páthos, to be toxic or to cause illness, misery or suffering. It refers to plants, which release a beneficial or harmful chemical substance into the soil to aid or suppress the growth of surrounding vegetation. A good example is the leaves of many Eucalyptus species or the articles on all the Cassuarina and Allocassuarina species and the fronds and rhizomes of Pteridium esculentum which all restrict or suppress the growth of competition.

Allelotheca: [al-le-loh-thee-ka] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for other and Theke, which is Ancient Greek for a box. It refers to glumes, which can be compared to little boxes and the bulk of material, which smothers most of its competition. A good example was Allelotheca annulatum, which is now known asLophatherum annulatum.

Alleniana: [al-le-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Named in honour of Mr Charles Ernest Frank Allen, a former curator of the Botanical Gardens, Darwin. A good example is Acacia alleniana.

Allenii: [al-le-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Named in honour of Mr Charles Ernest Frank Allen, a former curator of the Botanical Gardens, Darwin. A good example is Corchorus allenii.

Alliacea: [al-li-a-see-a] From Allium, which is Latin for an onion or garlic. It refers to leaves or odour of structures, which resembles the onion or, at times garlic plants in the Allium genus. A good example is Sowerbaea alliacea.

Alligatrix: [a-li-ga-triks] From Alligatrix, which is Latin for “She who binds together. “It refers to a species relationship with other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus alligatrix subsp. alligatrix which has intermediate characteristics with Eucalyptus cinerea and Eucalyptus cephalocarpus

Alliiligneum: [al-lee-lig-nee-um] From Allium, which is Latin for an onion or garlic and Lignum, which is Ancient Greek for firewood or later Latin for wood. It refers to timber, which has sections of bark included in the wood, thus, it is often seen as concentric rings in stem cross sections of the wood. A good example is Syzygium alliiligneum.

Allittia: [al-li-ti-a] Is named in honour of William Alitte; 1828-1893, who was an Australian herbarium collector and director of the Portland Botanic Gardens in Victoria. A good example is Allittia cardiocarpa.

Allittii: [a-li-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of William Alitte; 1828-1893, who was an Australian herbarium collector and director of the Portland Botanic Gardens in Victoria. A good example is Leucopogon allittii.

Allocasuarina: [al-loh-kas-uh-ree-na] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for other or different, and Kesuari, which is Latinised from the Malay vernacular for the giant Cassawary bird. It refers to the trees being slightly different to the Casuarina genus where the branchlets hang down looking similar to the feathers of the Cassawary. A good example is Allocasuarina inophloia.

Allocasuarina sp. stems and articles a: A. distyla, b: A. simulans;

Allogamy: [al-lo-ga-mee] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Gameo, which is Ancient Greek for to marry. It refers to where cross-pollination occurs to regenerate the offspring.

Allojohnsonii: [al-loh-jon-so-ni-ahy] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for the other or different, and Johnson, which is named in honour of Johnson but which Johnson cannot be established. It may refer to plants, which are named after the other Johnson or plants which resemble the species johnsonii but are not the same as that species. A good example is Grevillea juniperina subsp. allojohnsonii.

Allopatric 1: [a-loh-pa-trik] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for other or different and patriot for loyal to one’s land. It refers to plants, which are isolated or widely separated.

Allopatric 2: [a-loh-pa-trik] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for other or different and patriot for loyal to one’s land. It refers to plants, which occupy a diverse range of soil types.

Allophylaria: [al-loh-fahy-lar-i-a] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for other or different and Phiálē, which is Ancient Greek for a type of large flat saucer or later Phialae, which is Latin for a censor. It refers to the shape and form of a genus of fungi being like a censor (A container for burning incense. It is often used during religious ceremonies.) A good example is the fungus Allophylaria atherospermatis.

Allophylus: [al-loh-fahy-lus] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for other or different and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which have a wide variation in the foliage. A good example is Allophylus cobbe.

Alloplectus: [al-loh-plek-tus] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for diverse and Plecto, which is Ancient Greek for twisted, plaited or woven. It refers to calyxes, which overlapother organs. A good example is Plectranthus alloplectus.

Allopterigeron: [al-lo-ter-i-jer-on] From Allos, which are Ancient Greek for diverse, Eri which is Ancient Greek for early and Erigeron which is Ancient Greek for an old man. It refers to flowers, which are variable and turn grey early in the season. A good example is Allopterigeron filifolium.

Allos: [al-los] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for diverse.

Allosyncarpia: [ah-lo-sin-kar-pi-a] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for other or different, Syn, which is Ancient Greek for together and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a wide variation in shape and size. A good example is Allopterigeron ternata.

Alloteropsis: [al-loh-ter-op-sis] From Allotrios, which is Ancient Greek for foreign and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for an appearance. It refers to fruits, which have different appearances or forms. A good example is Alloteropsis semialata.

Alloxylon: [al-loh-zahy-lon] From Allos, which is Ancient Greek for other or different, and Xylon, which is Ancient Greek for wood. It refers to timber, which have much variation in colour or density. A good example is Alloxylon flammeum.

Alluvial: [al-loo-vee-al] From Alluvius, which is Latin for deposited by water. It refers to soils made by clay, sand or silt, which are deposited by water.

Almaleea: [al-ma-lee-a] Is named in honour of Alma Lee; 1912-1990, who was an Australian botanist specializing in Legumes. A good example is Almaleea subumbellata

Almum: [al-mum] From Almus, which is Latin for to nourish or nourishing. It refers to the seeds, which have higher protein and or nourishment. A good example is Sorghum bicolor subsp. almum.

Alnifolium: [al-ni-foh-li-um] From Alni, which is Latin for the European Alder Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the European Alder trees. A good example is Homalium alnifolium.

Alocasia: [a-loh-ka-si-a] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Colocasia, for the Egyptian Lotus root. It refers to roots, which appear to be similar to the Lotus. A good example is Alocasia brisbanensis.

Alopecota: [a-loh-pe-ko-ta] From Oleō, which is Latin for to grow or to nourish and maybe from Peccoto, which is Latin for breaking the rules. It refers to one or more characteristics, which vary somewhat to those usually found in the Hibbertia genus. A good example is Hibbertia alopecota which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to its real or correct classification.

Alopecuroidea: [a-loh-pe-kyoo-roi-dee-a] From Alopex, which is Ancient Greek for a fox, Oura, which is Ancient Greek for a tail and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the appearance of the Alopecuros genus that have the flowering spikes and seed heads that resemble a fox’s tail similar. A good example is Neurachne alopecuroidea.

Alopecuroides: [a-loh-pe-kyoo-roi-deez] From Alopekouros, which is Ancient Greek for a grass similar to a fox’s tail and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flower spikes or seed heads, which resemble the Alopecuros genus in that they look similar to a fox’s tail. A good example was Pennisetum alopecuroides, which is now known as Ptilotus polystachyus.

Alopecuroideus: [a-loh-pe-kyoo-roi-dee-us] From Alopekouros, which is Ancient Greek for a grass similar to a fox’s tail and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flower spikes or seed heads, which resemble the Alopecuros genus in that they look similar to a fox’s tail. A good example was Ptilotus alopecuroideus, which is now known as Ptilotus polystachyus.

Alopecuros: [a-loh-pe-kyoo-ros] From Alopex, which is Ancient Greek for a fox, and Oura, which is Ancient Greek for a tail. It refers to flowers and seed heads, which resemble a fox’s tail. A good example is the the exotic weedy grass in Australia known as Bromus alopecuros.

Alopecurus: [a-loh-pe-kyoo-rus] From Alopex, which is Ancient Greek for a fox, and Oura, which is Ancient Greek for a tail. It refers to flowers and seed heads, which resemble a fox’s tail. A good example is the exotic weeds like Alopecurus aequalis.

Alpestre: [al-pes-trahy] From Alpestris, which is Latin for the Alps. It refers to plants, which prefer subalpine areas of mountains below the permanent snow line or in spring thaw zones. They prefer the warmer areas. A good example is Prasophyllum alpestre.

Alpestris: [al-pes-tris] From Alpestris, which is Latin for the Alps. It refers to plants, which prefer subalpine areas of mountains below the permanent snow line or in spring thaw zones. They prefer the warmer areas. A good example is Luzula alpestris

Alphandii: [al-fan-di-ahy] Is named after M. Alphandi who was a French botanical author on the Paris Botanic Gardens. A good example is Castanophora alphandi.

Alphitonia: [al-fi-toh-ni-a] From Alphiton, which is Ancient Greek for baked barley mealy. It refers to the floury red mealy around the seeds. A good example is Alphitonia excelsa.

Alphitonioides: [al-fi-toh-ni-oi-deez] From Alphiton, which is Ancient Greek for baked barley mealy and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which resemble trees in the Alphitonia genus especially the manner, shape and size of the fruits. A good example is Emmenosperma alphitonioides.

Alpicola: [al-pi-koh-la] From Alpestis, which is Latin for the Alps and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to reside or dwell. It refers to plants, which habitat higher altitude areas. A good example is Olearia alpicola.

Alpigena: [al-pi-jee-na] From Alpestis, which is Latin for the Alps and Genum, which is Latinized for the German word for to be born. It refers to plants, which habitat higher altitude areas. A good example is Goodenia humilis var. alpigena.

Alpigenum: [al-pi-jee-num] From Alpestis, which is Latin for the Alps and Genum, which is Latinized for the German word for to be born. It refers to plants, which habitat higher altitude areas. A good example is Gnaphalium alpigenum.

Alpina: [al-pi-na] From Alpestis, which is Latin for the Alps. It refers to plants, which have their environments in subalpine areas of mountains below the permanent snow. A good example is Astelia alpina.

Alpine: [al-pahyn] From Alpestis, which is Latin for the Alps. It refers to plants, which have their environments in subalpine areas of mountains below the permanent snow line. A good example is Acacia alpine.

Alpinia: [al-pi-ni-a] Is named in honour of Prospero Alpini; 1553-1617, who was an Italian physician and botanist. A good example is Alpinia caerula.

Alpinum: [al-pi-num] From Alpīnum, which is Latin for the Alps. It refers to plants, which have their environments in subalpine areas of mountains below the permanent snow line. A good example is Myriophyllum alpinum.

Alpinus: [al-pi-nus] From Alpīnus which is Latin for the Alps. It refers to plants, which have their environments in subalpine areas of mountains below the permanent snow line. A good example is Ozothamnus alpinus.

Alpivaga: [al-pi-vei-ga] From Alpīnum, which is Latin for the Alps, and Vagan which is Latin for to roam. It refers to plants, which appear sporadically along the subalpine areas. A good example is Grevillea alpivaga.

Alsa: [al-sa] From Alsa, which is Latinised from the Old German word for a noble kind. It refers to plants, which are more noble or larger than other species in the genus. A good example is Euphrasia alsa.

Alsiniflora: [al-si-ni-flor-a] From Alsínē which is Ancient Greek for an unknown plant probably the chickweeds and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers which somewhat resemble the flowers of the European chickweeds. A good example is Euphorbia alsiniflora.

Alsinoides: [al-sin-oi-deez] From Alsínē which is Ancient Greek for an unknown plant probably the chickweeds and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants especially the leaves, which somewhat resemble the European chickweeds. A good example is Mitrasacme alsinoides.

Alsophila: [al-so-fi-la] From Alsos, which is Ancient Greek for a grove and Philos which is Ancient Greek for to be loved or loving. It refers to plants which are often found and look great in groves. A good example is Melaleuca alsophila.

Alsophilum: [al-so-fi-lum] From Alsos, which is Ancient Greek for a grove and Philos which is Ancient Greek for to be loved or loving. It refers to plants which are often found and look great in groves. A good example was Myrtoleucodendron alsophilum, which is now known as Melaleuca alsophila.

Alstonia: [al-stoh-nee-uh] Is named in honour of Doctor Charles Alston, 1683-1860, who was a professor of Medicine at Edinburgh University. A good example is Alstonia constricta.

Alterna: [ol/ahl-ter-nuh] From Alternātum, which is Latin for alternating, vacilating or to take turns in. It refers to structures or organs, which are placed alternatively. A good example is Alternanthera denticulata.

Alternantha: [al-ter-nan-tha] From Alternāta, which is Latin for alternating, vacilating or to take turns in and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which alternate between the petals. A good example is Alternanthera denticulata.

Alternanthera: [al-ter-nan-ther-a] From Alternātum, which is Latin for alternating, vacilating or to take turns in and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which alternate between the petals. A good example is Alteranthera bettzickeriana.

Alternanthum: [al-ter-nan-thum] From Alternātum, which is Latin for alternating, vacilating or to take turns in and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which alternate between the petals.

Alternanthus: [al-ter-nan-thus] From Alternātus, which is Latin for alternating, vacilating or to take turns in and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which alternate between the petals.

Alternate stamens: [al-ter-neit, stei-menz] From Alternātum, which is Latin for alternating, vacilating or to take turns in and Stamon which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower. It refers to where the stamens appear between the petals.

Alternate: [ol/al-ter-neit] From Alternātum, which is Latin for alternating, vacilating or to take turns in. It refers to a leaves, which are placed one after the other along the stems. (Synonym opposite referring to the leaves) A good example is Breynia oblongifolia.

Alternation of Generation: [ol/al-ter-nei-shon, gen-er-ei-shon] From Alternanum, which is Latin for alternating or to take in turns, and From generātiō, which is Latin for a decendant. It refers to two phases, or descendants that are often morphologically, and sometimes chromosomally, distinct. Basically it is the growth stage of a plant and the reproductive stage of the seeds or spore. A good example is easily seen in ferns, where the prothallus stage is distinctly different to the adult stage of growth of which Adiantum aethiopicum is a good example.

Alternifolia: [ol/ahl-ter-ni-foh-lee-a] From Alternanum, which is Latin for alternating or to take in turns, and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which alternate along the stems. A good example is Melaleuca alternifolia.

Alternifolium: [ol/al-ter-ni-foh-li-um] From Alternātum, which is Latin for alternating, vacilating or to take turns in and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which alternate along the stems. A good example is Gastrolobium alternifolium.

Alternifolius: [al-ter-ni-foh-li-us] From Alternātum, which is Latin for alternating, vacilating or to take turns in and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which alternate along the stems. A good example is Leucopogon alternifolius.

Alterniloba: [ol/al-ter-ni-loh-ba] From Alternātum, which is Latin for alternating, vacilating or to take turns in and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to lobes on a leaf, leaflets or thallus, which develops one after the other along an axis. (Synonym opposite) A good example is Aneura alterniloba.

Althaeifolia: [al-thee-foh-li-a] From Althaíā, which is Ancient Greek for a cure, or a product that heals and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which somewhat resemble the leaves of the Atheae genus. A good example was Rulingia althaeifolia, which is now known as Commersonia grandiflora.

Althaeoides: [al-thee-oi-deez] From Althaíā, which is Ancient Greek for a cure, or a product that heals and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves and flowers, which resemble the marshmallow or ancient Hibiscus genus. A good example is Convolvulus althaeoides.

Althenia: [al-the-ni-a] Maybe from Ather/Alther, which is Ancient Greek for sharp, and Aine, which is Ancient Greek for praise. It may refer to Athena, who was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare thus the plants are worthy of some praise despite having some thorns or prickles. A good example is Althenia cylindrocarpa.

Althofera: [al-thoh-feer-a] Is named in honour of George Altherofer who was an Australian native plant enthusiast who studied, cultivated and educated people on the benefits of natives as opposed to exotics. A good example is Diuris althofera.

Althoferi: [al-thoh-fer-ahy] Is named in honour of one of the Altherofer family members, who was an Australian native plant enthusiast who studied, cultivated and educated people on the benefits of natives as opposed to exotics. A good example is Prostanthera althoferi.

Althoferorum: [al-thoh-feer-or-um] Is named in honour of the Altherofer brothers who were Australian native plant enthusiasts, studied, cultivated and educated people on the benefits of natives as opposed to exotics. The brothers with wife Hazel instigated the Burrendong arbortum near Wellington in NSW which is dedicated to rare and endangered Australian Native Plants. A good example is Grevillea althoferorum.

Alticola: [al-ti-koh-la] From Altior, which is Latin for tall as in height above sea level and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which are prefer higher altidudes. A good example is Genoplesium alticola.

Altior: [al-ti-or] From Altior, which is Latin for tall as in height above sea level. It refers to plants, which grow at higher altitudes than other species in the genus or species. A good example is Pimelea latifolia subsp. altior.

Altissima: [al-tis-si-ma] From Alt, which is Latin for tallest or highest and Issima, which is Latin for the most. It refers to plants, which prefer higher altitudes than other species in the genus. A good example is Ailanthus altitissima, which has naturalized in some districts within Australia.

Altissimus: [al-tis-i-mus] From Alt, which is Latin for tallest or highest and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or the most. It refers to plants, which prefer the highest altitudes of all the other species in the genus. A good example is Scindapsus altissimus.

Altus: [al-tus] From Alt, which is Latin for tallest or highest and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or the most. It refers to plants, which prefer the highest altitudes of all the other species in the genus. A good example is the horticultural Chinese fire bush Euonymus altus.

Alulata: [a-loo-la-ta] Maybe from Alatus which is Latin for a small wing. It may refer to petioles, which have a small wing. A good example is Boronia alulata.

Aluminium: [al-yoo-min-i-um] From Alumen which is Latin for bitter.

Aluta: [a-loo-ta] From Aluta, which is Latin for a soft tweed leather (A soft leather suitable for dinning gloves or bookbinding). It refers to leaves, which have a soft, leathery feel. A good example is Aluta maisonneuvei subsp. maisonneuvei.

Alutacea: [a-loo-ta-see-a] From Aluta, which is Latin for a soft tweed leather (A soft leather suitable for dinning gloves or bookbinding), and Acea, which is Latin for alike. It refers to leaves, which resemble the Aluta genus. A good example is Collybia alutacea.

Alutaceum: [a-loo-ta-see-um] From Aluta, which is Latin for a soft tweed leather (A soft leather suitable for dinning gloves or bookbinding), and Acea, which is Latin for alike. It refers to leaves, which resemble the Aluta genus. A good example is Penicillium alutaceum.

Alutaceus: [a-loo-ta-see-us] From Aluta, which is Latin for a soft tweed leather (A soft leather suitable for dinning gloves or bookbinding), and Acea, which is Latin for alike. It refers to leaves, which resemble the Aluta genus. A good example is Agaricus alutaceus.

Alveata: [al-vee-a-ta] From Alveātus, which is Latin for a belly or stomach. It refers to flowers, which have a swollen mid-section similar to a pot belly stove or a man’s beer gut. A good example is Pterostylis alveata.

Alveatum: [al-vee-a-tum] From Alveātus, which is Latin for a belly or stomach. It refers to flowers, which have a swollen mid-section similar to a pot belly stove or a man’s beer gut. A good example is Diplodium alveatum, which is now known as Pterostylis alveata.

Alveiformis: [al-vei-for-mis] From Alvei, which is Latin for the hull of a ship and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the shape of lemmas, which resemble a ship’s hull. A good example is Eragrostis alveiformis.

Alveolaris: [al-vee-oh-lar-is] From Alysis, which is Latin for to be hollowed out or honeycombed. It refers to structures or organs, which are strongly or deeply pitted or honeycombed. A good example is the lower pileus on the fungus Marasmius alveolaris.

Alveolate: [al-vee-oh-leit] From Alysis, which is Latin for to be hollowed out or honeycombed. It refers to structures or organs, which are strongly or deeply pitted or honeycombed. A good example is the deeply pitted seeds on Santalum Acuminatum.

Alygoyne: [a-li-oh-jahyn] From Alytos, which is Ancient Greek for united or undivided and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to ovaries, which are joined together. A good example is Alygoyne huegelii.

Alysicarpus: [a-lahy-si-kar-pus] From Alysis, which is Ancient Greek for a chain, and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek, for a fruit. It refers to individual carpels, which are joined in a chain formation. A good example is Alysicarpus muelleri.

Alyxia: [a-lik-see-a] From Alysis, which is Ancient Greek for a chain. It refers to the individual carpels, which are joined in a very distinct chain formation. A good example is the cahin fruit shrub, Alyxia buxifolia.

Alyxifolia: [a-lik-si-foh-li-a] From Alysis, which is Ancient Greek for a chain, and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the individual leaflets, which are joined in a chain formation. A good example is Benthamina alyxifolia.

Alyxifolium: [a-lik-si-foh-li-um] From Alysis, which is Ancient Greek for a chain and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to individual leaflets, which are joined in a chain formation. A good example was Loranthus alyxifolium, which is now known as Benthamina alyxifolia. Loranthus alyxifolius

Alyxifolius: [a-lik-si-foh-li-us] From Alysis, which is Ancient Greek for a chain and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to individual leaflets, which are joined in a chain formation. A good example is Loranthus alyxifolius

Amabile: [a-ma-bahyl] From Amabilis, which is Latin for to be deserving of Love or beautiful. It refers to the beauty of a plant or more often the beauty of the flowers. A good example was Crinum amabile, which is now known as Crinum pedunculatum.

Amabilis: [a-ma-bil-is] From Amabilis, which is Latin for to be deserving of Love or beautiful. It refers to plants, which are more beautiful yjan other species in the genus. A good example is Juncus amabilis.

Amaliae: [a-ma-li-ee] Is named in honour of Amalia of Oldenburg; 1818–1875, who was queen consort of Greece from 1836 to 1862 as the spouse of King Otto. She won the hearts of Greek people for her rare beauty like the flowers of the Hibiscus and for her own design of a more comfortable attire still worn today and known as the Amaliae dress. It refers to flowers, which have large sepals and large spreading flowersfrom a compact fruit giving the appearance of the amaliae dress. A good example was Hibiscus amaliae, which is now known as Hibiscus heterophyllus subsp. heterophyllus.

Amanda: [a-man-da] From Amandum, which is Latin for to be loved. It refers to plants, which you can fall in love with. A good example is Acacia amanda.

Amanita: [a-ma-ni-ta] From Amanítēs, which is Ancient Greek for a type of fungus. It refers to various saprotrophic and agaricaceous fungi, which have white gills and a broken membranous ring (volva) around the stalk. Many of which are highly toxic and contain the peptides that can dissolve protein including the liver and kidneys. A good example is Amanita pyramidifera.

Amanita pyramidifera

Amara: [a-mar-a] From ōmós, which is Ancient Greek for raw or crude or    Amārum, which is Latin for to be bitter to the taste buds. It refers to structures or organs, which are crude or bitter to eat. A good example is the fruits on Lunasia amara.

Amaranthoides: [a-mar-an-thoi-deez] From Amaranton, which is Ancient Greek for an everlasting flower, Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which are similar to those in the Amaranthus genus. A good example is Deeringia amaranthoides

Amaranthus: [am-ar-an-thus] From Amaranton, which is Ancient Greek for an everlasting flower and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which do not fade over long periods. A good example is Amaranthus macrocarpus.

Amarissima: [am-ar-is-sim-a] From Amarum, which is Latin for to be bitter to the taste buds and Issimma, which is Latin for the superlative or the most. It refers to structures or organs, which are extremely bitter to eat. A good example is Brucea amarissima.

Amarus: [am-ar-us] From Amarus, which is Latin for to be bitter to the taste buds. It refers to structures or organs, which are bitter to eat. A good example is the fungus Leucopaxillus amarus.

Amauroderma: [am-or-ro-der-ma] From Amaúrōsis, which is Greek for darken, blacken or a deep colour and Dérō which is Ancient Greek or later Dérma, which is Ancient Greek or Dérmis, which is Latin for skin or hide. It refers to and structural surface which has a very deep colour. A good example is Hypolepis amaurorachis.

Amaurorachis: [am-awr-o-kis] From Amaúrōsis, which Greek is for darken, blacken or a deep colour and Rachis, which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to rachis, which are very deep maroon-brown colour. A good example is Hypolepis amaurorachis.

Ambigua: [am-big-yoo-a] From ambiguous, which is Ancient Greek for uncertainty or confusion. It refers to plants, which display similar properties to others causing confusion when trying to identify them. A good example is Kunzea ambigua with Kunzea affinis.

Ambiquus: [am-bi-kyoo-us] From Ambiguos. which is Ancient Greek for confusion or uncertainty. It refers to plants, which display similar properties to others species in the genus that cause confusion when trying to identify them. A good example is Cymbopogon ambiquus.

Ambita: [am-bi-ta] From Ambitus, which is Latin for desirable. It refers to plants, which would be desirable as horticultural rockery or garden specimen especially when in flower. A good example is Frankenia ambita.

Ambleia: [am-blei-a] Maybe from Amblygon, which is Ancient Greek for blunt or obtuse. It refers to the angles on the fruits being obtuse. A good example is Asperula ambleia.

Amblyantha: [am-blahy-ahn-thu] From Amblygon, which is Ancient Greek for blunt or obtuse and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which have obtuse apexes. A good example is Anthocercis amblyantha.

Amblyanthera: [am-blahy-an-ther-a] From Amblygon, which is Ancient Greek for blunt or obtuse, and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to apexes of petals, which have irregularly obtuse apexes. A good example is Scaevola amblyanthera.

Amblycarpum: [am-blahy-kar-pum] From Amblygon, which is Ancient Greek for blunt or obtuse and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have an obtuse angle on the sides. A good example was Phebalium amblycarpum, which is now known as Rhadinothamnus rudis subsp. amblycarpus.

Amblycarpus: [am-blahy-kar-pus] From Amblygon, which is Ancient Greek for blunt or obtuse and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have an obtuse angle on the sides. A good example is Anthocercis amblyantha.

Amblycoleus: [am-blahy-ko-lee-us] From Amblygon, which is Ancient Greek for blunt or obtuse and Koleós/Koleón, which is Ancient Greek for a sheath. It refers to flower structures, which have a sheath protecting the sexual organs or ovaries. A good example is Restio amblycoleus, which is now known as Chordifex amblycoleus.

Amblygona: [am-blahy-goh-na] From Amblygon, which is Ancient Greek for blunt or obtuse. It refers to the angles on the fruits, which are obtuse. A good example is Acacia amblygona.

Amblygonum: [am-blahy-goh-num] From Amblygon, which is Ancient Greek for blunt or obtuse. It refers to the angles on the fruits, which are obtuse. A good example is Racosperma amblygonum.

Amblymerum: [am-blahy-mer-um] From Amblygon, which is Ancient Greek for blunt or obtuse and Merum, which is Latin for pure or neat as in a wine. Its reference is unclear, unless it refers to the five wings on the petals, which maybe described as neat and ordilly. A good example is Solanum amblymerum.

Amblyogenium: [am-blahy-oh-je-ni-um] From Amblygon, which is Ancient Greek for blunt or obtuse and Genium, which is Latin for a genius. Its reference is unclear. A good example is Dendrobium amblyogenium.

Amblyophylla: [am-blahy-oh-fahyl-la] From Ambly, which is Ancient Greek for blunt or obtuse, and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaf apexes, which are obtusely blunt. A good example is Dodonaea amblyophylla.

Amboinense: [am-boi-nens] From Ambon, which is Latinized for an Island in Indonesia and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from or to come from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the Ambon Island. A good example is Leptospermum amboinense.

Amboinensis: [am-boi-nen-sis] From Ambon which is Latinized for an Island in Indonesia and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from or to come from. It refers to where the original plants were first discovered from the Ambon Island. A good example is Proiphys amboinensis.

Amboinicum: [am-boi-ni-kum] From Ambon, which is Latinized for an Island in Indonesia and Icus/Ensis, which are Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were thought to have originally come from Indonesia. A good example is Pimelodendron amboinicum.

Amboinicus: [am-boi-ni-kus] From Ambon, which is Latinized for an Island in Indonesia and Icus/Ensis, which are Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were thought to have originally come from Indonesia. A good example is the kitchen herb five spice Plectranthus amboinicus, which is not native despite many who think it is.

Ambrina: [am-bri-na] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Colubrina, which is Ancient Greek for snake like. It refers to plants, which crawl along the ground or have long thin stems which arch upwards before falling to the ground. A good example is Ambrina pumilio.

Ambroma: [am-broh-ma] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Bromos, which is Ancient Greek for food. It refers to plants, which are mildly toxic. A good example is Abroma fastuosum.

Ambrozii: [am-broh-zi-ahy] Is named in honour of Ambroz. It refers to a melon, which is very common in Asia and is naturally found in the Northern Territory and northern Australia. A good example was Trichosanthes ambrozii, which is now known as Trichosanthes cucumerina.

Ambuli: [am-byoo-li] From Ambulāre, which is Latin for to amble. It refers to plants, which have a relaxing amble like air about them. A good example was Ambuli sessiliflora, which is now known asLimnophila sessiliflora.

Ambulia: [am-byoo-li-a] From Ambulāre, which is Latin forto amble. It refers to plants, which have a relaxing amble like air about them. A good example was Ambulia sessiliflora, which is now known asLimnophila sessiliflora.

Ambusta: [am-bus-ta] From Ambustum, which is Latin for scorched. It refers to plants, which have a scorched appearance or appear as though they are sunburnt. A good example is Caladenia ambusta.

Amelichloa: [a-mel-i-kloh-a] Is named in honour of Marie Amelia Torres; 1931-2011, who was an Argentinian agrostologist and Khlóē, which is Ancient Greek for (young) green shoots – a grass. A good example is the American grass Amelichloa brachychaeta.

Amelum: [a-me-lum] From Amelius, which is Latin for a fetus born without legs or arms. It refers to plants, which have very few or no limbs. A good example is Lepidium amelum.

Ament: [a-ment] From Amentum, which is Latin for a strap a thong. It refers to plants, which are fibrous in nature. A dry, usually elongated or drooping, scaly spike bearing imperfect flowers; a catkin. It is a frequent feature of woody plants.

Amentacea: [a-men-ta-see-] From Amentum, which is Latin for a strap a thong, and Aceus, which is Latin for a family. It refers to plants, which have many characteristics of the Amentaceae family. A good example is Opilia amentacea.

Amenticola: [a-men-ti-koh-la] From Amentum, which is Latin for a strap a thong, and Kola which is Latin for to reside at or dwell. It refers to plants, which grow in a narrow strip along the coast. A good example is Mollisia amenticola.

Amentifera: [a-men-ti-feer-a]From Amentum, which is Latin for a strap a thong, and Fera which is Latin for to bear or carry. It refers to plants, which have long strap like leaves or phyllodes. A good example is Acacia amentifera.

Amentiferum: [a-men-ti-feer-um]From Amentum, which is Latin for a strap a thong, and Fera which is Latin for to bear or carry. It refers to plants, which have long strap like leaves or phyllodes. A good example is Racosperma amentiferum, which is now known as Acacia amentifera.

Ameria: [a-me-ri-a] From Ameria which is Latin for the Dianthus genus. It refers to plants, which resemble the Dianthus genus. A good example is Schoenus ameria.

Americana: [a-me-ri-kahr-na] From America, which is Latinized for from the Americas. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from North. A good example is Aeschyomene americana.

Americanum: [a-me-ri-kar-num] From America, which is Latinized for from the Americas. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from North. A good example is Solanum americanum.

Amicorum: [a-mi-kor-um] From Ami, which is and Corium which is Latin for attractive. It refers to leaves and overall appearance, which is quiet attractive. A good example is Plectranthus amicorum.

Amischus: [a-mis-khus] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Mischs, which is Ancient Greek for a stalk. It refers to leaves and or flowers, which are sessile. A good example is Calamus amischus of which the Australian species have been renamed Calamus australis.

Amman: [a-man] Is named in honour of Johann Amman; 1699-1741, who was a noted Russian Professor in natural history or Paul Amman; 1634-1691, who was a German Botanist.

Ammania: [a-ma-ni-a] Is named in honour of Paul Amman; 1634-1691, a German Botanist. A good example is Ammania multiflora.

Ammannioides: [a-man-ni-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Paul Amman; 1634-1691, a German Botanist and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which resemble the genus Ammannia. A good example is Bergia ammannioides.

Ammi: [am-mi] From Ammi, which is an ancient Latin name for the plant. It refers to plants, which have similar characteristics to the original plant. It may refer to an old Hebrew slang term for Jews – Bishops weed. A good example is the exotic toxic weed from Europe and Asia Minor, Ammi majus.

Ammobia: [am-moh-bi-a] From Psamomum, which is Ancient Greek for sand and Bios, for life. It refers to the plants preference for sandy soils. Two good examples are Fimbristylis ammobia or Acacia ammobbia.

Ammocharis: [am-moh-kahr-is] From Psamomum, which is Ancient Greek for sand, and Karis, which is Ancient Greek for a real beauty. It refers to plants, especially the flowers, which are very beautiful plants that have a strong preference to sandy soils. A good example is Ammocharis coranica.

Ammonilla: [am-mo-nil-la] From Ammos, which is Ancient Greek for sand, and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for to love or loving. It refers to plants, which prefer hot sandy environments. A good example is Berrya ammonilla.

Ammophila: [am-mo-fil-la] From Psamomum, which is Ancient Greek for sand and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which have a strong preference to sandy soils. Two good examples are Sida ammophila or Acacia ammophila.

Ammophilum: [ah-mo-filo-lum] From Psamomum, which is Ancient Greek for sand and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to the species preferences for growing in sandy habitats. A good example is Zygophyllum ammophilum.

Amnicola: [am-ni-Koh-la] From Amni, which is Latin for a stream or creek, Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which have a riparian environment. Two good examples are Arachnorchis amnicola or Atriplex amnicola.

Amnios: [am-ni-os] From Amnos, which is Ancient Greek for a sac in which the embryo is suspended. It refers to the sac, which holds the fluid that surrounds and protects the embryo.

Amniotic Fluid: [am-nee-o-tik, floo-id] From Amnos, which is Ancient Greek for a sac in which an embryo is suspended and Fluidus, which is Latin for to flow or flowing. It refers to the liquid within a sac, which surrounds and protects the embryo.

Amoena: [am-oh-ee-nuh] From Amoenus,, which is Latin for charming or pleasing. It refers to the plants, which have a rather beautiful disposition overall. A good example Acacia amoena.

Amoenissima: [am-oh-en-is-si-ma] From Amoena, which is Latin for delightful and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or the most. It refers to plants or flowers, which are the most delightful subjects to the eyes. A good example was Albizia amoenissima is now known as Cathormion umbellatum subsp. moniliforme.

Amoenus: [a-moh-en-us] From Amoenum, which is Latin for agreeable, pleasant or delightful. It refers to plants, which have an appeal or have delightful appearance. A good example is Plectranthus amoenum which is now known as Coleus amoenum,

Amomum: [am-oh-mum] From Amomon, which is Ancient Greek for the name of a local shrub which the Romans made a fragrant balsam from. It refers to the plants, which are related to the original plant in Europe. A good example is Amomum dallachyi.

Amooroides: [a-mor-oi-deez] From Amoor, which is unknown or maybe from Amor which is Latin for beloved and Eîdos/Oides which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to trees, which are very beautiful. A good example is Dysoxylum amooroides.

Amorphic: [a-mor-fik] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for a shape or form of. It refers to flowers, which have no symmetry; usually with an indefinite number of stamens and carpels, and usually subtended by bracts or discoloured upper leaves. (Most have been recorded from fossil records).

Amorphophallus: [a-mor-fahl-lus] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Morphṓ, which is Ancient Greek for the shapely one or form as in Aphrodites and Phallós, which is Ancient Greek or Phallus, which is Latin for a penis. It refers to flowers or the spadixes, which resemble a mangled penis in form. A good example is the exotic horticultural flower of interest in Amorphophallus paeoniifolium.

Amorphosperma: [a-mor-fo-sper-ma] From A, which is Greek/Latin without or not having, Morphṓ, which is Ancient Greek for the shapely one or form as in Aphrodites, and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which appear to have an apparent lack of seeds in some seasons. A good example is Niemeyera antiloga.

Amorphospermum: [a-mor-fo-sper-mum] From A, which is Greek/Latin without or not having, Morphṓ, which is Ancient Greek for the shapely one or form as in Aphrodites and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which appear to have an apparent lack of seeds in some seasons. A good example is Amorphospermum antiloga.

Amorphus: [a-mor-fus] From A, which is Greek/Latin without or not having and Morphṓ, which is Ancient Greek for the shapely one or form as in Aphrodites. It refers to seeds, which appear to have an apparent lack of seeds in some seasons. A good example is Amorphospermum whitei.

Ampacus: [am-pah-kus] Maybe from Ampycos which is the Ancient Greek for the god husband of Chloris (greenery). It refers to plants, with very, bright green leaves. A good example was Ampacus xanthoxyloides, which is now known as Melicope xanthoxyloides.

Ampelaster: [am-pel-as-ter] From ámpelîtis/ámpelos, which is Ancient Greek for a grape vine, and Astrum, which is Latin for a star. It refers to plants, which are members of the Astarteceae family and are climbers. A good example is Ampelaster carolinianus.

Ampelocissus: [am-pel-o-sis-sus] From ámpelîtis/ámpelos, which is Ancient Greek for a grape vine and Kissos, which is Ancient Greek for an ivy (grape). It refers to vines, which resemble the commercial grape vines. A good example is Ampelocissus acetosa.

Ampelographer: [am-pel-o-gra-fer] From ámpelîtis/ámpelos, which is Ancient Greek for a grape vine and graph which is Ancient Greek for to draw and Er, which is Latin for a person. It refers to a person who studies grape cultivation.

Ampelography: [am-pel-o-gra-fee] From ámpelîtis/ámpelos, which areAncient Greek for a grape vine, graph which is Ancient Greek for to draw and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study.Is the branch of botany that studies the growing of grapes.

Ampelopteris: [am-pel-o-teer-is] From ámpelîtis/ámpelos, which is Ancient Greek for a grape vine, and Pteris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to ferns, which produce bulbils that have a very vague resemblance to an ivy at times. A good example is Ampelopteris prolifera.

Amperea: [am-per-ee-a] Is named in honour of Antoine Ampere; 1775-1836, a physicist who worked on electromagnetism. A good example is Amperea xiphoclada var. xiphoclada.

Amphiachyris: [am-fi-a-kris] From Amphíbia, which is Greek for living a double life and Achyron, for chaff or husk. It refers to the achenes being somewhat chaff like. A good example is the yellow daisy from America Amphiachyris amoena.

Amphibia: [am-fi-bee-uh] From Amphíbia, which is Greek for living a double life. It refers to plants, which can live in water or in wet situations out of water or half in water and half out of the water. A good example is Ranunculus lappaceus.

Amphibiological: [am-fi-bahy-ol-o-ji-kal] From Amphíbia, which is Ancient Greek for living a double life, Zoion, which is Ancient Greek for living and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the branch of zoology that studies amphibians – frogs and toads.

Amphibiologist: [am-fi-bahy-ol-o-jist] From Amphíbia, which is Greek for living a double life, bio, which is Greek for living, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person, who studies the branch of biology, which studies amphibians – frogs and toads.

Amphibiology: [am-fi-bahy-ol-o-jee] From Amphíbia, which is Greek for living a double life, Zoion, which is Greek for living and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the branch of biology, which studies amphibians – frogs and toads.

Amphibium: [am-fi-bi-um] From Amphíbia, which is Greek for living a double life. It refers to plants, which can live in water or in wet situations out of water or half in water and half out of the water. A good example is Myriophyllum amphibium.

Amphibius: [am-fi-bi-us] From Amphíbia, which is Ancient Greek for living a double life. It refers to plants, which can live in water or in wet situations out of water or half in water and half out of the water.

Amphibolia: [am-fi-boh-li-a] From Amphíbia, which is Ancient Greek for living an ambiguity in life. It refers to plants, or animals which have an ambiguous life not knowing whether to live in or out of water as they can live in water or in wet situations out of water or plants that have their roots below the water surface and some structures or organs above the surface. A good example is Myriophyllum amphibium.

Amphibolis: [am-fi-bo-lis] From Amphibola, which is Latin for raising ambiguity or uncertainty. It refers to plants, which have ambiguity in characteristics, which resemble the other species. A good example is the ambiguity of the two species in the genus Amphibolis antarctica and Amphibolis griffithii.

Amphibromus: [am-fib-ro-mus] From Amphibola, which is Latin for raising ambiguity or uncertainty and Bromus, which is Ancient Greek for an oat. It refers to grains, which resemble oats but are in fact not related to the true oats, Avena sativa. A good example is Amphibromus neesii.

Amphicarpaea: [am-fi-kahr-pee-a] From Amphíbia, which is Greek for living a double life and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits, which have two distinct forms. A good example is Amphicarpaea edgeworthii, which is being strongly considered for phytotoxic use near swamps and marshes.

Amphicarpum: [am-fi-kahr-pum] From Amphíbia, which is Greek for living a double life and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have two distinct forms. A good example is the American species Amphicarpum amphicarpon.

Amphicarpus: [am-fi-kar-pus] From Amphíbia, which is Greek for living a double life and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have two distinct forms of spikelets. A good example is the American species Lathyrus amphicarpus.

Amphiflorous: [am-flor-us] From Amphíbia, which is Ancient Greek for living a double life and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have two distinct forms.

Amphigia: [am-fi-ji-a] From amphigyos, which is Ancient Greek for pointed at both ends. It refers to boat shaped bracteoles or maybe the transformation of the arid landscape into a sea of colour when it breaks into bloom. A good example is Verticordia amphigia.

Amphilophis: [am-fi-lo-fis] From Amphíbia, which is Ancient Greek for living a double life and Lophis, which is Ancient Greek for a crest. It refers to flowers which have two distinct types of crests. A good example is the flowering spikes on Amphilophis erianthoides, which is now known as Bothriochloa erianthoides.

Amphineuron: [ahm-fi-nyoo-ron] From Amphíbia, which is Ancient Greek for living a double life and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve or vein. It refers to plants, which have or may not have conspicuous nerves. A good example is Amphineuron queenslandicum.

Amphipogon: [am-fi-poh-gon] From Amphi, which is Ancient Greek for both sides or double sided and Pogon, a beard. It refers to hairs which are on both sides of the spikelets. A good example is Amphipogon caricinus var. caricinus.

Amphipogonoides: [am-fi-poh-gon-oi-deez] From Amphi, which is Ancient Greek for both sides or double sided and Pogon, a beard and Eîdos/Oides which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to grasses, which resemble the Amphipogon genus in that the hairs are on both sides of the spikelets. A good example is Amphipogon amphipogonoides.

Amphistomatica: [am-fi-sto-ma-ti-ka] From Amphi, which is Ancient Greek for both sides or double sided, and Stoma, which is Ancient Greek for a mouth. It refers to structures or organs, which have openings that somewhat resemble a mouth. A good example is Euphrasia amphisysepala.

Amphisysepala: [am-fi-sahy-se-pa-la] From Amphi, which is Ancient Greek for both sides or double sided, and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek, or Sepalum, which is Latin for specialized leaves behind the flower. It refers to sepals, which are the same on both the upper and lower surfaces. A good example is Euphrasia amphisysepala.

Amphitricha: [am-fi-trahy-ka] From Amphi, which is Ancient Greek for both sides or double sided and Trichos, which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to stems or leaves, which are very hairy on all sides. A good example is Grevillea juniperina subsp. amphitricha.

Amphitrichus: [am-fi-trahy-kus] From Amphi, which is Ancient Greek for both sides or double sided and Trichos, which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to the stems or leaves, which have hairs on all surfaces. A good example is Ranunculus amphitrichus.

Amphitropous: [am-fi-lo-tro-pos] From Amphi, which is Ancient Greek for both sides or double sided and Tropous, which is Ancient Greek for, to turn or inverted. It refers to where the micropyle is in relation to the attachment of the funiculi/o/us tube.

Ampla: [am-pla] From Amplus, which is Latin for generous or plenty of. It refers to plants, which have many leaves or fronds. A good example is Colysis ampla.

Amplceps: [am-pli-seps] From Amplus, which is Latin for generous or plenty of and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to the flower heads, which appear quite prolifically. A good example is Acacia ampliceps.

Amplectens: [am-plek-tenz] From Amplectens, which is Latin for to wind around and surround. Its reference is unclear. A good example is Blumea amplectens.

Amplexans: [am-plek-sanz] From Amplexus, which is Latin for encircled or embraced. It usually refers to leaves, which clasp the stem or at times other organs, clasping around adjacent structures. A good example is Cyanicula amplexans.

Amplexicaule: [am-plek-si-kawr-lee] From Amplexus, which is Latin for encircled or embraced, and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek or Caulus, which is Latin for a twig, stem, small branch. It refers to the base of leaves, which often curl back around the stem. A good example is Angophora robor or Grevillea infundibularis.

Amplexicaulis: [am-plek-si-kawr-lis] From Amplexus, which is Latin for encircled or embraced, and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek or Caulus which is Latin for a stem, branch or trunk. It refers to leaves, which clasp the stem. A good example is Bacopa amplexicaulis.

Amplexicoma: [am-plek-si-koh-muh] From Amplexus, which is Latin for encircled or embraced, and Koma, which is Ancient Greek for a hair or comb. It refers to a structure or organ, which is covered in hairs. A good example is the perianth lobes, which are densely covered, in hairy papillea externally on Tetragonella amplexicoma.

Ampliata: [am-pli-a-ta] From Ampliātum, which is Latin for to enlarge or dilate. It refers to the seedpods, which enlarge to a greater size than the foliage. A good example is Acacia ampliata.

Ampliate: [am-pli-eit] From Ampliātum, which is Latin for to enlarge or dilate. It refers to structures or organs, which has been enlarged.

Ampliceps: [am-pli-seps] From Amplum, which is Latin for generous or plenty of and Cephalis, which is Latin for a head. It refers to plants, which have an abundance of flower heads. A good example is Acacia ampliceps.

Amplicifolia: [am-pli-si-foh-li-a] From Amplum, which is Latin for generous or plenty of and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have a dense canopy, however this is a spelling error for amplifolia and not amplicifolia. A good example is Grevillea amplifolia.

Amplifolia: [am-pli-foh-lee-uh] From Amplum, which is Latin for ample, generous or plenty of and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have a dense canopy. A good example is the leaves on Eucalyptus amplifolia.

Amplissima: [am-plis-si-ma] From Amplum, which is Latin for generous or plentiful, and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to flowers, which are born in profusion compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Diuris amplissima.

Amplissimia: [am-plis-si-mi-a] From Amplum, which is Latin for generous or plentiful, and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to leaves, which are born in profusion compared to other species in the genus. A good example was Rhaphidophora amplissimia, which is now known as Epipremnum amplissimum.

Amplissimum: [am-pli-si-mum] From Amplum, which is Latin for generous or plentiful and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative very. It refers to a leaves, which have both a wide range in size and shape and that are very plentiful. A good example is Epipremnum amplissimum.

Amplus: [am-plus] From Amplum, which is Latin for full, generous or plentiful. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which are very prolific. This is an unresolved name awaiting further investigation or research to determine which genus, species or sub species or variety it should be placed in. A good example is Leptochilus amplus.

Ampulliform: [am-pul-li-form] From Ampulla/Ampullae, which is Latin for rounded like a potbelly stove and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape of or form of. It refers to structures or organs, which are swollen at the base like a flask or middle like an old potbelly stove. A good example is the fruits on Eremophila warnesii.

Ampulliformis: [am-pul-li-for-mis] From Ampulla/Ampullae, which is Latin for rounded like a potbelly stove and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape of or form of. It refers to structures or organs, which are swollen at the base like a flask or middle like an old potbelly stove. A good example is the fruits on Symplocos ampulliformis.

Amputata: [am-pyoo-ta/tei-ta] From Amputātum, which is Latin for to cut off and remove. It refers to plants, which have long stout sharp spines, thorns or prickles, which can inflict a sever gash. A good example is Acacia amputata.

Amyctica: [a-mahy-sti-ka] From Amuktikós which is Ancient Greek for scratchy or sharp. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are scratchy. A good example is Acacia amyctica.

Amydra: [a-mahy-dra] most likely from Amudrós, which is Ancient Greek for faint, obscure or dim. It refers to plants, which blend into their environment and as such are obscured especially when not in flower. A good example is the leaves on Melaleuca amydra.

Amyema: [am-ahy-em-a] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Myeo, for I point out something that is new. It refers to a new feature that separated this genus from the Loranthus genus. A good example is the leaves on Amyema Cambagei.

Amygdalifolius: [a-mahy-da-li-foh-li-us] From Amygdale, which is Ancient Greek or Amygdal which is Latin for an almond and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves, which are looking similar to those of the almond tree. A good example is the foliage on Senecio amygdalifolius.

Amygdaliform: [a-mahy-da-li-form] From Amygdalus, which is Ancient Greek for the almond tree and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape of or form of. It refers to spores usually of fungi, which have an almond shape.

Amygdalina: [a-mahy-dah-li-na] From Amygdale, which is Ancient Greek or Amygdal, which is Latin for an almond. It refers to the leaves, which are similar to those of the almond tree. A good example is the foliage on Eucalyptus amygdalina.

Amygdalus: [a-mahy-dh-lus] From Amygdalus, which is Ancient Greek for the almond tree. It refers to trees, which have harvestable almond nuts. A good example is Prunus amygdalus.

Amyloid: [a-mahy-loid] From Amyloids, which is Ancient Greek for starch or starchy. It refers to a chemical staining reaction in which the tissue, spore wall ornamentation, etc. stains bluish-black in Melzer’s reagent (iodine solution), showing the presence of starch. – A waxy compound of protein and polysaccarides that is found deposited in tissues.

Amylotheca: [a-mahy-lo-thee-ka] From Amylos, which is Ancient Greek for starch or starchy and Theke, which is Ancient Greek or Theca, which is Latin for a box. It refers to fruits, which are rather starchy. A good example is the fruits on Amylotheca dictyophleba.

Anacampseros: [a-na-kamp-ser-os] From Anakampto, which is Ancient Greek for I restore, and Eros, for the God of Love. In Greek mythology, a plant in this genus was thought to have the power to restore romance and love in a relationship. A good example is the small native succulent Anacampseros australiana.

Anacampserotis: [a-ah-kamp-ser-o-tis] From Anakampto, which is Ancient Greek for I restore, and Eros, for the God of Love. In Greek mythology, a plant in this genus was thought to have the power to restore romance and love in a relationship. A good example was Senecio anacampserotis, which is now known as Senecio spathulatus var. attenuatus.

Anacardioides: [a-na-kar-i-oi-deez] From Anakardia, which is Ancient Greek for the cashew nut and Eîdos/Oîdes, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the close resemblance of the leaves and flowers to the Anacardium genus. A good example is Cupaniopsis anachariodes.

Anacardium: [a-na-kar-di-um] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Kardiac, which is Latin for the heart. It refers to fruits, which have a heart shape. A good example is the fruits on the cashew Amorphophallus nut tree Anacardium occidentale.

Anacolosa: [a-na-ko-lo-sa] From Anakolos, which is Ancient Greek for knotted. It refers to the rim of calyxes, which are twisted or knotted. A good example is Anacolosa papuana.

Anactina: [a-nak-ti-na] Maybe from Anatīnus/Anas, which is Latin for pertaining to ducks. It may refer to plants, which have habitat sor environments or the shape or form of a of a duck. A good example is the habitat and vague form of the pitchers on Nepenthes anactina, which has recently been separated from Nepenthes mirabilis.

Anacyclus: [a-na-kahy-lus] From A, without or not having, ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower, and kuklos, which is Ancient Grek for a ring. It refers to flowers, which have sterile florets in the outer ring/s. A good example is the pyrethrum daisy Anacyclus pyrethrum.

Anadenia: [a-na-de-ni-a] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Adenia, which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to a structure or organ, which has no glands. A good example is Hakea anadenia.

Anadromic: [a-na-dro-mik] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Dromous, which is Ancient Greek for activity. It refers to stagnant water, which has collected a lot of plant material and becomes inactive due to the lack of oxygen.

Anaerobic: [a-ne-roh-bik / ahn-ahr-oh-bik] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Bios which is Ancient Greek for life. It is a condition where oxygen has been suppressed or eliminated and any reaction needed is done without the presence of oxygen. These conditions prevail in wet clay soils and at depths in water.

Anagalloides: [a-na-gal-loi-deez] From Anagall, which is Ancient Greek for again and to delight in. It refers to flowers, which open each time, the sun strikes them meaning they are enjoyed every time the sun shines. A good example is Halgania anagalloides.

Anamola: [a-na-mo-la] From Ananas, which is Latinized from the vernacular for the Peruvian word of the Pineapple family or many of the Bromilades. It refers to flowers, or fruits, which resemble those of the pineapple genus, Ananas. A good example was Habenaria anomala, which is now known as Habenaria xanthantha.

Anamorphosis: [a-na-mor-fos-sis] From Ana, which is Greek/Latin for again and morpha, which is Ancient Greek for a shape or form. It refers to species, which have the ability or has changed its appearance to mimic another as a means of self-defence.

Ananas: [a-na-nas] From Ananas, which is Latinized from the vernacular for the Peruvian word of the Pineapple family or many of the Bromilades. It refers to flowers or fruits, which resemble those of the pineapple genus Ananas. A good example is Ananas comosus.

Ananassae: [a-na-nas-see] From Ananas, which is Latinized from the vernacular for the Peruvian word of the Pineapple family or many of the Bromilades. It refers to flowers, or fruits, which resemble those of the pineapple genus, Ananas. A good example is Tapeinochilos ananassae.

Ananeotes: [a-na-nee-o-teez] From Aná, which is Ancient Greek for on, up, above or throughout and Neotes which is Greek for rough or crude. It refers to plants usually the flowers, which are rough or not as refined as other sub species or varieties in the genus. A good example is Verticordia plumosa var. ananeotes.

Ananiceps: [a-na-ni-seps] From Anan, which is Latin for uncertainty and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to Pileus, which are somewhat like a scruffy head. A good example is Boletellus ananiceps.

Anarthria: [an-ar-thri-a] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Arthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint. It refers to plants, which appear to have sections of the culms or rachis incomplete. A good example is Anarthria gracilis.

Anarthros: [ah-nahr-thros] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Arthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint. It refers to the nodal branchlets appearing as though they are incomplete. A good example is Acacia anarthros.

Anasilla: [ah-nah-sil-luh] Maybe from Nasella, which is Ancient Greek for a basket with a narrow neck. It refers to flower heads, which have very long peduncles similar to wicker baskets with long necks. A good example is Acacia anasilla.

Anastema: [a-na-ste-ma] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Stémma, which is Ancient Greek for a wreath or garland. It refers to fine stems, which are pliable and fine enough to be made into a wreath or garland. A good example is Acacia anastema.

Anastomose: [a-na-stoh-mos] From Ana, which is Ancient Greek for again, up or upwards, Stoma, which is Ancient Greek for a mouth or opening, and Osis, which is Ancient Greek for an action. It refers to the formation of a connection between two normally disjunct organs. It refers to veins usually on leaves, which have a cross-connection – an open end that fluids can still pass between. A good example is Dendrochnide excelsa.

Anastomosing: [a-na-sto-mahy-zing] From Ana, which is Ancient Greek for again, up or upwards, Stoma, which is Ancient Greek for a mouth or opening, and Osis, which is Ancient Greek for an action. It refers to the formation of a connection between two normally disjunct organs. It refers to veins usually on leaves, which have a cross-connection – an open end that fluids can still pass between. A good example is Dendrochnide phontinia.

Coleus graveolens showing the anatomising lateral veins.

Anastomosis: [a-na-sto-moh-sis] From Ana which is Ancient Greek for again, up or upwards, Stoma, which is Ancient Greek for a mouth or opening, and Osis which is Ancient Greek for an action. It refers to the formation of a connection between two normally disjunct organs. It refers to veins usually on leaves, which have a cross-connection – an open end that fluids can still pass between. A good example is Acacia courtii.

Anaticeps: [a-na-ti-seps] From Anati, which is Latin for a duck, and Cephalus, which is Latin for a head. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble a duck’s head. A good example is Acacia anaticeps.

Anatomy-plant: [a-na-to-mee, plant] From Anatome, which is Greek or Anatomia, which is Latin for cutting up and Plant which is Old English for a plant or Plante which is Latin for to plant. It refers to the study of the internal structure of plants, especially at a microscopic level which requiring dissecting.

Anatona: [a-na-toh-na] From Tónos, which is Ancient Greek for a rope or cordage. It refers to culms or stems, which are thin and pliable like rope or cordage. A good example is Dryandra anatona.

Anatropous: [a-na-tro-pos] From Ana, which is Greek again, up or upwards and Tropous, which is Ancient Greek for a turn or turning. It refers to ovules, which are somewhat inverted so that the micropyle turns down towards the funicular where the body of the ovule is united.

Ancana: [an-ka/kei-na] Maybe From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Incana, which is Latin for grey or ash coloured and or hoary. It may refer to plants, which have course, grey matted hairs. A good example was Ancana stenopetala, which is now known as Meiogyne stenopetala.

Anceps: [an-seps] From Anceps, which is Latin for two edges or uncertain. It refers to organs, which have two edges or plants, which display characteristics that are not reliable in placing it in a specific genus or species. A good example is the seedpods on Acacia anceps, which have two very distinct edges.

Anchusifolia: [an-choo-si-foh-li-a] From Anchousa, which is Ancient Greek or Anchūsa, which is Latin for an ancient European plant that was used to make cosmetics and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the old European Anchūsa genus. A good example is the spathe on Scaevola anchusifolia.

Ancipital: [an-si-pi-tal] From Anceps, which is Latin for having a sheild. It refers to organs, which have a spathe. A good example is the spathe on Gýmnostachys ancep.

Ancisodorum: [an-sis-o-dor-um] From Anis, which is Ancient Greek for aniseed and Odora, which is Ancient Greek for an odour or aroma. It refers to plants, which have the fragrance of aniseed or Pimpinella anisum. A good example is the European culinary herb Basil, Ocimum tenuiflorum var. anisodorum.

Ancistrachne: [an-ki-strak-nee] From Ankistron, which is Ancient Greek for a fishhook and achne, which is Ancient Greek for chaff or a glume. It refers to the glumes, which have the shape of a fishhook. A good example is Ancistrachne uncinulata.

Ancistrocarpa: [an-ki-stro-kar-pa] From Ankistron, which is Ancient Greek for a fishhook and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to pods, which have a sharp hook at the apex or bend like a fish hook. A good example is the bending of the pods like a fish hook on Acacia ancistrocarpa.

Ancistrocarpum: [an-ki-stro-kar-pum] From Ankistron, which is Ancient Greek for a fishhook and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to pods which have a sharp hook at the apex or bend like a fish hook. A good example is the bending of the pods like a fish hook on Racosperma ancistrocarpum, which is now known as Acacia ancistrocarpa.

Ancistrophylla: [an-ki-stro-fahyl-la] From Ankistron, which is Ancient Greek for a fishhook and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllodes. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have a sharp hook at the apex. A good example is Acacia ancistrophylla.

Ancistrotricha: [an-ki-stro-trahy-ka] From Ankistron, which is Ancient Greek for a fish hook, Treis, which is Ancient Greek for three and Trichome, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to plants, which have sharp hook like hairs. A good example is Hibbertia ancistrotricha.

Ancophila: [an-koh-fi-la] From Anakolos, which is Ancient Greek for knotted and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to juvenile organs, which are twisted 90 degrees. A good example is Eucalyptus ancophila.

Ancorarium: [an-kor-a-ri-um] Maybe From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Corona, which is Latin for a crown or tiara. It refers to flowers, which are born loosely along the spike. A good example was Dendrobium ancorarium, which is now known as Dendrobium adae.

Ancyrocarpa: [an-krahy-o-kar-pa] From Ankistron, which is Ancient Greek for a fishhook and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to seed hairs or barbs, which make the seeds, resemble anchors. A good example is Calotis ancyrocarpa.

Andersonia: [an-der-son-i-a] Is named in honour of William Anderson; 1750-1778, who was a Scotsman who travelled with Captain Cook on his second and third voyagers as surgeon and naturalist. A good example is the flowers on Andersonia lehmanniana.

Andrachne: [an-drak-nee] From Andrachne, which was Latin for the ancient name given to the Strawberry tree. A good example is the Strawberry tree Arbutus andrachne.

Andraeanus: [an-drei-ee-nus] Is named in honour of Édouard François André; 1840–1911, who was a French horticulturalist, landscape designer and landscape architect designed city parks and public spaces within Monte Carlo and Montevideo. A good example is Cuphonotus andraeanus.

Andragamous: [an-dra-ga-mos] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Gynoecium, which is Latin for the female organs on a flower. It refers to inflorescences, which have staminate flowers inside or above and neuter flowers outside or below. A good example is the flowers on Sauropus androgynous.

Andrewsii: [an-dryoo-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Ernest Clayton Andrews; 1870-1948, who was a New South Wales geologist and botanist. A good example is Acacia andrewsii.

Androdioecious: [an-dro-dahy-ee-shos] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man, Dis which is Ancient Greek for two and Oikia/Oikos, which is Ancient Greek for a house. It refers to plants, which have staminate flowers on some trees and perfect flowers on other trees. A good example is Eidothea hardeniana.

Androecious: [an-dro-ee-shos] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Oikia/Oikos, which is Ancient Greek for a house. It refers to plants, which have only male flowers, producing pollen but no seed. A good example is Allocasuarina torulosa.

Androecium: [an-dro-si-um] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Oikia/Oikos, which is Ancient Greek for a house. It refers to plants, which only produce male flowers. (Antonym Gynodioecious/Gynoecium) A good example is Allocasuarina littoralis.

Androgyna: [an-dro-jahy-na] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to flowers, which have both male and female organs that are perfect flowers. A good example is the commercial Pawpaw Capparis arborea.

Androgynomonoecious: [an-dro-jahy-no-mo-nee-shos] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man, Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Oikia/Oikos, which is Ancient Greek for a house. It refers to plants, which have male, female, and bisexual flowers on the same plant, also called trimonoecious.

Androgynophore: [an-dro-jahy-no-for] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man, Gýnos/Gunḗ, which are Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Phore, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to specialized stalks or columns, which support the stamens, ovaries and styles at the apex. A good example is Passiflora aurantica.

Passiflora coccinea showing the pistol with anthers attached known as the androgynophore.

Androgynous: [an-dro-jahy-nos] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to plants, which have imperfect male and female flowers placed randomly on the same spike or raceme. They differ from gynaecandrous in that the male and female flowers are produced separately on the same spike, raceme or cluster. Where the flowers appear on a spike or raceme, the female flowers are usually on the apical portion. A good example is the flowers on Carex brunnea.

Androhermaphroditic: [an-dro-her-ma-froh-di-tik] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and hermaphroditica, which is Ancient Greek for to have both sexes. It refers to an inflorescences, which have the staminate flowers are inside or above and where the hermaphroditic inflorescences are on the outside or below. A good example of the latter sexual condition of an inflorescence is found on the heads on composites like Xerochrysum bracteatum.

Andromediflora: [an-dro-me-di-flor-a] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Flōris, which is Latin for flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which have stamens, filaments and or anthers, which are more prominent than other species in the genus. A good example is Epacris andromediflora.

Andromedifolia: [an-dro-me-di-foh-li-a] From Andromeda, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have similar leaves to the Andromeda genus. A good example is Halgania andromedifolia.

Andromonoecious: [an-dro-mo-nee-shos] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man, Monos which is Ancient Greek for one or singular and Oikia/Oikos, which is Ancient Greek for a house. It refers to plants, which have male flowers and perfect flowers on the same plants.

Androphore: [an-dro-fawr] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and phorus a receptacle type column. It refers to an extension of the receptacle between the petals and the stamens on which the male and or female parts are borne. It is common in many members of the Capparaceae family. A good example is Myristica insipid.

Andropogon: [an-dro-poh-gon] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Pogon a beard. It refers to hairs, which appear like a man’s beard. A good example was Andropogon bombycinus, which is now known as Cymbopogon bombycinus.

Androsacea: [an-dro-sa-kee-a] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Sakos, which is a Greek for a shield made of several layers of ox-hide sometime, reinforced with metal elements. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a man’s shield. A good example is the leaves on Drosera androsacea.

Androsaceum: [an-dro-sa-kee-um] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Sakos, which is a Greek for a shield made of several layers of ox-hide sometime, reinforced with metal elements. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a man’s shield. A good example is the shape of the flowers on Ranunculus anemoneus.

Androsmaeoides: [an-dros-mee-oi-deez] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have rather prominent male organs. A good example is Hibbertia androsaemoides.

Androstemma: [an-dro-ste-ma] From Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Stemma, which is Ancient Greek for a garland a crown. It refers to corolla tubes and lobes, which resemble a fancy crown or garland. A good example is Conostylis androstemma.

Aneilema: [a-nee-lee-ma] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Eilema, which is Ancient Greek for a veil or covering. It refers to spikes, which do not have a spathe. A good example is Aneilema siliculose.

Anemocarpa: [a-ne-mo-kar-pa] From Anemos, which is Greek/Latin for daughter of the wind. It refers to the windswept habitats the plants prefer to grow in. A good example is Anemocarpa podolepidium.

Anemoifolium: [a-ne-moi-fo-li-um] From Anetha, which is Latin for leaved and Folium for leaves. It refers to a leaf having many divios or smaller leaves within the leaf. A good example is the leaves on Isopogon anemoifolium.

Anemone: [a-nem-mo-nee] From Anemos, which is Ancient Greek for a wind. It refers to plants, which prevail in windy conditions.

Anemoneus: [a-ne-mon-ee-us] From Anemos, which is Greek/Latin for daughter of the wind. It refers to the lightly windswept habitats the plants prefer to grow in. A good example is Ranunculus anemoneus.

Anemonifloris: [ah-ne-mo-ni-flor-is] From Anemos, which is Greek/Latin for daughter of the wind and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to flowers, which similar those of the Anemone genus. A good example is Sauropus anemonifloris.

Anemonifolia: [a-ne-mon-i-foh-li-a] From Anemos, which is Greek/Latin for daughter of the wind, and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to having leaves similar to those on the Anemone genus. A good example is Boronia anemonifolia subsp. anemonifolia.

Anemonifolius: [a-ne-mon-i-foh-li-us] From Anemos, which is Greek/Latin for daughter of the wind and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to having leaves similar to those on the Anemone genus. A good example is Isopogon anemonifolius.

Anemophily: [an-e-mo-fi-lahy] From Anemos, which is Ancient Greek for the wind and Philos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or for being loved. It refers to plants, which are pollinated by the wind. A good example is Atriplex nummularia and most grasses.

Anethifolia: [an-e-thi-foh-li-a] From Anetha, which is Latin for aniseed and Folium for leaves. It refers to a leaves, which are similar to those of the Anemone genus. A good example is Boronia anethifolia.

Anethifolium: [a-ne-thi-foh-li-um] From Anethum, which is Latin for anise or dill and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are similar to those of the Aniseed and Dill Genus. A good example is Isopogon anethifolium.

Anetholea: [a-ne-tho-lee-a] From Anēthon, which is Greek for the anise-flavouring chemical. It refers to leaves, which have a strong Aniseed or dill scent and or flavour. A good example is Anetholea anisata.

Anethum: [a-ne/nee-thum] From Anēthon, which is Ancient Greek for the anise flavouring chemical. It refers to the commercial herb, Dill. A good example is Anetheum graveolens.

Aneura 1: [a-nyoo-ru] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Neura, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve. It refers to green plants, which do not have a vascular system. A good example is the leaves on Aneura alterniloba.

Aneura 2: [a-nyoo-ru] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Neura, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve. It refers to leaves, which seemingly do not have veins. A good example is the leaves on Acacia Aneura.

Anfracta: [an-frak-ta] From Anfrāctum, which is Latin for twisted, broken and vanquished. It refers to structures and organs, which are severely twisted and appear as though they are broken. A good example is the stems on Goodenia anfracta.

Anfractuosa: [an-frak-tyoo-oh-sa] From Anfractum, which is Latin for twisted, broken and vanquished. It refers to structures and organs, which are severely twisted and appear as though they are broken. A good example is the stems and pods on Acacia anfractuosa.

Angasomyrtus: [an-ga-so-mer-tus] From Anga, which is Latinized from the Sanskrit word aṅga, which includes any of the eight practices of Yoga, abstentions, mandatory actions, posture, breath control, control of the senses, concentration, meditation, and contemplation and Mrytus which is Latin for the European Myrtle genus. It refers flowers, which resemble the European Myrtles but the reference to Angas is unclear. A good example was Angasomyrtus salina, which is now known as Kunzea salina.

Angianthoides: [an-jee-an-thoi-deez] From Ageion, which is Ancient Greek for a goblet like vessel, ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers, which resemble the Angianthus genus in that they look similar to small goblets. A good example is Gnephosis angianthoides.

Angianthus: [an-jee-an-thus] From Ageion, which is Ancient Greek for a goblet like vessel and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have similar shape to a goblet. A good example is Angianthus globuliformis. For those interested in statistics this was Western Australia’s 10,000th named vascular plant.

Angiopteris: [an-jee-oh-teer-is] From Angio, which is Ancient Greek for a capsule and Ptéris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to plants, which is any seedless, nonflowering vascular plant of the class Filicinae, of tropical to temperate regions, characterized by true roots produced from a rhizome, with fronds that uncoil upward and have a branching vein system, and reproduction by spores contained in sporangia that usually appear as brown or yellow grains or powder from on the underside of the fronds.. It refers to plants, which have very prominent spore capsules. A good example is the leaves on Angiopteris evecta.

Angiosperm: [an-jee-oh-sperm] From Angio, which is Ancient Greek for a capsule and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to plants, which are reproduce from flowers and have true seeds. A good example is the flowers and fruits on Hibiscus splendens.

Angophora: [ahn-go-for-a] From Angos, which is Ancient Greek for a goblet like vessel and Phóros/Phérein for to bear or bearing. It refers to seed capsules, which look like goblets. A good example is the leaves on Angophora costata.

Anguillaria: [an-gwee-lar-i-a] Is named in honour of Luigi Anguillara; 1512-1570, who was an Italian botanist. A good example is the leaves on Anguillaria biglandulosa, which is now known as Wurmbea biglandulosa.

Anguina: [an-gwee-na] From Anguis, which is Latin for an eel. It refers to the fruits, which have a persisent style that grows much longer than the fruits and resemble an eel. A good example is the leaves on Anguina subvelutina, which is now known as Trichosanthes subvelutina.

Angulata: [ahn-guh-la-ta] From Angular, which is Ancient Greek for to have angles. It refers to structures or organs, which have distinct angles. A good example is the leaves on Calytrix angulata.

Angulatum: [an-gu-la-tum] From Angular which is Ancient Greek for to have angles. It refers to structures or organs, which have distinct angles. A good example is the leaves on Aspidixia angulata, which is now known as Viscum angulatum.

Angulosa: [an-gyoo-loh-sa] From Angular, which is Ancient Greek for to have angles. It refers to structures or organs, which have distinct angles. A good example is fruits on Eucalyptus angulosa.

Angussi: [an-gus-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Reginald James Angus who discovered the species in 1987. A good example is Microtis angusii.

Angusta: [an-gus-ta] From Angusta, which is Latin for narrow. It refers to leaves, which are narrow but not linear. A good example is the leaves on Decaisnina angustata.

Angustata: [an-guhs-tei/tahr-tuh] From Angusta, which is Latin for narrow. It refers to leaves, which are narrow but not linear. A good example is the leaves on Zornia muriculata subsp. angustata.

Angustatum: [an-gu-stei-tum] From Angusta, which is Latin for narrow. It refers to leaves, which are narrow but not linear. A good example is the leaves on Lepidosperma angustatum.

Angustialata: [an-gus-ti-a-la-ta] From Angusta, which is Latin for narrow. It refers leaves, which are very narrow and almost linear. A good example is the leaves on Harpullia angustialata.

Angustifolia: [an-gus-ti-foh-li-a] From Angusta, which is Latin for narrow and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It usually refers to leaves or at times the calyx lobes or petals, which are narrower than other species in the genus. A good example is the leaves on Backhousia angusifolia.

Angustifolium: [an-gus-ti-foh-li-um] From Angusta, which is Latin for narrow and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are rather narrow or much narrower than other species in the genus. A good example is Zygophyllum angustifolium.

Angustifolius: [an-gus-ti-foh-li-us] From Angusta, which is Latin for narrow and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are rather narrow but not linear. A good example is Elaeocarpus angustifolius.

Angustilabris: [an-gus-ti-la-bris] From Angusta, which is Latin for narrow, and labrum, which is Latin for a lip. It refers to the complex lower petal on orchids, which are very narrow. A good example is Liparis angustilabris.

Angustilobum: [an-gus-ti-loh-bum] From Angusta, which is Latin for narrow and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to organs, which are rather narrow lobes. A good example is Erodium angustilobum.

Angustilobus: [an-gus-ti-loh-bus] From Angusta, which is Latin for narrow and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to organs, which are rather narrow lobes. A good example is the lobe on the leaves of Senecio angustilobus.

Angustisecta: [an-gus-ti-sek-ta] From Augustus, which is Latin for narrow and Secta, which is Latin for a section. It refers the leaves or fronds, which are divided into narrow sections. A good example is Bacularia angustisecta.

Angustisepala: [an-gus-ti-se-pa-la] From Angusta, that is Latin for narrow and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek, or Sepalum, which is Latin for a sepal. It refers to plants, which have rather long narrow sepals. A good example is Boronia angustisepala.

Angustispora: [an-gus-ti-spor-a] From Angusta, which is Latin for narrow, and Sporos, which is Ancient Greek for a fern or fungi seed. It refers to fungi or ferns, which have very long, narrow gills. A good example is Amanita angustispora.

Angustissima: [an-gus-tis-si-ma] From Angusta, which is Latin for narrow, and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to species or sub species, which have the narrowest leaves in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus angustissima.

Anidiophyllum: [a-ni-di-oh-fahyl-lum] From ánisos which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which have unsymmetrical leaves. A good example is the inflorescences on Chenopodium anidiophyllum, which is now known as Chenopodium desertorum subsp. anidiophyllum.

Anigosanthos: [a-ni-go-san-thus] From ánisos which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Anthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are not symmetrically even. A good example is the inflorescences on Anigosanthos flavida.

Anil: [a-nil] From Annil, which is Latinized from the Portuguese vernacular for indigo. It refers to many species, which produced the indigo dye. A good example was Anil coronillifolia, which is now known as Indigofera coronillifolia.

Anisacantha: [a-ni-sa-kan-tha] From Anison, which is Ancient Greek or Anisum which is Latin for the aniseed flower, and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers having an aniseed scent. A good example was Anisacantha birchii, which is now known as Sclerolaena birchii.

Anisacanthoides: [a-ni-sa-kan-thoi-deez] From Anison, which is Ancient Greek, or Anisum, which is Latin for having the scent of Anise or aniseed, ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for a thorn or spine, and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to very spiny plants, which have leaves that have an aniseed scent. A good example is Sclerolaena anisacanthoides.

Anisandra: [a-ni-san-dra] From Anti, which is Ancient Greek for opposite or opposed and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which vary greatly in their sexuality, sexual size, form and shape. A good example is Beaufortia anisandra.

Anisantha: [a-ni-san-tha] From Anti, which is Ancient Greek for opposite or opposed and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which vary greatly in their sexuality, sexual size, form and shape. A good example is Anthocercis anisantha.

Anisanthoides: [a-ni-san-thoi-deez] From Anti, which is Ancient Greek for opposite or opposed and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is the Greek suffix for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble other plants with the specie name anisantha. A good example is Sclerolaena anisacanthoides.

Anisata: [a-ni-sa-ta] From Anison, which is Ancient Greek or Anisum which is Latin for to have the scent of Anise or aniseed. It refers to aniseed scents of the leaves. A good example is Backhousia anisata.

Aniseia: [ah-ni-sei-a] Is named in honour of John Ansell; 1847.-19.., who was a British botanist who discovered the type specimen. A good example is Aniseia martinicensis.

Anisocarpa: [a-ni-so-kar-pa] From ánisos which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are not the same shape or size. A good example was Dimetopia anisocarpa, which is now known as Trachymene anisocarpas.

Anisocarpas: [a-ni-so-kar-pas] From ánisos which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are not the same shape or size. A good example is Trachymene anisocarpas.

Anisocarpous: [a-ni-so-kar-pos] From ánisos which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are not the same shape or size.

Anisocotylous: [a-ni-so-ko-tahy-los] From Anisos, which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Kotyledon, which is Ancient Greek for the embyonic leaf or leaves. It refers to dicotyledonous plants, which have unequal cotyledons.

Anisolateral: [a-ni-so-la-ter-al] From ánisos which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Lateralis which is Latin for a side. It refers to leaves, which have different mesophyll in regards to differing CO2 exchange rates on the upper and lower laminas.

Anisomeles: [a-ni-so-me-leez] From Anisos, which is Ancient Greek for unequal and Meles, which is Ancient Greek for an apple. It refers to plants, which have structure or organs, which resemble those of the apple trees. A good example is Anisomeles malabarica where the reference to an apple tree probably relates to the shape and vaguely to the form of the leaves.

Anisomerous: [a-ni-so-mer-os] From ánisos which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Merous, for a whorl/s. It refers to leaves, which have distinctly different sizes and or shapes on the same tree. A good example is the leaves on Brachychiton populneus.

Anisopetalous: [a-ni-so-pe-ta-los] From ánisos which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek or Petalum, which is Latin for a petal or petals. It refers to petals, which are different sizes and or shapes on the same flower. A good example is Eremophila maculata.

Anisophyllous: [a-ni-so-fahyl-lus] From ánisos which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Phullon/Phyllon, which is Ancient Greek for leaves. It refers leaves, which are very narrow almost but not linear. A good example is the leaves on Eucalyptus angustissima being the narrowest of all the species in the genus.

Anisopogon: [a-ni-so-poh-gon] From ánisos which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to hairs, which have distinctly different lengths. A good example is A good example is Anisopogon avenaceus.

Anisostome: [a-ni-so-stoh-me] From ánisos, which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Témnō,, which is Latin for to cut. It refers to leaf apexes, which have the appearance of all being cut unevenly.

Anisostylous: [a-ni-so-stahy-luh s] From ánisos, which is Ancient Greek for uneven and stylus for a stylus or Stilus which is Latin for the female reproductive organs on a flower. It refers to a plant with multiple styles, which are all different in size and or shape.

Anistrophy: [a-ni-soh-tro-fee] From ánisos, which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Tropia which is Ancient Greek for turning towards. It refers to having different dimensions along different axes.

Annae: [an-nee] From Ánna which is Ancient Greek for grace or graceful. It refers to plants, which show some form of gracefulness. A good example is Marsdenia annae.

Annectens: [a-nek-tenz] From Annectere, which is Latin for to link up, join or unite. It refers to articles, which are closely and tightly united. A good example is Allocasuarina diminuta subsp. Annectens.

Annona: [a-noh-na] From Annona, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the South America Hispanic word for the fruit. It refers to the exotic Custard Apple. A good example is Annona squamosa.

Annosocaule: [an-noh-so-kawr-le] From Annosa, which is Latin for long-lived and Kaulos which is Ancient Greek for a stem or branch. It refers to stems or branches, which are long lived. A good example is Eremophila annosocaule.

Annua: [a-nyoo-a] From Annularis, which is Latin for annual. It refers to plants, which are short-lived annuals. A good example is Minuria annua.

Annual: [a-nyoo-al] From Annularis, which is Latin for annual. It refers to plants, which has one growing season to complete its life cycle, forming the vegetive parts then the reproductive parts. A growing season can be several months or up to one year. A good example is Drosera burmanni.

Annular: [ah-nyoo-lar] From Annularis, which is Latin for annual. It refers to plants, which has one growing season to complete its life cycle, forming the vegetive parts then the reproductive parts. A growing season can be several months or up to one year. A good example is Drosera spatulata.

Annular Rings: [a-nyoo-lar, ringz] From Annularis, which is Latin for annual and Ring, which is Old English for a ring. It refers to rings, which are arranged in a circular pattern that tells the age of the trunk, branch or stem on trees.

Annulata: [an-yoo-la-ta] From Annularis, which is Latin for annual. It refers to trees, which have very distinct annual rings. A good example is Eucalyptus annulata.

Annulifera: [an-yoo-li-feer-a] From Annularis, which is Latin for annual and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to trees, which have very distinct annual habits like flowering leaf flushes etc. A good example is Grevillea annulifera.

Annuliformis: [an-yoo-li-for-mis] From Annularis, which is Latin for annual, and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to trees, which have very distinct annual rings. A good example is Eucalyptus annuliformis.

Annulus: [an-nyoo-lus] From Anularis, which is Latin for a little ring. It refers to tissues, which form rings or arranged in a circle as in the sporangia in ferns.

Annulus Ring: [an-nyoo-lus, ring] From Anulularis, which is Latin for a little ring. It refers to the tissues, which form a ring around the stipe on a fungus. A good example is Suillus luteus.

Anodontus: [a-no-don-tus] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Dontos/Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for a tooth or teeth. It refers to leaf margins, which are entire. A good example is Mischocarpus anodontus.

Anodopetalum: [a-no-do-pe-ta-lum] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Dontos/Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for a tooth or teeth and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to petal margins, which have very fine teeth. A good example is Anodopetalum biglandulosum.

Anoectochilus: [a-noh-ek-to-chi-lus] From Anoiktos, which is Ancient Greek for to open or opened and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip or lips. It refers to flowers, which have the labellum well outside the lateral petals and columns. A good example is Anoectochilus yatesiae.

Anoectocolea: [a-noh-ek-to-ko-lee-a] From Anoiktos, which is Ancient Greek for to open or opened and Colea, which is Latin for to wriggle or wag ones tail. It refers to plants, which tend to move with the slightest breeze or movement in the water. A good example is the culms on Hopkinsia anoectocolea, which appear as though they are wriggly lines.

Anogramma: [a-noh-gram-ma] From Ano, which is Ancient Greek for up or upwards and Gramma, which is Ancient Greek for written or lined out. It refers to the sori ripening near the apexes first. A good example is Anogramma leptophylla.

Anomala: [a-no-ma-la] From Anomalus, which is Latin for unusual. It refers to the unusual twists and turns in the petals. A good example is Acacia anomala.

Anomalum: [a-no-ma-lum] From Anomalus, which is Latin for unusual. It refers to plants, which look very different than what would be expected in the genus. A good example is Leptosema anomalum.

Anopterus: [a-no-teer-us] From ánisos, which is Ancient Greek for uneven and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to seeds, which have two different size or shaped wings. A good example is Anopterus macleayanus.

Anota: [a-noh-ta] From Annota, which is Latin for to notate and remember or write down. It refers to plants, which are noteworthy of being remembered. A good example is Guichenotia anota.

Anredera: [an-re-der-a] From Etymology, is unknown to the author but appears to be linked with being named in honour of Andreder which I am unable to verify. A good example from South America is Anredera cordifolia, which has become highly invasive plant in southern China and now appears to be doing the same in areas of Australia on the east coast.

Ansatum: [an-sa-tum] From Ansātus, which is Latin for a handle. It refers to flowers, or more often the pedicels, which resemble the handles of a jug or sword. A good example was Prasophyllum ansatum, which is now known as Genoplesium nudiscapum.

Anserina: [an-se-ri-na] From Anserinus, which is Latin for a goose and Ovinus, which is Latin for a sheep. It may refer to the plants, which are a farmer’s nightmare as the burrs are caught in the wool of sheep and the feathers of geese. A good example is Acacia anserina.

Anserovina: [an-se-ro-vi-na] From Anserinus, which is Latin for a goose and Ovinus, which is Latin for a sheep. It may refer to the plants, which are a farmer’s nightmare as the burrs are caught in the wool of sheep and the feathers of geese. A good example is Acaena anserovina.

Antarctica 1: [an-tark-ti-ka] From Antarctica, which is Latin for coming from the Antarctic region. It refers to plants, which were and are still closely associated with old growth forests that are relics of Gondwana land Antarctica. A good example is Dicksonia antarctica.

Antarctica 2: [ahn-tark-ti-ka] From Antarctica, which is Latin for coming from the Antarctic region. It refers to plants, which grow in the sub antarctic regions of the world. A good example is Nothofagus antarctica.

Antarcticum: [an-tark-ti-kum] From Antarctica, which is Latin for coming from the Antarctic region. It refers to plants, which were once closely associated with old growth forests that are relics of Gondwana land Antarctica or plants, which grow in the sub antarctic regions of the world. A good example is Galium antarcticum.

Antarcticus: [an-tark-ti-kus] From Antarctica, which is Latin for coming from the Antarctic region. It refers to plants, which were once closely associated with old growth forests that are relics of Gondwana land Antarctica or plants, which grow in the sub antarctic regions of the world. A good example is Juncus antarcticus.

Antennaria: [an-ten-nar-i-a] From Antenna, which is Latin for an antenna. It refers to flowers, often the male flowers, which resemble the heads of insects. A good example was Antennaria nubigena of which the Australian species are now known as Ewartia nubigena.

Antennariera: [an-ten-nar-ee-a] From Antenna, which is Latin for an antenna and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to flowers, often the male flowers, which resemble the heads of insects in that the anthers extend well beyond the flowers. Two good example are Thelymitra antennifera and Utricularia antennifera.

Antennarifera: [an-ten-nar-i-fer-a] From Antenna, which is Latin for an antenna and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to flowers, often the male flowers, which resemble the heads of insects in that the anthers extend well beyond the flowers. A good example is Thelymitra antennifera.

Antennarius: [an-ten-nar-i-us] From Antenna, which is Latin for an aerial or antennae. It refers to stamens and anthers, which protrude from the floral tube and resemble an insects head. A good example is Ozothamnus antennarius.

Antennatum: [an-ten-nei-tum] From Antenna, which is Latin for an antenna. It refers to flowers, often the male flowers, which resemble the heads of insects in that the anthers extend well beyond the corolla tube, petals or labellum. A good example is Prasophyllum antennatum.

Anterior: [an-teer-i-or] From Ante, which is Latin for a before or previous. It refers to the lower one or lower surface. A good example is the lower or anterior petal of Viola banksii.

Antheidosorus: [an-thei-do-sor-us] From Anthemis, which is Ancient Greek for a flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Anthemis genus, which includes the Chamomile teas. A good example is Antheidosorus gracilis.

Anthemnifolia: [an-them-ni-foh-li-a] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the Anthemis genus that includes the Chamomile teas. A good example is Soliva anthemifolia.

Anthemoides: [an-the-moi-deez] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Anthemis genus that includes the Chamomile teas. A good example is Rhodanthe anthemoides.

Anther: [an-ther] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. The pollen-bearing portion of the stamen usually at the apex of the filament. Anthers are attached to the filaments in different manners. Basifixed is where the anthers base is attached to the filament. Dorsifixed is where the anthers are elongated and are attached in the middle and adnately fixed is where the anthers are attached parallel to the filament for at least part of their length. A good example is Melaleuca flammea.

Anthericum: [an-ther-i-kum] From Antherikon, which is Ancient Greek for a flower in exaggeration. It refers to flowers, which have truly very beautiful features. A good example is Anthericum bulbosum, which is now known as Bulbine bulbosa.

Antheridium: [an-ther-i-di-um] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to the male reproductive sex organ, which producers the sperm. It refers to organs in certain organisms that produce male gametes, which include the byrophytes, ferns, ascomycete fungi, and some algae. Most Gýnosperms and all the angiosperms have lost the antheridium where the role has been replaced by pollen grains. A good example is Adiantum aethiopicum.

Anthesis: [an-thee-sis] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to the time when flowers become sexually functional. That is the moment a flower’s stigmas are receptive and or the anthers dehisce. A good example for easy observation can be seen on Hibiscus diversifolia where the pollen is released before the stigma becomes receptive.

Anthobolus: [an-tho-bo-lus] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower and Bolus, which is Ancient Greek for a pill. It refers to the flowers looking like snow along the branches and the fruits looking like little white pills stuck to the stems. A good example is Anthobolus filifolium.

Anthocarapa: [an-tho-kar-a-pa] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to anthers, which are attached to the edge of the petals, which often resemble a fruit. A good example is Anthocarapa nitidula.

Anthocercidea: [an-tho-ker-si-dee-a] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower and Kerkis, which is Ancient Greek for a weaver’s shuttle or spindle. It refers to flowers, which have long narrow lobes or long narrow corollas. A good example is Anthocercis anthocercidea.

Anthocercis: [an-tho-ker-kis] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower and Kerkis, which is Ancient Greek for a weaver’s shuttle or spindle. It refers to flowers, which have long narrow lobes or long narrow corollas. A good example is Anthocercis amblyantha.

Anthochaera: [an-tho-chee-ra] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower and Chaero, which is Latin for pleasing or to rejoice. It refers to flowers, which are very pleasing to the eye. A good example is Acacia anthochaera.

Anthosachne: [an-tho-sak-ne] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower and Achne, which is Ancient Greek for chaff or the lemma and glume spoken a s one. It refers to grasses, which have rather prominent lemmas and glumes. A good example is Anthosachne scabra.

Anthotaxis: [an-tho-tak-sis] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower and Táxis, which is Ancient Greek for to arrange in order. It refers to plants, or more accurately flowers on an inflorescence which are arranged in an order or sequence of lines, rows, orders, divisions and numbers to determine their order in the plant kingdom.

Anthotroche: [an-tho-tro-ke] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male part of a flower or the flower and Trochískos, which is Ancient Greek for a tablet or capsule. It refers to anthers, which have the form of a tablet or capsule. A good example is Anthotroche pannosa.

Anthoxanthinum: [an-tho-zan-thi-num] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower and Xanthós which is Ancient Greek for yellow. It refers to the yellow colour found in plants especially the flowers. A good example is the flowers on Xanthóstemon chrysanthus.

Anthoxanthoides: [an-thok-san-thoi-deez] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower, Xanthós, which is Ancient Greek for yellow and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which are similar to the genus Anthoxanthum in which the inflorescences are yellowish in colour. A good example is Aristida anthoxanthoides.

Anthoxanthum: [an-thoks-an-thum] From ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower and Xanthós, which is Ancient Greek for, yellow. It refers to inflorescences, which are yellowish in colour. A good example is Aristida anthoxanthoides.

Anthracina: [an-thra-si-na] From Anthracinus, which is Latin for black coal or anthrax. It refers to parts of the flower being very deep burgundy almost black. A good example is Arachnorchis anthracina.

Anthracinum: [an-thra-si-num] From Anthracinus, which is Latin for black coal or anthrax. It refers to parts of flowers, which are very deep burgundy almost black. A good example is Genoplesium anthracinum.

Anthropodium: [an-thro-poh-di-um] From Anthros, which is Ancient Greek for a joint and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or pedi which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to pedicels or petioles, which have a joint, or has a bend. A good example was Anthropodium strictum, which is now known as Dichopogon strictus.

Anthropophagorum: [an-thro-po-fei-gor-um] From Anthros, which is Ancient Greek for a human being and Phago, which is Ancient Greek for consuming or devouring. It refers to fruits, which are consumed by humans. A good example is Endiandra anthropophagorum.

Anthropophily 1: [an-thro-po-fi-lee] From Anthros, which is Ancient Greek for a human being and philos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or for being loved. It refers to plants, which are pollinated by people.

Anthropophily 2: [an-thro-po-fi-lee] From Anthros, which is Ancient Greek for a human being and Philos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or for being loved. It refers to insects, which eat human blood. A good example is the east coast, coastal mosquito Aedes aegypti.

Anthylloides: [an-thahyl-loi-deez] From Anthyllis, which is akin to Antha/ Anthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs or the flower, and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to a flower genus from Greece with this name which loos very similar. A good example was Crotalaria anthylloides, which is now known as Crotalaria sessiliflora.

Antiaris: [an-ti-ar-is] From Anti/Ante, which is Latinized from the Javan vernacular for poisonous juice. It refers to the sap, which was used by locals as a poison to kill small animals and birds on their arrow tips. A good example is Antiaris toxicaria subsp. macrophylla.

Anticheirostylis: [an-ti-chei-ro-stahy-lis] From Anti/Ante, which is Ancient Greek for against or opposite, Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip or lips and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column. It refers to the styles position between the erect columns above the labellum. A good example was Anticheirostylis apostasioides, which is now known as Genoplesium apostasioides.

Anticoryne: [an-ti-kor-ahyn] From Anti/Ante, which is Ancient Greek for against or opposite and Koryne, which is Ancient Greek for a club or trucheon. It may refer to styles, which are resemble a short club. A good example was Anticoryne diosmoides, which is now known as Baeckea diosmoides.

Antidesma: [an-ti-des-ma] From Anti/Ante, which is Ancient Greek for against or opposite and Desma, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the Burmese word for poison. It refers to plants, which were once spuriously used as an anti-venom. A good example is Antidesma hylandii.

Antiloga: [an-ie-loh-ga] From Anti/Ante, which is Ancient Greek for against or opposite and Légō, which is Ancient Greek for a contradiction in terms or ideas. It refers to the leaves, which are very contradictive in shape, size and colour. A good example is Niemeyera antiloga.

Antilogum: [an-ti-loh-gum] From Anti/Ante, which is Ancient Greek for against or opposite and Légō, which is Ancient Greek for a contradiction in terms or ideas. It refers to the leaves, which are very contradictive in shape, size and colour. A good example is Amorphospermum antilogum, which is now known as Niemeyera antiloga.

Antimony: [an-ti-moh-nee] From Anti/Ante, which is Ancient Greek for against or opposed and Stibis, which is Latin for a whitish coloured eye makeup in ancient times, now known as Antomōnium.

Antipetalous: [an-ti-pe-ta-los] From Anti/Ante, which is Ancient Greek for against or opposite and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to sepals or stamens, which oppose the petals. A good example is Dianella longifolia.

Antipetalous anthers on Dianella caerulea.

Antipoda: [an-ti-poh-da] From Anti/Ante, which is Ancient Greek for against or opposite and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to petioles, pedicels or rhizomes, which are much longer than other species in the genus. A good example is Ballantinia antipoda.

Antipodum: [an-ti-poh-dum] From Anti/Ante, which is Ancient Greek for against or opposite and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to petioles, pedicels or rhizomes, which are much longer than other species in the genus. A good example is Sparganium antipodum.

Antipodus: [an-ti-poh-dus] From Anti/Ante, which is Ancient Greek for against or opposite and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek for a foot or feet. It refers to plants, which have a foothold in an area on the opposite side of the world to their discoverers. A good example is Cuphonotus antipodus.

Antiquorum: [an-ti-quor-um] From Antīquārius, which is Latin for ancient or very old. It refers to plants, which have been in cultivation since antiquity. A good example is the horticultural Taro, Colocasia antiquorum.

Antirhea: [an-ti-ree-a] From Anti/Ante, which is Ancient Greek for against or opposite and Rhéa, which is Ancient Greek for the mother of Zeus. It refers to plants, which grow in drier and less fertile vine and littoral rainforests. A good example is Antirhea putaminosa.

Antisepalous: [an-ti-se-pa-los] From Anti/Ante, which is Ancient Greek for against or opposite and Sképē which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum, which is Latin for a sepal. It refers to sepals, which are directly behind its petal. A good example is the sepals and petals on Hibbertia scandens.

Antitropous: [an-ti-tro-pos] From Anti/Ante, which is Ancient Greek for against or opposite and tropus, for to turn or to curve. It refers to where the micropyle is in relation to the attachment of the funiculi/o/us tube. A good example is the seeds on Scirpus polystachyus.

Antommarchia: [an-tom-mar-chi-a] From Antom, which is not known, and Marchia, which is not known. The references are unknown. A good example is the hairs on Antommarchia rubra, which is now known as Correa reflexa.

Antrophyum: [an-tro-fahyl-lum] From Antro, which is not known and either Phylum, which is Ancient Greek for a major division or Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. The reference due to the spelling is unclear. A good example is Antrophyum semicostatum.

Antrorse: [an-trors] From Antrorsus, which is Latin for to be bent forward or bent upwards. It refers to hairs, which are bending forwards towards the apexes as opposed to retrorse where the hairs bend towards the base. A good example is the hairs on Periscaria attenuate.

Antrorsum: [an-tror-sum] From Antrorsus, which is Latin for to be bent forward or bent upwards. It refers to hairs, which are bent forward towards the apexes as opposed to retrorse where the hairs bend towards the base. A good example is the hairs on Geranium antrorsum.

Anulata: [an-yoo-la-ta] From Anulatus, which is Latin for to be ringed. It refers to flowers, which are surrounded by larger more prominent sepals of a different colour. A good example is Hoya anulata.

Anzybas: [an-zahy-bas] Maybe from Korybas, which is Greek, or Corybany, which is Latin for drunken, dancing Priest. It therefore may refer to the flowers, which sit atop of short non vertical floral stem dancing in the breeze. A field of orchid flowers leaning in all directions from above resembles a group of priests staggering home From A, party or pub. A good example is the hairs on Anzybas abditus, which is now known as Corybas abditus.

Aotoides: [ei-oh-toi-deez] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Otis, which is Latin for an ear, and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Aotus genus. A good example is Mirbelia aotoides.

Aotoinii: [ei-oh-toi-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Antoine de Jussieu; 1686-1758 who was a French physician, a notable apothecaryist and botanist who wrote many papers on human anatomy, zoology, and botany. A good example was Myrmecodia antoinii, which is now known as Myrmecodia platytyrea subsp. antoinii.

Aotus: [ei-oh-tus] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and ôtos/ōtós, which is Ancient Greek for a kind of horned or eared owl. It refers to Calyxes, which are not have lobes. A good example is Aotus subspinescens.

Apalochlamys: [a-pal-oh-kla-mis] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Rhopalon, which is Ancient Greek for a club shape, and Chlamys, which is Ancient Greek for a large cloak or a mantle. It refers to leaves, which are somewhat club or spathulate in shape and the bracts, which surround the flowers acting like a large cloak. A good example was Cassinia spectabilis, which is now known as Apalochlamys spectabilis.

Aparrerinja: [a-par-rer-in-ja] From Aparrerinja, which is Latinized from the local Arunta or Arernte tribe’s vernacular for the tree found in central Australia. It refers to the local name for this tree. Good examples can be seen on Corymbia aparrerinja.

Apatophyllum: [a-pah-toh-fahyl-lum] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Patens which is Latin for spreading and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which do not have spreading leaves. A good example is Apatophyllum constablei.

Apecta: [a-pek-tum] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Pekta, which is Ancient Greek for a comb or card of wool. It refers to structures or organs, which do not have frilly or woolly margins similar to other species in the genus. A good example is the petals on Verticordia apecta.

Apetala: [a-pe-ta-la] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Pétalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to flowers, which do not have petals. A good example is Colobanthus apetalus.

Apetalous: [a-pe-tah-lus] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Pétalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to flowers, which do not have petals.

Apetalum: [a-pe-tah-lum] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Pétalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to a flowers, which do not have petals. A good example is Ceratopetalum apetalum,which has very showy red sepals.

Apetalus: [a-pe-tah-lus] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Pétalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to flowers, which do not have petals. A good example is Colobanthus apetalus.

Apetiolata: [a-pe-ti-oh-la-ta] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Pétalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to flowers, which do not have petals. A good example was Linospadix apetiolata, which is still used erroneously in some literature instead of the accepted name of Linospadix apetiolatas.

Apetiolatus: [a-pe-ti-oh-la-tus] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Pétalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to flowers, which do not have petals. A good example is Linospadix apetiolatus.

Apex: [ei-peks] From Apex, which is Ancient Greek for the end, sumit, top or tip. It refers to the tip or end of a shoot leaf or other structures or organs on a plant.

Aphananthe: [a-fa-nan-the] From Aphanes, which is Ancient Greek for invisible and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are rather small and insignificant. A good example is Aphananthe philippinensis.

Aphanes: [a-fa-nes] From Aphanes, which is Ancient Greek for invisible. It refers to flowers, which are rather small and insignificant. A good example is Aphanes australiana.

Aphanoclada: [a-fa-noh-kla-da] From Aphanes, which is Ancient Greek for invisible, and Klados, which is Ancient Greek or Cladus for a twig, stem or small branch. It refers to stems, which are very fine and almost invisible. A good example is Acacia aphanoclada.

Aphanoneura: [a-fa-no-nyoo-ra] From Aphanes, which is Ancient Greek for invisible and Neûron, which is Ancient Greek or Nerves, which is Latin for a nerve or vein. It refers to leaves, which have very faint veins. A good example is Stipa aphanoneura, which is now known as Austrostipa flavescens.

Aphanopetalum: [a-fa-noh-pe-ta-lum] From Aphanes, which is Ancient Greek for invisible and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to petals, which are rather small and insignificant. A good example is Aphanopetalum resinosum.

Aphebioides: [ah-fe-bi-oi-deez] Maybe from A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Phlebo, which is Ancient Greek for a vein and Eîdos/Oides, which is alike or similar to. It refers to veins, which are similar to other lplants that appear not to have veins or conspicuous veins. A good example is the fern Crepidomanes aphlebioidess.

Aphelia: [ah-fe-li-a] From Aphelion, which is Ancient Greek, or Aphelium, which is Latin for farthest from the sun. It refers to habitats, which are on the southern edge of its range in each area. A good example is Aphelia gracilis.

Aphleboides: [a-fe-boi-deez] From Aphlebiae, which is Ancient Greek for aphlebiae an imperfect or irregular frond apexes and Eîdos/Oides, which is alike or similar to. It refers to ferns, which have great variation in their fronds apexes. A good example was Trichomanes aphlebioides, which is now known as Crepidomanes aphleboides.

Aphyla: [a-fahy-la] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which do not have or have very much reduced leaves or phyllodes. A good example is Acacia aphyla.

Aphylla: [a-fahy-la] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which do not have or have very much reduced leaves or phyllodes. A good example is Stackhousia aphylla.

Aphyllodium: [a-fahyl-oh-di-um] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf and Odium, which is Latin for hatred or to have an eversion to something. It refers to the plants, which do not have or appear not to have leaves, phyllodes or fronds. An example of the genus is Aphyllodium glossocarpum, which actually has trifoliate leaflets.

Aphyllopodic: [a-fahy-lo-po-dik] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having, Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf, and Pous which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It usually refers to culms or at times other structures, which only have sheaths or ocras that is they do not have leaves or petioles.

Aphyllopodium: [a-fahy-lo-poh-di-um] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having, Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf and Pous which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a little foot or small feet. It usually refers to culms or at times other structures, which only have sheaths or ocras that is they do not have leaves or petioles.

Aphyllorchis: [a-fahyl-lor-kis] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf and Orkhis, which is Ancient Greek or Orchis, which is Latin for testicles. It refers to orchids, which have no leaves. A good example is Aphyllorchis anomala.

Aphyllum: [a-fahyl-lum] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the shrubs not having leaves or phyllodes. A good example is Leptosema aphyllum.

Aphyllus: [a-fahyl-lus] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which have no leaves or very few leaves at maturity. A good example is Exocarpos aphyllus.

Aphyonota: [a-fahy-o-noh-ta] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf and Notatus, which is Latin for worthy of noting. It refers to the plants, which have very few or no leaves, phyllodes or fronds. A good example is Glycine aphyonota.

Apical: [a-pi-kal] From Apical, which is Latin for at the summit, top, at the apex or at the highest or furthest point. It refers to being at the end of a structure. A good example of an apical stipule is found covering the apical leaves of Ficus macrophylla

Apiciloba: [a-pi-si-loh-ba] From Apical, which is Latin for at the summit, top, at the apex or at the highest or furthest point and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to the lobes on the leaves, which have slightly pungent apexes. A good example was Grevillea apiciloba, which is now known as Grevillea hookeriana subsp. Apiciloba.

Apiculata: [a-pi-kyoo-la-ta] From Apical, which is Latin for at the summit, top, at the apex or at the highest or furthest point. It refers to the leaves and flowers, which form at the end of the trunk and stems. A good example is Eucalyptus apiculata.

Apiculate: [a-pi-kyoo-leit] From Apical, which is Latin for at the summit, top, at the apex or at the highest or furthest point. It refers to the leaves, which form a small point at the apex.

Apiculatum: [a-pi-kyoo-lei-tum] From Apical, which is Latin for at the summit, top, at the apex or at the highest or furthest point. It refers to the flowers forming near to the apexes of the stems. A good example is Adenanthos apiculatus.

Apiculatus: [a-pi-kyoo-lei-tus] From Apical, which is Latin for at the summit, top, at the apex or at the highest or furthest point. It refers to the flowers forming near to the apexes of the stems. A good example is Zygophyllum apiculatum.

Apiifolium: [ah-pi-foh-li-um] From Apium, which is Latin for celery or parsley and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves that resemble the celery genus Apium. A good example is the fronds on Trichomanes apiifolium.

Apium: [a-pi-um] From Apium, which is Latin for the old name of the parsley and celery plants. It refers to plants, which are related to the commercial celery, Apium graveolens originally named by Theophrastus. A good example is Apium prostratum subsp. howense.

Aplectra: [a-plek-tra] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Plektron, which is Ancient Greek for a spur. It refers to plants, which do not have spurs on the flowers. A good example is Lindernia aplectra.

Apluda: [a-ploo-da] From Apluda, which is Latin for chaff. It refers to the spikelets having groups of sterile chaff. A good example is Apluda mutica.

Apocarpous: [a-po-kar-pos] From Apo, which is Ancient Greek for away from or separated and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a carpel. It refers to a pistil or gynoecium that consists of a single carpel or more often, several carpels all separated from each other. A good example is found in the ovary of Ranunculus lappaceus.

Apocynifolia: [a-po-sahy-ni-foh-li-a] From Osmḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a fragrance, or scent and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which have a distinct Basil (Ocimum) fragrance. A good example is Eucalyptus apocynifolia.

Apodasmia: [a-po-das-mi-a] From Apo, which is Ancient Greek for away from or separated and Adesma, which is Ancient Greek for a bundle. It refers flowers, which are bundled together are somewhat away from the culms or spike. A good example is found in the ovary of Apodasmia brownii.

Apodocephala: [ah-po-do-ke-fa-la] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Pous, which is Ancient Greekor Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Kephalḗ which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flowers and fruits, which form in sessile heads. A good example is Melaleuca apodocephala.

Apodogynum: [a-po-do-jahy-num] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek for an ovary. It refers to the flowers and fruits, which are sessile or not having a pedicel. A good example is Glochidion apodogynum.

Apodophylla: [a-po-do-fahy-la] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are sessile or have no petioles. A good example is Eucalyptus apodophylla.

Apodophyllum: [a-po-do-fahyl-lum] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are sessile, or not having a pedicel. A good example is Syzygium apodophyllum.

Apodus: [a-po-dus] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to plants, which have leaves, or flowers that are sessile. A good example is Cleistanthus apodus.

Apodytes: [a-po-dahy-teez] From Apodytes, which is Ancient Greek for to strip off or to get undressed. It refers to corollas, which are not covered or protected by a calyx. A good example is Apodytes brachystylis.

Apogamy: [a-po-ga-mee] From Apo, which is Ancient Greek for away from or separated and Gaemik, which is Ancient Greek for a cell. It refers to spores, which are within the same species. A good example is pellaea nana.

Apogon: [a-poh-gon] From Apo, which is Ancient Greek for away from or separated and pogon beard. It refers to lemmas or at times other organs which have nine lobes or nine feathery like awns. A good example is Schoenus apogon.

Apomictic: [a-po-mi-stik] From Apo, which is Ancient Greek for away from or separated and Mixis, which is Greek/Latin for to mix or mingle. It refers to fruits, which have been self-fertilized or develops without fertilization meaning the seeds are actually clones of the parent plant. A good example is Garcinia warrenii.

Apomixis: [a-po-mik-sis] From Apo, which is Ancient Greek for away from or separated and Mixis, which is new Greek/Latin for to mix or mingle. It refers to plants, which can produce seeds without the need for fertilization in that they produce vegetively cloned seeds. A good example is Viola betonicifolia.

Apogeton: [a-po-ge-ton] From Aponi, which is Latin for the name of a healing spring and Geiton, which is new Latin for a neighbour. It refers to plants, which grow in springs. A good example is Aponogeton elongatus subsp. elongatus.

Apopetalous: [a-po-pe-ta-los] From Apo, which is Ancient Greek for away from or separated and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to petals, which are separated from each other. A good example is Crinum pedunculatum.

Crinum pedunculatum with three Apopetalous petals & three Aposepalous sepals.

Apophyllum: [a-po-fahyl-lum] From Apo, which is Ancient Greek for away from or separated and Phullon/Phýllon which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are well separated from each other. A good example is Apophyllum anomalum.

Apophysis: [a-po-fahy-sis] From Apophysis, which is Ancient Greek for to separate from as in an outgrowth or new shoot. It refers to an exposed outer surface of either an ovuliferous scale or megasporophyll as seen when the cone is closed.

Aporopsis: [a-por-op-sis] From Aporum, which is Ancient Greek for standing away from or withdrawing from and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for a resemblance. It refers to orchids, which are more like lilies than the other species in the genus. A good example is Aporopsis litorale.

Aposepalous: [ah-po-se-pa-los] From Apo, which is Ancient Greek for away from or separated and sepala for sepals. It refers to sepals, which are separated from each other.

Apostasioides: [a-po-sta-si-oi-deez] From Apostasia, which is Ancient Greek for standing away from or withdrawing from and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to orchids, which resemble the Apostasia genus. A good example is Genoplesium apostasioides.

Apostemonous: [a-po-stei-mo-nos] From Apostasia, which is Ancient Greek for standing away from or withdrawing from and Stḗmōn, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs as a whole. It refers to stamens, which stand erect and away from the female organs. A good example is Melaleuca pahyphyllus.

Apostiba: [a-po-sti-ba] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and maybe Postitum, which is Latin for to go behind or to follow. It may refer to plants, which will not fall behind others in their environment for prominence. A good example is Melaleuca apostiba.

Apostylous: [a-po-stahy-los] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for the female organs as a whole – Style. It refers to plants, which have not one but two free styles, as opposed to a single free style.

Types of carples

Apothalassica: [a-po-thah-las-si-ka] From Apo, which is Ancient Greek for away from and Thalassicos, which is Ancient Greek for the sea. It refers to plants, which are well away from the seaboard. A good example is Eucalyptus apothalassica.

Apothecium: [a-po-thee-ki-um] From Apotheóō, which is Ancient Greek for for to defy and Thḗkē, which is Ancient Greek for a box or at times a cup. It usually refers to the cup shape pileus of some fungi in some ascomycetes family.

Apowollastonia: [a-po-wol-la-sto-ni-a] From Apo, which is Ancient Greek for away from or separated and is named in honour of Alexander Frederich Richmond Wollaston; 1875-1930, who was an English explorer and naturalist. A good example is Apowollastonia spilanthoides.

Apoxychilum: [a-pok-sahy-chi- lum] From Apoxys, which is Ancient Greek for to taper and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to labellum on orchids, which taper to an acute point. A good example is Prasophyllum apoxychilum.

Appendage: [a-pen-deej] From Appendicule, which is Latin for an appendage. It refers to organs, which are added to another organ or structure as an attachment. For example, a part added to the end of the anthers, that play an important role in the dehiscing of the anthers is the appendage to the anther. They are usually more pronounced in grasses, sedges, lilies and orchids. Good examples can be seen on Lepidospermum elatius.

Appendicula: [a-pen-di-kyoo-la] From Appendicule, which is Latin for a small appendage. It refers to a stamens, which have variously shaped or modified, protrusion/appendage. A good example is the stamens on Appendicula australiensis.

Appendiculata: [a-pen-di-kyoo-la-ta] From Appendicule, which is Latin for a small appendage. It refers to organs, which have a small appendage. A good example is Uncaria lanosa var. appendiculata.

Appendiculatum: [a-pen-di-kyoo-la-tum] From Appendicule, which is Latin for a small appendage. It refers to organs, which has many small appendages. A good example is Prasophyllum appendiculatum.

Appendiculatus: [a-pen-di-kyoo-la-tus] From Appendicule, which is Latin for a small appendage. It refers to organs, which has many small appendages. A good example is Myriocephalus appendiculatus.

Applanata 1: [a-pla-na-ta] From Applanata, which is Latin for flattened as in the cornea. Its reference to the orchid is unclear. A good example is Caladenia applanata.

Applanata 2: [a-pla-nahr-tuh] From Applanate, which is Latin for horizontally flattened. It refers to structures, which are flattened. A good example is the stem hairs on Acacia applanata.

Applanate: [a-pla-neit] From Applanate, which is Latin for horizontally flattened. It refers to rhizomes, which are somewhat more flattened than other species in the genus. A good example was Restio applanatus, which is now known as Platychorda applanata.

Appressa: [a-pres-sa] From Appressus, which is Latin for lying close together. It refers to structures or organs usually hairs, which are lying close together or close against another’s surface. A good example is the stem hairs on Gaultheria appressa.

Appressum: [a-pres-sum] From Appressus, which is Latin for Lying close together and Um, which is Greek/Latin for a degree. It refers to structures or organs, which lay very tightly together or flat against a surface. A good example is the leaves on the stems of Gastrolobium appressum.

Appressus: [a-pres-sus] From Appressus, which is Latin for Lying close together and Um, which is Greek/Latin for a degree. It refers to structures or organs, which are lay rather tightly together or flat against a surface. A good example is the flowers on the leaves of Leucopogon appressus.

Apprimus: [ap-pri-mus] From Primus, which is Latin for the very first. It refers to being the primary one or first in line. A good example is Acianthus apprimus.

Aprepta: [a-prep-ta] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Preptus, which is for eminent. It refers to plants, which have no special attractions. A good example is Acacia aprepta.

Apreptum: [a-prep-tum] From A, which is Greek/Latin for the without or not having and Preptus, which is for eminent. It refers to plants, which have no special attractions. A good example was Racosperma apreptum, which is now known as Acacia aprepta.

Apreptus: [a-prep-tus] From A, which is Greek/Latin for the without or not having and Preptus, which is for eminent. It refers tothe plants, which have no special attractions. A good example is Plectranthus apreptus.

Aprica: [a-pri-ka] From Aprica, which is Latin for to love the sun. It refers to plants, which prefer full sunlight to growing in even light shade that is often hotter and more baking than other subspecies or species can tolerate. A good example is Acacia aprica.

Aproximanata: [a-prok-si-man-a-ta] From Approximātus, which is Latin for to lie close to or near to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble another species in the genus. A good example was Grevillea approximata, which is now known as Grevillea ilicifolia subsp. ilicifolia.

Aproximans: [a-proks-si-manz] From Approximātus, which is Latin for to lie close to or near to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble another species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus approximans.

Apsleyensis: [ap-slei-en-sis] From Aspley, which is Latin for the Aspley National Park in Tasmania (Is named in honour of Henry Aspley the third Earl of Bathurst Aspley) and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the area in Tasmania, where the first plants were discovered. A good example is Deyeuxia apsleyensis.

Aptaneura: [a-ta-nyoo-ra] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having or Apt, which is Latin for lacking and Neuron, which Greek for a vein. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which seem to lack a midvein. A good example is Acacia aptaneura.

Aptera: [ap-teer-a] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to drupes or pods, which do not have wings. A good example is the fruits on Dodonaea aptera.

Apterantha: [ap-teer-an-tha] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to drupes or pods, which do not have wings. A good example is the fruits on Lobelia apterantha, which is now known as Scaevola ramosissima.

Apteropteris: [ap-teer-oh-ter-is] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Pteris which Greek for a fern. It refers to ferns, which do not have wings along the rachises. A good example was Apteropteris applanata, which is now known as Sphaerocionium applanatum.

Apus: [a-poos] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Pous/Podion, which Greek for a foot or feet. It refers to organs, which do not have a pedicel or petiole that is they are sessile. A good example was Ardisia apus, which is now known as Ardisia brevipedata.

Aqua: [a-kwu] From Aquāticum, which is Latin for water or watery. It refers to plants, which prefer to live in watery environments. A good example is Nymphoides indica.

Aquarii: [a-kwua-ri-ahy] From Aquarius, which is Latin for water. It refers to plants, which grow in damp environments. A good example is the desert grass Austrostipa aquarii which prefers damp gullies.

Aquatica: [a-kwua-ti-ka] From Aquaticus, which is Latin for to have a watery abode. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in wet or waterlogged environments. A good example is Phalaris aquatica.

Aquaticum: [a-kwua-ti-kum] From Aquaticus, which is Latin for to have a watery abode. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in wet or waterlogged environments. A good example was Leptospermum aquaticum, which is now known as Leptospermum polygalifolium subsp. polygalifolium.

Aquaticus: [a-kwua-ti-kus] From Aquāticum, which is Latin for water or watery. It refers to plants, which prefer to live in watery environments. A good example is Pandanus aquaticus.

Aquatilis: [a-kwua-ti-lis] From Aquaticus, which is Latin for to have a watery abode. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in wet or water logged environments. A good example is Ranunculus aquatilis.

Aqueum: [a-kwua-ee-um] From Aqueum, which is Latin for watery. It refers to plants, which produce watery fruits. A good example is Syzygium aqueum.

Aquifolia: [a-kwi-foh-li-a] From Aque, which is Latin for holly like and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which closely resemble the leaves of the European Holly. This is a spelling error often seen in older literature and should read Grevillea aquifolium not Grevillea aquifolia. A good example is Grevillea aquifolium.

Aquifolium: [a-kwi-foh-li-um] From Aque, which is Latin for holly like and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which closely resemble the leaves of the European Holly. A good example is Alchornea aquifolium, which is now known as Ilix aquifolium is some states.

Aquilonia: [a-kwi-lo-ni-a] From Aequalis, which is Latin for an eagle’s claw. It refers to flowers, which hang down like an eagle’s claw. A good example is the four or five flowers on Pimelea aquilonia.

Arabica: [a-ra-bi-ka] From Arabica, which is Latin for of or from Arabia. It refers to the type specimen, which originates from around Arabia. A good example is the horticultural coffee bean, Coffea arabica.

Arabidea: [ah-rah-bi-dee-a] From Arabis, which is Ancient Greek for mustard. It refers to the nose, which twists or turns up when the plants are chewed. A good example is Blumea arabidea.

Arabidella: [ah-ra-bi-del-la] From Arabis, which is Ancient Greek for mustard, and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to the nose being twisted or turned up when the plants are chewed. A good example is Arabidella trisecta.

Arachis: [a-ra-kis] From Arákis, which is the ancient Greek name for a legume. It refers the commercially grown peanuts, which are a legume crop. A good example is Arachis hypogaea.

Arachnaea: [a-rak-nee-a] From Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek, or Arachnida, which is Latin for a spider’s web. It refers to the leaves, which have very fine leaf venation similar to a spiders web. A good example is Eucalyptus arachnaea.

Arachnanthe: [a-rahk-nee] From Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek or Arachnida, which is Latin for a spider’s web and ántha/ánthos, which are Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which somewhat resemble a spiders web. A good example was Durabaculum arachnanthe, which is now known as Dendrobium discolour.

Arachne: [ah-rak-ne] From Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek, or Arachnida, which is Latin for a spider’s web. It refers to organs, which are densely covered in hairs similar to those of spider legs. A good example is Arachne decaisnei, which is now known as Notoleptopus decaisnei.

Arachniodes: [ah-rak-ni-oi-deez] From Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek or Arachnida, which is Latin for a spider’s web and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to fronds, leaves or at times other structures, which are covered in or appear as though they are covered in a spider’s web. A good example is Arachniodes aristata.

Arachnoid: [ah-rak-noid] Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek or Arachnida, which is Latin for a spider’s web. It refers to plants, which appear to be covered in a spider’s web.

Arachnoidea: [ah-rak-noi-dee-a] From Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek, or Arachnida, which is Latin for a spider’s web. It refers to stems, which are covered in or appear as though they are covered in a spider’s web. A good example is Podolepis arachnoidea.

Arachnoides: [ah-rahk-noi-deez] From Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek or Arachnida, which is Latin for a spider’s web. It refers to stems, which are covered in or appear as though they are covered in a spider’s web. A good example is Leptospermum arachnoides.

Arachnoideum: [a-rahk-noi-dee-um] From Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek or Arachnida, which is Latin for a spider’s web. It refers to stems, which are covered in or appear as though they are covered in a spider’s web. A good example is Leptospermum arachnoideum, which is now known as Leptospermum arachnoides.

Arachnoideus: [a-rak-noi-dee-us] From Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek or Arachnida, which is Latin for a spider’s web. It refers to stems, which are covered in or appear as though they are covered in a spider’s web. Senecio linearifolius subsp. arachnoideus.

Arachnologist: [a-rak-nol-o-jist] From Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek or Arachnida, which is Latin for a spider’s web, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for study and Ist, a person. It refers to a person who studies spiders and other arachnids.

Arachnology: [a-rahk-nol-o-jee] From Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek or Arachnida, which is Latin for a spider’s web, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for study. It refers to the science of studying spiders and other arachnids.

Arachnorchis: [a-rak-nor-kis] From Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek or Arachnida, which is Latin for a spider’s web and Orchis, which is Ancient Greek for a pair of testicles. It refers to spikes, which are covered in short white hairs resembling a spider’s sexual organs. A good example is Arachnorchis actensis.

Arafurica: [a-ra-few-ri-ka] From Arafura, which is Latinized for the Arafura Sea. It refers to plants, which grow along the coastal waters or close to the coast of the Arafura Sea. A good example is Corymbia arafurica.

Aralia: [a-ra-li-a] From Aralia, which is Latinized for the French Canadian word for a plant, found in Canada. It refers to plants, which resemble the Canadian plants in the Aralia genus. A good example was Aralia cephalobotrys, which is now known as Cephalaralia cephalobotrys.

Araliifolia: [a-ra-li-foh-li-a] From Aralia, which is Latinized for the French Canadian word for a plant, found in Canada and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the leaves of the Canadian Aralia genus. A good example is Carnarvonia araliifolia.

Araneolifera: [a-ra-nee-o-li-fer-a] From Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek or Arachnida which is Latin for a spider or spider like and Ferae/Ferārum which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to organs usually the seeds, which bear markings that resemble a spider’s web. A good example is Hibbertia araneolifera

Araneosa: [a-ra-nee-o/oh-sa] From Aráchnē, which is Ancient Greek or Arachnida, which is Latin for a spider or spider like. It refers to plants, which have fine stems and leaves, or phyllodes that resemble a spider’s web. A good example is Acacia araneosa.

Araucaria: [a-ru-kar-i-a] From Araucarian, which is Ancient Greek, or Arachnida, which is Latinized for the word of the Indians of a Patagonian tree. A good example is Araucaria bidwillii.

Araucarioides: [a-ra-kar-i-oi-deez] From Araucarian, which is Ancient Greek or Arachnida, which is Latinized for Indians of Patagonia and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which somewhat resemble the Araucaria genus in that the leaves are held close to the stems. A good example is Melaleuca araucarioides.

Araujacea: [ah-ra-ja-see-a] From Araucarian, which is Ancient Greek, or Arachnida, which is Latinized for Indians of Patagonia. It refers to trees, which grow prominently in their territory. A good example is Araucaria bidwillii.

Arbiana: [ar-bia-na] From Arbiana, which is not known. A good example is Acacia arbiana.

Arbianum: [ar-bia-num] From Arbiana, which is not known. A good example was Racemosa arbianum which is now known as Acacia arbiana.

Arborea: [ar-bor-ee-a] From Arborescent, which is Latin for a tree. It refers to plants, which have a typical tree like structure. A good example is Capparis arborea.

Arborella: [ar-bor-el-la] From Arborescent, which is Latin for a tree, and Ella, which is Latin for the female form. It refers to plants, which have a typical tree like structure but look a little daintier. A good example is Eucalyptus arborella.

Arborescens: [ar-bor-es-enz] From Arborescent, which is Latin for a tree. It refers to plants, which are more tree like than other species in the genus. A good example is Buchanania arborescens.

Arborescent: [ar-bor-es-sent] From Arborescent, which is Latin for a tree. It refers to plants, which are normally shrubs having a typical tree like appearance. A good example is Kunzea subsect. Arborescentes.

Arbuscula: [ar-bu-skyoo-la] From Arborescent, which is Latin for a tree, and Sculus, which is Latin for small or smaller. It refers to plants, which have a typical small tree like structure. A good example is Tecticornia arbuscula.

Arbusculoides: [ar-bu-skyoo-loi-deez] From Arbuscula, which is Latin for a small tree, and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to herbs or shrubs, which diverge away from that which is normally found in the genus and grow as small trees. A good example is Suaeda arbusculoides.

Arbutiflora: [ar-bu-ti-flor-a] From Arbutus, which is Latin for the Strawberry tree and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to leaves, which resemble the Arbutus genus. A good example is Cryptandra arbutiflora.

Arcana: [ar-ka-na] From Arcanus, which is Latin mysterious and secret. It refers to the type specimen, which was hidden in dense scrub. A good example is Eucalyptus arcana.

Archaeoides: [ar-kee-oi-deez] From Arkhaios/Arkhein, which is Ancient Greek forthe beginning, and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. (Archaea organisms constitute a domain and kingdom of ancient formed, single-celled microorganisms) It refers to plants, which are believed to be the start of the genus. A good example is Hakea archaeoides.

Archboldiana: [ark-bol-di-an-a] Is named in honour of Richard Archbold; 1907–1976, who was an American aviator and explorer. A good example is Hoya archboldiana which is a New Guinee Hoya much sought after by Australian collectors.

Archegonium: [ar-kee-goh-ni-um] From Arkhe, which is Ancient Greek for to come first in a race and Gonos, for a female seed prior to fertilization. It refers to the female sex organ’s anatomy that produces the egg ready for fertilization. Stage 4 where Archegonium takes place.

Archeri: [ar-cher-ahy] Is named in honour of William Archer; 1820-1874 who was a Tasmanian botanist. A good example is Amphibromnus archeri.

Archeriana: [ar-cher-i-an-a] Is named in honour of William Archer; 1820-1874 who was a Tasmanian botanist. A good example is Lagerstroemia archeriana.

Archidéndron: [ar-ki-den-dron] From Arche, which is Ancient Greek for chief or first head, and Déndron, which is Greek for a tree. It refers to trees, which appear very stately. A good example is the overall appearance of Archidéndron grandiflorum.

Archidendropsis: [ar-ki-den-drop-sis] From Arche, which is Ancient Greek for chief or first head, Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for to resemble or resembling. It refers to the trees, which are appear very stately and similar to the Archidéndron genus. A good example is Archidendropsis xanthoxylon.

Archirhodomyrtus: [ar-ki-roh-do-mer-tus] From Arche, which is Ancient Greek for chief or first head, Rhodo, which is Ancient Greek for reddish and Myrtos, which is Ancient Greek or Myrtus which is Latin for the European Myrtle bush. It refers to shrubs, which somewhat resemble the European Mrytle but is more exquisitely beautiful with pale rose, pink coloured flowers. A good example is Archirhodomyrtus beckleri.

Archontophoenix: [ar-kon-toh-fee-niks] From Archontos, which is Ancient Greek for a chiefton and Phoînix, which is Ancient Greek or Phoenīx, which is Latin for majestic. It refers to plants, which have a majestic appearance of palms. A good example is Archontophoenix cunninghamii.

Arcohastata: [ar-koh-has-ta-ta] From Arcus, which is Latin for a bent bow, and hastata, which is Latin for an arrow, head. It refers to pileus of fungi, which are emerge in the shape of an arrowhead before taking the shape of a bent bow. A good example is Hygrocybe arcohastataa.

Arctotidis: [ark-toh-ti-dis] From Arctos/Arcturos, which is Ancient Greek for a bear and Otos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear. It refers to the stigmas which somewhat resemble a bear’s ear. A good example is Dryandra arctotidis, which is now again known as Banksia tortifolia that again proves the difficulty botanists have had in the past with these two genre.

Arctiflora: [ark-ti-flor-a] From Antarctica, which is Latin for coming from the Antarctic region and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers.  It refers to a the frosty white flowers on this species. A good example is Alpinia arctiflora.

Arctotis: [ark-toh-tis] From Arctos/Arcturos, which is Ancient Greek for a bear, and Otos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear. It probably It refers to the stigmas, which somewhat resemble a bear’s ear. A good example is the pappus on the exotic weed Arctotis stoechadifolia.

Arcturi: [ark-tyoo-ri] From Arctos/Arcturos, which is Ancient Greek for a bear, and Ura/Uro, which is Ancient Greek for a tail. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a bear’s tail. A good example is the leaves on Drosera arcturi.

Arcuata: [ar-kyoo-a-ta] From Arcuatus, which is Latin for an arch as in an archer’s bow and a rainbow. It refers to flower spikes, which bend like a bow. A good example is the exotic garden plant Acacia arcuata.

Arcuate: [ar-kyoo-eit] From Arcuatus, which is Latin for an arch as in an archer’s bow and a rainbow. It refers to branches or stems, which have a distinct arch. A good example is Ehretia acuminata.

Arcuatilis: [ar-kyoo-ah-ti-lis] From Arcuatus, which is Latin for a curve, bow or bend. It refers to leaves, which have a distinct arch. A good example is Acacia arcuatilis.

Arcuatum: [ar-kyoo-ei-tum] From Arcuatus, which is Latin for a curve, bow or bend. It refers to leaves, which resemble a bow or have a bend. A good example was Panicum arcuatum, which is now known as Sacciolepis indica.

Ardisia: [ar-di-si-a] From Ardis/Ardisea, which is Latin for pointed, or to point. It refers to anthers, which taper strongly towards their apexes. A good example is Ardisia bakeri.

Arecaceae: [ar-ka-see-a] From Areca, which is Latinized from the local Malabar vernacular for a palm. It refers to the family name for palm trees. A good example Ptychospermum elegans.

Arenacea: [ar-en-ei-see-a] From Arenaceus, which is Latin for a sandy place. It refers to plants, which have a strong preference for very sandy soils. A good example is Eucalyptus arenacea.

Arenaria: [a-ren-ar-i-a] From Arena, which is Latin for sand. It refers to species, which prefer growing in sandy environments. A good example Grevillea arenaria.

Arenariobulbosa: [a-ren-ar-i-oh-bul-boh-sa] From Arena, which is Latin for sand, and Bulbōsus, which is Latin for a bulb or swelling. It refers to fungi, which prefer growing in sand and have larger bulbulous like stalks that other species in the genus. A good example Pholiota arenariobulbosa.

Arenarium: [a-ren-ar-i-um] From Arena, which is Latin for sand. It refers to species, which prefer to grow in sandy environments. A good example is Xanthóstemon arenarius.

Arenarius: [a-ren-ar-i-us] From Arena, which is Latin for sand. It refers to species, which prefer to grow in sandy environments. A good example is Xanthóstemon arenarius.

Arenga: [a-reng-ga] From Areng, which is Latinized from the local Malay vernacular for a palm. It refers to the local palms, which are related to the palms found in Malaysia. A good example is Arenga australasica.

Arenicola: [a-ren-i-koh-la] From Arena, which is Latin for sand and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which prefer sandy flat, habitats. A good example is Cycas arenicola.

Arenicolens: [a-ren-i-koh-lenz] From Arena, which is Latin for sand, and Colēns, which is Latin for to nurture or to till or cultivate. It refer to plants, which prefer sandy flat, habitats and which can be cultivated for their edible qualities. In saying that all wild species of Inocybe should be avoided as many contain low to high levels of muscarine and there is no reliable method of identification without a microscope, which includes Inocybe arenacolens.

Arenitensis: [a-ren-i-ten-sis] From Arenit, which is Latinized for an area in Kakadu National Park and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the vicinity of Arenit in Kakadu National Park. A good example is Duboisia arenitensis.

Arenosa: [a-re-noh-sa] From Arenosa, which is Latin for very sandy. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in course sandy habitats and environments. A good example is Fuirena arenosa.

Arenosus: [a-re-noh-sus] From Arenosa, which is Latin for very sandy. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in course sandy habitats and environments. A good example is Sauropus arenosus.

Areola 1: [a-ree-oh-la] From Areolata, which is Latin for a diminutive area or marked out in small areas. It refers to small interstices (spaces) which are found between the fibers of connective tissue like the veins of a leaf.

Areola 2: [a-ree-oh-la] From Areolata, which is Latin for a diminutive area or marked out in small areas. It refers to any small, circular, coloured area such as the pigmented zone around the human nipple, the red inflamed area around a pimple or the area surrounding a spine particularly in cactus and succulents. A good example is found on the cactus Mammillaria hahniana.

Areolata: [a-ree-oh-la-ta] From Areolata, which is Latin for a diminutive area or marked-out in small areas. It refers to a surface that is split into regular or irregular shaped blocks, revealing the underlying flesh, usually referring to the outer skin of a fungus. A good example is the standard petals on Zornia areolata.

Areolate: [a-ree-oh-leit] From Areolata, which is Latin for a diminutive area or marked out in small areas. It refers to the spaces between the veins on a lamina. A good example is the spaces between the veins on the fronds of Gleichenia dicarpa.

Areolatoimbricatus: [a-ree-oh-la-toh-im-bri-ka-tus] From Areolata, which is Latin for a diminutive area or marked out in small areas and Imbricatus, which is Latin for to have the shape of form of tiles or shingles. It refers to organs, which have small patches of shingle like surfaces. A good example is the pileus on Cortinarius areolatoimbricatus.

Areolatum: [a-ree-oh-lei-tum] From Areolata, which is Latin for a diminutive area or marked out in small areas. It refers to small areas, which are distinctly marked in a different colour. A good example is Scleroderma areolatum.

Arethusa: [a-re-thyoo-sa] From Arethusa, which is Greek for the water. It refers to the Greek nymph who fled her home and shed tears like a fountain was turned into a spring by Artemis to escape the admiration and attentions of the river god Alpheus. A good example is Arethusa catenata, which is now known as Caladenia catenata.

Arfakiana: [ar-fa-ki-a-na] From Africanus, which is Latin for Africa. It refers plants, which were originally discovered in Africa. A good example is Sciaphila arfakiana.

Argentatus: [ar-jen-tei-tus] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for silver. It refers to structures or organs usually the foliage and stems, which are very silvery. A good example is the lower leaf laminas of Arachnorchis arenaria.

Argentea: [ar-jen-tee-a] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for silver. It refers to structures or organs usually the foliage and stems, which are silvery. A good example is the lower leaf laminas of Arachnorchis arenaria.

Argenteum: [ar-jen-tee-um] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for silver. It refers to structures or organs, which are silvery in colour. A good example is the flower heads and fruiting bodies on Hypaelyptum argenteum, which is now known as Lipocarpha chinensis.

Argenteus: [ar-jen-tee-us] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for silver. It refers to structures or organs, which is silvery in colour. A good example is the lower leaf laminas of Pipturus argenteus.

Argentifolia: [ar-jen-ti-foh-li-a] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for silver and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, leaflets or pinnules, which are silvery-green to silvery. A good example is the lower leaf laminas of Acacia leucoclada subsp. Argentifolia.

Argentifolium: [ar-jen-ti-foh-li-um] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for silver, Folium, which is Latin for  and Um, which is Greek/Latin for a degree. It refers to the colour of the leaves, leaflets or pinnules, which are strongly silvery in colour. A good example is the lower leaf laminas of Gnaphalium argentifolium.

Argentifolius: [ar-jen-ti-foh-li-us] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for silver, Folium, which is Latin for  and Um, which is Greek/Latin for a degree. It refers to the colour of the leaves, leaflets or pinnules, which are strongly silvery in colour. A good example is the lower leaf laminas of Euchiton argentifolius.

Argentina: [ar-jen-ti-na] From Argentīnum, which is Latin for silvery. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds and at times the stems, which are silvry in colour. A good example is the phyllodes and stems on Acacia argentina.

Argentipallium: [ar-jen-ti-pahl-li-um] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for silver and Pallium, which is Latin for a palladium, or mantle. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covering of silvery white hairs. A good example Argentipallium obtusifolium.

Argentum: [ar-jen-tum] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for silver. It refers to structures or organs, which are strongly or bright silver. A good example is Teucrium argutum.

Argillacea: [ahr-gil-la-ke-a] From Agilla, which is Ancient Greek for clay especially potters clay. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow with other plants on clay soils. A good example is Daviesia argillacea.

Argillaceae: [ar-gil-la-see-a] From Agilla, which is Ancient Greek for clay especially potters clay. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow with other plants on clay soils. A good example is Goodenia argillaceae.

Argillicola: [ar-gil-koh-la] From Agilla, which is Ancient Greek for clay especially potters clay and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on whitish clays. A good example is Batis argillcola.

Argocalla: [ar-goh-kal-la] From Aárgillos, which is Ancient Greek for bright and silvery or white and Kallos, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful. It refers to petals and or sepals, which are bright and silvery-white in colour. A good example is the beautiful, brilliant silvery-white tepals on Arachnorchis argocalla.

Argophloia: [ar-goh-floi-a] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or whiteand phlóos, which is Ancient Greek for bark. It refers to barks, which are bright white. A good example is the bark on Eucalyptus argophloia.

Argopholis: [ar-goh-fo-lis] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or white, Pholis, which is Ancient Greek for a scaly or horny scaleand Oura, which is Ancient Greek for a tail. It refers to Lichens, which are silvery, scaly whith tail like apendages. A good example is the bark on Graphis argopholis.

Argophylla: [ar-goh-fahyl-la] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Greek for a leaf. It refers to lower lamina on leaves, which are silver to white in colour. A good example is the leaves on Oleria argophylla.

Argophyllum: [ahr-goh-fahyl-lum] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Greek for a leaf. It refers to lower lamina on leaves, which are silver to white in colour. A good example is the leaves on Argophyllum nullumense.

Argophyllus: [ahr-goh-fahyl-lus] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to lower lamina on leaves which are silvery-white. A good example is Ozothamnus argophyllus.

Argrophylla: [ar-groh-fahyl-la] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to lower laminas on leaves, which are silvery-white. A good example is Grevillea argyrophylla.

Arguens: [ahr-jyoo-enz] From Arguēns, which is Latin for assert or to accuse. It refers to organs, which are more dominant or stand out more in their habitats. A good example is Themeda arguens.

Arguta: [ahr-jyoo-ta] From Arguta, which is Latin for sharp or pungent tooth. It refers to organs, which have a sharp tooth like appendage. A good example is the tooth on the sepals of Velleia arguta.

Argutifolia: [ahr-jyoo-ti-foh-li-a] From Argūtum, which is Latin for assertive. It refers to the position of plants in their environment or habitat, which is very assertive because of the phyllodes which are strongly and very pungently pointed. A good example is the phyllodes and stems on Acacia argutifolia.

Argutum: [ar-jyoo-tum] From Arguta which is Latin for sharp or pungent tooth. It refers to a structure or organ, which has many sharp teeth like appendages. A good example is Teucrium argutum.

Argutus: [ar-jyoo-tus] From Argūtus, which is Latin for sharp or pungent tooth. It refers to organs, which have a few sharp teeth like appendages. A good example is the teeth on the apexes of the leaves Heteroscyphus argutus.

Argyphea: [ar-gahy-fee-a] From Aárgillos, which is Greek, and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and maybe Phea, which is Latin for curved. Its reference is unknown. A good example is the leaves and bark on Eucalyptus argyphea.

Argyraea: [ar-gahy-ree-a] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or white. It refers to structures or organs, which are dazzling or shinny silvery-white. A good example is the silvery-white sheen on the phyllodes of Acacia argyraea.

Argyrea: [ar-gahy-ree-a] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or white. It refers to structures or organs, which are dazzling or shinny silvery-white. A good example of is the white flowers contrasting the large, deep purple-violet sepals on Patersonia argyrea.

Argyreia: [ar-gahy-rei-a] From Aárgillos which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or white. It refers to petals or floral tubes, which are dazzling white. A good example is the flowers on Argyreia soutteri, which is now known as Merremia peltata.

Argyreus: [ar-gahy-ree-us] From Aárgillos, which is Greek, and later Argyreus which is Latin for bright and silvery or white. It refers to the colour of the leaf margins, which are silvery. A good example is Adenanthos argyreus.

Argyrocaule: [ar-gahy-ro-kor-le] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Kaulos which is Ancient Greek or Caulus, which is Latin for a stick, stem or branch. It refers to stems and small branches, which are silvery-white. A good example is Argyrodéndron trifoliolatum which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation.

Argyochiton: [ar-gahy-ro-kahy-ton] From Aárgillos, which is Greek, and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Khiton/Chiton, which is Ancient Greek for a tunic. It refers to bracts, which resemble a silvery-white chiton or tunic around the flowers. A good example is Hibbertia argyrochiton which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further.

Argyrocome: [ar-grahy-o-koh-me] From Aárgillos, which is Greek, and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Chromos, which is Ancient Greek for a powder. It refers to structures or organs, which appear to be covered in a slivery–white powder. A good example is the stems and foliage on Argyrocome anthemoides, which is now known as Rhodanthe anthemoides.

Argyodendron: [ar-gahy-ro-den-dron] From Aárgillos, which is Greek, and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree. It refers to the lower laminas, which are silvery-tan and the appearance of the trees From A, distance when in flower. A good example is Argyrodéndron trifoliolatum.

Argyroglottis: [ar-gahy-ro-glo-tis] From Aárgillos, which is Greek, and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Glôssa, which are Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to leaves, which resemble silvery-white tongues. A good example is Argyroglottis turbinata.

Argyrolepis: [ar-gahy-ro-le-pis] From Aárgillos, which is Greek, and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Lepis, which is Ancient Greek for a scale. It refers to structures or organs, which are silvery-white and scaly. A good example is Pumilo argyrolepis, which is now known as Siloxerus multifloris.

Argyropedicum: [ar-gahy-ro-pe-di-kum] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Pedīculus/Pedīculī, which is Ancient Greek for a foot or feet. It refers to silvery-white pedicels, which are longer, thicker and more rigid than any other species in the genus. A good example is Syzygium argyropedicum.

Argyrophylla: [ar-gahy-ro-fahyl-la] From Aárgillos, which is Greek, and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to lower laminas, which are bright silver in colour. A good example is Pomaderris argyrophylla.

Argyrophyllum: [ar-gahy-ro-fahyl-lum] From Aárgillos, which is Greek, and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to lower laminas, which are bright silvery-white in colour. A good example is Argophyllum nullumense.

Argyropum: [ar-gahy-roh-pum] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Pous, which Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to petioles or peduncles, which are thicker and silvery in colour. A good example is Adelopetalum argyropum.

Argyropus: [ar-gahy-roh-pus] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to petioles or peduncles, which are silvery in colour. A good example is Bulbophyllum argyropus.

Argyotegium: [ar-gahy-roh-te-jee-um] From Aárgillos, which is Greek and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Stegium, which is Ancient Greek for a roof. It may refer to the habitats of the plants, which grow at higher altitudes or on the roof of Australia. A good example is Argyrotegium poliochlorum.

Argyrotricha: [ar-gahy-roh-trahy-ka] From Aárgillos, which is Greek, and later Latin for bright and silvery or white and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to hairs, which are silver in colour. A good example is Acacia argyrotricha.

Arhizous: [ar-iz-os] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Rhizoma, which is Greek/Latin for a type of root. It refers to plants, which do not have roots. A good example is the truffle Psiolitus tinctorius.

Arida: [a-ri-da] From ārida, which is Latin for dry. It refers to plants, which prefer habitats that are drier or more arid than other species in the genus. A good example Acacia arida.

Aridicola: [a-ri-di-koh-la] From ārida, which is Latin for dry and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell. It refers to plants, which have environments or habitats taht are rather dry or arid. A good example is Wahlenbergia aridicola.

Aridulus: [a-ri-dyoo-lus] From ārida, which is Latin for dry. It refers to the habitats, which are very dry or arid. A good example is Polycarpaea arida

Aril: [a-ril] From Arillus, which is Latin for a fleshy appendage or covering of many seeds. Common as an appendage on Acacia seeds. Think of it as the umbilicle cord in mamals.A good example is the white aril on Acacia melanoxolyn.

Orange arils on the seeds of Acacia melanoxylon.

Arillacea: [ah-ril-la-see-a] From Arillus, which is Latin for a fleshy appendage covering all of the seed. It refers to outgrowths from the funiculi of seed coats or chalaza. It can be an outgrowth on a fleshy seed coat. A good example is the seeds of Hypoxis arillacea.

Arillate: [ah-ri-leit] From Arillus, which is Latin for a fleshy appendage covering all of the seed. It refers to outgrowths from the funiculi of the seed coats or chalaza. It can be an outgrowth on a fleshy seed coat. A good example is the seeds of Diploglottis australis.

Arrilate covering on Diploglottis australis seeds.

Aristata: [ah-ris-tei/tahr-tuh] From Aristatus, which is Latin for a  beard or bearded or at times a long appendage. It refers to organs, which have bristle-like beards or a long appendage. A good example is the glumes of Aristida lignose.

Aristate: [ah-ris-teit] From Aristatus, which is Latin for a beard or bearded or at times a long appendage. It refers to organs, which have bristle-like beards or a long appendage. A good example is the lemma on Aristida exserta.

Aristate leaf apex.

Aristatum: [a-ris-tei-tum] From Aristatus, which is Latin for a  beard or bearded or at times a long appendage. It refers to organs, which have bristle-like beards or a long appendage. A good example was Aspidium aristatum, which is now known as Arachniodes aristata.

Aristatus: [a-ris-tei-tus] From Aristatus, which is Latin for a  beard or bearded or at times a long appendage. It refers to organs, which have bristle-like beards or a long appendage. A good example is Orthosiphon aristatus.

Aristida: [a-ris-ti-da] From Aristatus, which is Latin for a  beard or bearded or at times a long appendage. It refers to organs, which have bristle-like beards or a long appendage. A good example is Aristida echinata.

Aristidea: [a-ris-ti-dee-a] From Aristatus, which is Latin for a  beard or bearded or at times a long appendage. It refers to lemmas or glumes, which have a long appendage at the apex. A good example is Eriachne aristidea.

Aristiglumis: [a-ris-ti-gloo-mis] From Aristatus, which is Latin for a  beard or bearded or at times a long appendage and Gluma, which is Latin for a covering. It refers to Glumes or Lemmas, which have a prominently rigid awn. A good example is Austrostipa aristiglumis.

Aristispicula: [ar-is-ti-spi-kyoo-la] From Aristatus, which is Latin for a  beard or bearded or at times a long appendage and Spiculus, which is Latin for a long spike. It refers to spikes, which have a long awn/s on the upper glume. A good example is Arthragrostis aristispicula.

Aristolochia: [a-ri-sto-lo-ki-a] From Aristos, which is Ancient Greek for best or most useful and Locheia, which is Ancient Greek for childbirth. It refers to plants, which are from ancient Greece that were used in childbirth. A good example is Aristolochhia déltantha var. laheyana, which is now known as Pararistolochia laheyana.

Aristotelia: [a-ri-sto-te-li-a] Is named in honour of Aristotle; 384BC-322BC, who was a Greek Philosopher and naturalist. A good example is Aristotelia australasica.

Aristrophylla: [a-ri-stro-fahyl-la] From Aristulatus, which is Latin for to have a stubbled beard and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have short hairs, which resemble a stubble beard. A good example is Hibbertia astrophylla which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to its real or correct classification.

Aristulata: [ar-i-stu-la-ta] From Aristulatus, which is Latin for to have a stubbled beard. It refers to stems and petioles, which have hairs that resemble a stubble beard. A good example is Acacia aristulata.

Aristum: [a-ris-tum] From Aristulatus, which is Latin for to have a stubbled beard. It refers to structures or organs, which have hairs, which resemble a stubble beard. A good example is Taraxacum aristum.

Armaliae: [ar-ma-li-ee] Is named in honour of Konkordia Amalie Dietrich (nee Nelle); 1821-1891, who was a German physician, geologist and naturalist. A good example is Sargassum amaliae.

Armata: [ar-ma-ta] From Armatus, which is Latin for armed as in war. It refers to the species being armed with sharp protective thorns. A good example is Acacia armata.

Armatoides: [ar-ma-toi-deez] From Armatus, which is Latin for armed as in war and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to stems, which are armed with very pungent thorns. A good example is Acacia armatoides.

Armatum: [ar-ma-tum] From Armatus, which is Latin for armed as in war. It refers to plants, which are armed with sharp protective thorns. A good example is Solanum armatum.

Armatus: [ar-ma-tus] From Armatus, which is Latin for armed as in war. It refers to the species, which are armed with sharp protective thorns. A good example is Adenanthos armatus.

Armeria: [ar-mer-i-a] From Armeria, which is Latin for Dianthus. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble the Ameria genus of which the present Dianthus species are members. A good example is the leaves on Schoenus armeria.

Armeriifolia: [ar-mer-i-foh-li-a] From Armeria, which is Latin for Dianthus, and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble those of the Ameria genus of which the present Dianthus species are members. A good example is Goodenia armeriifolia, which is now known as Goodenia stelligera.

Armerium: [ar-mer-i-um] From Armeria, which is Latin for Dianthus. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble the Ameria genus of which the present Dianthus species are members. A good example is the flowers especially the colour on Stylidium armerium.

Armigera: [ar-mer-i-jer-a] From Armarta, which is Latin for well armed. It refers to plants, which are generally well protected with thorns, spines or needle sharp leaves or at times stinging hairs. A good example is Grevillea armigera.

Armillaria: [ar-mil-lar-i-a] From Armilla, which is Latin for a bracelet. It refers to fungi, which form a ring or bracelet around the roots of many plants, especially the Eucalyptus genus that causes the death of the plants. A good example is Armillaria luteobubalina.

Armillaris: [ar-mil-lar-is] From Armilla, which is Latin for a bracelet. It refers to flowers, which surround the petiole like a bracelet. A good example is Melaleuca armillaris.

Armillata: [ar-mil-la-ta] From Armilla, which is Latin for a bracelet. It refers to flowers, which surround the petiole like a bracelet. A good example is Acacia armillata.

Armillatum: [ar-mil-lah-tum] From Armilla, which is Latin for a bracelet. It refers to flowers, which surround the petiole like a bracelet. A good example was Racosperma armillatum, which is now known as Acacia armillata.

Armitiana: [ar-mi-ti-a-na] Is named in honour of William Edington de. Margrat Armit; 1848-1901, who was a Belgian Queensland police officer, naturalist and explorer in north Queensland and Papua New Guinea. A good example is Goodenia armitiana.

Armitii: [ar-mi-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of William Edington de. Margrat Armit; 1848-1901, who was a Belgian Queensland police officer, naturalist and explorer in north Queensland and Papua New Guinea. A good example is Acacia armitii.

Armourense: [ar-mor-ens] From Armatus, which is Latin for armed as in war and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to the sharp protective spines, which are sparsely positioned on the stems, leaves and at times on the calyxes. A good example is Solanum armourense

Armstrongiana: [arm-strong-i-an-a] Is named in honour of Armstrong but which Armstrong cannot be substantiated. A good example is Goodenia armstrongiana.

Armstrongii: [arm-stong-ee-ahy] Is named in honour of Armstrong but which Armstrong cannot be substantiated. A good example is Cycas armstrongii.

Arnhemensis: [ar-ne-men-sis] From Arnhemica, which is Latinized for the vernacular aboriginal word for Arnhem Land. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from Arnhem Land. A good example is the fern Ilex arnhemensis.

Arnhemiaca: [ar-ne-mi-a-ka] From Arnhemica, which is Latinized for the vernacular of the aboriginal word for Arnhem Land. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from Arnhem Land. A good example is Lobelia arnhemiaca.

Arnhemica: [ar-ne-mi-ka] From Arnhemica, which is Latinized for the vernacular aboriginal word for Arnhem Land. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from Arnhem Land. A good example is Psydrax odorata subsp. arnhemica.

Arnhemicum: [ar-ne-mi-kum] From Arnhemica, which is Latinized for the vernacular of the aboriginal word for Arnhem Land. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from Arnhem Land. A good example is Lophopetalum arnhemicum.

Arnhemicus: [ar-nem-mi-kus] From Arnhemica, which is Latinized for the vernacular of the aboriginal word for Arnhem Land. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from Arnhem Land. A good example is Elaeocarpus arnhemicus.

Arnocrinum: [ar-no-krahy-num] From Arnos, which is Ancient Greek for a lamb and Krinis, which is Ancient Greek for hair. It refers to stems, which are densely covered in woolly like hair. A good example is Arnocrinum preissii.

Aromaphloia: [ar-o-ma-floi-a] From Aramatikos, which is Ancient Greek or Arimaticsus, which is Latin for a strong aroma, and Phloiós, which is Ancient Greek for, bark. It refers to barks, which have a strong aroma. A good example is Eucalyptus aromaphloia.

Aromatic: [a-ro-ma-tik] From Aramatikos, which is Ancient Greek or Arimaticsus which is Latin for an aroma. It refers to leaves or flowers, which have a sweet aroma or fragrant smell. A good example is Plectranthus sauveolens.

Aromatica: [a-ro-ma-ti-ka] From Aramatikos, which is Ancient Greek or Arimaticsus, which are which is Latin for an aroma. It refers to leaves or flowers, which have a sweet aromatic fragrance. A good example is Doryphora aromatica.

Aromaticum: [a-ro-ma-ti-kum] From Aramatikos, which is Ancient Greek or Arimaticsus, which is Latin for an aroma. It refers to leaves or flowers, which have a sweet aromatic fragrance. A good example is Lysiosepalum aromaticum.

Arostrata: [a-ro-stra-ta] From A, which is Ancient Greek/Latin for without or not having and Rostrātum, which is Latin for a small beak like apendage. It refers to leaves or fruits, which have a blunt rounded apex instead of a rostrate apex. A good example is Lysiosepalum aromaticum.

Arrecta: [a-rek-ta] From Arrectus, which is Latin for to stand erect or upright. It refers to plants, which have erect stems or branches. A good example is Acacia arrecta.

Arrectum: [a-rek-tum] From Arrectus, which is Latin for to stand erect or upright. It refers to plants, which stand erect. A good example is the little ground orchid Genoplesium arrectum.

Arrhenatherum: [ar-ren-a-ther-um] From Arrhen, which is Ancient Greek for a male and Anthera, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to male organs on flowers or the male flowers on spiklets, which have awns or bristles. A good example is Arrhenatherum avenaceum.

Arrhenechthites: [ar-re-nek-thi-teez] From Arrhen, which is Ancient Greek for a male, and Erechtites, which is the Greek god Attica who is associated with King Neptune. It refers to vines, which have a twinning nature and with imagination are the rivers and streams. A good example is Arrhenechthites mixtus.

Arrhenia: [ar-ren-i-a] Is named in honour of Svante August Arrhenius; 1859-1927, who was a Swedish Nobel prize winner in Chemistry. A good example is Arrhenia chlorocyanea. 

Arrhiza: [a-rahy-za] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Rhíza, which is the Greek for a root. It refers to plants, which do not have roots. A good example is Wolffia arrhiza.

Arsenic: [ar-sen-ik] From Arseniko, which is Ancient Greek or Arsenicum, which is Latin for yellow pigment – Symbol As, Atomic number 33.

Artabotrys: [ar-ta-bo-trahy-es] From Artao, which is Ancient Greek for support, and Botrys, which is Ancient Greek for a bunch of grapes. It refers to plants, which bear fruits in bunches. A good example is Artabotrys carnosipetalus.

Artanema: [ar-ta-nee-ma] From Artao which is Ancient Greek for to support and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to the persistant styles which hang like long threads. A good example is Artanema fimbriata.

Artemisiifolia: [ar-te-mis-i-foh-li-a] From Artemisia, which is Ancient Greek for the virgin goddess of the hunt and moon, and Oides, for alike or similar to. It refers to shrubs, which closely resemble the African Artemisia genus. A good example is the noxious weed Ambrosia artemisiifolia.

Artemisiodes: [ar-te-mis-i-oi-deez] From Artemisia, which is Ancient Greek for the virgin goddess of the hunt and moon and Oides, for alike or similar to. It refers to shrubs, which closely resemble the African Artemisia genus. A good example is Senna artemisiodes.

Artensis: [ar-ten-sis] Maybe from Artemisia, which is Ancient Greek for the virgin goddess of the hunt. It refers to parasitic plants, which have a special something about them. A good example was Loranthus artensis, which is now known as Amyema artensis.

Arthragrostic: [ar-thra-gros-tik] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint and Agrostis, which is Ancient Greek for a grass. It refers to disarticulation of panicles into component parts. A good example is Aertragrostic deschampsioides.

Arthratherum: [ar-thra-ther-um] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint and ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for a flower. It refers to the flower’s rachis, which are jointed. A good example was Arthratherum arenarium, which is now known as Agrostis arenarium.

Arthraxon: [ar-thrak-son] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint and áxōn, which is Ancient Greek for an axis. It refers to rachis, which have many joints. A good example is Arthraxon hispidus.

Arthrochilus: [ar-thro-chi-lus] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to the very pronounced labellum on a genus of orchids. A good example is Arthrochilus prolixus.

Arthrocneum: [ar-throk-nee-um] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint and knḗmē for a shin or lower tibia. It refers to stems, which have very pronounced joints similar to a knee or ankle joint. A good example is the stem joints on Arthrocneum macrostachyum from the Mediterranean region or the Australian species, which are now known as Sarcocomia quinqueflora and Tectacornia halocnemoides.

Arthrogrostis: [ar-throh-gros-tis] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint, and ágrōstis, which is Ancient Greek for a grass found in the ancient world around Greece. It refers to culms which have very pronounced nodal joints. A good example is Arthragrostis aristispicula.

Arthrolasium: [ar-throh-la-si-um] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint and Lasiōn/Lasiōs, which is Ancient Greek for wool. It refers to structures or organs, which are quite wooly. A good example is Trichinium arthrolasium, which is now known as Ptilotus arthrolasius.

Arthrolasius: [ar-throh-la-si-us] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint and Lasiōn/Lasiōs, which is Ancient Greek for wool. It refers to structures or organs, which are quite wooly. A good example is Ptilotus arthrolasius.

Arthrophylla: [ahr-thro-fahyl-la] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint, and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to stipule like leaves, which have a swelling at the base. A good example is Baumea arthrophylla.

Arthrophyllum: [ar-thro-fahyl-lum] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint, and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to stipule like leaves, which have a swelling at the base. A good example is Cladium arthrophyllum, which is now known as Baumea arthrophylla.

Arthropodium: [ar-thro-poh-di-um] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a little foot or feet. It refers to a panicle’s spike, which has swollen joints. A good example is Arthropodium paniculatum.

Arthropteris: [ar-thro-teer-us] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint and Pteris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to ferns, which have joints on climbing rhizomes. A good example is Arthropteris bleckleri.

Arthrostylis: [ar-thro-stahy-lus] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column or later the female reproductive organ on a flower between the ovaries and the stigma. It refers to styles, which are jointed. A good example is Arthrostylis aphylla.

Arthrostyloides: [ar-thro-stahy-loi-deez] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column or later the female reproductive organ on a flower between the ovaries and the stigma. It refers to styles, which are jointed. A good example is Fimbristylis arthrostyloides.

Arthrotricha: [ar-thro-trahy-ka] From Anthron, which is Ancient Greek for a joint and Tríchōma, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to joints or nodes which hairy. A good example is Goodenia arthrotricha.

Articles: [ar-ti-kals] From Arundo, which is Latin for a joint. It refers to the joints, which are between the diminished leaves and premature stems. Articles vary in shape, size and number on the different species & subsp. of Cassuarina and Allocassuarina. Good examples are found in Allocasuarina littoralis and Casuarina equistifolia.

Various shape and number of articles found on Allocassuarina and Cassuarina species.

Articulata: [ar-ti-kyoo-la-ta] From Articulatus, which is Latin for to be divided into distinct sections. It usually refers to scale like fruits, which resemble scales dividing or overlapping each other. A good example is Lepironia articulata.

Articulate: [ar-ti-kyoo-leit] From Articulatus, which is Latin for to be divided into distinct sections. It refers to leaves, leafletsor stems, which have a swollen area, often discoloured, at the point of branching of the stem or base. A good example is Sclerolaena articulata.

Articulate Hairs: [ar-ti-kyoo-leit, hairz] From Articulatus, which is Latin for to be divided into distinct sections. It refers to hairs with multiple jointed cells, which are often in several different directions. Stellate hairs are an example of an articulate hair. A good example is the hairs on Fieldia australis.

Articulatum: [ar-tik-yoo-lei-tum] From Articulatus, which is Latin for to be divided into distinct sections. It refers to stems, which have very distinct divisions at the joints. A good example is Viscum articulatum.

Articulatus: [ar-tik-yoo-lei-tus] From Articulatus, which is Latin for to be divided into distinct sections. It refers to where the peduncules and pedicels meet. A good example is the hairs on Juncus articulatus.

Arundelliana: [a-ruhn-del-i-a-na] From Arundo, which is Latin for a reed. It refers to grasses, which are tall thin, and bamboo or reed like. A good example is Alpinia arundelliana.

Arundinacea: [a-run-di-na-see-a] From Arundo, which is Latin for a reed. It refers to grasses, which have tall thin bamboo or reed like culms. A good example is Bambusa arundinacea.

Arundinaceum: [a-run-di-na-kee-uhm] From Arundo which is Latin for a reed. It refers to grasses, which are tall thin and bamboo or reed like. A good example is Ischaemum arundinaceum.

Arundinaceus: [a-ruhn-di-na-see-a] From Arundo, which is Latin for a reed. It refers to grasses, which are tall thin, and bamboo or reed like. A good example is the problem some introduced bamboo type grass Erianthus arundinaceus.

Arundinaria: [a-run-di-nar-i-a] From Arundo, which is Latin for a reed. It refers to bamboos, which closely resemble reeds. A good example is the problem some introduced bamboo Arundinaria simonii.

Arundinella: [a-run-di-nel-la] From Arundo, which is Latin for a reed. It refers to grasses, which are tall thin, and bamboo or reed like. A good example is Arundinella montana.

Arundo: [a-run-doh] From Arundo, which is Latin for a reed. It refers to grasses, which are tall thin, and often bamboo or reed like. A good example was Arundo poiformis, which is now known as Poa poiformis.

Arvensis: [ar-ven-sis] From Arvensis, which is Latin for growing in fields. It refers to plants, which resemble an old type of field clover. A good example is the exotic annual Anagallis arvensis.

Arytera: [a-rahy-teer-a] From Arytaenus, which is Latin for a cup or ladle. It refers to fruits, which have a shape that resembles a cup or ladle. A good example is Arytera divaricata.

Ascendens: [a-sen-denz] From Ascendens, which is Latin for an upwards direction or going up. It refers to shrubs, which have anorectic growth habit. A good example is Acacia ascendens.

Ascending: [a-sen-ding] From Ascends, which is Old English for growing upwards. It refers to plants, which are grow in a verticle direction as opposed to horizonat. A good example is Mucana gigantea subsp. gigantea.

Aschersonii: [as-ker-so-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Paul Frederich August Ascherson; 1834-1913 who was a German botanist and entomologist. A good example is Lepidium aschersonii.

Asclepias: [as-kle-pi-as] From Ascelpias, which is Ancient Greek for the god of healing. It refers to medicinal properties of the genus. A good example is the exotic Hemlocks Ascelpias curassavica and Ascelpias fruiticosa which was the fatal elixa that Socrates had to drink.

Ascobolus: [a-sko-bo-lus] From Askos, which is Ancient Greek for a bag or bladder and Bolos, which is Ancient Greek for a pill or tablet. It refers to fungi, which resemble a tablet or bladder or at times both. A good example is Ascobolus furfuraceus.

Ascomycete: [a-sko-mahy-se-te] Asci, which is Ancient Greek for a sack and múkēs, which is Ancient Greek for a fungus. It refers to a class of fungi that produce their spores in sack like cells.

Ascospores: [a-sko-spawrs] From Askós, in mycology, is Greek for a sac-shaped cell; usually an elongated cell, present in ascomycete fungi that produced spore from the Ascos in Fungi and Sporá, which is Ancient Greek for a seed or sowing. Acrospores are classified as ascomycetes (Ascomycota). Ascospores are formed in an ascus under optimal conditions. A single ascus will contain eight ascospores. The eight spores are produced by meiosis followed by a mitotic division. Two meiotic divisions turn the original diploid zygote nucleus into four haploids. – The single original diploid cell, contains two complete sets of chromosomes. In preparation for meiosis, all the DNA of both sets is duplicated, to make a total of four sets. The nucleus that contains the four sets divides twice, separating them into four new nuclei. Each one has a complete set of chromosomes. Following this process, each of the four new nuclei duplicates its DNA and undergoes division by mitosis. As a result, the ascus will contain four pairs of spores. Then the ascospores are released from the ascus.

Ascus: [a-skus] From Askós, in mycology, is Greek for a sac-shaped cell; usually an elongated cell, present in ascomycete fungi that produced spore from the Ascos in Fungi.

Ascyrum: [a-skrahy-um] From Askryon, which is Ancient Greek for a name of a type of Hypericum. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the Hypericum genus. A good example was Ascyrum involutum, which is now known as Hypericum gramineum.

Asepala: [a-se-pa-la] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or much later Sepalum, which is Latin for a covering or roof. It refers to specialized leaves known as sepals, which cover and protect the petals and sexual organs in the bud stage separating prior to anthesis. It refers to flowers, which have no sepals. A good example is Acacia asepala.

Asepalous: [a-se-pa-los] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or much later Sepalum, which is Latin for a covering or roof. It refers to specialized leaves known as sepals, which cover and protect the petals and sexual organs in the bud stage separating prior to anthesis. It refers to flowers, which have no sepals. A good example is Eucalyptus camaldulensis

Asepalum: [a-se-pa-lum] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or much later Sepalum, which is Latin for a covering or roof. It refers to the specialized leaves known as sepals, which cover and protect the petals and sexual organs in the bud stage separating prior to anthesis. It refers to flowers, which have no sepals. A good example is Racosperma asepalum.

Aseroe: [a-se-roh] From Asē-, which is Greek for disgusting and Roe, which is Ancient Greek for Juice. It refers to fungi which have fruiting bodies that spread out with a greyish-brown or greenish-grey gleba, which has a fetid smell for attracting flies. A good example is Aseroe rubra.

Ashbyae: [ash-bahy-ee] Is named in honour of Alyson Marjorie Ashby; 1901-1987, who was an Australian floral artist, collector and distributor of Native plants. A good example is Solanum ashbyae.

Ashbyi: [ash-bahy-i] Is named in honour of Alyson Marjorie Ashby; 1901-1987, who was an Australian floral artist, collector and distributor of Native plants. A good example is Banksia ashybi.

Asiatica: [a-see/zee-a-ti-ka] From Asiatikós, which is Ancient Greek for from Asia. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from Asia or at times Asia Minor. A good example is Centella asiatica.

Asiaticum: [ah-see/zee-a-ti-kum] From Asiatica, which is Latinized for from Asia. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in Asia or at times Asia Minor. A good example is Crinum asiaticum.

Askania: [a-ska-ni-a] From Askana, which is Latinized for Askania Park. It refers to plants, which werefirst discovered at Askania Park near Ourinbah N.S.W. A good example is Prostanthera askania.

Aspalathoides: [a-pa-la-thoi-deez] From Aspalanthos, which is Ancient Greek for an ancient thorny, aromatic shrub and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to native shrubs, which are look similar to the Greek shrub aspalanthos. A good example is Zieria aspalathoides.

Asparagoides: [as-pa-ra-goi-deez] From Asparagos, which is Ancient Greek or Asparagus, which is Latin for the Asparagus genus and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the original Asparagus genus which was named by Theophrasus.The etymology of the word is unknown. A good example is Acacia asparagoides.

Asparagus: [as-pa-ra-gus] From Asparagos, which is Ancient Greek or Asparagus, which is Latin for the Asparagus genus. It refers to plants, which are related to the original name given to the genus by Theophrasus. The etymology of the word is unknown. A good example is Asparagus racemosa.

Asper: [as-per] From Asper, which is Ancient Greek for rough. It refers to surfaces, which are rather rough. A good example is the fronds on Isopogon asper.

Aspera: [as-peer-a] From Asper, which is Ancient Greek for rough like a rasp. It refers to surfaces usually the leaves phyllodes or fronds or at times the stems, which are rather rough. A good example is the fronds on Doodia aspera.

Asperata: [as-per-a-ta] From Asperātus, which is Ancient Greek for rough or roughened. It refers to structures or organs, which are rougher than other species in the genus. A good example is Buchnera asperata.

Asperato: [as-per-a-to] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough. It refers to surfaces, which have been roughened up. A good example is the fronds on Pultenaea asperata.

Aspericaulis: [as-peer-i-kor lis] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek or Caulus, which is Latin for a stem or trunk. It refers to trunks or stems, which are rough. A good example is the stems on the very rare but beautiful exotic fern Pteris aspericaulis.

Aspericocca: [as-peer-i-koh-ka] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough and Kókkos, which is Ancient Greek for a dried berry or seed. It refers to dried berry fruits, which have a rough surface. A good example is the fronds on Stackhousia aspericocca.

Asperifolia: [as-peer-i-foh-li-a] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to fronds, leaves or phyllodes, which are rather rough. A good example is the surface of the seeds on Astrotricha asperifolia.

Asperocarpus: [as-peer-o-kar-pus] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a rough surface. A good example is the culms on Schoenus asperocarpus.

Asperococca: [as-peer-o-koh-ka] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough and Kókkos, which is Ancient Greek for a dried berry or seed. It refers to dried berry fruits, which have a rough surface. A good example is the fronds on Stillingia asperococca.

Asperococcum: [as-per-oh-koh-kum] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough and Kókkos, which is Ancient Greek for a seed , grain or dried drupe. It refers to dried drupes, which are rather rough. A good example is the surface of the seeds on Elachocroton asperococcum, which is now known as Microstachys chamaelea.

Asperospora: [as-per-o-spor-a] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough and Spora, which is Ancient Greek for a seed or spore. It refers to surfaces on seeds, fern spores or fungi spores, which are rather to very rough. A good example is the surface of the spores on the fungus Lacrymaria asperospora.

Asperous: [as-peer-os] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough. It refers to surfaces or organs, which are rather rough. A good example is the surface of the seeds on Entolasia stricta.

Asperrimum: [as-pe-ri-mum] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough. It refers to an organ or more usually a structure which is very rough. A good example is Heliotropium asperrimum.

Asperula 1: [as-per-u-la] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough. It refers to plants, which have rough stems. A good example is Asperula asthenes.

Asperula 2: [as-per-u-la] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough. It refers to structures or organs, which have a rougher surface than other sub species in the genus. A good example is Grevillea asperula.

Asperulacea: [as-per-u-la-kee/see-a] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough and Lákkos, which is Ancient Greek for a pit or flooded area.and Lákkos, which is Ancient Greek for a pit or flooded area. It refers to habitats which are periodically flooded or depressions, which hold water or organs, which resemble large roughened pits. A good example is the pods on Acacia asperulacea, which have a long roughened, longitudinal valley type furrow.

Asperulaceum: [as-per-yoo-lei-kee/see-um] From Aspis, which is Ancient Greek or later Asper, which is Latin for rough and Lákkos, which is Ancient Greek for a pit or flooded area. It refers to habitats, which are flooded periodically or are in depressions which hold water or structures which resemble large roughened pits. A good example is the pods on Racosperma asperulaceum, which is now known as Acacia asperulacea which have a long roughened, longitudinal valley type furrow.

Asperulus: [as-per-u-lus] From Asper, which is Latin for rough. It refers to stems, which have a very rough feel. A good example is the stems on Asperula geminifolia.

Asphodelus: [as-fo-de-lus] From Asphódelos, which is Ancient Greek or asphodelus, which is Latin for a lily. It refers to plants, which resemble the Asphodel genus or Daffodils. A good example is the stems on Asphodelus fistulosus.

Aspidioides: [as-pi-di-oi-deez] From Aspis/Aspidēs, which is Ancient Greek for an asp or snake and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to rhizomes on ferns, which resemble snakes creeping between cracks in rocks similar to the now defunct Aspidium genus. A good examples was Polypodium aspidioides var tropica, which is now known as Lastreopsis rufescens.

Aspidium: [as-pi-di-um] From Aspis/Aspidēs, which is Ancient Greek for an asp or snake. It refers to rhizomes on ferns, which resemble snakes creeping between cracks in rocks. The ferns in this genus have been reassigned to several other major genre in Australia and world wide including Arachnioides, Arthropteris, Christella, Lastriopsis, Nephrolepis, Polystichumand Tectaria. A good example is Aspidium acuminatum, which is now known as Lastreopsis acuminatum.

Aspidixia: [as-pi-dik-si-a] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Psidium, which is Ancient Greek for the pomegranate. It refers to these parasitic plants, which have small fruits, which resemble small pomegranate fruits. A good example is Aspidixia angulata, which is now known as Viscum angulatum.

Asplenifolia: [as-plen-i-foh-li-a] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Splenon, which is Ancient Greek or Splenum, which is Latin for the spleen and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the fronds in some of the ferns in the Asplenium genus. A good example is the stems on Grevillea asplenifolia.

Asplenium: [as-plen-i-um] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Splenon, which is Ancient Greek or Splenum, which is Latin for the spleen. It refers to ancient beliefs that the plants supplied a medicine to benefit the spleen. A good example is Asplenium australisica.

Aspratilis: [as-pra-ti-lis] From Aspratilis, which is Latin for rough and scaly. It refers to structures or organs, which look or feel rough and scaly. A good example is Eucalyptus aspratilis.

Aspratum: [as-pra-tum] From Aspratilis ,which is Latin for rough and scaly. It refers to structures or organs, which look or feel rough and scaly. A good example is Cyptotrama aspratum.

Assera: [a-seer-a] From Assero, which is Latin for I plant. It refers to plants, which produce extravaginal shoots distally that lay down and grow roots independently when they come into contact with the soil. A good example is Dianella caerulea subsp. assera.

Dianella Caerulea subsp. assera.

Assimile: [as-si-mi-le] From Assimilis, which is Latin for alike or similar to. It refers to species, which resemble other species in the genus. A good example is Racosperma assimile, which is now known as Acacia assimilis.

Assimilis: [as-si-mi-lis] From Assimilis, which is Latin for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble other plants in the genus. A good example is Acacia assimilis.

Assurgent: [as-ser-jent] From Assurgent, which is Latin for to droop down before rising up. It refers to structures or organs, which bend down at the base before curving upwards on the apical two thirds. A good example is Chrysocephalum apiculatum.

Assurgentiflora: [ah-ser-jen-ti-flor-a] From Assurgent, which is Latin for to droop down before rising up and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which first bend down in bud before rising when fully open. A good example is Lavatera assurgentiflora.

Astartea: [a-star-ti-a] From Astártē, which is Ancient Greek for the Phoneician goddess of fertility, sexuality, and war. It refers to flowers, which are very like the stars in the night sky. A good example is the beautiful star like flowers on Astartea fasiculatus that is at war with the other Astartea species to see which of them is the most beautiful.

Astarteodes: [a-star-ti-oh-deez] From Astártē, which is Ancient Greek for the Phoneician goddess of fertility, sexuality, and war. It refers to flowers, which are very like the stars in the night sky.A good examples is the strong star like leaves and flower heads on Cyperus astartodes.

Astarteoides: [a-star-tee-oi-deez] From Astártē, which is Ancient Greek for the Phoneician goddess of fertility, sexuality, and war. It refers to flowers, which are very like the stars in the night sky. It refers to plants, which resemble the Astartea genus. A good examples is Baeckea astarteoides.

Astatogala: [a-stah-toh-gei/gahr-la] From Astato, which is Latin for stand by and Galeata, which is Latin for a helmet. It refers to the pileus on some fungi which resemble a helmet. A good example was Bertrandia astatogala, which is now known as Hygrocybe astatogala.

Astelia: [a-ste-li-a] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Stele, which is Ancient Greek for a pillar or trunk. It refers to plants, which do not have stems, trunks or more usually do not have styles. A good example is the alpine plants of Astelia alpina.

Asteliifolia: [a-stel-li-foh-li-a] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Stele, which is Ancient Greek for a pillar or trunk and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which do not have a trunk. A good example is the alpine plants of Celmisia asteliifolia.

Astemonous: [a-ste-moh-nos] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Stamon, which is Ancient Greek for stamens. It refers to flowers, that have no stamens or androecium.

Aster: [a-ster] From Aster, which is Greek/Latin for a star. It refers to starry shaped flowers, which are carried aloft of the foliage. A good example is one of the many horticultural flowers Aster tataricus.

Asterella: [a-ster-el-la] From Aster, which is Greek/Latin for a star. It refers to bryophyte sporangia, which are held above the foliage. A good example is Asterella hemisphaerica.

Asteridea: [a-ster-i-dee-a] From Aster, which is Greek/Latin for a star. It refers to flower heads, which are held well above the foliage like little white stars. A good example is Asteridea archeri.

Asteriscophora: [a-ster-i-sko-for-a] From Aster, which is Greek/Latin for a star and maybe Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for bearing or to carry. It refers to starry shaped flowers, which are carried aloft of the foliage. A good example is Asterolasia asteriscophora subsp. asteriscophora.

Asteriscophorum: [ah-ster-i-sko-for-um] From Aster, which is Greek/Latin for a star and may be Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for bearing or to carry. It refers to plants, which have starry shaped flowers that are carried aloft of the foliage. A good example is Phebalium asteriscophorum, which is now known as Asterolasia asteriscophora subsp. asteriscophora.

Asteriscosa: [a-ster-i-skoh-sa] From Aster, which is Greek/Latin for a star and Cosa, which is Latin for to cover. It usually refers to structures, or organs, which are covered in stellate hairs. A good example is Grevillea asteriscosa which has leaves with strong pungent apexes which resemble stars.

Asteriskos: [a-ster-i-kos] From Aster, which is Greek/Latin for a star and Cosa, which is Latin for to cover. It refers to flowers, which resemble little stars in their environment. A good example is Guichenotia asteriskos.

Asterocalyx: [a-ster-oh-ka/kei-liks] From Aster, which is Greek/Latin for a star and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for a veil or cover. It refers to the specialized leaves, which surround the bud and protect the developing sexual organs and ovaries. It refers to caliyxes which resemble stars behind the petals. A good example is Sida asterocalyx.

Asterocarpon: [ah-ster-oh-kar-pon] From Aster, which is Greek/Latin for a star and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have the shape of a star. A good example is Planchonella asterocarpon.

Asterochiton: [ah-ster-oh-kahy-ton] From Aster, which is Greek/Latin for a star and Khiton, which is Ancient Greek for a tunic or bodice covering. It refers to flowers, which have conspicuous stellate hairs on the outer surfaces. A good example is Asterochiton pyggmaeus, which is now known as Thomasia pygmaea.

Asteroides: [a-ster-oi-deez] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have flowers, which are resemble the exotic Asters. A good example is Asteridea asteroides.

Asteroideum: [a-ster-oi-dee-um] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers, which somewhat resemble the single flowers of wild Asters. A good example is Stylidium asteroideum.

Asterolasia: [a-ster-o-la-si-a] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star and Lasios which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to a leaves, which have stellate hairs. A good example is Asterolasia correifolia.

Asteromyrtus: [a-ster-oh-mer-tus] From Strum, which is Latin for a star/s and Myrtus, which is Ancient Greek for the European Myrtle. It refers to plants, which have flowers that resemble those of the exotic Asters genus and leaves which resemble the European Myrtle genus. A good example is the fruits on Asteromyrtus lysicephala.

Asterospora: [a-ster-oh-spor-a] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star and Sporum, which is Ancient Greek for the seeds of a fern, fungi or other bryophyte. It refers to spores, which have a somewhat stellate form. A good example is Inocybe asterospora.

Asterotricha: [a-ster-oh-trahy-ka] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star and Tricha, which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to hairs, which have stellate hairs. A good example is Olearia asterotricha.

Asterotrichon: [a-ster-oh-trahy-kon] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star and Tricha, which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to hairs, which have stellate hairs. A good example was Plagianthus sidoides, which is now known as Asterotrichion discolor.

Asthenes 1: [as-theenz] From Asthéneia/Asthenḗs, which are Ancient Greek for weak or struggling. It refers to plants, which appear to have a lack of strength. A good example is Leptochloa decipiens subsp. asthenes.

Asthenes 2: [ahs-theenz] From Asthéneia/Asthenḗs, which are Ancient Greek for to have a lack of strength or appear to be weak. It refers to plants, which are rather fine and fragile looking. A good example is Leptochloa asthenes which is now known as Dinebra decipiens subsp. asthenes.

Astipulea: [a-sti-pyoo-lee-a] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Stipula/Stipulus, which is Latin for specialized appendages at the base of the petioles which resemble small leaves. It refers to plants, which do not produce stipules. A good example was Pultenaea astipulea, which is now known as Phyllota luehmannii.

Astragalifolia: [as-trah-ga-li-foh-li-a] From Astrágalos, which is Greek then later Astragalus, which is Latin for a vertebra, a huckle-bone or a molding and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the old name for vetch, of which the plant’s leaves closely resemble. A good example was Swainsona astragalifolia, which is now known as Swainsona lessertiifolia.

Astragalodes: [as-trah-ga-loh-deez] From Astrágalos, which is Greek then later Astragalus, which is Latin for a vertebra, a huckle-bone or a molding and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the old name for vetch, of which the plants closely resemble. A good example is Cracca astragalodes.

Astragaloides: [as-trah-ga-loi-deez] From Astrágalos, which is Greek then later Astragalus, which is Latin for a vertebra, a huckle-bone or a molding and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the old name for vetch, of which the plants closely resemble. A good example is Tephrosia astragaloides.

Astrebla: [as-tre-bla] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Streblos/Streptos, which is Ancient Greek for twisted or bent. It refers to culms, which twist. A good example is the flowers on Astrebla pectinata.

Astreptus: [a-strep-tus] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Streblos/Streptos, which is Ancient Greek for twisted or bent. It refers to the culms, which extremely straight and rigid. A good example is the flowering culms on Juncus astreptus.

Astringens: [a-strin-jenz] From Astringens, which is Latin for constrictive or bound to. It refers to sections of barks, which cling tightly to the trunk. A good example is the bark on Eucalyptus astringens.

Astrocarpa: [a-stro-kar-pa] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have very prominent lobes. A good example is the bark on Neobassia astrocarpa.

Astrocarpus: [a-stro-kar-pus] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have very prominent lobes. A good example is the bark on Tribulus astrocarpus.

Astrolasium: [ah-stro-la-si-um] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star and Lasium/Lasios, which is Ancient Greek for wool. It refers to star like structures, which are very wooly. A good example is the stems on Trichinium astrolasium, which is now known as Ptilotus astrolasius.

Astroloma: [a-stro-loh-ma] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star and Loma, which is Ancient Greek for a fringe. It refers to floral tubes which have a ring of stellate hairs inside. A good example is the bark on Astroloma pinifolium.

Astrolomoides: [a-stro-loh-moi-deez] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star, Loma, which is Ancient Greek for a fringe and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the Astroloma genus in that they have floral tubes which have a ring of stellate hairs inside. A good example is the bark on Leucopogon astrolomoides, which is now known as Leucopogon rufus.

Astrolux: [a-stroh-luks] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star and Lux which is Latin for a light. It refers to leaves, which have a silvery sheen on the upper laminas and brilliant white on the lower laminas so that they reflect more light compared to the other sub species. A good example is Banksia paludosa subsp. astrolux.

Astrosporina: [a-stroh-spor-i-na] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star and Speírein, which is Ancient Greek or Spora, which is Greek/Latin for a germ cell or sperm. It refers to spores, which have a star like shape. A good example was Astrosporina exigua, which is now known as Inocybe exigua.

Astrotricha: [a-stroh-trahy-ka] From Aster, which is Ancient Greek for a star and Thrix/Trikos which is Ancient Greek for a stiff hair. It refers to a vestiture of short, stiff stellate hairs. A good example is the hairs on Astrotricha floccose.

Astylocarpellous: [as-tahy-loh-kar-pos] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column or style and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a carpel. It refers to flowers, which are without a style and stipe. A good example is Piper gaudichaudia.

Astylocarpepodic: [as-tahy-loh-kar-pe-po-dik] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column or style and Karpós, for a carpel. It refers to flowers, which are without a style. A good example is Acacia pycnantha.

Astylous: [as-tahy-los] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a style. It refers to flowers, which are without a style.

Asymmetrical: [a-si-me-tri-kal] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Symmetry which is Ancient Greek for identical on both sides of a line. Unequally developed on either side of a common axis. A good example is Hakea teretifolia.

Asymmetriphyllum: [a-sim-me-tri-fahyl-lum] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Symmetry, which is Ancient Greek for identical on both sides of a line and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are unequal on either side of a common axis. A good example is Solanum asymmetriphyllum.

Asystasia: [a-sis-ta-si-a] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Systasia, which is Ancient Greek for united or consistent. It refers to characteristics which are not constant over its range. A good example is Asystasia gangetica which is on the National alert list as a menacing weed and must be reported immediately when seen.

Atalantia: [a-ta-lan-ti-a] From Atalantos, which is Ancient Greek for the daughter of Schoeneus who was swift and had the same value as a man, A, as a suffix for “one together” and Talanton, which is Ancient Greek for a weight of currency, Later it indicated a person who accumulated a lot of the currency or talent had talent or an ability. In mythology it refers to the maiden promising to marry whoever could defeat her in a running race. She lost the race when she stopped to pick up three golden apples that Hippomenes deliberately dropped on the last lap. Hippopmenes won the race, her heart and virginity. It now refers to plants that grow naturally around the Atlantic Ocean.

Atalaya : [a-ta-lei-ya] From Atalaya, which is the Latinized form of the Indian word for a local tree. It refers to plants with similar winged seeds. A good example is Atalaya hemiglauca.

Ataxiphylla: [a-tak-si-fahyl-la] Maybe From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Táxis, which is Greek to place in order and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllodes. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which don’t seem to have any order along the stems. A good example is Acacia ataxiphylla.

Ataxiphyllum: [a-tak-si-fahyl-lum] Maybe From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having, Táxis, which is Greek to place in order and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllodes. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which don’t seem to have any order along the stems. A good example is Racosperma ataxiphylla , which is now known as Acacia ataxiphylla.

Atelandra: [a-te-lan-dra] Maybe from Atil, which is Latinized from the Palestinian town of Atil that connects several villages together and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man or male. It may It refers to stamens or anthers, which are connected together at some point or bend towards each other to be almost reunited together at the base. A good example was Atelandra incana, which is now known as Hemigenia incana.

Ater: [ol-ter] From Ater which is Latin for black. It refers to structures, which are have a very deep colour or are black. A good example is the trunk on Eucalyptus siderophloia.

Atherocephala: [a-ther-o-ke-fa-la] From Ather, which is Ancient Greek for goats, Atheros, which is Ancient Greek for repelling wild animals and Kephalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flowers, which are in small hairy heads that somewhat resemble a goat’s head. A good example was Atherocephala drummondii, which is now known as Andersonia aristata.

Atherolepis: [a-ther-o-le-pis] From Ather, which is Ancient Greek for goats, Atheros, which is Ancient Greek for repelling wild animals and Lepos, which is Ancient Greek for a scale or scaly. It refers to stems, which are covered in scales. A good example is Leucopogon atherolepis.

Atherophora: [a-ther-o-for-a] From Athḗra/Athḗrōma, which is Ancient Greek for a cancer which is filled with a yellowish gruel and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are enclose a yellow or yellowish substance. A good example is the swollen calyx buds on Sida atherophora which encircle the yellow flowers.

Atherosperma: [a-ther-o-sper-ma] From Atheros, which is Ancient Greek for a barbed spine and Spérma, which is Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which have barbed spines. A good example is Athertosperma moschatum.

Atherospermataceae: [a-ther-o-sper-ma-tei-see-e] From Atheros, which is Ancient Greek for a barbed spine, Spérma, which is Greek for a seed and Aceae, which is Latin for the family. It refers to a family of plants, which have seeds that have a or are covered in barbed spines. A good example is Doryphora sassafras.

Athertonenense: [a-ther-to-n-ens] From Atherton, which is Latinized for the Atherton Tablelands and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the Atherton Tableland. A good example is Asplenium athertonense.

Athertonia: [a-ther-toh-ni-a] From Atherton, which is Latinized for the Atherton Tablelands. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the Atherton Tableland. A good example is Athertonia diversifolia.

Athrixia: [a-thrik-si-a] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for a short stiff hair. It refers to plants, which are glabrous. A good example is Athrixia angustissima.

Athrixioides: [a-thrik-si-oi-deez] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for a short stiff hair and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Athrixia genus in that they are glabrous. A good example is Athrixia athrixioides.

Athrodactylis: [a-thro-dak-tahy-lis] From Athrox, which is Ancient Greek for being crowded and Dactylos, which is Ancient Greek for the fingers. It refers to inflorescences, which resemble fingers crowded around a central ball. A good example is Pandanus tectorius.

Athrotaxis: [a-throh-tak-sis] From Athrox, which is Ancient Greek for being crowded and Taxis, for arranging in order. A good example is Athrotaxis cupresiodes from western Tasmania.

Athyrium: [a-thahy-ri-um] From A, which is Ancient Greek for without or not having and Thurium, which is Ancient Greek for a shield. It refers to the sporangia not having a cover for protection. A good example was Athyrium australis, which is now known as Diplazium australe.

Atkinsiana: [at-kin-si-ei/a-na] Is named in honour of Atkins but which Atkins cannot be substantiated. A good example is Maireana atkinsiana

Atkinsonia: [at-kin-so-ni-a] Is named in honour of Caroline Louisa Waring Atkinson Calvert; 1834-1872, who was an Australian naturalist, botanical artist and a collector of herbarium samples. By the 1860s Louisa was becoming aware of the impact of European agriculture on native flora. She wrote about this on several occasions, making such statements as “It needs no fertile imagination to foresee that in, say, half-a-century’s time, tracts of hundreds of miles will be treeless” and in a century the country will be heading down the path of ruination. Such wisdom and prophesy requires in depth reading of her writings. A good example is Atkinsonia ligustrina.

Atkinsoniana: [at-kin-son-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Caroline Louisa Waring Atkinson Calvert; 1834-1872, who was an Australian naturalist, botanical artist and a collector of herbarium samples. By the 1860s Louisa was becoming aware of the impact of European agriculture on native flora. She wrote about this on several occasions, making such statements as “It needs no fertile imagination to foresee that in, say, half-a-century’s time, tracts of hundreds of miles will be treeless “and in a century the country will be heading down the path of ruination. Such wisdom and prophesy requires in depth reading of her writings. A good example is Xanthósia Atkinsoniana.

Atopa: [ah-toh-pa] From Atopa, which is unknown. A good example is Acacia atopa.

Atopum: [ah-toh-pum] From Atopa, which is unknown. A good example was Racosperma atopum, which is now known as Acacia atopa.

Atoto: [a-to-toh] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Toto, which is Latin for complete in total. It refers to plants, which are not complete. A good example is the apparent incompletion of the flowering bracts on Euphorbia atoto, which is now known as Euphorbia psammogeton.

Atractocarpus: [a-trahk-tohkar-pus] From Actractivum which is Latin for attractive and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a lovely appearance. A good example is Atractocarpus benthamianus.

Atrans: [a-tranz] From Atrans, which is Latin for a deepening colour towards the apical sections. It refers to organs, which have deeper coloured apexes than what is found at the bases. A good example is the petals on Nymphaea atrans.

Atrata: [a-tra-ta] From Atratus, which is Latin for to be clothed in black as in funeral garb. It refers to the fruits being covered in deep coloured or black sheathes or hairs. A good example is the black sheaths on Luzula atrata.

Atraxis: [a-trahk-sis] From Átrax, which maybe from Latin for serenity. It therefore may refer to the habitat of the plants, which are generally serene environments. A good example is Dianella atraxis.

Atricha: [a-trahy-ka] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to grasses which glabrous. A good example is Eleocharis atricha.

Atrichus: [a-trahy-kus] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to grasses which are glabrous. A good example was Scirpus atrichus, which is now known as Eleocharis atricha and Trichophorum pumilum subsp. pumilum.

Atriola: [ah-tri-oh-la] From Aātriolum/ātriola which is Latin for a small hallway or ante chamber. It refers to structures or organs, which have smaller chambers usually formed from the sepals of orchids – hood and lower sepals. A good example is Pterostylis atriola.

Atriplex: [a-tri-pleks] From Atriplexum, which is Ancient Greek for a saltbush. It refers to plants, which have rather saline environments around salt lakes, estuaries and coastlines. A good example is Atriplex australasica.

Atriplicifolia: [a-tri-pli-si-foh-li-a] From Atriplexum, which is Ancient Greek for a saltbush and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the leaves typicaly found on some of the Atriplex genus. A good example is he leaves on Ptilotus atriplicifolium.

Atriplicifolium: [a-tri-pli-si-foh-li-um] From Atriplexum, which is Ancient Greek for a saltbush and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble the leaves typicaly found on some of the Atriplex genus. A good example was Trichinium atriplicifolium, which is now known as Ptilotus sessilifolium.

Atriplicina: [a-tri-pli-si-na] From Atriplexum, which is Ancient Greek for a saltbush. It refers to plants, which resemble the Atriplex genus. A good example is Lobelia atriplicina.

Atriplicinum: [a-tri-pli-si-num] From Atriplexum, which is Ancient Greek for a saltbush. It refers to plants, which resemble the Atriplex genus. A good example is Scleroblitum atriplicinum.

Atrisola: [a-tri-soh-la] From ātrum, which is Latin for dismal, gloomy or miserable and Sōlum, which is Latin solitary or uninhabited. It refers to plants, which grow singularly and thus look mesierable or dismal in the environment. A good example was Brachiaria atrisola, which is now known as Urochloa atrisola.

Atrochilus: [a-tro-chi-lus] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep in colour and Cheilus, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to labellum, which have a much deeper colour than other species in the genus. A good example is Petalochilus atrochilus.

Atroclavia: [a-troh-klah-vi-a] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep in colour and Clava, which is Latin for a club. It refers to flowers, which have a deep purple–black club shape. A good example is Arachnorchis atroclavia, which is now known as Caladenia atroclavia.

Atrococcinea: [a-troh-kok-si-neea] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep in colour and Coccinea, which is Latin for scarlet-red. It refers to structures or organs, which are a deep scarlet red in colour. A good example is the colour of the flowers on Swainsona atrococcinea, which is now known as Swainsona galegifolia.

Atromarginatus: [a-troh-mar-jin-a-tus] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep in colour and Marginata, which is Latin for on the margin. It refers to structures or organs, which are very deep in colour verging on chocolate-brown or even black. A good example is the pileus and stalk on Pluteus atromarginatus.

Atronitida: [a-tro-ni-ti-da] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep in colour and Nitidus, which is Latin for glossy oor shinny. It refers to the flowers, which have deep blue colouring and a gloss about them. A good example is Thelymitra atronitida.

Atropis: [a-tro-pis] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep in colour and Apodus, which is Latin for stalkless. It refers to leaves, which are deeper in colour than other species in the genus which are basically sessile. A good example was Atropis pumila, which is now known as Rytidosperma pumilum.

Atropous: [ah-tro-pos] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep in colour and Apodus, which is Latin for stalkless. It refers to leaves, which are deeper in colour than other species in the genus which are basically sessile. A good example is Atriplex atropous.

Atropurpurea: [a-troh-pur-pur-ee-a] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep in colour and Purpurea, which is Latin for purple. It refers to leaves and new growth, which have a deep purple colour. A good example is Agathis atropurpurea.

Atropurpureum: [a-troh-pur-pur-ee-um] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep in colour and Purpurea, which is Latin for purple. It refers to flowers, which have a very deep maroon colour. A good example is the exotic weed Macroptilium atropurpureum.

Atrorubra: [a-troh-roo-bra] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep in colour and Rubra, which is Latin for red. It refers to flowers, which have a very deep red colour. A good example is Gomphrena atrorubra.

Atrosanguinea: [a-tro-sahn-gi-nee-a] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep colour and Sanguinea, which is Latin for blood-red. It refers to flowers, which are a very deep red colour. A good example was Rhodanthe atrosanguinea, which is now known as Rhodanthe maculata in which the colour of the flowers is actually a very deep pink.

Atroviolacea: [a-troh-vahy-o-la-see-a] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep in colour and Violacea which is Latin for violet or purple. It refers to flowers, which have a very deep purple or violet colour. A good example is Prostanthera atroviolacea, which is now known as Prostanthera clotteniana.

Atrovirens: [a-troh-vahy-renz] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep in colour and Viridus, which is Latin for green. It refers to the leaves being very deep sea-green. A good example is Eucalyptus atrovirens.

Atroviride: [a-troh-vi-ri-de] From Atro, which is Ancient Greek for very dark or deep in colour and Viridus, which is Latin for green. It usually refers to leaves, phyllodes fronds or other structures or organs, which are a deeper green compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Adiantum atroviride.

Atrox: [a-troks] From Atrox, which is Latin for terrible or cruel. It refers to the phyllodes, which have developed into terribly cruel, rigid, curved sharp spines. A good example is Acacia atrox subsp. atrox.

Attenuata: [a-ten-yoo-ahr/ei-tuh] From Attenuāta, which is Latin for thin, slender or weak looking. It usually refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are slender and fine. A good example is found in Acacia attenuata.

Attenuate: [ah-ten-yoo-eit] From Attenuātum, which is Latin for thin, slender or weak. It refers to structures or organs, which is thin, slender and weak looking. A good example is Melaleuca viridiflora subsp. attenuate.

Attenuatum: [ah-ten-yoo-ei-tum] From Attenuātum, which is Latin for thin, slender or weak. It refers to structures or organs, which are thin, slender and weak looking. A good example is Leptospermum attenuatum.

Attenuatus: [a-ten-yoo-ei-tus] From Attenuātus, which is Latin for thin, slender or weak. It refers to structures or organs, which are thin, slender and weak looking. A good example is Leptospermum attenuatum.

Attingens: [a-tin-jenz] From Attingens, which is Latin for reaching to or attaining. It refers to calli, which extend as far as the tip of the labellum. A good example is Caladenia attingens.

Atylosia: [a-tahy-loh-si-a] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Tylos, which is Latin for a knot or knob. It refers to small scrambly creepers, which resemble a fisherman’s hand line all knotted up.– Mine anyway. A good example is Atylosia cinerea.

Atylus: [a-tahy-lus] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and stylus, which is Latin for a writing tool. It refers to a flowers, which do not appear to have a female reproductive organ on the flower. A good example is Atylus anemonifolium, which is now known as Isopogon anemonifolium.

Aucklandica: [ork-lahn-di-ka] From Auckland which is Latinized for Auckland. It refers to plants, which were first discovered around Auckland, New Zealand. A good example is Isolepis aucklandica.

Audasii: [or-da-si-ahy] Is named in honour of James Wales Clarendon Audas; 1872-1959, who was a Victoria botanist who studied the plants on Wilsons Promontory and the Grampians. A good example is Randia audasii.

Audax: [or-dahks] From Audax, which is Latin for bold or to be bold. It refers to plants, which have a strong bold appearance. A good example is the flowers on Banksia audax.

Augusta: [or-gus-ta] From Augustus, which is Latin for noble or majestic. The name applied to Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus; 63BC-14AD, who was later bestowed with the name Augustus Caesar. A good example is Ambroma augusta.

Augustus: [or-gus-tus] From Augustus, which is Latin for noble or majestic. The name applied to Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus; 63BC-14AD, who was later bestowed with the name Augustus Caesar. A good example is Agaricus augustus.

Aulacocarpa: [or-la-ko-kar-pa] From Aula, which is Ancient Greek for a furrow and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have deep, longitudinal furrows. A good example is found in the fruits of Acacia aulacocarpa.

Aulacocarpum: [or-la-koh-kahr-pum] From Aula, which is Ancient Greek for a furrow and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have deep, longitudinal furrows. A good example was Racomosperma aulacocarpum, which is now known as Acacia aulacocarpa.

Aulacophylla: [or-lah-koh-fahyl-la] From Aula, which is Ancient Greek for a furrow and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllodes. It refers to leaves, which have longitudinal furrows. A good example is Acacia aulacophylla.

Aulacophyllum: [or-la-koh-fahyl-lum] From Aula, which is Ancient Greek for a furrow and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllodes. It refers to a leaves, which have longitudinal furrows. A good example is Racosperma aulacophyllum, which is now known as Acacia aulacophylla.

Aulacothecia: [or-la-koh-thee-ki-a] From Aula, which is Ancient Greek for a furrow and Theka, which is Ancient Greek for a case or a box. It refers to the fruiting bodies which resemble small boxes. A good example is the Lichen, Acacia aulacocarpa.

Aurantia: [or-an-ti-a] From Aurantius/Aurantiacum, which is Latin for golden-orange to brilliant orange. It refers to structures or organs usually the flowers, which have a brilliant yellow to orange colour. A good example is Passiflora aurantia.

Aurantiaca: [or-an-ti-a-ka] From Aurantius/Aurantiacum, which is Latin for orange colour. It refers to flowers, which are orange in colour. A good example is Nymphoides aurantiaca.

Aurantiacopurpurea: [or-an-ti-a-koh-pur-pur-ee-a] From Aurantius/Aurantiacum, which is Latin for golden-orange to brilliant orange and Purpurea, which is Latin for purple. It refers to structures or organs usually the flowers, which have a brilliant yellow to orange colour with a purplish tinge or purplish markings. A good example is Davejonesia aurantiacopurpurea.

Aurantiaco-purpureum: [or-an-ti-a-koh-pur-pur-ee-a] From Aurantius/Aurantiacum, which is Latin for orange colour and Purpura, which is Latin for purple. It refers to flowers, which are purplish-orange or orange with a purple tinge or markings. A good example is Dendrobium aurantiaco-purpureum.

Aurantiaca: [or-ahn-ti-ei-ka] From Aurantiacum, which is Latin for orange-red colour. It refers to flowers, which are pale orange in colour. A good example is Drosera aurantiaca.

Aurantiacum: [or-ahn-ti-ei-kum] From Aurantiacum, which is Latin for orange-red colour. It refers to flowers, which are pale orange in colour. A good example is Passiflora aurantiacum.

Aurantiacus: [or-an-ti-ei-kus] From Aurantius/Aurantiacum, which is Latin for golden-orange to brilliant orange and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are a brilliant yellow-orange to orange colour. A good example is Hybanthus aurantiacus.

Auranticarpa: [or-an-ti-kar-pa] From Aurantius/Aurantiacum, which is Latin for orange colour and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are brightly orange in colour. A good example is Auranticarpa rhombifolia.

Aurantiocampanula: [or-an-ti-oh-kahm-pa-nyoo-la] From Aurantius/Aurantiacum, which is Latin for orange colour and Campanula, which is Latin for a small bell or to be bell shaped. It refers to pileus, which have a distinctly orange colour on a bell shape. A good example is Auranticarpa rhombifolia.

Aurantioides: [or-an-ti-oi-deez] From Aurantius/Aurantiacum, which is Latin for orange colour and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers , which are in colour similar to those of the its near relation Passiflora aurantia. A good example is Passiflora aurantioides.

Aurantiopallens: [or-an-ti-oh- pal-lenz] From Aurantius/Aurantiacum, which is Latin for orange colour and Pallidus, which is Latin for rather pale. It refers to a structure, organ or pileus, which are pale orange in colour. A good example is Hygrocybe aurantiopallens.

Aurantipes: [or-an-ti-pes] From Aurantius/Aurantiacum, which is Latin for orange-red colour. It refers to a structure, organ or pileus, which are variably orange to orange-red in colour. A good example is Hygrocybe aurantiopallens.

Auratiflorum: [or-ah-ti-flor-um] From Aurata, which is Latin for golden rays and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have a golden aura about them. A good example was Racosperma auratiflorum, which is now known as Acacia auratiflora.

Auratiflora: [or-ah-ti-flor-a] From Aurata, which is Latin for golden rays and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have a golden aura about them. A good example is Acacia auratiflora.

Aurbertii: [or-ber-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Georges Eleosippe Aubert; 19th century French missionary and plant collector in in Western China. A good example is Blyxa aubertii.

Aurburnensis: [or-bur-nen-sis] From Auburn, which is Latinized for Auburn and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered around Auburn. A good example is Eucalyptus auburnensis.

Aurea: [or-ee-a] From Aurea, which is Latin for yellow-orange or golden-yellow. It refers to structures or organs, which are yellow-orange or golden-yellow in colour. A good example is the twinning stems on Cassytha aurea.

Aureocrinita: [or-ee-oh-kri-ni-ta] From Aureus, which is Latin for golden and Crinita, which is Latin for long hair. It refers to stems, leaves, and rachises which have long, golden hairs. A good example is Acacia aureocrinita.

Aureocrinitum: [or-ee-oh-kri-ni-tum] From Aureus, which is Latin for golden and Crinita, which is Latin for long hair. It refers to stems, leaves, and rachises, which have long, golden hairs. A good example was Racosperma aureocrinitum, which is now known as Acacia aureocrinita.

Aureola: [or-eer-oh-la] From Aurea, which is Latin for yellow-orange or golden-yellow. It refers to structures or organs, which are deep yellow-orange or golden-yellow in colour. A good example is the bark on Corymbia aureola.

Aureonitens: [or-ee-oh-nahy/ni-tenz] From Aureus, which is Latin for golden and Nitens, which is Latin for to shine. It refers to the rich golden flower heads having a real glow about them. A good example is the bright golden-yellow flowers on Cassinia aureonitens.

Aureoviride: [or-ee-oh-vi-ri-de] From Aureus, which is Latin for golden and Viridis, which is Latin for bright green. It refers  to the bright golden to lime-green flowers. A good example is the flowers on the orchid, Prasophyllum aureoviride.

Aureum: [or-ee-um] From Aurum, which is Latin for gold especially the colour of gold. It refers to structures or organs, which are deep golden to yellow-orange in colour. A good example is Acrostichum aureum.

Aureus: [o-ree-us] From Aurum, which is Latin for gold especially the colour of gold. It refers to structures or organs, which are deep golden to yellow-orange in colour. A good example is the flowers on Leptorhynchos aureus, which is now known as Waitzia suaveolens var. suaveolens.

Auricle: [o-ri-kal] From Auricle, which is Latin for to be shaped like an ear. It refers to organs, which has an ear shaped organs, usually found at the base of a leaf on grasses or a petal. A good example is Digitaria ramularisa.

Auricomum: [o-ri-koh-mum] From Auricle, which is Latin for being shaped similar to an ear and Koma, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to organs, which are usually found at the base of a leaf on grasses or a petal. A good example is Chenopodium auricomum.

Auricoma: [o-ri-koh-ma] From Auricle, which is Latin for being shaped similar to an ear and Koma, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to organs, which are usually found at the base of a leaf on grasses or a petal. A good example is Acacia auricoma.

Auricomiforme: [o-ri-koh-mi-form] From Auricle, which is Latin for an ear and Form, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to organs, which have a distinct ear shape. A good example is Chenopodium auricomiforme.

Auricomum: [o-ri-koh-mum] From Auricle, which is Latin for an ear. It refers to organs, which have a distinct ear shape. A good example is Chenopodium auricomum.

Auricularia: [o-ri-kyoo-lar-i-a] From Auricle, which is Latin for an ear. It refers to organs, which have a distinct ear shape. A good example is Oldenlandia auricularia.

Auriculata: [o-ri-kyoo -la-ta] From Auricle, which is Latin for an ear. It refers to organs, which have a strong ear shape. A good example is Tecticornia auriculata.

Auriculate: [o-ri-kyoo-leit] From Auricle, which is Latin for an ear. It refers to organs, which have a distinctive ear shape. A good example is the leaves on Drosera auriculata.

Auriculatum: [o-ri-kyoo-lei-tum] From Auros, which is Latin for an ear or ear lobe and Ata/Atum, which is Latin for to process or processing. It refers to grasses, which have a small lobe on the lemma. A good example is Rytidosperma auriculatum.

Auriculatus: [o-ri-kyoo-lei-tus] From Auricle, which is Latin for being shaped like an ear. A good example is Toxocarpus auriculatus.

Auriculiform: [o-ri-kyoo -li-form] From Auricle, which is Latin for an ear and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape of or form of. It refers to organs, which are obovate with two small rounded, basal lobes.

Auriculiforme: [o-ri-kyoo-li-form] From Auricle, which is Latin for an ear and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to organs, which have a distinct ear shape. A good example is Racosperma auriculiforme, which is now known as Acacia auriculiformis.

Auriculiformis: [o-ri-kyoo-li-for-mis] From Auricle, which is Latin for an ear and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape of or form of. It refers to organs, which are obovate with two small rounded, basal lobes. A good example is Acacia auriculformis.

Auripila: [o-ri-pi-la] From Aurea, which is Latin for yellow-orange and Pila, which is Latin for a pill or ball. It refers to ball shaped flowers, which are yellow-orange in colour. A good example is Acacia auripila.

Auritum: [o-ri/ree-tum] From Auritum, which is Latin for a large or long ear. It refers to organs, which resemble very long large ears. A good example is Abutilon auritum.

Auronitens: [o-roh-nahy/ni-tenz] From Aurea, which is Latin for golden-orange or golden-yellow and Nitens, which is Latin for shinny. It refers to flowers, which are deep yellow-orange or golden-yellow in colour and have a glossy shine about them. A good example is Acacia auronitens.

Ausfeldii: [os-fel-di-ahy] Is named in honour of G. Ausfeld, who was an Australian plant collector in the Bendigo district Victoria. A good example is Acacia ausfeldii.

Australasiae: [os-tra-lahy-si-ee] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Asiatica, which is Greek for Asia. It refers to plants, which originate from Eastern Asia through to the land down under and New Zealand. A good example is Tristellateia australasiae.

Australasica: [os-tra-la-si-ka] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example of the names use is Citrus australisica.

Australasicum: [os-tra-la-si-kum] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example of the names use is Asplenium australasicum.

Australasius: [os-tra-la-si-us] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example of the names use is Eriostemon australasius.

Australe: [os-trar-lee] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example of a plant being a southerner is Syzygium australe.

Australiana: [os-tra-li-an-a] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is Astelia australiana.

Australianum: [os-tra-li-ei-num] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is Gymnostoma australianum.

Australianus: [os-tra-li-ei-nus] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is the native longan Dimocarpus australianus, which has potential as a commercial crop once fruits with smaller seeds and more flesh are grown and established.

Australiensis: [os-tra-li-en-sis] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is Pavetta australiensis.

Australina: [os-tra-li-na] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is Australina pusilla.

Australinus: [os-tra-lei-nus] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is Dasydorylas australianus which is one of our pollen flies with a small body and a big head.

Australis: [os-tra-lis] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is Livistona australis.

Australisica: [os-tra-lis-i-ka] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is Citrus australasica.

Australopithecurus: [os-tra-lo-pi-the-ku-rus] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Pithecurus, which is Ancient Greek for the tail of an ape. It refers to plants, with a long slender flower spike which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is Pararistolochia australopithecurus.

Australopyrum: [os-tra-lo-pahy-rum] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Pyros, which is Ancient Greek for a grain of wheat. It refers to grains which resemble wheat and were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is Australopyrum pectinatum.

Australorchis: [os-tra-lor-kis] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Orchis, which is Ancient Greek for a pair of testicles in reference to the resemblance of tubers of many ground orchids resembling a pair of man’s testicles. It refers to orchids, which were first discovered from the land down under and belong to the family of Orchids. A good example is Pararistolochia australopithecurus.

Austrinus: [os-trin-nus] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the southern section of the country. A good example is Desmocladus austrinus which is found in far south west Western Australia.

Austroalbidus: [os-troh-al-bi-dus] From Terra Australis ,which is Latin for land of the south and Albus, which is Latin for whitish. It refers to indigenous native fungi, which have pileus in variable shades of off white. A good example is Cortinarius austroalbidus.

Austrobaileya: [os-troh-bei-lee-ya] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and named in honour of Frederick Mason Bailey; 1827-1915who was a British born Australian author of “Queensland Flora”. A good example is the liana from far north eastern Queensland Austrobaileya scandens.

Austrobassi: [os-troh-bas-si] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and in Ferdinando Bassi; 1710-1774, who was an Italian Botanist, director of the Bologna Botanic Gardens and was successful in having plants flower in cultivation which were either not well known or difficult to attain flowering. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the land down under in his honour. A good example was Austrobassia brachyptera, which is now known as Sclerolaena brachyptera.

Austroboletus: [os-troh-bo-le-tus] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Boletus which is Latin for a mushroom. It refers to mushrooms, which resemble the Boletus genus and were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is the surface cavities on Austroboletus lacunosus.

Austrobryonia: [os-troh-brahy-o-ni-a] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Bryonia, which is Ancient Greek for a wild vine or bramble. It refers to brambles which, were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is the surface cavities on Austrobryonia micrantha.

Austrobuxus: [os-troh-buk-sus] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Buxus, which is Latin for boxwood. It refers to species, which resemble the northern hemispheres Buxus but which were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is Austrobuxus swainii.

Austrocapense: [os-troh-ka-pens] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south, Cape, which is Latin for a Cape as in a land mass and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on Cape York Peninsular. A good example is Stylidium austrocapense.

Austrochloris: [os-troh-klor-is] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Chloris, which is Ancient Greek for the goddess of flowers. It refers to the northern hemisphere genus Chloris, of which the Australian genus closely resemble. A good example is Austrochloris dichanthioides.

Austrocynoglossum: [os-troh-sahy-noh-glos-sum] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south, Kyno, which is Ancient Greek for a dog and Glossum which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to a genus of Australian plants, which have structures or organs, which resemble to a dog’s tongue. A good example is Austrocynoglossum latifolium.

Austrodanthonia: [os-troh-dhn-tho-ni-a] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and is named in honour of Etienne Danthoin; 1739-1794, who was a French biologist and agrostologist. It refers to an Australian genus, which is very similar to the European genus of Danthonia. A very good example is Austrodanthonia geniculata.

Austrodolichos: [os-troh-do-li-kos] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Dolichos, which is Latin for a long bean. It refers to an Australian genus, which has very long pods. A good example is Austrodolichos errabundus.

Austrofestuca: [os-troh-fe-styoo-ka] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Festuca, which is Latin for straw. It refers to plants, which have straw like culms and were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is Austrofestuca littoralis.

Austrofilopes: [os-troh-fi-lo-peez] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Festuca, which is Latin for straw. It refers to plants, which have straw like culms and were first discovered from the land down under. A good example is Mycena austrofilopes.

Austrogautieria: [os-troh-gor-ti-er-i-a] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Gauterier, which Is named in honour of Pierre Jules Théophile Gautier1811–1872who was a French romantic poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist, and latter art and literary critic. It refers to Australian truffles, which are considered romantic foods. A good example is Austrogautieria chlorospora.

Austrolutea: [os-troh-loo-ti-a] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Lutea, which is Latin for yellow. It refers to Australian fungi, which are yellow in colour which are considered romantic foods. A good example is Hygrocybe austrolutea.

Austrolycopodium: [os-tro-lahy-koh-poh-di-um] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south, Lyco, which is Latin for a wolf and Pous/Podion which is Ancient Greek for a foot or platform on which to stand. It refers to plants, which resemble the Lycopodium genus but are strictly from the land down under Australia. A good example is Austrolycopodium fastigiatum.

Austromaculata: [os-tro-ma-kyoo-lei-ta] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Maculata, which is Ancient Greek for spotted. It refers to plants, which come from the land down under Australia and are spotted. A good example is Mycena austromaculata.

Austromatthaea: [os-troh-mat-thee-a] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Matthaea, which is Latinized from the vernacular of a Malaysian word for a genus found in Melanesia. It refers to the similarities of the Australian genus with those of the Malaysian genus. A good example is Austromatthaea elegans.

Austromuellera: [os-troh-myoo-ler-a] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and named in honour of Ferdinand Von Mueller 1825-1896 who was a German born Australian noted botanist and taxonomist. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the land down under and still pays tribute to Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Austromuellera trinervia.

Austromyrtus: [os-troh-mer-tus] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Myrtus, which is Ancient Greek for a myrtle. It refers to similarities of plants, which originate from the land down under with those of the European Myrtles. A good example is Austronyrtus dulcis.

Austropacifica: [os-troh-pa-si-fi-ka] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Pācifica, which is Latin for peaceful, calm or peacemaking. It refers to the Pacific Ocean and the adjacent Islands along the east coast of Australia. (The Pacific Ocean is reagarded as being more calm than the other Oceans of the world). A good example is the pileus and stalk on Rubus moluccanus var. austropacifica.

Austropacificus: [os-troh-pa-si-fi-kus] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Pācifica, which is Latin for peaceful, calm or peacemaking. It refers to the Pacific Ocean and the adjacent Islands along the east coast of Australia. (The Pacific Ocean is reagarded as being more calm than the other Oceans of the world). A good example is the pileus and stalk on Rubus moluccanus var. austropacificus, which is now known asRubus moluccanus var. moluccanus.

Austropallescens: [os-troh-pal-les-ensz] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Pallidus, which is Latin for pale. It refers to organs, which are pale in colour that come from the land down under. A good example is the pileus and stalk on Cortinarius austropallescens.

Austropratensis: [os-troh-pra-ten-sis] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Pratens ,which is Latin for a meadow. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in the open in meadow type habitats that come from the land down under. A good example is the pileus and stalks on Hygrocybe austropratensis.

Austropygmaeum: [os-troh-pig-mee-um] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Pygmae, which is Latin for very small. It refers to plants, which are much smaller and finer or shorter than other species in the genus w that come from the land down under. A good example is Myriophyllum austropygmaeum.

Austroqueenslandica: [os-troh-kweenz-lan-di-ka] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Queenslandica, which is Latinized for Queensland. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from Queensland in the land down under. A good example is Wilkiea austroqueenslandica.

Austroqueenslandicum: [os-troh-kweenz-lahn-di-kum] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Queenslandica, which is Latinized for Queensland. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from Queensland in the land down under. A good example is Haemodorum austroqueenslandicum.

Austrosteenia: [os-troh-stee-ni-a] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and is named in honour of Doctor Cornellius Gisjbert Gerret Jan von Steenis; 1901-1986, who was a Dutch marine taxonomist. It refers to plants, which are named after Steenis and were first discovered in Australia. A good example is Austrosteenia glabristyla.

Austrostipa: [os-troh-sti-pua From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Stipa, which is Ancient Greek for fiber. It refers to plants, which originate from the land down under, which have many very similar traits with the European Stipa genus. A good example is Austrostipa pubescens.

Austrotenuifolia: [os-troh-ten-wee-foh-li-a] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south Tenuis which is Latin for thin or slim and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to structures or organs, which are slim and thin. A good example is Cheilanthes austrotenuifolia.

Austroveneta: [os-troh-ven-e-ta] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Venenatus, which is Latin for Poisoned, drugged or enchanted. It refers to indigenous native fungi which have green pileus and gills. A good example is Dermocybe austroveneta, which is now known asCortinarius austrovenetus.

Austrovenetus: [os-troh-ven-e-tus] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Venenatus, which is Latin for Poisoned, drugged or enchanted. It refers to indigenous native fungi which have green pileus and gills. A good example is Cortinarius austrovenetus.

Austrovinaceus: [os-troh-vi-nei-see-us] From Terra Australis, which is Latin for land of the south and Vināceum, which is Latin for wine. It refers to fungus, which were first discovered from the land down under and have a wine coloured pileus or gills. A good example is Agaricus austrovinaceus.

Autecologist: [or-te-kol-o-jist] From Autos, which is Ancient Greek for self, Oikos which is Ancient Greek for ecology, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies an individual species and how it pertains to its environment.

Autecology: or-te-kol-o-jee] From Autos, which is Ancient Greek for self and Oikos, which is Ancient Greek for ecology and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the study of the science of studying an individual species and how it pertains to its environment.

Autogamy: [or-toh-gamy] From Autos, which is Ancient Greek for self and Gamous, which is Ancient Greek for to marry. It refers to plants, which have the ability to be self-pollinated from the same flower. Good examples are found in Microtis parviflora or Viola betonicifolia.

Autotrophic: [or-toh-tro-fik] From Autos, which is Ancient Greek for self and Trophikos, which is Ancient Greek for food. It refers to plants, which are able to produce carbohydrates by means of photosynthesis or self-sustained nutrients from chemosynthesis. It is independent of other organisms in respect of its organic nutritional intake.

Autumnal: [or-tum-nal] From Autumnalis, which is Latin for the autumn time. It refers to plants, which bloom in autumn. Two good examples are Banksia spinulosa or Crowea reflexa.

Autumnalis: [or-tum-na-lis] From Autumnalis, which is Latin for the autumn time. It refers to plants, which bloom in autumn. A good example is the commercial flower Adonis autumnalis or for a couple of Australian garden favourites look at Crowea exalta or for something really blue look at Lechenaultia biloba.

Auxillary Bud: [ok-zil-lar-ee, Buhd] From Auxillaris, which is Latin for in the leaf axils and From Budde, which is Old English or Bud, which is Dutch for a newly sprouted leaf or blossom that has not yet unfolded. It refers to any new growth on a plant that has not commenced development. A good example is Fitzwillia axilliflora.

Auxilliflora: [ok-zil-li-flor-ra] From Auxillaris, which is Latin for in the leaf axils and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which develop from the leaf axils. A good example is Fitzwillia axilliflora.

Auxotelic: [ok-so-te-lik] From Auto, which is Ancient Greek for self and Tele, for afar or distant. It refers to new shoots, which grow out prior to the start of anthesis or the completion of anthesis. A good example is the inflorescence of Melaleuca viminalis which grows out prior to or as the first flower buds commence opening.

Avellinia: [a-vel-lin-i-a] Maybe from Avella, which is Latin for hazy. It may refer to plants, which have a hazy appearance in the field. A good example is Avellinia michelii.

Avenacea: [a-ven-a-see-a] From Avena, which is Latin for oats. It refers to inflorescences, which resemble those of the Avena genus. A good example is Enneapogon avenacea.

Avenaceum: [a-ven-a-see-um] From Avena, which is Latin for oats. It refers to inflorescences, which resemble those of the Avena genus. A good example is Arrhenatherum avenaceum.

Avenaceus: [a-ven-ah-see-us] From Avena, which is Latin for oats. It refers to inflorescences, which resemble those of the Avena genus. A good example is Anisopogon avenaceus.

Avenastrum: [a-ven-a-strum] From Avena, which is Latin for oats. It refers to inflorescences, which resemble those of the Avena genus. A good example is the illegitimate name of Avenastrum nervosum, which is known as Amphibromus nervosus.

Aveolae: [a-vee-oh-lee] From Aveolus, which is Latin for a cavity or a cell like a honeycomb cell.

Aversum: [a-ver-sum] From A, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Versum, which is Latin for certainty. It refers to plants, which display uncertainties within their genus, thus they stand alone in the genus. A good example is Paspalidium aversum.

Avicennia: [a-vi-se-ni-a] From Avicennia, which is Latinized from Ibna Sina and is named in honour of Ibna Sina; 980-1037, who was an Arab physician and author who was the most influential medical thinker of his time. Two good example are Avicennia marina subsp. australica or Solanum avicennia.

Aviculare: [ah-vi-kyoo-lair] From Avicula, which is Latin for a small bird. Its reference is unclear but it may refer to the flowers, which have wide spreading petals like a small bird. A good example is Solanum-aviculare.

Avium: [a-vi-um] From āvium, which is Latin for out of the way. It refers to plants, which are found in more isolated locations than other species in the genus. A good example is Lepidosperma avium.

Avonensis: [ah-vo-nen-sis] From Avon, which is Latinized for the Avon National Park and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Avon National Park in south western, Western Australia. A good example is Hibbertia avonensis.

Awestoniana: [or-wes-to-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Doctor Auther Stewart Weston; 1932-20.., who was an Australian Botanist and ecologist. A good example is Acacia awestoniana.

Awestonianum: [or-wes-to-ni-um] Is named in honour of Dr. Auther Stewart Weston; 1932-20.., who was an Australian Botanist and ecologist. A good example is Racosperma awestonianum, which is now known as Acacia awestoniana.

Awl 1: [or l] From Aven/Avena, which is Latin for a broad bristle usually with a concave surface. It refers to glumes or lemmas of grasses, which have the shape of an awl. A good example is the glumes on Themeda triandra.

Awl 2: [or l] From Aven/Avena, which is Latin for a broad bristle usually with a concave surface. It refers to some cones which have scales, which resemble broad awls. A good example is found on the fruits of Araucaria bidwillii.

Awn: [or n] From Aven/Avena, which is Latin for a broad bristle with a concave surface. It usually It refers to glumes or lemmas of grasses. A good example is Paspalidium aversum.

Axial: [ahk-si-al] From Axis, which is Latin for the main central stem. It refers to the main central structure of a plant of which the other structures and organs are arranged.

Axiflora: [ahk-si-flor-a] From Axis, which is Latin for the main central stem and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to the main central structure hosting the flowers. A good example is Pimelea axiflora subsp. axiflora.

Axiflorum: [ahk-si-flawr-uhm] From Axis, which is Latin for the main central stem and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to the main central structure hosting the flowers. A good example is Galium axiflorum, which is now known asGalium gaudichaudii subsp. gaudichaudii.

Axil: [ahk-sil] From Axis, which is Latin for the main central stem. It refers to the upper angle between the leaf base and the stem.

Axile: [ak-sahy-l] From Axis, which is Latin for the main central stem. It refers to the placentae, which is along the central axis in a compound ovary with septa.

Axillare: [ak-si-lair] From Axis, which is Latin for a leaf axils. It refers to auxiliary shoots between the bracts, which have swell in the leaf axils. A good example is Macrotyloma axillare.

Axillaris: [ak-sil-lar-is] From Axis, which is Latin for a leaf axil. It refers to bracts or auxiliary shoots which are all in the leaf axils. A good example is Acacia axillaris.

Axillary: [ak-zil-lar-ee] From Axis, which is Latin for a leaf axil. It refers to the leaf axil or the lateral growth.

Axillary bud: [ak-zil-ar-ee, buh d] From Axis, which is Latin for a leaf axils and Budde, which is Old English for a spray, pod or bag. It refers to lateral buds along the side of the axis of stems, which are at the leaf nodes. They are produced by the terminal buds during growth. They grow out and form a lateral stems and become terminal buds of the lateral stem.

Axillibarba: [ak-sil-li-bar-ba] From Axis, which is Latin for a leaf axils and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which was the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which have the flowers that appear from the leaf axils. A good example is Hibbertia axillibarba.

Axilliflora: [ak-sil-li-flor-a] From Axis, which is Latin for a leaf axils and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which was the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have flowers that appear from the leaf axils and bloom in the spring time. A good example is Fitzwillia axilliflora.

Axilliflorum: [ak-sil-li-flor-um] From Axis, which is Latin for a leaf axils and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which was the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which have flowers that appear from the leaf axils. A good example is Sphincterostoma axilliforum, which is now known asAndersonia axilliflora.

Axis: [ak-sis] From Axis, which is Latin for a leaf axil. It refers to main central structures of a plants, of which the other structures and organs are arranged around.

Axonopus: [ak-son-o-poos] From Axon, which is Ancient Greek for an leaf axils and Pous, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It may refer to the way the seedlings first set up a rosette of leaves with several lateral buds that branch out like feet as they start to run. A good example is the exotic grass Axonopus fissifolium.

Ayersiana: [air-zi-a-na] Is named in honour of Sir Henry Ayers; 1821-1897, who was an English born Australia and a non compromising Chief Secretary of South Australia. It refers to the plants, which were first discovered around Ayers Rock which is now correctly named Uluru. A good example is Acacia ayersiana.

Ayersii: [air-zi-ahy] Is named in honour of Sir Henry Ayers; 1821-1897, who was an English born Australia and a non compromising Chief Secretary of South Australia. It refers to the plants, which were first discovered around Ayers Rock which is now correctly named Uluru. A good example is Helichrysum ayersii.

Aylmeria: [ahyl-mer-i-a] From America, which is Latin for Dianthus. It refers to daisies, which somewhat resemble the Asian Dianthus genus. A good example is the colour of the flowers on Aylmeria rosea, which is now known as Rhodanthe chlorocephala subspecies rosea.

Azanza: [a-zan-zh] From Azanza, which is ancient Greek for a n area in Africa which is now Ethiopia and Somalia. It refers to the appearance of the flowers being similar to Malvaceae plants found in Ethiopia and Somalia region. A good example is Azanza thespesioides.

Azedarach: [a-ze-dar-ak] From Azad, Darakht which is Latinized from the Persian word for the Neem Tree. It refers to the neem tree, which is found from Asia Minor to Australia with only slight differences. A good example is Melia azedarach subsp. Australisica.

Azolla: [a-zohl-la] From Azo, which is Ancient Greek for dry and Ollo, to kill. It refers to the plants, which succumb quickly during dry conditions or when out of water. A good example is the foreign water weed Azolla filiculoides.

Azorella: [a-zor-el-la] From Azores, which is Latinized for a small group of volcanic Islands in the north Atlantic Ocean. It refers to plants, which originate from the Islands however the connection to the old name is not clear. A good example is Azorella compressa, which is now known as Platysace compressa.

Azurea: [az-yor-ee-a] From Azure, which is the old English for bright sky blue. It refers to the colour of flowers, which are sky blue. A good example is Lindsaea azurea.

B

Babbagia: [ba-ba-ji-a] Is named in honour of Benjamin Herschel Babbage; 1815-1878, an engineer and amateur explorer who sent many botanical samples to Baron Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example was Babbagia acropterum, which is now known as Osteocarpum acropterum.

Babianoides: [ba-bi-a-noi-deez] From Babiana, which is Latin for a baboon and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It may refer to the large, united, chartacea flower bracts, which smooth in the centre and rough around the edges like baboon’s face. A good example is Patersonia babianoides.

Babindae: [ba-bin-dee] From Babinda, which is Latinized for the Babinda district. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the Babinda district south of Cairnes in far north eastern Queensland. A good example was Hymenophyllum babindae, which is now known as Hymenophyllum subdimidiatum.

Babingtonia: [ba-bing-toh-ni-a] Is named in honour of Charles Cardale Babington; 1808-1895, who was an English professor of botany at Cambridge University. A good example is Babingtonia virgata.

Baccata: [ba-ka-ta] From Bacca, which is Latin for a berry or to be berrylike. It refers to fruits, which are berries. A good example is Rhagodia baccata.

Baccate: [ba-keit] From Bacca, which is Latin for a berry or to be berrylike. It refers to fruits, which are berries. A good example of a small tree whose fruits are berries is Maytenus bilocularis.

Baccatum: [ba-kei-tum] From Bacca, which is Latin for a berry or to be berrylike. It refers to fruits, which are berries. A good example was Leptospermum baccatum, which is now known as Leptospermum arachnoides and Leptospermum squarrosum.

Baccatus: [ba-kei-tus] From Bacca, which is Latin for a berry or to be berrylike. It refers to fruits, which are berries. A good example is Phyllanthus baccatus.

Baccaurea: [ba-kor-ee-a] From Bacca, which is Latin for a berry or to be berrylike and Aureus, which is Latin for gold coin from the Julius Ceasar period. It refers to berries, which have a golden-yellow colour which resemble Ancient Roman gold coins. A good example is Baccaurea nankhua which is a small tree from Asia with golden edible fruits.

Baccelliana: [bak-sel-li-a-na] Is named in honour of Baccell. A good example was Wrightia baccelliana, which is now known as Melodinus baccellianus.

Baccellianum: [bak-sel-li-a-num] Is named in honour of Baccell. A good example was Trichostomanthemum bacellianum , which is now known as Melodinus acutifloris.

Baccellianus: [bak-sel-li-a-nus] Is named in honour of Baccell. A good example is Melodinus baccellianus.

Baccharoides: [bak-kar-oi-deez] From Baccharis, which is a Greek name of an ancient plant with a fragrant root and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the exotic Baccharis genus. A good example is Pluchea baccharoides.

Bacciferaera: [bak-si-fer-ee-a] From Bacci, which is Latin for a berry and Ferra, which is for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which have numerous small berries from the leaf axis. A good example is Ammannia baccifera.

Backhouseana: [bak-hour-zee-ei-na] ] Is named in honour of James Backhouse; 1794-1869, who was an English nurseryman and botanist who first ventured to Tasmania. His interests included working with the poor, especially convicts, aboriginal welfare and Austrlian native flora. A good example is Correa backhouseana.

Backhousei: [bak-hour-ze-ahy] Is named in honour of James Backhouse; 1794-1869, who was an English nurseryman and botanist who first ventured to Tasmania. His interests included working with the poor, especially convicts, aboriginal welfare and Austrlian native flora. A good example is Wilsonia backhousei

Backhousia: [bak-hour-zi-a] Is named in honour of James Backhouse; 1794-1869, who was an English nurseryman and botanist who first ventured to Tasmania. His interests included working with the poor, especially convicts, aboriginal welfare and Austrlian native flora. A good example is Backhousia myrtifolia.

Backwater: [bak-wor-ter] From Back waters, which is Middle English for a place where the water is held back naturally. It refers to a section of a river or stream where there is no flow. It is where a branch of the main river or stream lies beside it like a cul-de-sac or has an obstruction that causes the water to stop flowing or reduces greatly the normal flow.

Bacopa: [bah-koh-pa] From Bacopa, which is Latinized for the Sanskrit Brahmi name for the herb from South East Asia. It refers to the place of origin of the type specimen. A good example is Bacopa monnieri.

Bacteriologist: [bak-teer-i-o-lo-jist] From Baktḗria singular or Baktḗrion plural, which is Ancient Greek for ubiquitous one-celled organisms, spherical, spiral, or rod-shaped and appearing singly or in chains, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, for a person. It refers to a person who studies the science of bacteria.

Bacteriology: [bahk-teer-i-o-lo-jee] From Baktḗria singular or Baktḗrion plural, which is Ancient Greek for ubiquitous one-celled organisms, spherical, spiral, or rod-shaped and appearing singly or in chains and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the branch of science, which deals with certain microbes that constitute a large domain within the group microorganisms known as prokaryotic.

Bactrilobium: [bahk-tr-loh-bi-um] From Baktron, which is Ancient Greek for a walking stick and Lobós which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers plants, which had stems that are suitable for making walking sticks and whose foliage resembles ear lobes. A good example is the exotic tree Bactrilobium fistula which is now known as Cassia fistula.

Bacularia: [bah-kyoo-lar-i-a] From Baktḗria singular or Baktḗrion plural, which is Ancient Greek for ubiquitous one-celled organisms, spherical, spiral, or rod-shaped and appearing singly or in chains. It refers to fruits, which are shaped like rods. A good example was Bacularia aequisegmentosa which is now known as Linospadix palmerianus.

Badensis: [ba-den-sis] From Badu, which is Latinized for Badu Island and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered on Badu Island in the Torres Straight. A good example is Cycas badensis.

Badioatrum: [bad-i-oh-ah-truh m] From Badio, which is Latin for bay or chestnut coloured in relation to horses and ātrum, which is Latin for dull black, gloomy or dismal. It refers to structures or organs, which have deep dull chest nut colours. A good example is the lichen Rhizocarpon badioatrum.

Badioclavata: [bahd-i-oh-klah-vei-ta] From Badio, which is Latin for bay or chestnut coloured in relation to horses and Clāvātus, which is Latin for a club. It refers to plants, which have the shape of a club and the reddish-brown bay colour of a horse. A good example is Hygrocybe badioclavata.

Badius: [ba-di-us] From Badio, which is Latin for bay or chestnut coloured in relation to horses. It refers to plants, which have a distinct reddish-brown bay colour similar to a horse. A good example is Schoenus badius.

Badjensis: [ba-jen-sis] From Badja, which is Latinized for Big Badja Hill and Ana/Ensis, which is Latin for origin. It refers to where the first plants were discovered at Big Badja Hill north east of Coom in southern New South Wales. A good example is Eucalyptus badjensen.

Badocana: [ba-do-ka-na] From Badoc, which is Latinized for the place name and Ana/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered at Badoc. A good example is Liparia badocana, which is now known as Cullen badocanum.

Badocanum: [ba-do-ka-num] From Badoc, which is Latinized for the place name and Ana/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered at Badoc. A good example is Cullen badocanum.

Baeckea: [ba-kee-a] Named in honour of Carl Linneus’s best friend Dr. Abraham Baeck; 1717-1795, who was a Swedish naturalist and physician. A good example is Baeckea baeckeacea.

Baeckeacea: [ba-kee-ei-see-a] Named in honour of Carl Linneus’s best friend Dr. Abraham Baeck; 1717-1795, who was a Swedish naturalist and physician and Acea which is Latin for the family. It refers to plants, which display very typical characteristics at the Family level down to the specie level in classification in that they resemble the backea genus. A good example is Thryptomene baeckeacea.

Baeckeoides: [ba-kee-oi-deez] Named in honour of Carl Linneus’s best friend Dr. Abraham Baeck; 1717-1795, who was a Swedish naturalist and physician and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Baeckea genus. A good example is the leaves on Pultenaea baeckeoides.

Baeobotrys: [bee-o-bo-trahys] From Baeo, which is Ancient Greek for little and Botryos, which is Ancient Greek for a bunch of grapes. It refers to fruits or flowers, which resemble little bunches of grapes. A good example was Baeobotrys macrophylla, which is now known as Eubotrys macrophylla.

Baeometra: [bee-o-me-tra] From Baeo, which is Ancient Greek for little and Metra, which is Ancient Greek for a uterus or womb. It refers to plants, which have little ovaries in their fruits. A good example is the lily Baeometra uniflora, which is being grown for limited commercial use.

Baeospora:[bee-o-spor-a] From Baeo, which is Ancient Greek for little and Sporá /Speírein, which are Greek for a spore or seed. It refers to fungi, which have very small spores. A good example is Baeospora clastotricha.

Baeosporus:[bee-o-spor-us] From Baeo, which is Ancient Greek for little and Sporá /Speírein, which are Greek for a spore or seed. It refers to fungi, which have very small spores. A good example is Marasmiellus baeosporus.

Baeuerlenii: [bee-er-le-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Wilhelm Baeurlen; 1840-1917, who was a plant collector for Ferdinand von Mueller and John maiden and author of “Wildflowers of NSW.” A good example is Haloragodéndron baeuerlenii.

Bagleyi: [bag-lee-ahy] Is named in honour of Bagley. A good example of the fungi is Hygrocybe bagleyi.

Bagnisia: [bag-ni-si-a] Maybe from Agnōt/Agōtos, which is Ancient Greek for ignorance or unknown. It refers to plants, which have partial or the total inability to be recognized by use of the senses Confused with another specie or genre. A good example is the fungi Bagnisia rodwayi, which is now known as Thismia rodwayi.

Bagoens: [ba-gonz] From Bago, which is Latinized for Bago near Wauchope and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for origin. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Bago, Wauchope area in New South Wales. A good example is Prasophyllum bagoense.

Bagoensis: [ba-gon-sis] From Bago, which is Latinized for Bago near Wauchope and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for origin. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Bago, Wauchope area in New South Wales. A good example is Prasophyllum bagoensis.

Bagsteri: [bag-ster-ahy] Is named in honour of William Robert? Baxter (Bagster) who was an English gardener and collector of plants in south western Australian. A good example is Acacia bagsteri.

Baileyana: [bei-li-a-na] Is named in honour of Frederick Mason Bailey; 1827-1915, who was an English born Australian seed collector and curator of the Queensland Museum. A good example is Eucalyptus baileyana.

Baileyi: [bei-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Frederick Mason Bailey; 1827-1915, who was an English born Australian seed collector and curator of the Queensland Museum. A good example is Cryptandra baileyi.

Baileyoxylon: [bei-li-ok-sahy-lon] Is named in honour of Frederick Mason Bailey; 1827-1915, who was an English born Australian seed collector and curator of the Queensland Museum and Xylon which is Ancient Greek for Wood. A good example is Baileyoxylon lanceolatum.

Bairdiae: [bair-di-ee] Is named in honour of Baird but which one is unknown. A good example is Burchardia bairdiae.

Bairdianum: [bair-di-ei-num] Is named in honour of Baird but which Baird is unknown. A good example is Dendrobium bairdianum, which is now known as Dendrobium fellowsii.

Bakeri: [bei-ker-ahy] Is named in honour of C. T. Baker who was the curator of the Technology museum in Sydney. A good example is Ardisia bakeri.

Bakeriana: [bei-ker-i-ei-na] Is named in honour of Richard Thomas baker; 1854-1941, who was an English born Australian who published more than 100 papers, which included describing many new species of Eucalypts sp.. A good example is Hakea bakeriana.

Bakersiana: [bei-ker-si-a-na] Is named in honour of C. T. Baker who was the curator of the Technology museum in Sydney. A good example is Petrophile bakersiana.

Balanites: [ba-la-ni-teez] From Válanos which is Ancient Greek for an Acorn. It refers to fruits, which resemble small acorns. A good example is Eucalyptus balanites.

Balanopelex: [ba-lan-o-pe-leks] From Válanos, which is Ancient Greek for an Acorn and Perplexa, which is Latin for to be completely entwined. It refers to plants, which have small acorn like fruits and have a very complex relationship with other species in the genus. Some good examples are Eucalyptus balanopelex, Eucalyptus balanites and Eucalyptus phylacis.

Balanophora: [ba-lan-o-for-a] From Válanos, which is Ancient Greek for an Acorn and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to fruits, which resemble small acorns. A good example is Balanophora fungosa or Grevillea balanophora.

Balanops: [ba-lan-ops] From Válanos, which is Ancient Greek for an Acorn and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which bear fruits which resemble small acorns. A good example is Balanops australiana.

Balantium: [bah-lan-ti-um] From Balaústion, which is Ancient Greek for or Balaustium, which is Latin for the Pomegranate. It refers to fruits, which resemble small Pomegranates. A good example is Balantium javanicum.

Balaustion: [ba-la-sti-on] From Balanos, which is Ancient Greek for Acorn and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which bear fruits resembling small acorns. A good example is Balaustion pulcherrimum.

Balfouria: [bal-for-i-a] Is named in honour of Sir Isaac Bayley Balfour; 1853–1922, who was a Scottish botanist and Regius Professor of Botany at several universities in Scotland. A good example is Balfouria saligna.

Balgohioides: [bal-goh-i-oi-deez] Maybe from Balgoh/Balog, which are both Hungarian for a race of indigenous people or no man’s mistress. It therefore may refer to plants, which are beautifully garbed when flushed with new growth, fruit or flowers, which appear to be all female. (At least on the trees I have seen) A good example is Dissiliaria baloghioides.

Balingayum: [ba-lin-jahy-um] Maybe from Baling, which is modern Anglo-Latin for to be ready for to bundle up. It therefore may refer to plants, which have a neat compact growth habit. A good example is Balingayum ovata, which is now known as Goodenia ovata.

Balladonensis: [bal-la-don-en-si] From Balladon, which is Latinized from the local Aboriginal vernacular for a big rock standing by itself and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered and grow around the township of Balladonia. A good example is Eucalyptus balladoniensis.

Ballantinia: [bal-lan-ti-ni-a] Probably named in honour of Mary Smith nee Ballintyne (Ballintini) who was an Australian plant collector in the 1800’s. A good example is Ballantinia antipoda.

Ballii: [bal-li-ahy] Maybe Is named in honour Robert Ball; who studied and collected Bryophytes. A good example is Olearia ballii.

Ballota: [bal-lo-ta] From Ballota, which is Latin for a little ball. It refers to fruits, which resemble little balls. A good example is the Greek horehound Ballota pseudodictamnus.

Balls-headleyi: [borlz, hed-lei-ahy] Named in honour of Ball and probably Charles Hedley; 1862-1926 who were English born Australians who was a museum curator and collector of many plant exhibitions particularly around Boyne Island near Gladstone. A good example is Medinilla balls-headleyi.

Baloghia: [bal-lo-ji-a] Is probably named in honour of Dr. Joseph Balogh who studied the plants of Romania and Transylvania. A good example is Baloghia inophylla.

Baloghioides: [bal-lo-jee-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Dr. Joseph Balogh who studied the plants of Romania and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Baloghia genus. A good example is Dissiliaria baloghioides.

Balonensis: [bal-lo-nen-sis] From Ballone, which is Latin for the local Aboriginal vernacular for the Ballone River and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered along the Ballone River. A good example is Parakeelya balonensis, which is now known as Calandrinia balonensis.

Baloskion: [bal-os-ki-on] From Baloskion which is Ancient Greek for deliberately mangled or twisted. It refers to stems or culms which are twisted or distorted. A good example is the culms on Baloskion stenocoleum.

Balpineum: [bal-pi-nee-um] From Alpineumm which is unknown. A good example of the name is Cystangium balpineum.

Balsamea: [bal-sa-mee-a] From Balsamonm, which is Ancient Greek or Balsamum, which is Latin for aromatic. It refers to plants, which have aromatic leaves or phyllodes. A good example is Acacia balsamea.

Balsamica: [bal-sa-mi-ka] From Balsamon, which is Ancient Greek or Balsamum, which is Latin for aromatic. It refers to plants, which usually have aromatic leaves or at times fruits. A good example is Psoralea balsamica.

Balsamicum: [bal-sa-mi-kum] From Balsamon, which is Ancient Greek or Balsamum, which is Latin for aromatic. It refers to plants, which usually have aromatic leaves or at times fruits. A good example is Cullen balsamicum.

Balsamina: [bal-sa-mi-na] From Balsamon, which is Ancient Greek or Balsamum, which is Latin for aromatic. It refers to plants, which usually have aromatic leaves or at times fruits. A good example is Momordica balsamina.

Bamagensis: [ba-ma-jen-sis] From Bamaga, which is Latinized for the district in far northern Cape York Peninsular and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered from the Bamaga district. A good example is Gossia bamagensis.

Bambra: [bam bra] From Bambra, which is Latinized for the district in East Gippsland in Victoria. It refers to the original plants, which were discovered in the Bambra district. A good example is Amanita bambra.

Bambrus: [bam-brus] From Bramia, which is Latinized From A, Nigerian dialect vernacular for the plant which was originally discovered there. It refers to the type specimen, which was discovered in Nigeria. A good example is the trunk on Bramia monnieri, which is now known as Bacopa monnieri.

Bambusa: [bam-boo-sa] From Bambu, which is Latinized from the Malay word for bambu or bamboo. It refers to plants, which belong to the classic bamboo family. A good example is Bambusa arnhemica.

Bambusifolia: [bam-boo-si-foh-li-a] From Bambu, which is Latinized from the Malay word for bambu or bamboo and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which closely resemble the classic bamboos. A good example is Dianella bambusifolia.

Bamleriana: [bam-ler-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Bamler. A good example is Hypolepis bamleriana.

Bancalus: [ban-ka-lus] From Bankalos, which is Latinized from the Philippine tree known by this name. A good example was Bancalus orientalis, which is now known as Nauclea orientali.

Bancroftii: [ban-krof-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Thomas Lane Bancroft; 1860-1933, who was a Queensland physician and research biologist who spent time in the northern Rivers of New South Wales. A good example is Eucalyptus bancroftii.

Bancroftiorum: [ban-krof-ti-or-um] Is named in honour of Thomas Lane Bancroft; 1860-1933, who was a Queensland physician and research biologist who spent time in the northern Rivers of New South Wales. A good example is Acacia bancroftiorum.

Bandaense: [ban-da-ens] From Barba, which is Latinized for a and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Banda Banda National Park. A good example is Durabaculum bandaense, which is now known as Dendrobium discolor.

Banded: [ban-ded] Is to have transverse stripes or bands of one colour over another. A good example is Hibbertia senna which relies on the banded bumble bee Amegilla cingulate for buzz pollination.

Banfieldii: [ban-feel-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Banfield but which Banfield cannot be substantiated. A good example is Habenaria banfieldii.

Banksia: [bank-si-a] Is named in honour of Sir Joseph Banks; 1743-1820, who was an English Naturalist and patron of botany who travelled with Captain Cook on the Endeavour to explore and study the plants of the east coast of Australia. A good example is Banksia oblongifolia.

Banksiana: [bank-si-a-na] Is named in honour of Sir Joseph Banks; 1743-1820, who was an English Naturalist and patron of botany who travelled with Captain Cook on the Endeavour to explore the east coast of Australia. A good example is Ionidium banksianum, which is now known as Hybanthus enncaspermus.

Banksii: [bank-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Sir Joseph Banks; 1743-1820, who was an English Naturalist and patron of botany who travelled with Captain Cook on the Endeavour to explore the east coast of Australia. A good example is Grevillea banksii.

Banksiifolia: [bank-si-foh-li-a] Is named in honour of Sir Joseph Banks; 1743-1820, who was an English Naturalist and patron of botany who travelled with Captain Cook on the Endeavour to explore the east coast of Australia and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which somewhat resemble those of the Banksia genus. A good example was Hermesia banksiifolia, which is now known as Callicoma serratifolia.

Banyabba: [ban-yah-ba] From Banyabba, which is Latinized for the local Aboriginal vernacular for Macropus rufogriseus (Red Neck Wallaby). It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Banyabba National Park which is known locally as a good refuge for the red neck wallaby north of Grafton in New South Wales. A good example is Grevillea banyabba.

Baobab: [boh-ab] From Baobab, which is Latinized probably from an African dialect for the local Boab tree. It refers to any trees, which are in the Adasonia genus. A good example is Baobab gregorii, which is now known as Adansonia gregorii.

Baouleensis: [ba-our-lee-en-sis] From Baoulee, which is unknown and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered around, near, in or on Baoule. A good example is Utricularia baouleensis, which is now known as Utricularia foveolata.

Baptistii: [bap-tis-ti-ahy] Is probably named in honour of John Baptist; who was an English born Australian horticulturalist and nurseryman. A good example is Pterostylis baptistii.

Baracchiana: [bar-ak-chi-a-na] Is named in honour of Baracch. A good example is Gnephosis baracchiana , which is now known as Trichanthodium baracchianum.

Baracchianum: [bar-ahk-chi-a-num] Is named in honour of Baracch. A good example is Trichanthodium baracchianum.

Barakulensis: [bar-a-kyoo-len-sis] From Barakula, which is Latinized from the aboriginal vernacular for the forest area known as the Barakula forests and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the halotype specimens originating from the Barakula forests in south east Queensland near Chinchilla. A good example is Acacia barakulensis.

Barattensis: [bar-a-te-nen-sis] From Baratti, which is Latinized from the area north east of Port augusta in the Flinders Ranges and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the halotype specimens originating from the Flinders Ranges in southern South Australia. A good example is Acacia barattensis.

Barbara: [bar-bar-a] From Barbātum, which is Latin for a beard or a barb. It refers to the barbs on the basal half of the rachis. A good example is Todea barbara.

Barbarae 1: [bar-bar-ee] Bárbaros which is Ancient Greek for the wild one roughien or savage. It refers to the labellum’s beard, which is wild and like that of a roughiens. A good example is Corybas barbarae.

Barbarea 2: [bar-bar-ee] Bárbaros which is Ancient Greek for the wild one roughien or savage. It refers to plants, which have a wild and roughien like growth habits. A good example is Barbarea arcuata.

Barbarella: [bar-bar-el-la] From Barbara, which is Latin for foreign and Ella, which is Latin for the feminine form. It refers to flowers, which are very different yet look very feminine. A good example is Caladenia barbarella.

Barbarorum: [bar-bar-or-um] From Barbātum, which is Latin for a beard or a barb. It refers to the barbellate bristles on the outer plumose hairs of the Cypsela. A good example is Picris barbarorum.

Barbarossa: [bar-bar-os-sa] From Barbbara, which is Latin for foreign. It refers to flowers, which are daintily different from the norm within the genus. A good example is Caladenia barbarossa.

Barbarum: [bar-bar-or-um] From Barbātum, which is Latin for foreign. It refers to flowers, which are much different than other species in the genus. A good example is the Chinese commercial Goji berry or Lyceum barbarum.

Barbata: [bar-ba-ta] From Barbātum, which is Latin for a beard or a barbed hair. It refers to tufts of hairs, which are barbed. A good example is the barbed hairs on the margins of the petals on Tylophora barbata.

Barbatum: [bar-ba-tum] From Barbātum, which is Latin for a beard or a barbed hair. It refers to tufts of hairs, which are barbed. A good example is the barbed hairs on the margins of the petals on Ischaemum barbatum.

Barbate: [bar-beit] From Barbātum, which is Latin for a beard or a barbed hair. It refers to the description of plants, which have tufts of hairs with barbs.

Barbed: [bar-bd] From Barbātum, which is Latin for a beard or a barb. It refers to tufts of hairs which have barbs. A good example is Cymbopogon refractus.

Barbellate: [bar-bel-leit] From Barbātum, which is Latin for a beard or a barb. It refers to tufts having small barbs. A good example is the barbs on the pappus of Cremnothamnus thomsonii.

Barberi: [bar-ber-ahy] Is named in honour of Horace Newton Barber; 1914-1971 who was a British born Australian who had a keen interest in Eucalyptus and was also the founder of the species named in his honour. A good example is Eucalyptus barberi.

Barbiger: [bar-bi-jer] From Barbātum, which is Latin for having abeard. It refers to flowers, especially the lobes which are covered in long often straggly hairs. A good example is Adenanthos barbiger.

Barbigera: [bar-bi-jeer-a] From Barbātum, which is Latin for having a beard. It refers to flowers, especially the lobes which are covered in long often straggly hairs. A good example is Banksia barbigera, which is now known as Banksia goodii.

Barbigerorum: [bar-bi-jeer-or-um] From Barbātum, which is Latin for having a beard. It may refer to the trunk and the lower branches having fine and medium-course reddish coloured bark strips hanging down which resemble a beard From A, distance. A good example is Eucalyptus rubida subsp. barbigerorum.

Barbigera: [bar-bi-jer-a] From Barbula which is Latin for having a beard. It refers to sepals or calyx lobes which are covered in long often straggly hairs like a beard. A good example is Drosera barbigera.

Barbigerum: [bahr-bi-jeer-um] From Barbula which is Latin for having a beard. It refers to sepals or calyx lobes which are covered in long often straggly hairs like a beard. A good example is Gompholobium barbigerum, which is now known as Gompholobium latifolium.

Barbinervis: [bar-bi-ner-vis] From Barbi, which is Latin for a bristly beard and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek for nerves or veins. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which have the nerves covered in a short bristly beard. A good example is Acacia barbinervis.

Barbinervum: [bar-bi-ner-vum] From Barbi, which is Latin for a bristly beard and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek for nerves or veins. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which have the nerves covered in a short bristly beard. A good example is Racosperma barbinervum , which is now known as Acacia barbinervis.

Barbula: [bar-byoo-la] From Barbātum,which is Latin for a beard or a barb. It refers to a single outgrowth on the margin of the wings or in the throat of the corolla. A good example is the apexes on the sporophytes of Tortula subulata.

Barbulae: [bah-byoo-lee] From Barbātum,which is Latin for a beard or a barb. It refers to a single outgrowth on the margin of the wings or in the throat of the corolla. A good example is on the wings of Scaevola calliptera.

Barclayana: [bar-klahy-a/ei-na] Is named in honour of Robert Barclay; 1757-1830, who was an English botanist and horticulturalist. A good example is Senna barclayana.

Bargoensis: [bar-goh-en-sis] From Bargo, which is Latinized for the Bargo district and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the plant species originally being discovered in the Bargoe district of New South Wales. A good example is Persoonia bargoensis.

Barilletii: [bar-ril-le-ti ahy] Is named in honour of Barillet. A good example is Goodenia barilletii, which is now known as Goodenia coerulea.

Bark: [bar-k] From Beorcan, which is Old English for bark. It refers to the outer covering of the woody material below on the trunks, branches and stems of shrubs and trees. The external tissue on the outside of the cambium layer. A good example of variable barks can be seen on the various Eucalyptus species including Eucalyptus mannifera.

Barkeriana: [bar-ker-i-a-na] Is named in honour of George Baker was an English horticulturalist and orchid fancier. A good example is Boronia barkeriana subsp. gymnopetala.

Barkhausioides: [bahr-khor-si-oi-deez] Is probably named in honour of Barkhausen and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Barkhausia genus. A good example is Senecio barkhausioides.

Barklya: [bark-lee-a] Is named in honour of Sir henry Barkly; 1815-1898, who was the Governor of Victoria. A good example was Barklya syringifolia, which is now known as Bauhinia syringifolia.

Barklyana: [bark-lee-a-na] Is named in honour of Sir Henry Barkly; 1815-1898, who was the Governor of Victoria. A good example is Barklya syringifolia.

Barklyanus: [bark-lee-ei-nus] Is named in honour of Sir Henry Barkly; 1815-1898, who was the Governor of Victoria. A good example is Distichostemon barklyanus , which is now known as Dodonaea barklyana.

Barklyensis: [bar-klee-en-sis] From Barkly, which is Latinized for the Barkly Tableland and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers towhere the first plants were discovered. A good example is Eucalyptus barklyensis, which is now known as Eucalyptus microtheca.

Barleei: [bahr-lee-ahy] Is named in honour of Barlee. A good example is Stylidium barleei.

Barleria: [bar-ler-i-a] Is named in honour of Barler. A good example is Barleria cristata.

Barlowii: [bar-loh-i-ahy] Is most likely named in honour of Dr. Bryan Alwyn barlow; 1933-20.., who was an Australian  Botanist, the national Herbarium Director and specialist inMelaleuca, Loranthaceae and Viscaceae species. A good example is Melaleuca barlowii.

Barnardianum: [bar-nar-di-a-num] Is named in honour of Francis W. Barnard; 1823-1912, or his son Francis George Allman Barnard; 1857-1932 who were Australian chemists and collectors of plants for Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Crepidomanes barnardianum.

Barongia: [bar-on-ji-a] From Barong, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the Moros word for a large, broad bladed knife. It refers to leaves, which resemble the Moros knives. A good example is Barongia lophandra.

Barosma: [bar-os-ma] From Baro, which is Ancient Greek for heavy and Osma, which is Ancient Greek for a fragrance. It refers to plants, which emit a powerful fragrance. A good example is Barosma serratifolia.

Barragensis: [bar-ra-jen-sis] From Barragen, which is Latinized for the local district west of Sydney and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered from around the Barragan district. A good example is Boletus barragensis.

Barrel 1: [ba-rel] From Bariculus, which is Latin for a small wooden cask. It refers to the shape of buds or fruits which are longer than wide. A good example is the fruits on Eucalyptus marginata.

Barrel 2: [ba-rel] From Bariculus, which is Latin for a small wooden cask. It refers to the shape of the trunks which are longer than wide and have a distinct bulge in the middle. A good example is Brachychiton rupestris.

Barren 1: [ba-ren] Is Latinized from Brahaigne, which is Old French for being sterile. It refers to being unable to reproduce. A good example is the fruits on Syzygium leuhmanni which often produce a very high percentage of sterile fruits.

Barren 2: [ba-ren] Is Latinized from Brahaigne, which is Old French for being sterile. It refers to being a stretch of land which is seemingly devoid of life. A good example is the grass Triodia scariosa and the beautiful tree Adansonia gregorii.

Barrett: [bar-ret] Is named in honor of Barrett but which Barrett cannot be substantiated. A good example is Drosera barrettorum.

Barrettiorum: [ba-ret-ti-or-um] Is named in honour of Barrett but which Barrett cannot be substantiated. A good example is Barringtonia asiatica.

Barringtonense: [ba-ring-to-nen-see] From Barrington, which is Latinized for the Barriington Tops district and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the plant species which were originally discovered on the Barrington Tops district of New South Wales. A good example is Xerochrysum bracteatum subsp. barringtonense.

Barringtonensis: [bah-ring-ton-en-sis] From Barrington, which is Latinized for the Barriington Tops district and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the plant species which were originally discovered on the Barrington Tops district of New South Wales. A good example is Acacia barringtonensis.

Barringtonia: [ba-ring-toh-ni-a] Is named in honour of Daines Barringtonia; 1727-1800, who was an English barraster and naturalist. A good example is Barringtonia asiatica.

Barronense:[bah-ron-ens] From Baeo, which is Latinized for the Barron River and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were discovered and are restricted to the riparian and estuarine zones along the Barron River in far north eastern Queensland. A good example is Glochidion barronense.

Barronfieldii: [ba-ron-feel-dee-ahy] Is named in honour of Barron Field; 1786-1846, who was an English born Australian who was a lawyer and naturalist. A good example is Senna barronfieldii.

Barryanum: [ba-ree-ei-num] Maybe named in honour of Elizabeth Barry; 1862-1932 who collected for ferdinand von Mueller, however I do not have positive proof. A good example is Lysiosepalum barryanum, which is now known asLysiosepalum involucratum.

Barteriana: [bar-ter-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Barter. A good example is Acacia barteriana.

Barteriana: [bar-ter-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Barter. A good example is Acacia barteriana.

Bartlei: [bar-te-ahy] Is named in honour of Bartle. A good example is Acacia bartlei.

Bartleiana: [bart-lei-a-na] Maybe named in honour of after Sir Henry Bartle Frere; 1815-1884, a British colonial administrator and then president of the Royal Geographical Society. A good example was Acacia bartleiana, which is now known as  Acacia bartlei.

Bartlensis: [bartel-en-sis] From Bartle, which is Latinized for Mount Bartle Frere and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on Mount Bartle Frere within the Wooroonooran National Park between Cairnes and Babinda in far north eastern Queensland. The mountain was named in honour of after Sir Henry Bartle Frere; 1815-1884, a British colonial administrator and then president of the Royal Geographical Society. A good example is Parsonsia bartlensis.

Bartlingia: [bart-lin-ji-a] Maybe named in honour of Frederick Gottlieb Bartling; 1798-1875, who was a German physician and botanist. A good example is Bartlingia brachyphylla.

Bartlingii: [bart-lin-ji-ahy] Maybe named in honour of Frederick Gottlieb Bartling; 1798-1875, who was a German physician and botanist. A good example is Hemiphora bartlingii.

Bartramia: [bar-tra-mi-a] Is named in honour of Edwin Bunting Bartram; 1878-1964,who was an American botanist and bryologist. A good example is Commersonia bartramia.

Bartsia: [bart-si-a] Is named in honour of Johann Bartsch; 1709?–1738, who was a German physician who assisted Linneus. His only work was Flora Lapponica before he died prematurely in Suriname from climate associated stresses. A good example is Bartsia trixago.        

Basal: [ba-sil] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base. It refers to the lower portion of a structure or organ.

Basal and suprabasal leaves.

Basal Reticulation: [ba-sal, re-tik-yoo-lei-shon] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for foundation or at the base and Rēticulātum, which is Latin for to have the veins or nerves arranged like the threads of a net or network. It usually It refers to leaves, which have the veins radiate out together from the base or close to the petiole. A good example is the leaves of Hibiscus splendens.

Basal Reticulation on Hibiscus splendens

Basalis: [ba-sa-lis] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or basilis which is Latin for basal. It refers to grasses culms all rising from near the base. A good example is Eriachne basalis.

Basaltica: [trah-sol-ti-kuh] From Basanos, which is Greek and later basanite which is Latin for a hard igneous rock. It refers to plants, which have a preference for growing on or amongst basalt rocks. A good example is Digitaria basaltica.

Basalticum: [trah-sol-ti-kuhm] From Basanos, which is Greek and later basanite which is Latin for a hard igneous rock. It refers to plants, which have a preference for growing on or amongst basalt rocks. A good example is the ground orchid Prasophyllum basalticum.

Basalticus: [trah-sol-ti-kuhs] From Basanos, which is Greek and later basanite which is Latin for a hard igneous rock. It refers to plants, which have a preference for growing on or amongst basalt rocks. A good example is the ground orchid Oligochaetochilus basalticus, which is now known asPterostylis basaltica.

Basedowia: [beis-dour-wi-a] Is named in honour of Herbert Basedow; 1881-1933, who was an explorer, geologist and protector of Australian aborigines. A good example is Basedowia tenerrima.

Basedowii: [beis-dour-wi-ahy] Is named in honour of Herbert Basedow; 1881-1933, who was an Australian doctor, explorer, geologist and protector of Australian aborigines. A good example is Triodia basedowii.

Basibulbosus: [ba-si-bul-bo-sus] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Bulbosus, which is Latin for a bulb or a bulb like swelling. It refers to plants, which have bulb like swellings at the base. A good example is the fungi Cortinarius basibulbosus or the base of the trunk on Brachychiton rupestris.

Basicaulous 1: [ba-si-kor-los] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and kaulis, which is Ancient Greek or Caulis. which is Latin for a trunk. It refers to branches, which are born from near the base of a plant. A good example is Banksia oblongifolia.

Basicaulous 2: [ba-si-kor-los] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Kaulos which is Ancient Greek or Caulis which is Latin for a trunk, branch or twig. It refers to flowers, or other structures being born near the base of the stems or the trunks. A good example is Syzygium cormiflorum.

Basicendosymbiosis: [ba-si-sen-doh-sim-bi-o-sis] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation, éndon, which is Ancient Greek for inner or internal and Sumbíōsis, which is Ancient Greek for living together. It refers to the theory that simple multi celled animals started life as two individual cells, where one consumed the other but did not die and benefitted from its internal position being fed nutrient from the consumer and passed on benefits to its new host in a symbiotic relationship where both benefitted. A good example is Acacia fimbriata with its individual rhizobium, which live in the root nodules and aid in fixing nitrogen taken in with air during photosynthesis an discarded as waste in the soil or the algae, which live within corals.

Basicephala: [ba-si-se-fa-la] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to plants, which have their flowers in distinct heads. A good example is Melaleuca basicephala.

Basicephalum: [ba-si-se-fa-lum] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to plants, which have their flowers in distinct heads. A good example is Myrtoleucodendron basicephalum, which is now known as Melaleuca basicephala.

Basicidal Capsule: [ba-si-sahy-dal, kap-syool] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Capsulere, which is Latin for a small cylindrical case. It refers to any type of dry fruiting body.

Basiclada: [ba-si-kla-da] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a branch. It refers to branches which have a strong thick attachment to the trunk or other branches. A good example is Seteria basiclada.

Basicladum: [ba-si-kla-dum] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a branch. It refers to branches which have a strong thick attachment to the trunk or other branches. A good example is the branching nodes on Paspalidium basicladum.

Basidia: [ba-si-di-a] From Básidium, which is Greek for a rim. It refers to a small structure, shaped like a club, found in the Basidiomycota division of fungi, that bears four spores at the tips of small projections.

Basidiome: [ba-si-di-ohm] From Básidium, which is Greek for a rim. It refers to certain fungi which have a rim where the sporocarp of a basidiomycete; the multicellular structure, on which the spore-producing hymenium is borne. A good example is the branching nodes on Paspalidium basicladum.

Basidium: [ba-si-di-um] From Básidium, which is Greek for a rim. It refers to a small structure, shaped like a club, found in the Basidiomycota division of fungi, that bears four spores at the tips of small projections.

Basifixed: [ba-si-fiks-d] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and fix which is Middle English for attached to. It refers to where the base of the anther is attached to the apex of the filament. A good example is Melaleuca acuminatus.

Basiflora: [ba-si-flor-ra] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flower pedicels which have a strong thicker attachment to the peduncle or rachis than other species in the genus. A good example is Pluchea basiflora.

Basifloris: [ba-si-flo-ris] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of Spring and flowers. It refers to the flowers, which are found well down on the spikes. A good example is Lepidobolus basifloris.

Basiflorum: [ba-si-flor-um] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of Spring and flowers. It refers to the flowers, which are found well down on the spikes. A good example is Thespidium basiflorum.

Basiflorus: [ba-si-flor-us] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of Spring and flowers. It refers to the flowers, which are found well down on the spikes. A good example is Lepidobolus basiflorus.

Basileophyta: [ba-si-lee-oh-fahy-ta] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for Basil and Phyton, which is Ancient Greek for a plant. It refers to plants, which resemble the exotic Basil. A good example is Basileophyta friderici-augusta.

Basilicum: [ba-si-li-kum] From Básiculum, which is Ancient Greek or Basilere, which is Latin for Basil. It refers to plants, which have a Basil like scent or resemble the leaves or growth habits of the exotic Basil. A good example is Basilicum polystachyon.

Basionym: [ba-si-oh-nim] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and ónuma which is Ancient Greek for a word or a name. It refers to the original of plant before its present name or any synonyms given. A good example was Metrosideros viminalis which was later known with the synonym of Callistemon viminalis and most recently known as Melaleuca viminalis.

Basipetal: [ba-si-pet-al] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Petalon which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to flowers on a spike, in which the first to open is nearest to the base.

Basipetiolar: [ba-si-pe-ti-oh-lar] From Basis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Petiolus, which is Latin for a leaf’s stem. It refers to an area at or near the base of the petiole and the stem.

Basiramous: [ba-si-ra-mos] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Ramous, which is Latin for a branch. It refers to where the leaves or flowers are near the base of the branch. A good example is Hakea sericea.

Basirubescens: [ba-si-roo-be-sens] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Rubra which is Latin for red or reddish. It refers to a structure or organ, which is red or reddish in colour. A good example is the stipes on Cortinarius basirubescens.

Basiscopic: [ba-si-sko-pik] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Skopos, which is Ancient Greek or Scopo, which is Latin for to see. It refers to an organ looking towards the basal side of a plant’s structure. A good example is the costular on Drynaria rigidula.

Basisolute: [ba-si-sol-yoot] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation. It refers to the bracts being appressed at the base along the stem and continued to be appressed along the petiole, peduncle, rachis or pedicel. A good example is Utricularia sandersonii.

Basistaminea: [ba-si-sta-min-ee-a] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Stamons, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower the stamens. It refers to the stamens which are noticeably united at the base. A good example is Wendlandia basistaminea.

Basitricha: [ba-si-trahy-ka] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek for a base or foundation and Trichos, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to hairs which are very noticeable at the base of the flowers, which include the stamens. A good example is Hibbertia basitricha.

Bassia: [bas-si-a] Is named in honour of Ferdinando Bassi; 1710-1771, who was an Italian botanist and Prefect of the Bologna Botanic Gardens in Italy. A good example is Bassia amoena, which is now known as Maireana amoena.

Bassianus: [bas-si-a-nus] Is probably named in honour of Ferdinando Bassi; 1710-1771, who was an Italian botanist and Prefect of the Bologna Botanic Gardens in Italy. A good example is Juncus bassianus.

Bast Bundel: [bast, buhn-del] From Bast, which is old English for any of the several strong, woody fibers found in the cell walls which run parallel to the midrib on a leaf.

Bast Fibre: [bast, fahy-ber] From Bast, which is old English for any of the several strong, woody fibers found in Flax, Hemp, Ramie, Jute etc, which are obtained from the phloem tissue and used in the manufacturing of cordage and linen.

Batatas: [ba-ta-tas] From Batatas, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the Haitian name for the sweet potato. It refers to plants, which are related to the sweet potato. A good example is the horticultural vegetable known as the sweet potato Batatas paniculata.

Bateae: [ba-tee-ei] Is named in honour of Mary Bate who collected the type specimen. A good example is Myoporum bateae.

Batesian Mimicry: [beit-si-an, mi-mi-kree] Is named in honour of Henry Walter Bates; 1825-1892, who was anEnglish naturalist who studied insects and plant mimicry in the rainforests in Brazil and Mimetikos which is Ancient Greek for to ape or imitate. It refers to where harmless species have evolved to imitate the warning colours, patterns or actions of a harmful species which is directed at a common predator. A good example is the predatory katidid Chlorobalius leucoviridis which is camouflaged as a herbaceous katydid.

Batesii: [ba-te-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Bates. A good example is Lachnagrostis batesii.

Bathurstiana: [bath-thers-ti-a-na] From Bathurst, which is Latinized from for the Bathurst district and Ensis/Anus which are Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from around the Bathurst district in central eastern New South Wales. A good example is Hakea microcarpa var. bathurstiana.

Bathurstianus: [ba-thers-ti-a-nus] From Bathurst, which is Latinized from for the Bathurst district and Ensis/Anus which are Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from around the Bathurst district in central eastern New South Wales. A good example is Senecio bathurstianus .

Batianoffii: [ba-ti-a-nof-fi-ahy] Is named in honour of George Nicholas Batianoff; 1945-2009, who was born in Xinjiang province China and became a n Australian citizen in 1963 dedicated his life to Serpentile soil ecologies worldwide and the impact of invasive weeds on native flora habitats and the environment. A good example is Paspalum batianoffii.

Batillum: [ba-til-lum] From Batill, which is unknown. A good example was Oxylobium batillum, which is now known as Gastrolobium polystachyum.

Batis: [ba-tis] From Batis, which is Ancient Greek for a plant that grows along the foreshore. It refers to plants, which prefer an environment associated with the foreshores. A good example is Batis argillicola.

Batologist: [ba-tol-o-jist] From Baton, which is Ancient Greek for blackberry, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies aggregate fruits or brambles.

Batology: [ba-tol-o-jee] From Baton, which is Ancient Greek for blackberry and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the branch of botany that studies aggregate fruits or brambles. It should not to be confused with Batology which is from the Greek word Battus for to stammer or repeatedly use the same word or phrase over and over again so that it becomes wearisome.

Batologists study aggregates like Rubus moluccanus

Batrachioides: [ba-tra-chi-oi-deez] From the sub-genus of Ranunculus species, batracheios which is Ancient Greek fora frog or other amphibian and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which prefer marshy environments. A good example is Grevillea batrachioides.

Batrachium: [ba-tra-chi-um] From the sub-genus of Ranunculus species, batracheios which is Ancient Greek fora frog or other amphibian. It refers to plants, which prefer marshy environments. A good example is Batrachium trichophyllum.

Batrachospermum: [ba-trah-cho-sper-mum] From Batracheios which is Ancient Greek for a frog or a toad and Spérma which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to plants, which prefer to have its seeds sown in wet marshy environments. A good example is Batrachospermum pseudogelatinosum.

Battarea: [ba-trah-ree-a] Is named in honour of Giovanni Antonio Battarra; 1714–1789, who was an Italian priest, naturalist, and foremost mycologist of his time. A good example is Battarea stevenii.

Battii: [ba-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of John Downton Batt; 1843-1919, who was an Australian linesman and collector of plants in Western Australia. A good example is Bossiaea battii.

Baudiniana: [bor-di-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Thomas Nicolas Baudin; 1754-1803, who was a French Explorer. Agood example is Eucalyptus baudiniana.

Baudinii: [bor-din-i-ahy] Is named in honour of Thomas Nicolas Baudin; 1754-1803, who was a French Explorer. A good example is Limonium baudinii.

Bauera: [bour-ee-a] Is named in honour of brothers Franz Bauera; 1758-1840, and Ferdinand Bauera; 1760-1826, who were botanical artists for Sir Joseph banks and Mathew Flinders. A good example of their works are found in Bauera rubioides or Grevillea bauera.

Bauerella: [bour-el-la] Is named in honour of brothers Franz Bauera; 1758-1840, and Ferdinand Baeura; 1760-1826, who were botanical artists for Sir Joseph banks and Mathew Flinders and Ella which is Latina for a young girl. It refers to the plants, which are daintier and fragile in appearance. A good example was Bauerella simplicifolia, which is now known as Sarcomelicope simplicifolia.

Baueri: [bour-ahy] Is named in honour of brothers Franze Andre Bauer; 1758-1840, and Ferdinand Lucas Bauer; 1760-1826, who were Austrian botanical artsists. Ferdinand travelled with Mathew Flinders on his Australia expeditions. A good example is Lasiopetalum baueri.

Baueriana: [bour-ri-a-na] Is named in honour of brothers Franze Andre Bauer; 1758-1840, and Ferdinand Lucas Bauer; 1760-1826, who were Austrian botanical artsists. Ferdinand travelled with Mathew Flinders on his Australian expeditions. A good example is Freycinetia baueriana subsp. baueriana.

Bauerianum: [bour-r-a-num] Is named in honour of Ferdinand Lukas Bauer; 1760-1826, who was an Austrian botanical artist. A good example is Cephalomanes bauerianum.

Bauerifolia: [bour-ri-foh-li-a] Is named in honour of brothers Franze Andre Bauer; 1758-1840, and Ferdinand Lucas Bauer; 1760-1826, who were Austrian botanical artsists. Ferdinand travelled with Mathew Flinders on his Australia expeditions and folia which is Latin for . It refers to the foliage resembling the leaves of the Baueri genus. A good example is Tetratheca bauerifolia.

Baueropsis: [bour-rop-sis] Is named in honour of Karl Ernst Ritter von Baer; 1792–1876 who was a Russian a naturalist, biologist, geologist, meteorologist, geographer, and a founding father of embryology science. It refers to plants, which resemble the Bauer genus. A good example is Baueropsis tomentosa.

Bauhinia: [bor-hi-ni] Is named in honour of brothers Gaspard Bauhin or Caspar Bauhin; 1560–1624), who was a Swiss botanist whose Phytopinax in 1596 described thousands of plants and classified them in a manner that draws similarities to the binomial nomenclature developed of Linnaeus and Johann/Jean Caspar Bauhin; 1541–1613, who was a Swiss botanist. A good example is Bauhinia hookeri.

Baumanni: [bor-man-ni] Is probably named in honour of M. Baumann, who collected in the Royal national park in New South Wales in the mid to late 1890’s. A good example is Kennedia baumanni.

Baumea: [bor-mee-a] Is probably named in honour of Antoine Baumé; 1728–1804, who was a French chemist. He devised many improvements in technical processes, e.g. for bleaching silk, dyeing, gilding, purifying saltpetre, etc., but he is best known as the inventor of the Baumé scale hydrometer or “spindle” which provides scientific measurements for the density of liquids. A good example is Baumea acuta.

Bawbawiensis: [bor-bor-i-en-sis] From Bawbaw, which is Latinized for Mount Bawbaw and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered on Mount Bawbaw. A good example is Chionogentias bawbawensis, which is now known as Gentianella bawbawensis.

Baxteri: [baks-ter-ahy] Is named in honour of Named for William Baxter; 17..-1836 who was a British gardener and plant collector and the first person sent professionally to collect seeds in Western Australia for commercial purposes. A good example is Hemiclidia baxteri, which is now known as Banksia biterax.

Baxteriana: [baks-ter-i-na] Is named in honour of Named for William Baxter; 17..-1836 who was a British gardener and plant collector and the first person sent professionally to collect seeds in Western Australia for commercial purposes. A good example is Casuarina baxteriana, which is now known as Allocasuarina lehmanniana.

Beadleana: [Beed-lee-a-na] Is named in honour of Noel Charles William Beadle; 1914-1998 , who was an Australian botanist, conversationalist and university lecturer. A good example is Grevillea beadleana.

Beaglensis: [bee-glen-sis] From Beagle, which is Latinized for the Beagle Islands or Beagle Bay and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on the Beagle islands or Beagle Bay in Western Australia. A good example is Nymphoides beaglensis which were first discovered around Beagle Bay.

Bealiana: [bee-li-a-na] Is named in honour of Amy Beal, Nee Murch; 1827 – 1925, who was an Australian sheep farmer, collector of plants for Ferdinand von Mueller and keen collector of Australian ferns. A good example is Conostylis bealianai.

Beaniana: [Bee-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Bean but which Bean cannot be substantiated. A good example is Eucalyptus beaniana.

Beardiana: [Bear-di-a-na] Is named in honour of Beardbut which Beard cannot be substantiated. A good example is Eucalyptus beardiana.

Beardiana: [Bear-di-ei-nuh] Is named in honour of Beardbut which Beard cannot be substantiated. A good example is Melaleuca beardii.

Beardii: [Bear-di-ahy] Is probably named in honour of John Stanley Beard; 1916-2011, who was an English born Australian who was renowned for his work on African Acacia sp. and crop improvement utilizing Acacia species. he later became director of the Kings Park Botanic Gardens. A good example is Ptilotus beardii.

Beasleyana: [Beez-lee-a-na] Is named in honour of Ruben Cartwright Beasley; 1878-1956 who was an Australian farmer and collector of the type species. A good example is Swainsona beasleyana.

Beasleyi: [Beez-lee-ahy] Is named in honour of Ruben Cartwright Beasley; 1878-1956 who was an Australian farmer and collector of the type species from his property. A good example is Eucalyptus beasleyi.

Beatricae: [Bee-tri-cee] Is named in honour of Beatrice. A good example is Ptychosperma beatricae, which is now known as Archontophoenix alexandrae.

Beaufortia: [Boh-for-ti-a] Is named in honour of Mary Somerset, Duchess of Beaufort, Nee Capell; 1630–1715, also known as Mary Seymour, Lady Beauchamp who was an English noblewoman, gardener and botanist. A good example is Beaufortia anisandra.

Beaufortioides: [Boh-for-ti-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Mary Somerset, Duchess of Beaufort, Nee Capell; 1630–1715, also known as Mary Seymour, Lady Beauchamp who was an English noblewoman, gardener and botanist and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Beaufortia genus. A good example is Eremaea beaufortioides.

Beaugleholei: [Boh-glho-lei] Is named in honour of A. Clifford Beauglehole (Cliff); 1920-2002, who was an Australian farmer who dedicated his life to the plants of Victoria. A good example is Lobelia beaugleholei.

Beauverdiana: [Boh-ver-di-a-na] Is named in honour of Gustave Beauverd; 1867-1942, who was a Swiss botanist who specialized in Pteridophytes and curator of the Barbey-Boissier herbarium in Geneva. A good example is Acacia beauverdiana.

Beauverdianum: [boh-ver-di-a-num] Is named in honour of Gustave Beauverd; 1867-1942, who was a Swiss botanist and curator of the Barbey-Boissier herbarium in Geneva. A good example is Racosperma beauverdianum, which is now known as Acacia beauverdiana.

Beauverdianus: [boh-ver-di-a-nus] Is named in honour of Gustave Beauverd; 1867-1942, who was a Swiss botanist and curator of the Barbey-Boissier herbarium in Geneva. A good example is Loranthus beauverdianus, which is now known as Amylotheca dictyophieba.

Beauverdii: [Boh-ver-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Gustave Beauverd; 1867-1942, who was a Swiss botanist who specialized in Pteridophytes and curator of the Barbey-Boissier herbarium in Geneva. A good example is Bryophyllum beauverdii.

Bebrana: [Bee-bra-na] Is named in honour of Jane Charlotte von Bibra (also von BEBRA); 1822-1882, who was an Australian  Station-owner’s wife, near Champion Bay Western Australia who first discovered the plant. A good example is Bryophyllum beauverdii.

Beccariana: [bek-kar-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Ludwig Philipp Heinrich Becker; 1808-1861, who was a German scientist, artist, botanical illustrator, and lithographer. he illustrated works for Ferdinand Mueller. A good example is Myrmecodia beccarii

Beccariella: [bek-kar-i-el-la] Is named in honour of Odoardo Beccari; 1843–1920, who was an Italian naturalist best known for discovering the Titan lily, Amorphophallus titanum. A good example is Beccariella papyracea.

Beccarii: [bek-kar-i-ahy] Is named in honour of Ludwig Philipp Heinrich Becker; 1808-1861, who was a German scientist, artist, botanical illustrator, and lithographer. He illustrated works for Ferdinand Mueller but I cannot substantiate it 100%. A good example is Myrmecodia beccarii.

Beckeri: [bek-er-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Ludwig Philipp Heinrich Becker; 1808-1861, who was a German botanical artist and explorer who died on the last Burk and Wills expedition near Balloo in Queensland. A good example is Glycocystis beckeri.

Beckleri: [bek-ler-ahy] Is named in honour of Herman Beckler; 1828-1914, who was a German medical practioner and amateur botanist of high quality specimens. He collected extensively around the Moreton Bay area in southern Queensland and the Clarence Valley in northern New South Wales. A good example is Panicum beckleri.

Becklerianum: [bek-ler-i-a-num] Is named in honour of Herman Blecker; 1828-1914, who was an Australian collector of plants especially from the north coast of New South Wales. A good example is Dysoxylum becklerianum, which is now known as Dysoxylum fraserianum.

Beckxiana: [beks-si-a-na] Is named in honour of Gustav Beckx; 19th century Belgium born Australian who later became the consul-general for Belgium in Australia and plant collector. A good example is Kennedia beckxiana.

Bedfordia: [bed-for-di-a] Is named in honour of John Russell; 1776-1839, 6th Duke of Bedford, father of Prime Minister John Russel and political whig. A good example is Bedfordia arborescens.

Bedggoodiana: [bedj-goo-di-a/ei-na] Is most likely named in honour of Mrs. Stella Winifred Bedgood; 1916-1978, who was an Australian naturalist and wildlife photographer. A good example is Grevillea bedggoodiana.

Behriana: [be-ri-a-na] Is named in honour of Hans Hermann Behr who was a German medical physician who took a passionate interest in anthropology and was a noticeable plant collector and good friend of Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Aristida behriana.

Behrii: [be-ri-ahy] Is named in honour of Hans Hermann Behr who was a German medical physician who took a passionate interest in anthropology and was a noticeable plant collector and good friend of Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Lasiopetalum behrii.

Beilschmiedia:[bel-shmi-di-a] Is named in honour of Carl Traugott Beilschmied; 1793-1848, who was a German pharmacist and botanist who did extensive research in phytogeography. A good example is Beilschmiedia obligandra.

Belangeri: [be-lan-jer-i] Maybe is named in honour of Charles Paulus Bélanger; 1805-1881, who was a French botanist and mycologist but I cannot substantiate it 100%. A good example is Selaginella belangeri, which is now known as Selaginella ciliaris.

Belgraveana: [bel-gra-vee-a-na] Is named in honour of Belgrave. A good example is Galbulimima belgraveana.

Bella: [bel-la] From Bella, which is Ancient Greek/Latin for a reference to a beautiful thing. It refers to plants which are more beautiful than other species in the genus. A good example was Plectranthus bella which is now known as Coleus bella.

Bellendena: [bel-len-dee-na] Is named in honour of John Bellenden Ker; 1764–1842, who was a Scottish botanist. A good example is Bellendena montana.

Bellendenkerana: [bel-len-den-ker-a-na] From Bellendenker, which is Latinized for the Bellendenker Range and Ana which is Latin for coming from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on Mount Bellendenker range in far north eastern Queensland. A good example is Endiandra bellendenkerana.

Bellendenkerensis: [bel-len-den-ker-en-sis] From Bellendenker, which is Latinized for the Bellendenker Range and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on Mount Bellendenker range in far north eastern Queensland. A good example is Peperomia bellendenkerensis.

Bellida: [bel-li-da] From Bella, which is AncientGreek/Latin for a pretty girl. It refers to plants which are more beautiful than other species in the genus.  A good example is found in Goodenia species including Bellida graminea.

Bellidifolia: [bel-li-di-foh-li-a] From Bella, which is AncientGreek/Latin for a pretty girl and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves similar to the European Bellis genus. A good example is found in Goodenia species including Goodenia bellidifolia subsp. argentea.

Bellidifolium: [be-li-di-foh-li-um] From Bella, which is Ancient Greek/Latin for a pretty girl and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants which are more beautiful than other species in the genus. A good example is found in Goodenia species including Stylidium bellidifolium.

Bellidingeri: [bel-lin-jer-ahy] Is named in honour of Bellidinger. A good example is Ficus bellingeri, which is now known as Ficus watkinsiana.

Bellidioides: [bel-li-di-oi-deez] From Bella, which is Ancient Greek/Latin for a pretty girl and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants which are more beautiful than other species in the genus. A good example is Actinotus bellidioides.

Bellioides: [bel-li-oi-deez] From Bella which is Ancient Greek/Latin for a pretty girl and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants which are more beautiful than other species in the genus. A good example is Solenogyne bellioides.

Bellus: [bel-lus] From Bella which is Ancient Greek/Latin for a pretty girl. It refers to plants which are more beautiful than other species in the genus. A good example is Solenogyne bellioides.

Belmoreana: [bel-mor-ee-a-na] Is named in honour of the fourth Earl of Belmor, Somerset Richard Lowry-Corry Belmore; 1835-1913, who was a the Governor and chief commander of NSW. A good example is Howea belmoreana.

Belostemma: [bel-o-stem-ma] From Belos, which is Ancient Greek for an arrow or saggitate and Stemma which is Ancient Greek for a tirra, crown or garland. It refers to usually the leaves, which have an arrow like shape or are saggitate and resemble the use of foliage used in ancient garlands. A good example is Belostemma cordifolium.

Belsonii: [bel-so-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Belson. A good example is Homopholis belsonii.

Belvisia: [bel-vi-si-a] Maybe named in honour of Segundo Ruiz Belvis 1829–1867, who was a Spanish abolitionist, fighting for the freedom of black slaves in Puerto Rico and for Puerto Rico’s right to independence. A good example is Belvisia mucronata.

Benetectum: [ben-e-tec-tum] From Bene/benedict, which is Latin for well being or good and Tectum, which is Latin for hidden or covered as in protected. It refers to plants, which are often protected by growing amongst or beneath other shrubs. A good example is Sphaerolobium benetectum.

Bengalensis: [ben-ga-len-sis] From Bengal, which is Latinized for the Baengal district in southern Asia and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which originally were discovered in Bengal. A good example is Rinorea bengalensis.

Benincasa: [be-nin-ka-sa] Is named in honour of Count Giuseppe Benincasa, 152?-15??, who was an Italian botanist who founded the Botanic Garden at Pisa which are the oldest continuous teaching gardens in the world. A good example is the horticultural winter melon Benincasa vacua.

Benjamina: [ben-ja-mahy-nh] From Benjan, which is Latinized from the Bengal district in India for the name of the tree there. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in Bengal. A good example is Ficus benjamina.

Bennettiae: [ben-ne-ti-ee] Is named in honour of George Bennett; 1804-1893, who was an English born Australian botanist. A good example is Eucalyptus bennettiaei.

Bennettiana: [ben-ne-ti-ei-na] Is named in honour of Bennett, but which Bennet cannot be substantiated. A good example is Flindersia bennettiana.

Bennettii: [ben-ne-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of George Bennett; 1804-1893, who was an English born Australian botanist. A good example is Litsea bennettii.

Bennettsianum: [ben-net-si-a-num] Is probably named in honour of Dr. Harold William Bennets; 1898-1970, who was an Australian Veterinary pathologist and author. A good example is Gastrolobium bennettsianum.

Bennigseniana: [ben-ning-se-ni-ei-nuh]Is named in honour of Benningsen. A good example was Leptospermum bennigsenianum, which is now known as Myrtella bennigseniana.

Bensonii: [ben-son-i-ahy] Is named in honour of Dr. Douglas Howard Benson; 1949-2…, who was an Australian botanist. A good example is Eucalyptus bensonii.

Bent: [bent] From Bend many archaic languages which means flexible. It refers to the stems and or branches bending downwards and being flexible. A good example is Agonis flexuosus.

Benthamea: [ben-thei-mee-uh] Is named in honour of George Bentham; 1800-1884, who was an English botanist who undertook the reclassification of seed plants into families. A good example was Scaevola benthamea, which is now known as Scaevola calliptera.

Benthamiana: [ben-tha-mi-a-na] Is named in honour of George Bentham; 1800-1884, who was an English botanist who undertook the reclassification of seed plants into families. A good example is Lepidosperma benthamianum.

Benthamianum: [ben-tha-mi-a-num] Is named in honour of George Bentham; 1800-1884, who was an English botanist who undertook the reclassification of seed plants into families. A good example is Lepidosperma benthamianum.

Benthamianus: [ben-tha-mi-a-nus] Is named in honour of George Bentham; 1800-1884, who was an English botanist who undertook the reclassification of seed plants into families. A good example is Atractocarpus benthamianus.

Benthamii: [ben-tha-mi-ahy] Is named in honour of George Bentham; 1800-1884, who was an English botanist who undertook the reclassification of seed plants into families. A good example is Livistona benthamii.

Benthamina: [ben-tha-mi-na] Is named in honour of George Bentham; 1800-1884, who was an English botanist who undertook the reclassification of seed plants into families. A good example is Benthamna alyxifolia.

Bentianus: [ben-ti-a-nus] Is named in honour of Bent. A good example was Thysanotus bentianus, which is now known as Thysanotus triandrus.

Benwellii: [ben-wel-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Andrew Benwell, who is an Australian botanist and expert in seed generation under variable conditions including drought, fire, and habitat with various plnat colonies. He discovered the species while on research. A good example is Leptospermum benwellii.

Berardiana: [ber-ar-di-a-na] Is named in honour of Berard. A good example is Goodenia berardiana.

Berberidoides: [ber-ber-i-doi-deez] From Berberis, which is Latinized from the Arabic vernacular for the Barberry fruit and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the exotic Barberry in appearance. A good example is Pittosporum berberidoides.

Berberidopsis: [ber-ber-i-dop-sis] From Berberis, which is Latinized from the Arabic vernacular for the Barberry fruit and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for to have the appearance of. It refers to plants, which have fruits, which resemble the exotic Barberry in appearance. A good example is Berberidopsis beckleri.

Berberifolia: [ber-ber-i-foh-li-a] From Berberis, which is Latinized from the Arabic vernacular for the Barberry fruit and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble the exotic Barberry in shape and form. A good example is Cassinia berberifolia, which is now known as Cassinia denticulata.

Berberifolium: [ber-ber-i-foh-li-um] From Berberis, which is Latinized from the Arabic vernacular for the Barberry fruit and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the exotic Barberry in shape and form. A good example is Podolobium berberifolium.

Berberis: [ber-ber-is] From Berberis, which is Latinized from the Arabic vernacular for the Barberry fruit. A good example is Berberis darwinii.

Berchemia: [ber-che-mi-a] Is named in honour of Berthout von Berchem who was a Dutch botanist. A good example is Berchemia corollata.

Bergia: [ ber-ji-a] Is named in honour of Dr. Peter Jonus Bergius; 1730-1790, who was a Swedish botanist. A good example is Bergia occultipetala.

Bergiana: [ber-ji-a-na] Is named in honour of Dr. Peter Jonus Bergius; 1730-1790, who was a Swedish botanist. A good example is Lobelia bergiana, which is now known as Grammatotheca bergiana.

Berkheya:[ber-kee-a] Is named in honour of Johannes le Francq van Berkhey; 1729–1812, who was a Dutch painter, scientist, physician and poet. A good example is Berkheya carduiformis.

Bernaysii: [bern-hahy-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Lewis Adolphus Bernays; 1831-1908 who was an English born Australian. A good example is Microstylis bernaysii, which is now known as Dienia montana.

Bernhardia: [bern-harh-di-a] Is named in honour of Theodor Bernhardi; 1810-1889 who collected extensively in central Australia especially around Winton. A good example is Berhardia truncata.

Bernieana: [ber-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Bernie but which Bernie cannot be substantiated. A good example is Diploglottis bernieana.

Berringbinensis: [ber-ring-bi-nen-sis] From Berringbine, which is Latinized from the local Aboriginal vernacular for little water and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered along Berringbine Creek Berringbine Creek, Belele outside Meekatharra in Western Australia. A good example is Goodenia berringbinensis.

Berry: [be-ree] From Berie, which is Old English, Beere which is German, Basi which is Gothic or Besie which is Dutch for a fruit which contains several seed. It refers to a fleshy or pulpy fruit, typically which have two or more seeds developed From A, single ovary. A good example of a berry is the fruit on Cissus antarctica.

Berrya: [be-ree-a] From Berie, which is Old English, Beere which is German, Basi which is Gothic or Besie which is Dutch for a fruit which contains several seed. It may refer to fruits, which typically have very little flesh around the hard non digestible seeds. A good example is the fruit on Berrya javanica.

Berryana: [be-ree-a-na] Is named in honour of Berry but which Berry cannot be substantiated. A good example is the fruit on Grevillea berryana.

Berteriana: [ber-ter-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Carlo Giuseppe Bertero; 1789-1831, who was an Italian botanist and physician. A good example was Fagraea berteriana, which is now known as Fagraea berteroana.

Berteroana: [ber-ter-oh-a-na] Is named in honour of Carlo Giuseppe Bertero; 1789-1831, who was an Italian botanist and physician. A good example is Fagraea berteroana.

Berteroanum: [ber-ter-oh-num] Is named in honour of Carlo Giuseppe Bertero; 1789-1831, who was an Italian botanist and physician. A good example is Tulostoma berteroanum.

Berthae: [ber-thee] Is named in honour of Clara Bertha Doughty; 1827-1896, who was German born Australian and sister of Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Lawrencia berthae.

Bertolonia: [ber-tol-oh-ni-a] Is named in honour of Antonio Bertoloni; 1775-1869, who was an Italian physician and botanist who made extensive studies and collections of plants in Italy and Central America. A good example is Bertolonia glandulosa.

Bertrandia: [ber-trahn-di-a] Probably named in honour of Charles Eugène Bertrand; 1851-1917, who was a French botanist, paleo botanist and geologist who is best remembered for his research involving the formation of coal. It refers to plants, which resemble the exotic Basil. A good example is the fungi Bertrandia astatogala.

Bertya: [ber-tahy-a] Is named in honour of Count Léonce de Lambertye; 1810-1877, who was a French botanist and horticulturist at Chaltrait. A good example is Bertya andrewsii.

Bessaphila: [bes-sa-fi-la] From Bessa, which is Latin for eight or of little value and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaves which have eight prominent veins. A good example is Endiandra bessaphila.

Beta: [bee-ta] From Bett, which is Latinized from the Celtic vernacular for deep red. It refers to roots which have a deep red colour. A good example is Beta vulgaris.

Betacea: [be-ta-see-a] From Bett, which is Latinized from the Celtic vernacular for deep red. It refers to a structure or organ, which have deep red colours. A good example is Cyphomandra betacea which is better known as tamarilo and is now known as Solanum betaceum.

Betaceum: [bet-ta-see-um] From Bett, which is Latinized from the Celtic vernacular for deep red. It refers to a structure or organ, which have deep red colours. A good example is Solanum betaceum, which is better known as tamarilo.

Betchea: [bet-chee-a] Is named in honour of Daniel Ludwig Ernst   Betch; 1851-1913, who was a German born Australian botanist who collected plant specimens for the Sydney Botanic Gardens. A good example is Betchea australiensis, which is now known as Caldcluvia australiensis.

Betcheanum: [bet-chee-ei-num] Is named in honour of Daniel Ludwig Ernst Betch; 1851-1913, who was a German born Australian botanist who studied plants in the Goodeneacea family. A good example is Myoporum betcheanum.

Betchei: [bet-chee-ahy] Is named in honour of Daniel Ludwig Ernst Betch; 1851-1913, who was a German born Australian botanist who studied plants in the Goodeneacea family. A good example is Acacia betchei.

Betonicifolia: [be-ton-is-i-foh-li-a] From Betonie, which is German or Betoine which is French for the Stahys genus and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the common name for the European flowering plant Stachys officincalis being Betony. A good example of a berry is the fruit on Viola betonicifolia.

Bettyae: [be-tahy-ee] Is named in honour of Betty Jacobs; 1947-20.., who was an Australian teacher and grass specialist. A good example is Agrostis bettyae.

Bettzickiana: [bet-si-ki-a-na] Is named in honour of August Bettzick; who was a German gardener. A good example is Alternanthera bettzickiana.

Betula: [be-tyoo-la] From Betula, which is Latin for the family of Elders and birches from Europe. It refers to plants, which belong to the European Birches, Betula genus. A good example is Betula alba.

Betulina: [be-tyoo-li-na] From Betula, which is Latin for the family of Elders and birches from Europe. It refers to foliage, which resembles many of the birches. A good example is Pomaderris betulina subsp. betulina.

Beyeri: [bei-er-ahy] Is named in honour of George Beyer; l865?-1920, who was an Australian who worked at the Sydney Technical Museum. A good example is Eucalyptus beyeri, which was incorrectly named and was later found to be a hybrid between Eucalyptus beyeriana and Eucalyptus creba.

Beyeria: [bei-er-i-a] Is named in honour of George Beyer; l865?-1920, who was an Australian who worked at the Sydney Technical Museum. A good example is Beyeria lechenaultii.

Beyeriana: [bei-er-i-a-na] Is named in honour of George Beyer; 1865?-1922?, who was a clerk and herbarium assistant who assisted botanists outside and above his normal duties. A good example is Eucalyptus beyeriana.

Bi: [bahy] From Bi/Bis, which is Latin for two.

Biagiana: [bahy-ji-a-na] From Bi/Bis, which is Latin for two and ántha/ánthos, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers, which occur in pairs from the leaf axis. A good example is Geissois biagiana.

Bialata: [bi-a-la-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Aālātus, which is Latin for a wing. It refers to structures or organs, which have two wings. A good example is the two wings on the seeds of Trachymene bialata.

Biangularis: [bahy-an-gyoo-lar-is] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Angularis, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to capsules, which have two distinct rib angles. A good example is Eucalyptus biangularis.

Biangulata: [bahy-an-gyoo-la-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Angulāta, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to organs, which have two distinct angles.

Biangulatus: [bahy-an-gyoo-la-tus] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Angulātus, which is Latin for an angle. It refers to organs, which have two distinct angles. A good example is Aphyllodium biarticulatum.

Biarticulatum: [bahy-ti-kyoo-la-tum] F From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Articulate which is Ancient Greek for a joint. It refers to leaves or other organs, which only appear at every second joint or node. A good example was Loranthus biangulatus, which is now known as Decaisnina biangulata.

Biaurita: [bahy-or-ri-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Aurita, which is Latin for large ears. It refers to structures or organs, which have two large ears. A good example is the leaf lobes appearing like rabbit’s ears on Pomaderris biaurita, which is now known as Pomaderris obcordata.

Biauritum: [bahy-or-ri-tum] From Bi/Bis, which is Latin for two and Auritum, which is Latin for large ears. It refers to structures or organs, which have two large ears. A good example is Trymalium biauritum, which is now known as Trymalium odoratissimum subsp. odoratissimum.

Bible: [bahybel] From Bi/Bis, which is Ancient Greek/Latin for two and (bi)blía, which is Ancient Greek for books. It refers to having many books or many books together as one book. A good example is the “Bible of Botany”.

Bicalliata: [bahy-kal-li-a-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and maybe Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful. It refers to plants, which are twice as beautiful as other species in the genus. A good example is Caladenia bicalliata.

Biciliata: [bahy-si-li-a-ta] From Bi/Bis, which is Latin for two and Cilia, which is Latin for hairs on the margins. It refers to organs, which have a row of hairs along the margins. A good example is the lower glume and seeds on Whiteochloa biciliata.

Bicostata: [bahy-ko-sta-ta] From Bi/Bis, which is Latin for two and Costātum, which is Latin for a rib or ribs. It refers to structures usually organs, which have two longitudinal ribs. A good example is the two ribs on the seed capsules of Eucalyptus bicostata.

Bicuspidata: [bahy-kus-pi-da-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Cuspidate, which is Latin for a point. It refers to organs, which have two distinct points. A good example is the article apexes which seem to have two long appendages of Casuarina bicuspidata, which is now known as Allocasuarina trichodon.

Bicuspidatum: [bahy-kus-pi-dei-tum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Cuspidate, which is Latin for a point. It refers to organs, which have two distinct points. A good example is the lichen Thelotrema bicuspidatum, which is now known as Ocellularia bicuspidata.

Biddulphiana: [bahy-dyoo-fi-a-na] Is probably named in honour of one of the Bidolph sisters, Alice Caroline Bidolph (later Mrs. Wells), 1873-1971, Ellen Caroline Bidolph (nee Foot), 1855-1917, Florence Francis Bidolph 1879-1964, Harriette Sophia, (later Mrs. Foot), 1839-1940 or Muriel Margaret Bidolph,1956-1966 who were Australian plant collectors for Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Chamaecrista biddulphiana.

Bidens: [bi-denz] From Bi/Bis, which is Latin for two and Dentāta, which is Latin for to have a tooth or teeth or Bidēns which is Latin for to be two pronged. It refers to structures or organs, which have two blades, two teeth or two rows of teeth. It often refers to organs especially the petals which have two rows. A good example is the two or three large teeth near the apex of the phyllodes on Acacia bidentata.

Bidentata: [bahy-den-ta-ta] From Bi/Bis, which is Latin for two and Dentāta, which is Latin for to have a tooth or teeth. It refers to structures or organs, which have two teeth or two rows of rows. It often It refers to organs especially the petals which have two rows. A good example is the two or three large teeth near the apex of the phyllodes on Acacia bidentata.

Bidentatum: [bahy-den-ta-tum] From Bi/Bis, which is Latin for two and Dentātum, which is Latin for to have a tooth or teeth. It refers to structures or organs, which have two teeth ot two rows of rows. It often It refers to organs especially the petals which have two rows. A good example is the two or three large teeth near the apex of the phyllodes on Racosperma bidentatum, which is now known as Acacia bidentata.

Bidwellianum: [bi-dwel-li-a/ei-num] Is named in honour of John Carne Bidwill, 1815-1853, who was a British born New Zealander who took a strong interest in New Zealand alpine plants. A good example is Podolobium bidwellianum.

Bidwillii: [bi-dwil-li-ahy] Is named in honour of John Carne Bidwill, 1815-1853, who was a British born New Zealander who took a strong interest in New Zealand alpine plants. A good example is Aracaria bidwellii.

Bifaria: [bahy-far-i-a] From Bifaria, which is Latin for a two fold or doubled. It often It refers to structures or organs, which have two rows. A good example is the phyllodes which form two distinct rows either side of the stem on Acacia bifaria.

Bifarium: [bahy-far-i-um] From Bifārium, which is Latin for a twofold or doubled. It often It refers to structures or organs, which have two rows. A good example is the phyllodes which form two distinct rows either side of the stem on Racosperma bifarium, which is now known as Acacia bifaria.

Bifida: [bahy-fi-da] From Bi/Bis, which are Latin for two and Fīda, which is Latin for to divide into two clefts or clovens. It refers to structures or organs, which have more than two equal clefts generally to about halfway to the midrib. A good example is the leaves on Andersonia bifida.

Bifidum: [bahy-fi-dum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Fīdum, which is Latin for to divide into two clefts or clovens. It refers to structures or organs, which have more than two equal clefts generally to about halfway to the midrib. A good example is the leaves on Phebalium Bifidum.

Bifidus: [bahy-fi-dus] From Bi/Bis, which are Latin for two and Fīdus, which is Latin for to divide into two clefts or clovens. It refers to structures or organs, which have more than two equal clefts generally to about halfway to the midrib. A good example is the leaves on Schoenus bifidus.

Bifimbriata: [bahy-fim-bri-a-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Latin for two and Fimbriātus, which is Latin for a fringe. It refers to structures or organs, which have two rows of hairs in the fringe. A good example is Verticordia bifimbriata.

Biflora: [bahy-flor-a] From Bi/Bis, which are Latin for two and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which have two flowers at each leaf node. A good example is Acacia biflora.

Biflorum: [bahy-flor-um] From Bi/Bis, which are Latin for two and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which have two flowers at each leaf node. A good example is Racosperma biflorum, which is now known as Acacia biflora.

Biflorus: [bahy-flor-us] From Bi/Bis, which are Latin for two and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which have two flowers at each leaf node. A good example is Scleranthus biflorus.

Bifoliolata: [bahy-foh-li-oh-la-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Latin for two and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have two leaflets on a compound leaf. A good example is Acacia biflora.

Bifurcata: [bahy-fur-ka-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Latin for two and Furcata, which is Latin for a fork. It refers to branches, leaves or fronds, which divide several times into two equal branches throughout. A good example is the fronds on Wodyetia bifurcata, which divide several times.

Bifurcatum: [bahy-fur-ka-tum] From Bi/Bis, which are Latin for two and Furcata, which is Latin for a fork. It refers to branches, leaves or fronds, which divide several times into two equal branches throughout. A good example is the fronds of Platycerium bifurcatum, which divide several times and often have the appearance of being branches.

Forked fronds on Platycerium bifurcatum

Bifurcatus: [bahy-fur-ka-tus] From Bi/Bis, which are Latin for two and Furcata, which is Latin for a fork. It refers to branches, leaves or fronds, which divide several times into two equal branches throughout. A good example is the leaves on Loranthus bifurcatus, which is now known asAmyema bifurcate.

Bigalerita: [bahy-ga-ler-i-ta] From Bi/Bis, which is Latin for two and Galerus, which is Latin for a cap or small hat. It refers to operculums, which are much smaller than many other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus bigalerita.

Bigeminate: [bi-jem-in-eit] From Bi/Bis, which is Latin for two and Geminum, which is Latin for to duplicate, be twinned or to double. It often It refers to the foliage where a plant has two distinct types of foliage which are paired like bifurcatum leaflets.

Biglandulosa: [bahy-glan-dyoo-loh-sa] From Bi/Bis, which is Latin for two and Glans, which is Latin for a gland or glands. It refers to plants, which have two distinct types of glands. A good example is Tylophora biglandulosa.

Biglandulosum: [bahy-glan-dyoo-loh-sum] From Bi/Bis, which is Latin for two and Glans, which is Latin for a gland or glands. It refers to plants, which have two distinct types of glands. A good example is Anodopetalum biglandulosum.

Bignonia: [big-noh-ni-a] Is named in honour of Abbe Jean Paul Bignon; 1662-1743, who was a French New Latin Librarian for King Lois the XIV. A good example is Bignonia pandorae , which is now known as Pandorea pandorana.

Bignoniacea: [big-noh-ni-a-see-a] Is named in honour of Abbe Jean Paul Bignon; 1662-1743, who was a French New Latin Librarian for King Lois the XIV and Ceae, which is a Latin suffix for the family class or order a group of plants belong to. It refers to plants, which have some common characteristics. A good example is Billardiera bignoniacea, which is now known as Marianthus bignoniaceus.

Bignoniaceus: [big-noh-ni-a-see-us] Is named in honour of Abbe Jean Paul Bignon; 1662-1743, who was a French New Latin Librarian for King Lois the XIV and Ceae, which is a Latin suffix for the family class or order a group of plants belong to. It refers to plants, which have some common characteristics. A good example is Marianthus bignoniaceus.

Bignoniiflora: [big-noh-ni-flor-a] Is named in honour of Abbe Jean Paul Bignon; 1662-1743, who was a French New Latin Librarian for King Lois the XIV and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which was the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. A good example is Eremophila bignoniiflora.

Bignoniiflorus: [big-noh-ni-flor-us] Is named in honour of Abbe Jean Paul Bignon; 1662-1743, who was a French New Latin Librarian for King Lois the XIV and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which was the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. A good example was Stenochilus bignoniiflorus, which is now known as Eremophila bignoniiflora.

Bignoniiflora: [big-noh-ni-flor-us] Is named in honour of Abbe Jean Paul Bignon; 1662-1743, who was a French New Latin Librarian for King Lois the XIV and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which was the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. A good example was Stenochilus bignoniifloris, which is now known asEremophila bignoniiflora.

Bijuga: [bahy-jyoo-ga] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Jugatus, which is Latin for a pair. It refers to foliage which has four leaflets or two pairs of leaflets. A good example is Intsia bijuga.

Bijugate: [bahy-jyoo-geit] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Jugatus, which is Latin for a pair. It refers to having two orders of leaflets, each bifoliolate or doubly paired. A good example is Bruguiera gymnorrhiza.

Bijugatus: [bahy-jyoo-ga-tus] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Jugatus which is Latin for a pair. It refers to leaves, which has four leaflets or two pairs of leaflets. A good example is Melicoccus bijugatus.

Bijugum: [bahy-jyoo-gum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Jugatus which is Latin for a pair. It refers to foliage which has four leaflets or two pairs of leaflets. A good example is Dysoxylum bijugum.

Bilabiate: [bahy-la-bi-eit] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and labiatus, which is Latin for a lip. It refers to flowers which have two lips. A good example is Prostanthera calycina.

Bilateral: [bahy-la-ter-al] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Latus which is Latin for side. It refers to structures or organs which have two equal sides one on either side of an axis. A good example is the species Epacris impressa.

Bilaterally: [bahy-la-ter-al-lee] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Latus, which is Latin for side. It refers to a description of a plants, which have two equal sides one on either side of an axis.

Biligulatum: [bahy-li-jyoo-la-tum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Ligule, which is Latin for tongue or strap like. It refers to organs, which have two tongue or thong like strap appendages. A good example is the species Pleuranthodium biligulatum.

Billardiera: [bil-lar-di-er-a] Is named in honour of Jacques Julien Houtou de la Billardier; 1755-1834 who travelled with the D’entrecasteaux Expedition to Western Australia and Tasmania where he discovered many new species. A good example is Billbardiera scandens.

Billardierei: [bil-lar-di-e-rahy] Is named in honour of Billardier; 1755-1834 who travelled with the D’entrecasteaux Expedition to Western Australia and Tasmania where he discovered many new species. A good example is Notogrammitis billardierei.

Billardierianum: [bil-lar-di-er-i-a-num] Is named in honour of Jacques Julien Houtou de la Billardiere; 1755-1834, who was a French botanist who specialized in Australian flora. A good example is Epilobium billardierianum subsp. billardierianum.

Billardierianus: [bil-lar-di-er-i-a-nus] Is named in honour of Jacques Julien Houtou de la Billardiere; 1755-1834, who was a French botanist who specialized in Australian flora. A good example is Austrofestuca billardierianus, which is now known as Austrofestuca littoralis.

Billawinica: [bil-la-win-i-ka] From Billawinica, which is probably Latinized from the local Aboriginal vernacular for an area in the Grampians National Park. It refers to a the area where the first plants were discovered in The Grampians National Park in Victoria. A good example is Monotoca billawinica.

Billotia: [bil-lo-ti-a] Is named in honour of Paul Constant Billot; 1796–1863, who was a French botanist who with botanist Friedrich Wilhelm Schultz co-authored the “Archives de la Flore de France et d’Allemagne”. A good example is Billotia flexuosa, which is now known as Agonis flexuosa.

Biloba: [bahy-loh-ba] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to flowers, or other structures which have two lobes and two clefts. A good example is the flowers on Lechenaultia biloba.

Bilobatum: [bahy-loh-ba-tum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to structures, which have two lobes and two clefts. A good example is the flowers on Trymalium bilobatum, which is now known as Pomaderris obcordata.

Bilobed: [bahy-loh-bd] From Bi/Bis, which is Greek/Latin for two and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to flowers, or other structure which have two lobes and or two clefts.

Bilobed stigma on Senecio linearifolius.

Bilobum: [bahy-loh-bum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to flowers, or other structures which have two lobes and two clefts. A good example is the flowers on Gastrolobium bilobum.

Bilocular: [bahy-lo-kyoo-lar] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Loculus, which is Latin for an apartment. It refers to a description of a fruit which has two locules or compartments.

Bilocularis: [bi-lo-kyoo-lahr-is] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Loculus, which is Latin for an apartment. It refers to a fruit having two locules or compartments. A good example is found in the fruit of Denhamia bilocularis.

Biloculata: [bi-lo-kyoo-la/lei-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Loculus, which is Latin for an apartment. It refers to fruits, which have two locules or compartments. A good example was Dampiera biloculata, which is now known as Dampiera trigona.

Bimaculata: [bahy-ma-kyoo-la-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Maculatus, which is Latin for to stain of spotted. It refers to lemmas and glumes, which have two maroon spots at the apexes. A good example is Eremochloa bimaculata.

Bimarginatum: [bahy-mar-ji-na-tum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and marginata, which is Ancient Greek for a margin or at the edge. It usually It refers to the leaves or at times other organs, which have a thickened edge , undulation or other prominent characteristic. A good example is the thickened frond margins on Didymoglossum bimarginatum.

Bimarous: [bahy-mar-os] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Ramous, which is Latin for a large stem or branch. It refers to the branches dividing equally into two. A good example is the branches on Polyscias elegans or Polyscias murrayi.

Bimerous: [bahy-meer-os] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Merous, which is Ancient Greek for to be divided into 2 equal parts or to having groupings of 2. It refers to a flower which has 2 sepals, two petals and two stamens.

Bimestrial: [bahy-me-stri-al] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Mestrial, which is for a month. It refers to occurring twice periodicity, that is occurring every two months or lasting for two months.

Binata: [bahy-na-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two. It usually refers to leaves, which are forked. A good example is Acacia binata.

Binate 1: [bahy-neit] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two. It refers to leaves, which are forked. A good example of glandular forked leaves is to be found on Drosera binata.

Binate 2: [bahy-neit] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two. It refers to leaves or fronds, which are placed opposite along the stem or rachis. A good example is the pinnae on Nephrolepsis cordata.

Binatum: [bahy-nei-tum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two. It refers to leaves, which are forked. A good example is Lysiphyllum binatum.

Bindoniana: [bin-do-ni-a-na] Maybe named in honour of A. de Bindoni; who was an Italian botanist. A good example is Litsea bindoniana.

Binervata: [bahy-ner-va-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Neruron, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve. It refers to the xylem or phloem system in the leaves or flowers which transport liquids and minerals. A good example is the glands on Acacia binervata.

Binervatum: [bahy-ner-va-tum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Neruron, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve or vein. It refers to the xylem or phloem system in the leaves or flowers for transporting of liquids and minerals. A good example is Racosperma binervatum, which is now known as Acacia binervata.

Binervia: [bahy-ner-vi-a] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Neruron, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve or vein. It refers to the xylem or phloem system in the leaves or flowers for transporting of liquids and minerals. A good example is Acacia binervia.

Binervis: [bahy-ner-vis] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Neruron, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve or vein. It refers to the xylem or phloem system in the leaves or flowers for transporting of liquids and minerals. A good example is Acacia stricta subsp. binervis.

Binervium: [bahy-ner-vi-um] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Neruron, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve or vein. It refers to the xylem or phloem system in the leaves or flowers for transporting of liquids and minerals. A good example is Racosperma binervium, which is now known as Acacia binervia.

Binervosa: [bahy-ner-voh-sa] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Neruron, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve or vein. It refers to the xylem or phloem system in the leaves or at times the flowers for transporting of liquids and minerals. A good example is Acacia binervosa.

Binghiensis: [bing-hi-en-sis] From Binghi, which is Latin for Binghi and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to localities of granitic batholithic rocks surrounded by Permian sedimentary rocks which are known as Blinghi. Thus It refers to the plants, which wre originally discovered growing amongst these rock formations. A good example is Homoranthus binghiensis.

Biniflora: [bahy-ni-flor-a] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to having two flowers emerge from each leaf node. A good example is Gilesia biniflora.

Biniflorum: [bahy-ni-flor-um] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to having two flowers emerge from each leaf node. A good example is Amyema biniflorum, which is now known as Amyema biniflora.

Binifolium: [bi-ni-foh-li-um] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves, which grow in two pairs at each node compared with other species where the leaves are in whorls of three. A good example is Galium binifolium subsp. binifolium.

Biopathologist: [bahy-oh-path-ol-o-jist] From Bíos which is Ancient Greek for life, Pathion, which is Ancient Greek for for a pathogen or disease, Ology which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for for a person. It refers to person who studies the science of the diseases of plants.

Biopathology: [bahy-oh-path-ol-o-jee] From Bíos which is Ancient Greek for life, Pathion, which is Ancient Greek for a pathogen or disease and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the studies which surround the science of the diseases of plants.- Plant pathology.

Biophytum: [bahy-oh-fahy-tum] From Bíos which is Ancient Greek for life and Phŷton, which is Ancient Greek for a plant. It refers to the smallest forms of plants, which are capable of vegative reproduction. A good example is Biophytum petersianum.

Bipalmate: [bahy-parl-meit] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Palmatus, which is Latin for the shape of a hand. It usually It refers to leaves, which resemble the shape of a primates hand.

Bipartita: [bahy-pahr-ti-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Sparton, which is Ancient Greek for a broom. It refers to the coarseness of the culms which were suitable for broom making. A good example is Austrodanthonia bipartita.

Bipartum: [bahy-pahr-tum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Sparton, which is Ancient Greek for a broom. It refers to the coarseness of the culms which were suitable for broom making. A good example is Rytidosperma bipartitum.

Bipinnata: [bahy-pin-a-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Pinnatus which is Latin for a feather. It refers to leaves, which divided into two equal parts similar in structure to a bird’s feather. A good example is the branches on Boronia bipinnata.

Bipinnate: [bahy-pin-eit] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Pinnatus which is Latin for a feather. It refers to leaves, which divided into two equal parts similar in structure to a bird’s feather. A good example is the branches on Nephrolepis cordifolia.

Bipinnatifida: [bahy-pin-a-ti-fi/fahy-da] From From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Pinnatus, which is Latin for a feather. It refers to leaves, which divided into two equal parts similar in structure to a bird’s feather then is divided again into two equal parts. A good example is the branches on Grevillea bipinnatifida.

Bipinnatifidum: [bahy-pin-a-ti-fi/fahy-dum] From From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Pinnatus, which is Latin for a feather. It refers to leaves, which divided into two equal parts similar in structure to a bird’s feather then is divided again into two equal parts. A good example is the branches on Blechnum discolor var. bipinnatifidum, which is now known as Blechnum nudum.

Bipinnatisect: [bahy-pi-na-ti-sekt] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two, Pinnatus, which is Latin for a feather and Sect which is Latin for to be cut into sections. It refers to leaves, which divided into at least two deeply cut equal parts similar in structure to a bird’s feather either side of the axis. A good example is the branches on Aricnioides arista .

Bipinnatisecta: [bahy-pi-nah-ti-sek-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two, Pinnatus, which is Latin for a feather and Sect which is Latin for to be cut into sections. It refers to leaves, which divided into at least two deeply cut equal parts similar in structure to a bird’s feather either side of the axis. A good example is the fern Lomaria discolor var. bipinnatisecta, which is now known as Blechnum nudum.

Bipinnatisectus: [bahy-pi-na-ti-sek-tus] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two, Pinnatus, which is Latin for a feather and Sect which is Latin for to be cut into sections. It refers to leaves, which divided into at least two deeply cut equal parts similar in structure to a bird’s feather either side of the axis. A good example is the branches on Senecio bipinnatisectus.

Biplicatum: [bahy-pli-ka-tum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Plicātus, which is Latin for to fold or pleat. It refers to leaves, which undulate to the point of forming pleats along the margins. A good example is Lepidium biplicatum.

Bipulvinaris: [bahy-pul-vi-nar-is] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Pulvinus, which is Latin for a pillow or swelling. It refers to swellings usually found at the base of the petioles to aid in moisture regulation by raising or lowering the leaves or phyllodes. A good example is Microtis bipulvinaris.

Bipunctata: [bahy-punk-tata] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Pūnctātus, which is Latin for to be marked with spots or dots or two sets of spots. It refers organs, which have two distinct spots. A good example is the two sets of spots on the flowers of Labichea bipunctata, which is now known as Labichea lanceolata subsp. lanceolata.

Bipunctatum: [bahy-punk-ta-tum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Pūnctātus, which is Latin for to be marked with spots or dots or two sets of spots. It refers organs, which have two distinct spots. A good example is Crepidomanes bipunctatum.

Birchii: [ber-chi-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Charles Weldon Burgh Birch who was a pastoralist while he collected for Ferdinand von Mueller from 1870 to 1890 in central southern to north western Queensland. A good example is Sclerolaena birchii.

Birdii: [ber-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Bird but which Bird cannot be substantiated. A good example is Calycothrix birdii.

Birnbaumii: [bern-bor-mi-ahy] Is named by Czech mycologist August corda, who named it in honour of Birnbaum, who was a garden inspector from Prague, where he found it growing in a greenhouse. A good example is Leucocoprinus birnbaumii.

Bischofia: [bis-cho-fi-a] Is named in honour of Gottlieb Wilhelm Theophilus Guilielmus Bischoff; 1797-1854, who was a German pharmacist and professor of Botany. The accepted name is with one “f” which was a typing error when written up. A good example is Bischofia javanica.

Bisculata: [bahy-skyoo-la-ta] From Sculata, which is Latin for a furrow or ploughed field. A good example is Melaleuca bisulcata.

Biseriata: [bahy-seer-i- ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Serrāta, which is Latin for to have serrations. It refers to structures or organs, which have many fine or small serrations of which each has smaller serrations. A good example is Thryptomene biseriata.

Biseriate: [bahy-seer-eit] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Serrātum which is Latin for to have serrations. It refers to spores arranged in two rows in sacks. A good example is the fungus Claussenomyces australis.

Biserrata: [bahy-ser-a-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Serrāta which is Latin for to have serrations. It refers to structures or organs, which have many fine or small serrations of which each has smaller serrations. A good example is Eremophila biserrata.

Biserratum: [bahy-ser-a-tum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Serrātus, which is Latin for to have serrations. It refers to structures or organs, which have many fine or small serrations of which each has smaller serrations. A good example is the fern Aspidium biserratum, which is now known as Nephrolepis biserrata.

Biserratus: [bahy-ser-a-tus] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Serrātus, which is Latin for to have serrations. It refers to structures or organs, which have many fine or small serrations of which each has smaller serrations. A good example is Senecio biserratus.

Biseta: [bahy-se-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Setum, which is Latin for a bristle. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in bristles. A good example is bristles on the tepals of Pterostylis biseta.

Bisexual: [bahy-sek-syoo-al] From Bi/Bis, which is Greek/Latin for two and sexus, which is Latin for having sexual organs. It refers to plants, which has perfect flowers, that is the flowers are found on dioecious plants where both male and female sexual organs are on the same flower as opposed to a unisexual flower that has the male and female flowers born on separate flowers but on the same plant. A good example is Syzygium australe.

Bishopii: [bish-o-pi-ahy] Is named in honour of Bishop but which Bishop cannot be substantiated. A good example is Genoplesium bishopii.

Bispinosa: [bahy-spi-noh-sa] From Bi/Bis, which is Greek/Latin for two and Sinosus, which is Latin for a spine. It refers to plants, which have two spines at each leaf or phyllodes node. A good example is Acacia bispinosa.

Bissillii: [bi-sil-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Walter Kirk Bissill (Bissell); 1842-1890 who was a grazier and collector for Ferdinand von Mueller in central Victoria. A good example is Hannafordia bissillii.

Bistylovarious: [bi-stahy-lo-var-i-us] from Stylos, which is Old French for a pen and Varius, which is Latin for variable or changeable. It refers to flowers that have two styles. A good example is Telopia speciossima.

Bisulcata: [bahy-sul-ka-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Sulcata, which is Latin for a ploughed row. It refers to a structure or organ, which has two deep grooves. A good example is the leaves on Bulbine bisultata.

Bisulcate: [bahy-sul-keit] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Sulcatum, which is Latin for a ploughed row. It refers to a structure or organ, which has two deep grooves. A good example is the leaves on Grevillea involucrate.

Bisulcatum: [bahy-sul-ka-tum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Sulcatum, which is Latin for a ploughed row. It refers to a structure or organ, which has two deep grooves. A good example is Panicum bisulcatum where the glumes and lemmas spread at a wide angle appearing to be divided.

Bisumbellata: [bi-sum-bel-la-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Umbellata, which is Latin for an umbel or Umbra, which is Latin for shade or shadow – an umbrella. It refers to the shape of the two or at times three loose flower heads being in the shape of an umbrella. A good example is Fimbristylis bisumbellata.

Bisumbellatus: [bi-sum-bel-la-tus] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Umbellata, which is Latin for an umbel or Umbra, which is Latin for shade or shadow – an umbrella. It refers to the shape of the two or at times three loose flower heads being in the shape of an umbrella. A good example was Scirpus bisumbellatus, which is now known asFimbristylis bisumbellata.

Biterax: [bahy-ter-aks] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and maybe Terax which is Latin? for someone who knows all about half life. It therefore may refer to plants, which appear to be letting their hair (leaves) down and are having a great time or may have something to do with the deeply divided leaves. A good example is Banksia biterax.

Biternata: [bahy-ter-nei-tum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Ternatus, which is Latin for to be in sets of three. It refers to having the leaves divide twice into three equal parts. A good example is the leaves on Grevillea biternata.

Biterranea: [bahy-ter-ra-nee] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Terranea, which is Latin for the ground. Its reference is unclear. A good example is the leaves on Eucalyptus biterranea, which is now known as Eucalyptus pellita.

Bitextura: [bahy-teks-tyoo-ra] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Textūra/Textūrae, which is Latin for to weave, a web or texture. It refers to organs, which have a very fine double weave of membranous web like markings. A good example is the glumes and lemmas on Triodia bitextura.

Biturbinata: [bei-tur-bi-nei/na-ta] From Bi/Bis which are Ancient Greek and later Latin for two and Turbinatus, which is Latin for a childs toy – a top. It refers to calyptras which are shaped like a spinning top and looking the same at the base and apex when in bud from the side. A good example is Eucalyptus biturbinata.

Bivalve: [bahy-valv] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Valvae, which is Latin for a door leaf. It usually refers to fruits or at times sporangium, which divide into two separate chambers when ripe. A good example is the sporangia on fronds on Hymenophyllum bivalve.

Bivalvis [bahy-val-vis] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Valvae, which is Latin for a door leaf. It usually It refers to the fruits, which divide into two separate chambers when ripe. A good example is the fruit on Hernandia bivalvis.

Bivenosa: [bahy-ve-noh-sa] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Vena, which is Latin for a nerve or vein. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have two distinct veins. A good example is Acacia bivenosa.

Bivenosum: [bahy-ve-noh-sum] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Vena, which is Latin for a nerve or vein. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have two distinct veins. A good example is Racosperma bivenosum, which is now known as Acacia bivenosa.

Bivestita: [bahy-ves-ti-ta] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Vestīta, which is Latin for to be clad, clothed, dressed or covered. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in hairs or scales. A good example is the leaves, peduncles and pedicels that have a sparse covering of hirsuit hairs on Trachymene bivestita.

Bivoltine: [bahy-vol-teen] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two and Voltin, for the number or sets of offspring had in a year. It refers to giving birth, laying eggs or raising two sets of offspring every year. A good example is Melaleuca viminalis which flowers and producers seeds twice a year.

Blackallia: [blak-al-li-a] Is named in honour of Dr. W. Blackall; 1876-1941 who a British born Australian who was a medical doctor. He had a very strong passion for the flora of Western Australia and had a herbarium with over 5,000 specimens and commenced the keys for Western Australian plants. A good example is Blackallia nudiflora.

Blackallii: [blak-al-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Dr. W. Blackall; 1876-1941 who a British born Australian who was a medical doctor. He had a very strong passion for the flora of Western Australia and had a herbarium with over 5,000 speciemens and commenced the keys for Western Australian plants. A good example is Grevillea blackallii, which is now known as Grevillea pityophylla.

Blacketii: [bla-ke-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of H Blackett; 1855-1951. A good example is Baeckea blackettii.

Blackiana: [blah-ki-a-na] Is probably named in honour of John McConnell Black; 1855-1951, who was a Scottish born Australian journalist, botanist and collector of plants. A good example is Sclerolaena blackiana.

Blackiella: [blah-ki-el-la] Is named in honour of Black. A good example was Blackiella conduplicata, which is now known as Atriplex lindleyi subsp. conduplicata.

Blackii: [blah-ki-ahy] Is named in honour of John McConnell Black; 1855-1951, who was a Scottish born Australian journalist, plant collector and botanical author. A good example is Austrostipa blackii.

Blackstonia: [blahk-stoh/sto-ni-a] Is named in honour of John Blackstone; 1713-1753, who was an English apothecist and botanist. A good example is Blackstonia perfoliata.

Blackwelliana: [blahk-wel-li-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Marion Isabel Blackwell; 1928-2…, who was an Australian botanist, mycologist and university lecturer in Botany. A good example is Eremaea blackwelliana.

Bladder:[bla-der] From Bladdre, which is Old English or Blatter which is German for a sack. It refers to a sac or pitcher, which contains a fluid. They are most common in carnivorous plants and aquatic plants. A good example is  the specialized pitcher leaves on Utricularia fenshamii.

Blade: [bleid] From Blaed which is Old English, Blatt which is German, Blath which is Old Nordic or Blad which is Dutch for a blade. It refers to the flat section of a leaf or petal.

Bladhia: [bla-di-a] Is named in honour of Pehr Johanne Bladh; 1846-1816, who was a Finnish collector of Chinese plants. A good example is Bladhia brevipedata.

Bladhii: [bla-di-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Peter Johan Bladh; 1746-1816, who was a Swedish Botanist who worked and studied in China where he discovered the genus type specimen in China however there is reference to a Pehr Johanne Bladh; 1846-1816, who was a Finnish collector of Chinese plants. A good example is Bothriochloa bladhii.

Blaeriifolia: [blee-ri-foh-li-a] From Blaer, which maybe Danish for a gentle breeze and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the stems and foliage, which tends to be shaped by the wind or leaning away from the prevaing winds. A good example is Melaleuca blaeriifolia.

Blaeriifolium: [blee-ri-foh-li-um] From Blaer, which maybe Danish for a gentle breeze and Folium which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the stems and foliage, which tends to be shaped by the wind or leaning away from the prevaing winds. A good example was Myrtoleucodendron blaeriifolium, which is now known as Melaleuca blaeriifolia.

Blainvillea: [blein-vil-ia] Is named in honour of Henri de Blainville; 1777-1850, who was a French zoologist in Paris. A good example is Blainvillea dubia.

Blairiana: [blair-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Blair. A good example is Rhodamnia blairiana.

Blakeana: [bla-kee-a-na] Is probably named in honour of H. P. Blake who was an Australian collector of plants in NSW. A good example is Westringia blakeana.

Blakeanus: [blah-kee-a-nus] Is probably named in honour of H. P. Blake who was an Australian collector of plants in NSW. A good example is Cyperus blakeanus.

Blakei: [blah-kee-ahy] Is named in honour of Stanley Blake; 1911-1973, who was an Australian botanist who dedicated his life to botany especially the grasses and reeds. Some good examples are Cyperus blakei, Sporobolus blakei or Acacia blakei subsp. blakei.

Blakelyi: [blei-kel-ee-ahy] Is named in honour of William Farris Blakely; 1875-1941, who devoted much of his life to the Australian Eucalyptus species. A good example is Eucalyptus blakelyi.

Blakeochloa: [bla-kee-o-kloh-a] Is probably named in honour of Stanley Blake; 1911-1973, who was an Australian botanist who dedicated his life to botany especially the grasses and reeds and Khloē which is Ancient Greek for with young green shoots. It is reasonable to say the it refers to Stanley Blake who saw the verdant greens of grasses and greens for their beauty. A good example is Blakeochloa paradoxa.

Blakewellia: [bla-kee-wel-li-a] Is probably named in honour of Blackwell, Marion Isabel; 1928-20?? who was an Australian botanist and conservationalist who submitted studies on soil stabilisation and revegetation programs. A good example is Blakwellia brachybotrya.

Blancoa: [blan-koh-a] Is named in honour of Manual Blanco; 1878-1945, who was the author of the book Flora of the Philippines. A good example is Blancoa canescens.

Blanda: [blan-da] From Blanda which is Latin for smooth, enchanting, pleasant or pleasing to the tongue or at times flattering as in beauty. It refers to plants, which have a pleasant taste or are unassumingly beautiful in their own way. A good example is Peperomia blanda var. floribunda.

Blandfordia: [blan-for-di-a] Is named in honour of George Spenser Blandford; 1766-1840, who was the marquis of Blandford. A good example is Blandfordia nobilis.

Blandowskianum: [blan-dour-ski-a/ei-num] Is named in honour ofJohann Wilhelm Theodor Ludwig von Blandowski; 1822–1876, who was a Polish naturalist who visited Australia in 1851 t0 1859 before departing under very contraversial circumstances over the ownership of the artifacts, sketches and photographs as he was paid by the Melbourne Museum to conduct the research. A good example is Argentipallium blandowskianum.

Blandum: [blan-dum] From Blandum, which is Latin for smooth, enchanting or pleasing of the tongue. A good example is Crinum blandum.

Blastocarpous: [blahs-toh-kar-pos] From Blast which is Ancient Greek for means a germ – bud-cell, or a cell that produces budding material and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the germination of a seed, which takes place while the seed is still in the pericarp. A good example is Avecinnia marina subsp. australisica.

Blatti: [blat-tahy] Is probably named in honour of Blatt an English botanist who studied medicinal plants around the 1860. A good example is Blatti acidula, which is now known as Sonneratia caseolaris.

Blaxellii: [blahk-sel-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Donald Fredrick Blaxell; 1934-200??, who was an Australian botanist and orchidologist. A good example is Acacia blaxellii.

Blaxlandii: [blaks-lan-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Gregory Blaxland; 1778–1853, who was an English pioneer farmer and explorer in Australia who first found a successful dray route across the Blue Mountains. A good example is Eucalyptus blaxlandii.

Blayana: [blei-ya-na] From Blayana which is unknown. A good example is Acacia blayana.

Bleasdalei: [blees-da-lee] Is named in honour John Ignatius Bleasdale; 1822-1884, who was an English Clergyman and amateur botanist who collected in Victoria. A good example is Bleasdalea bleasdalei.

Blechnifolia: [blek/blech-ni-foh-li-a] From Blockhon, which is Ancient Greek for the ancient name given to fishbone ferns and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have foliage that resembles the Blechnum genus. A good example is Banksia blechnifolia.

Blechnoides: [blek/blech-noi-deez] From Blockhon, which is Ancient Greek for the ancient name given to ferns and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to ferns, which closely resemble the Blechnum genus. A good example is Ctenopteris blechnoides.

Blechnopteris: [blek/blech-no-teer-is] From Blockhon, which is Ancient Greek for the ancient name given to ferns and Pteris, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to ferns, which have a wing along the rachis between the pinnules. A good example is Blechnopteris ambiguum, which is now known as Blechnum ambiguum.

Blechnum: [blek/blech-um] From Blockhon, which is Ancient Greek for the ancient name given to ferns. It refers to a group of ferns, which have typical fishbone type fronds. A good example is Blechnum orientalis.

Bleckeri: [blek-er-ahy] Is named in honour of Herman Blecker; 1828-1914, who was an Australian collector of plants especially from the north coast of New South Wales. A good example is Ixora beckleri.

Bleekeria: [blee-ker-i-a] Is named in honour of Pieter Bleeker; 1819-1878, who was a Dutch medical doctor, ichthyologist, and herpetologist. He was famous for the Atlas Ichthyologique des Orientales Neerlandaises with his monumental work on the fishes of East Asia published between 1862 and 1877. A good example is Bleekeria calocarpa, which is now known as Ochrosia elliptica.

Bleeseri: [blee-ser-rahy] Is named in honour of Florenz August Karl Bleeser; 1871-1942, who was an Australian amateur botanist collected and studied plants from the Northern Territory where he was stationed as the Post Master. A good example is Eriachne bleeseri.

Blennodes: [blen-noh-deez] From Blennos, which is Ancient Greek for slime or mucous. It refers to seeds which become slimy or mucousy when soaked in water. A good example is Blenodia blennodes.

Blennodia: [blen-noh-di-a] From Blennos, which is Ancient Greek for slime or mucous. It refers to seeds which become slimy or mucousy when soaked in water. A good example is Blennodia canescens.

Blennodiodes: [blen-noh-di-oi-deez] From Blennos, which is Ancient Greek for slime or mucous and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the seeds, which become slimy or mucousy when soaked in water similar to those from the Blennodia genus. A good example is Harmsiodoxa blennodioides.

Blennospora: [blen-noh-spor-a] From Blennos, which is Ancient Greek for slime or mucous and Sporá/Speírein, which is Ancient Greek for to sow seeds or the seed of ferns and fungi. It refers to seeds, which become slimy or mucousy when soaked in water similar to those from the Blennodia genus. A good example is Blennospora phlegmatocarpa.

Blepharantherus: [ble-far-an-ther-us] From Blepharon, which is Ancient Greek for an eyebrow and Antha/Anthos which are Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to the petals on flowers, which have a long, ciliate fringes especially on the apical half. A good example is Calothamnus blepharantherus.

Blepharocarpa: [ble-far-oh-kar-pa] From Blepharon, which is Ancient Greek for an eyebrow and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a ciliate fringe near the base or apex. A good example is Hydrocotyle blepharocarpa.

Blepharocarya: [ble-far-oh-kar-ee-a] From Blepharon, which is Ancient Greek for an eyebrow and Karyon, which is Ancient Greek for a nut. It refers to the fruits, sepals which look somewhat like eyebrows surrounding the nut. A good example is Blepharocarya involucrigera.

Blepharochilum: [ble-far-oh-chi-lum] From Blepharon, which is Ancient Greek for an eyebrow and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to the lips or lower labellum on orchids, which are fringed. A good example is Blepharochilum sladeanum.

Blepharodes: [ble-far-oh-deez] From Blepharon, which is Ancient Greek for an eyebrow and maybe Rōdō, which is Latin for to gnaw or scratch. It refers to leaves, which have ciliate hairs and are rather scratchy. A good example is Leucopogon blepharodes, which is now known as Astroloma pallidum.

Blepharolepis: [ble-far-oh-le-pis] From Blepharon, which is Ancient Greek for an eyebrow and Lepos, which is Ancient Greek for a scale or scaly. It refers to scales, which have a fringe of hairs which resemble an eyebrow. A good example is Fimbristylis blepharolepis.

Blepharophylla: [ble-far-oh-fahyl-la] From Blepharon, which is Ancient Greek for an eyebrow and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which have a fringe of hairs which resemble an eyebrow. A good example is the leaves and petals on Verticordia blepharophylla.

Bletia: [ble-ti-a] Is named in honour of Bletin; who was a Spanish botanist. A good example was Bletia tancarvilliae, which is now known as Phaius tancarvilliae and is often incorrectly associated and erroneously called Phaius tancarvilliae in Australia which is really Phaius australis in northern New South Wales while the synonym was Phaius tankervilleae for the northern Queensland species,which is now known as Phaius tancarvilliae.

Blitum: [blahy-tum] From Blitum, which is Latin for the old name of the strawberry blight. It refers to the fruits of the plant which resemble the domestic strawberry. A good example is Blitum atriplicinum.

Bloom: [bloom] From Blom, which is Old English or Blume which is German for a flower. It refers to when a plant is in flower.

Blotched: [bloch-t] From Blot, which is old English, French Nordic or Dutch for s smudge of blotch. It refers to the color disposed in broad, irregular patches.

Bloudowskyana: [bluh-dow-skahy-a-na] From Blepharon which is Ancient Greek for an eyebrow and Caryon, for a nut. It refers to the nut’s sepals looking somewhat like eyebrows and the seeds themselves having eyebrows or eyelashes. A good example is Adriana bloudowskyana.

Bloxsomei: [blok-soh-me-ahy] Is named in honour of Bloxsome. A good example is Corymbia bloxsomei.

Blumea: [bloo-mee-a] Is named in honour of Carl Blume; 1796-1862, who was the director of the Batavia Botanic Gardens now known as the Jakarta Botanic Gardens and the author of the book Flora of Java. A good example is Blumea mollis.

Blumei: [bloo-me-ahy] Is named in honour of Carl Blume; 1796-1862, who was the director of the Batavia Botanic Gardens now known as the Jakarta Botanic Gardens and the author of the book Flora of Java. A good example is Bulbophyllum blumei.

Blunt: [blunt] From blundra, which is Old Nordic for obtuse or rounded. It refers to an organ being somewhat obtuse or round tipped.

Blyxa: [blayk-sa] From Blyxein, which is Ancient Greek for to flow or gush out. It refers to plants, which grow in slow to fast flowing water. A good example is Blyxa aubertii.

Bobea: [bo-bi-a] Is named in honour of Bobe-Moreau, Jean Baptiste, 1761-1849 who was a French bioscientist. A good example is Bobea myrtoides.

Boccanii: [bo-ka-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Bocconei named after Paolo Silvio Boccone; 1633-1704, who was an Italian monk, botanist and physician. A good example is Spergularia bocconii.

Bodalla: [bo-dal-la] From Bodalla, which is Latinized for the Bodalla district. It refers to the plants habitat being located around Bodalla in south eastern NSW. A good example is Pomaderris bodalla.

Boea: [boh-ee-a] From Wuyi, which is Latinized from the Chinese Fukien Dialect for (武夷山 Bo He shan) or Bohea Hills/mountains in south eastern China. It refers to the plants, which were first discovered on the Wuyi Mountains in Fujian province. A good example is Boea hygroscopica.

Boehmeria: [boh-mer-i-a] Is named in honour of George Boehmer; 1723-1803, who was a German professor of Botany. A good example is Boehmeria calophleba.

Boeophylla: [boh-ee-oh-fahyl-la] From Boeo, which is not known and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are round and linear like those of many succulents. A good example is Melaleuca boeophylla.

Boerhavia: [boer-ha-vi-a] Is named in honour of Herman Boerhaave; 1668-1738, who was a Dutch professor of medicinal botany. A good example is Boerhavia dominii.

Bog: [bog] From Bogache, which is Gaelic for a soft ground. It refers to a wetland, which contains varies amounts of peaty matter and which is usually very acidic which makes the ground soft under foot. It is opposed to a fen, which is very alkaline.

Boisduvallia: [boi-doo-val-li-a] Is named in honour of J. A. Boisduval; 1801-1872, who was a famous French Botanists.

Bolax: [bo-laks] From Bolaks which is Ancient Greek for a lump. It refers toflowers which resemble or have a lump/s. A good example is Bolax floccipes.

Bolbitis: [bol-bi-tis] From Bolbos, which is Ancient Greek for a bulb or tuber. It refers to plants, which have bulbous, thickened veins. A good example is Bolbitis heudelotii.

Bolbophyllum: [bohl-bo-fil/fahyl-lum] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus, which is Latin for a bulb and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the fleshy leaves and starch, which produce the bulb and is in fact the erroneous spelling of Bulbophyllum. A good example is Bolbophyllum baileyi.

Bolboschoenus: [bol-bo-shoo-nus] From Bolbos, which is Ancient Greek for a bulb or tuber and Schoenus, which is Ancient Greek for a reed or rush. It refers to the rushes which resemble the Schoenus genus however they have bulberous tubers. A good example is Bolboschoenus caldwellii.

Bole: [bole] From Bohl, which is Old Nordic/English for a trunk or torso. It refers to the lower part of a tree trunk, which is that section between the ground and below the first branches. A good example is trunk on Corymbia citriodora.

Boletellus: [bo-le-tel-lus] From Boletus, which is Latin for a mushroom. It refers to the largest Australian toadstools or mushrooms, which are related to the European genus. A good example is the giant Boletes mushroom Boletellus ananiceps.

Boletellus ananiceps

Boletes: [bo-le-teez] From Boletus, which is Latin for a mushroom. It refers to the largest Australian toadstools or mushrooms. A good example is the giant Boletes mushroom Phlebopus marginatus.

Bolgartense: [bol-gar-tens] From Bolgart, which is Latinized for the town and district of bogart and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to the location where the first plant was discovered. A good example is the giant Stylidium bolgartense.

Boliviana: [bo-li-vi-a-na] From Bolivia, which is Latin for Bolivia and Ana, which is Latin for coming from. It refers to the type specimens coming from Bolivia. A good example is Eucalyptus boliviana.

Bombax: [bom-baks] From Bombyx, which is Ancient Greek for raw silk. It refers to the long silk threads surrounding the seeds. A good example is Bombax ceiba.

Bombayensis: [bom-bei-en-sis] From Bombay, which is Latinized from the local name for the Mumbai district and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the plants, which were originally discovered in and around Mumbai. A good example is Bossiaea bombayensis.

Bombycinum: [bom-bahy-si-num] From Bombycinus, which is Latin for silky. It refers to plants, which have a structure or organ, which is silky soft to touch or is covered in silky soft hairs. A good example is the flower heads that are loose, very fine and silky to touch on Panicum bombycinum.

Bombycinus: [bom-bahy-si-nus] From Bombycinus, which is Latin for silky. It refers to plants, which have a structure or organ that is silky soft to touch or is covered in silky soft hairs. A good example is Cymbopogon bombycinus.

Bonamia: [bon-a-mi-a] Is named in honour of Francoise Bonam; 1719-1786, who was a French botanist and doctor. A good example is Bonamia media.

Bona-nox: [boh-na, noks] From Bona, which is Latin for good and Nyx, which is Ancient Greek for night. It refers to plants, which flower in the evening or throughout the night. A good example is the noxious weed that needs to be removed as soon as it is seen in Calonyction bona-nox, which is now known as Ipomoea alba.

Bondtia: [bond-ti-a] Is named in honour of Gerard de Bondt also known as Gerardus Bontius; 1536–1599, who was a Dutch physician and a pioneer of tropical medicine. A good example is Bondtia serrulata.

Bonduc: [bon-duk] From Bonduk, which is Ancient Greek for a hazelnut. It refers to the fruits which resemble grey hazelnuts. A good example is Bonduc majus or Caesalpina bonduc.

Bonducella: [bon-du-sel-la] From Bonduk, which is Ancient Greek for a hazelnut and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the female form. It refers to the fruits, which resemble grey hazelnuts. A good example was Guilandina bonducella, which is now known as Caesalpina bonduc.

Boninensis: [bo-ni-en-sis] From Bonin, which is Latinized from the local name for the Islands and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants which were originally discovered around the Bonin Islands which are also known as the Ogasawara Islands. A good example was Myoporum boninense subsp. australe

Bonneyana: [bo-nee-ya-na] Is Latinized from Bonsai (盆栽) which is Japanese or earlier from Middle Chinese Bun (盆) which is Chinese for a bowl and Tsai (栽) which is Chinese for a plant. Bonsai were originally grown in China because no commoners were allowed to do anything better or bigger than the emporer so plebs grew miniature plants to avoid getting into trouble. The art of growing a tree in a  miniaturized form was perfected by the Japanese by planting the trees into small pot, thus restricting their roots with careful and precise pruning. A good example is found on many Australian native plants including Podocarpus elatus, Brachychiton aceriifolium, Ficus rubiunosa, Callitris glaucophylla or C. macleyana, Banksia marginata or B. serrata, Melaleuca viminalis, Backhousia myrtifolia and Eucalyptus or Corymbia species just to mention a few that work really well.

Bonsai: [bon-sahy] Is Latinized from Bonsai (盆栽) which is Japanese or earlier from Middle Chinese Bun (盆) which is Chinese for a bowl and Tsai (栽) which is Chinese for a plant. Bonsai were originally grown in China because no commoners were allowed to do anything better or bigger than the emporer so plebs grew miniature plants to avoid getting into trouble. The art of growing a tree in a  miniaturized form was perfected by the Japanese by planting the trees into small pot, thus restricting their roots with careful and precise pruning. A good example would be Podocarpus elatus.

Bontia: [bon-ti-a] Is named in honour of Gerard de Bondt also known as Gerardus Bontius; 1536–1599, who was a Dutch physician and a pioneer of tropical medicine. A good example was Bontia bignoniiflora, which is now known as Eremophila bignoniifolia.

Bonwickii: [bon-wi-ki-ahy] Is named in honour of James Bonwick; 1817 -1906, who was an English born Australian teacher, historian and author. A good example is Melicope bonwickii.

Boolaronga: [boo-la-ron-ga] From Boorabbin, which is Latinized for the aboriginal vernacular for the large boulder at the edge of the Parkland Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered at Boorabbin National Park which is around 450 kilometers east of Perth. A good example is Acacia boorabbinensis.

Booloola: [boo-loo-la] From Booloola which is Latinized for the local Aboriginal vernacular of possible ‘bulyeroo’ or ‘bulyaroo which may mean plenty or soft mud however the real meaning is potentially lost with the loss of the last speaker of the dialect. Most of the Lepiota species are toxic and some have been fatal overseas so should not be eaten under any circumstances. A good example is Lepiota booloola.

Boomerang: [boo-mer-ang] From Būmarin which is Latinized for the local Aboriginal vernacular of the Dharuk people (now an extinct language) for a boomerang. It refers to the shape or form of a flower which takes the form of a boomerang. Unfortunately the wisdom did not carry over to the naming of the plants. A good example is Stylidium breviscapum.

Boonjee: [boon-jee] From Boonjee, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the local aboriginal name for the area. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from Boongee within the Wooroonooran National Park. A good example is Argodendron boonjee.

Boophthona: [boof-thoh-na] From Boophthona which is unknown. A good example is Euphorbia boophthona.

Boorabbinensis: [boo-rab-bi-nen-sis] From Boorabbin which is Latinized for the aboriginal vernacular for the large boulder at the edge of the Park and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refer to plants, which originally were found at Boorabbin National Park which is around 450 kilometers east of Perth. A good example is Acacia boorabbinensis.

Boormanii: [bor-ma-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of John Boorman; 1864?-1938, who was an English born Australian who was a herbarium collector for the NSW state Herbarium. A good example is Acacia boormanii.

Borago: [bor-a-goh] From Burrāgō, which is Latin for hairy and Ella, which is Latin for the feminine form. It refers to plants, which are found in south eastern Europe which are in the Borage family. A good example is the exotic salad plant Borago offincalis.

Borassus: [bor-as-sus] From Borassos, which is Ancient Greek for the date palm fruit which was adopted from Dioscorides for the fruit of a palm. A good example is the Asian sugar date palm Borassus flabellifer.

Boreale: [bor-ee-a-la] From Borealis which is Latin for from the north. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered in the northern hemisphere or far northern Australia. A good example is Conospermum boreale.

Borealis: [bor-ee-a-lis] From Borealis, which is Latin for from the north. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the northern hemisphere or far northern Australia. A good example is Acianthus borealis.

Borneensis: [bor-nee-en-sis] From Borneo, which is Latinized for the Island of Borneo and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to orginate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on the Island of Borneo.. A good example is Mutinus borneensis.

Bornhardtiensis: [born-hard-ti-en-sis] From Bornhardt, which is Latinized for a granite, gneiss or at times Sandstone rock formation with steep or vertical sides and a round or dome-shaped top and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to orginate from. It refers to plants, which prefer this type of rock formation as a habitat. The Olgas, kata Tjuta and bald rock are a few good examples of sandstone rock formations in Australia. A good example is Homoranthus bornhardtiensis.

Boron: [bor-on] From Buraq which is Arabic for borax. Symbol B, Atomic Number 5.

Boronia: [bor-oh-ni-a] Is named in honour of Francesco Borone; 1769-1794, who was an Italian botanical enthusiast. A good example is Boronia rosmarinifolia.

Boroniaceum: [bor-oh-ni-a-see-um] Is named in honour of Francesco Borone; 1769-1794, who was an Italian botanical enthusiast. A good example is Hypocalymma boroniaceum, which is now known as Hypnodendron comosum.

Boroniacus: [bor-oh-ni-a-kus] Is named in honour of Francesco Borone; 1769-1794, who was an Italian botanical enthusiast. A good example is Phyllanthus boroniacus, which is now known as Micrantheum hexandrum.

Boroniifolia: [bor-oh-ni-foh-li-a] Is named in honour of Francesco Borone; 1769-1794, who was an Italian botanical enthusiast and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to foliages, which resemble many of the foliages in the Boronia genus. A good example is Dodonaea boroniifolia.

Borreria: [bor-re-ri-a] Is named in honour of William Borer; 1781-1846, who was an expert on the plants of the British Isles. A good example was Borreria alata, which is now known as Spermacoce alata.

Borunastylis: [bor-u-na-stahy-lis] From Borealis, which is Latin for from the north. A good example was Anticheirostylis borunastylis, which is now known as Corunastylis apostasioides.

Borya: [bor-ya] Is named in honour of J. B. Borya de St. Vincent; 1780-1862, who was botanist.

Bosistoa: [bo-sis-toh-a] Is named in honour of Joseph Bostisto; 1827-1898, who was a British born Australian pharmaceutical manufacturer of essential oils and early colonial politician in Victoria. It refers to the Eucalyptus oil industry coming from Joseph Bosisto. A good example is the genus Eucalyptus bosistonoana.

Bosistoana: [bo-sis-toh-a-na] Is named in honour of Joseph Bosisto; 1827-1898, who was an English born Australian pharmacist who delved deeply into the study and commercialization of Eucalyptus oils and Ana which is Latin for coming from. It refers to the Eucalyptus oil industry coming from Joseph Bosisto. A good example is Eucalyptus bosistoana.

Bosistoi: [bo-sis-toi] Is named in honour of Joseph Bosisto; 1827-1898, who was an English born Australian pharmacist who delved deeply into the study and commercialization of Eucalyptus oils. It refers to the Eucalyptus oil industry coming from Joseph Bosisto. A good example is Acradenia bosistoi.

Bossiaea: [bos-si-a-ee] Is named in honour of Bossieu de la Martinierra; 17??-1788, who was a botanist on the ill fated Le Perouse Expedition. A good example is the genus Bossiaea rhombifolia.

Bossiaeoides: [bos-si-e-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Bossieu de la Martinierra; 17??-1788, who was a botanist on the ill fated Le Perouse Expedition and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants resembling those of the Bossiaea genus. A good example is Leptosema bossiaeoides.

Bostockii: [bo-sto-ki-ahy] Is named in honour of Bostock. A good example is Diplazium bostockii.

Botanic Gardens: [bo-tan-ik, gar-denz] From Botanic, which is Ancient Greek for the science of plants and Gardin/Jardin which is Old English/French or Gartin/Garten which is German for a fertile pleasant place. It refers to a place set aside for the raising of plants so that they can be studied (Later to be enjoyed). Refer to article written by Marie Elizabeth Phillips; 1917–1977 views on Botanic gardens.

Botanical: [bo-tan-ik-al] From Botanic, which is Ancient Greek for the science of plants. It refers to the adjectival form of botany.

Botanist: [bo-tan-ist] From Botanic, which is Ancient Greek for the science of plants and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies the science of plants.

Botany:[bo-tan-ee] From Botanic, which is Ancient Greek for the science of plants. It refers to the scientific study of flora – plants.

Bothriochloa: [bo-thri-oh-kloh-a] From Bothrion/Brothos, which is Ancient Greek for a little pit and Chloe, which is Ancient Greek for a grass. It refers to organs usually the glumes, which have small pits. A good example is the genus Bothriochloa decepiens.

Botriospermum: [bo-tri-oh-sper-mum] From Bothrion/Brothos, which is Ancient Greek for a little pit and Spermum, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the seeds being strongly pitted.

Botrychium: [bo-trahy-chi-um] From Botrys, which is Ancient Greek for a bunch of grapes and Chium, which is Ancient Greek for a wine district in Ancient Greece. It refers to sporangia or fruits which somewhat resemble a bunch of grapes. A good example is the genus Botrychium australe.

Botrydion: [bo-trahy-di-on] From Botrys, which is Ancient Greek for a bunch of grapes and Dionae, which is Ancient Greek for the goddess of love, beauty, sex and fertility Venus. It refers to plants, which can have an intoxicating beauty. A good example is the flower heads on Acacia botrydion.

Botrys: [bo-trahy-us] From Brotrys, which is Ancient Greek for a bunch of grapes. It refers to fruits or bunches of flowers, which somewhat resemble a small bunch of grapes. A good example is Erodium botrys.

Bottii: [bo-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Harold Bott, 1880-1957, who was an Australian mining engineer and friend of W. F. Blake accompanying him on many botanical field trips. A good example is Eucalyptus bottii, which is now known as Eucalyptus piperita.

Botuliform: [bo-tyoo-li-form] From Botulos, which is the Latin for sausage shape and Forme, which is Latin to take the shape or form of. It refers to an organ which resembles a sausage. A good example is Billardiera cymosa.

Bouchardatia: [boh-kar-da-ti-a] Is named in honour of A. Bouchardt; 1806-1886, who was a French botanical professor. A good example is Bouchardatia neurococca.

Boucheana: [boh-chee-a-na] Is named in honour of Bouch. A good example was Hakea boucheana, which is now known as Hakea trifurcata.

Bourjotiana: [bour-jo-ti-a-na-a] Is probably named in honour of Saint-Hilaire Bourjot 1838 1859, who was a plant collector in Algeria between 1850 and 1859 with an earlier reference to 1830. A good example is Flindersia bourjotiana.

Bourlieri: [bour-li-er-i] Is named in honour of Bourlier. A good example is Eucalyptus bourlieri which appears to be a hybrid of Eucalyptus globulus.

Bovinus: [boh-vi-nus] From Bovīnus, which is Latin for a cow, buffulo or kudus. It refers to the flowers extending outwards along the main axis. It refers to a structure or organ, which has similar colours to bovine animals. A good example is Cortinarius bovinus.

Boviperda: [boh-vi-per-da] From Bovīnus, which is Latin for a cow, buffulo or kudus, and Perdere, which is Latin for a loss. It refers to plants, which are toxic to bovine animals. A good example is Indigofera boviperda.

Bowdeniae: [boh-de-ni-ee] Is named in honour of Bowden but which Bowden cannot be substantiated. A good example is the genus Bowenia spectabilis.

Bowena: [boh-wen-a] Is named in honour of Sir George Bowen; 1821-1899, who was Queensland’s first Governor. A good example is the genus Bowenia spectabilis.

Bowgada: [boh-ga-da] From Bowgada, which is Latinized for the local Aboriginal vernacular for a local shrub. It refers to plants, which grow in and around the town of Bowgada and district in western Australia about 230 kilometers north east of Perth. A good example is Persoonia bowgada.

Bowiei: [boh-wi-ei] Is named in honour of James Bowie; 1789-1869, who was an English botanist and plant collector for the Kew Gardens. A good example is the genus Bowenia spectabilis.

Bowkettiae: [boh-ket-ti-ee] Is named in honour of Eva Bowkett; 1883-1890; who was an Australian botanical collector in at in far north Queensland. A good example is Serpenticaulis bowkettiae.

Bowmanii: [boh-ma-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Edward M. Bowman; 1826-1896, who was an Australian station hand who collected widely in the outback. A good example is Ricinocarpos bowmanii.

Boyaginensis: [boi-a-ji-nen-sis] From Boyagnin/Boyachen, which are Latinized for a water course and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered along a watercourse in Boyagin Nature Reserve east of Mandurah in Western Australia. A good example is Synaphea boyaginensis.

Brachiaria: [bra-chi-ar-ri-a] From Brachium, which is Latin for the forearm. It refers to the flowers extending outwards along the main axis. A good example is the exotic pasture grass Brachiaria decumbens.

Brachiata: [bra-chi-a-ta] From Brachium, which is Latin for the forearm. It refers to flowers, which have an arm like extension or very long pedicels. A good example is Carallia brachiata.

Brachiatus: [bra-chi-a-tus] From Brachium, which is Latin for the forearm. It refers to flowers, which have an arm like extension or very long pedicels. A good example is Thysanotus brachiatus.

Brachyacanthum: [bra-kee-a-kan-thum] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Kanthios, which is Ancient Greek for a spine. It refers to spines on the trunk which are short and stout. A good example is the Sichuan pepper (四川辣椒 Sichuan lajiao) Zanthoxylum brachyacanthum, which actually has short and long spines.

Brachyachne: [bra-kee-ak-ne] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Achne for a glume. It refers to the glumes being short. A good example is Brachyachne convergens.

Brachyachne: [brah-kee-ahk-nee] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Achne for a glume. It refers to the glumes being short. A good example is Brachyachne convergens.

Brachyandra: [bra-kee-ahn-dra] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to the stamens, which are much shorter when compared to the other species in the genus. A good example is the stamens on Acmena brachyandra.

Brachyandrum: [bra-kee-an-drum] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to stamens which are much shorter than other species in the genus. A good example is the Leptospermum brachyandrum.

Brachyandrus: [bra-kee-an-drus] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Andros for a man. It refers to the stamens which are much shorter when compared to the other species in the genus. A good example is the anthers on Acmena brachyandra.

Brachyantha: [brah-kee-an-tha] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers or anthers, which are rather short. A good example is Billardiera brachyantha.

Brachyantherum: [bra-kee-an-ther-um] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers or anthers, which are rather short. A good example is Cartonema brachyantherum.

Brachyantherus: [bra-kee-an-ther-us] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers or anthers, which are rather short. A good example is Thysanotus brachyantherus.

Brachyanthum: [bra-kee-an-thum] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers or anthers, which are rather short. A good example is Trichinium brachyanthum, which is now known as Ptilotus brachyanthus.

Brachyanthus: [bra-kee-an-thus] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to the anthers, which are much shorter than other species in the genus. A good example is Melaleuca brachyandra.

Brachyathera: [bra-kahy-a-ther-a] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Athēra/Athērae, which is Ancient Greek for a kind of medicine prepared from the grains of the Anrinka genus. It refers to the similarity of the two plants. A good example is Deyeuxia brachyathera.

Brachybotrya: [bra-kee-bo-trahy-a] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and botrys, which is Ancient Greek for a bunch of grapes. It refers to the inflorescences which resemble short bunches of grape. A good example is Acacia brachybotrya.

Brachycalyx: [bra-kee-ka-liks] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and kalyx, which is Ancient Greek for a calyx or sepal. It refers to having short calyxes. A good example is Eucalyptus brachycalyx.

Brachycarpa: [bra-kee-kar-pa] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to plants which have smaller fruits than other species in the genus. A good example was Racosperma brachycarpum, which is now known as Acacia brachycarpa.

Brachycarpum: [bra-kee-kar-pum] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to plants which have small fruits. A good example is Melhania brachycarpa.

Brachycarpus: [bra-kee-kar-pus] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to plants which have small fruits. A good example is Polyscias sambucifolia.

Brachycephalus: [bra-kee-ke-fa-lus] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Kephalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flowers, which appear in small heads. A good example was Leucopogon brachycephalus, which is now known as Leucopogon squarrosus subsp. squarrosus.

Brachychiton: [bra-kee-kahy-ton] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Khiton, which is Ancient Greek for a tunic or long dress worn born women. It refers to the flower’s bracts draping around the flowers similar to a short tunic. A good example is Brachychiton acerifolium.

Brachychlaenus: [bra-kee-klee-nus] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Chaita, which is Ancient Greek for a bristle. It refers to seeds which are completely surrounded by soft bristles. A good example is Hibiscus brachychlaenus.

Brachyclada: [bra-kee-kla-da] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stick, stem or small branch.t It refers to stems which are short or have short internodes. A good example was Grevillea brachyclada, which is now known as Grevillea inconspicua.

Brachycladum: [bra-kee-klah-dum] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stick, stem or small branch. It refers to stems which are short or have short internodes. A good example is Racosperma brachycladum, which is now known as Acacia brachyclada.

Brachycomoides: [bra-kee-ko-moi-deez] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short. Comode which is Portugese for a comfortable and Oides which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the beautiful small flower heads, which are relaxing to be near. A good example was Vittadinia brachycomoides, which is now known as Camptacra gracilis.

Brachycorys: [bra-kee-kor-is] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Korys, which is Ancient Greek for a helmet. It refers to calyptras, which are much shorter than most other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus brachycorys.

Brachyglossa: [bra-kee-glos-sa] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Glôssa, which  is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to styles which are longer than other species in the genus and stick out somewhat like a tongue. A good example is Shawia brachyglossa, which is now known as Olearia axillaris.

Brachyglossus: [bra-kee-glos-sus] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Glôssa, which  is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to styles which are longer than other species in the genus and stick out somewhat like a tongue. A good example is, Senecio brachyglossus which is now known as Senecio glossanthus.

Brachygyne: [bra-kee-jahyn] From Brachus which is Ancient Greek for short and Gyne which is Ancient Greek for a woman. It refers to the style being very short. A good example is Heliotropium brachygyne.

Brachylaena: [brah-kee-lee-na] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Laena, which are Latin for a thick, decorative woolen cloak. It refers to the hairs around the floral tube. A good example is Brachylaena discolor.

Brachylaenus: [brah-kee-lee-nus] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Laena, which are Latin for a thick, decorative woolen cloak. It refers to the hairs around the floral tube. A good example is Senecio brachylaenus.

Brachyloba: [bra-kee-loh-ba] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to structures or organs, which have larger lobes than other species in the genus. A good example is the calyx lobes on Sersalisia brachyloba, which is now known as Pouteria brownlessiana.

Brachylobus: [bra-kee-loh-bus] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to structures or organs, which have small lobes. A good example is the calyx lobes on Tripterococcus brachylobus.

Brachyloma: [bra-kee-loh-ma] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Combe or Loma, which are Greek for neat hair. It refers to the short hairs which are located in the floral tube. A good example is Brachyloma daphnoides.

Brachynema: [bra-kee-ne-ma] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Némos, which is Ancient Greek or Nemus/Nemora, which is Latin for a woodland or open forest. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in an open forest environment. A good example is Sprengelia brachynema, which is now known as Andersonia macranthera.

Brachynemum: [bra-kee-nee-mum] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Némos, which is Ancient Greek or Nemus/Nemora, which is Latin for a woodland or open forest. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in an open forest environment. A good example is Syzygium brachynemum, which is now known as Syzygium smithii.

Brachyodon: [bra-kahy-oh-don] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Odonto/Dontos, which is Ancient Greek for a tooth or teeth. It refers to a structure or organ, which has small or very fine teeth. A good example is Indigofera brachyodon.

Brachyota: [bra-kahy-oh ta] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and maybe Otatea, which is Latin for the name of a type of bamboo. It refers to a structure or organ, which resembles the Otatea genus. A good example is the dwarf shrubby appearance of Sprengelia brachyota, which is now known as Andersonia parvifolia.

Brachypappus: [bra-kee-pa-puhs] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Pappos, which is Ancient Greek for a grandfather. It refers to seeds, which have short white beard or hairs like those found on a grandfather. A good example is Enkianthus brachypappus.

Brachypetala: [bra-kee-pe-ta-la] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators. A good example is the short petals on Tribonanthes brachypetala.

Brachypetalum: [bra-kee-pe-ta-lum] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Petánnumi which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators. A good example is the short petals on Stenopetalum brachypetalum, which is now known as Stenopetalum robustum.

Brachyphylla: [bra-kee-fahyl-la] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves which are much shorter than other species in the genus. A good example is Pimelea brachyphylla.

Brachyphyllum: [bra-kee-fahyl-lum] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example was Phebalium brachyphyllum, which is now known as Leionema microphyllum.

Brachyphyllus: [bra-kee-fahyl-lus] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves which are much shorter than other species in the genus. A good example is Stachystemon brachyphyllus.

Brachypoda: [bra-kee-poh-da] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek for a foot or feet. It refers to ferns which creep over logs, rocks and stumps on very small rhizomes. A good example is Lindsaea brachypoda.

Brachypodum: [bra-kee-poh-dum] From Brachy, which is Ancient Greek for short and Pous which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to leaves which have short petioles. A good example is the introduced fodder legume Desmodium brachypodum that has short lateral pedicels.

Brachypodus: [bra-kee-poh-dus] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Pous which is Ancient Greek or Pedi which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to structures or organs, which have very short petioles or pedicels. A good example is the much shorter pedicels on the flowers and fruits of Phyllanthus brachypodus, which is now known as Phyllanthus maderaspatensis var. maderaspatensis.

Brachyptera: [bra-kee-ter-a] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Ptera, which is Ancient Greek for a wing or wings. It refers to the short pentagonal wings which surround the seeds. A good example is Sclerolaena brachyptera.

Brachypteris: [bra-kee-ter-is] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Ptera, which is Ancient Greek for a wing or wings. It refers to the short wings which surround the seeds. A good example was Salsola brachypteris, which is now known as Salsola australis.

Brachypterum: [bra-kee-ter-um] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Ptera, which is Ancient Greek for a wing or wings. It refers to the short pentagonal wings which surround the seeds. A good example was Brachypterum scandens, which is now known as Derris scandens.

Brachypterus: [bra-kee-teer-us] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Ptera, which is Ancient Greek for a wing or wings. It refers to the short pentagonal wings surrounding the seeds. A good example is Echinopsilon brachypterus.

Brachypus: [bra-kee-ter-poos] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek for a foot or feet. It refers to pedicels which are shorter than other species in the genus. A good example is Croton brachypus.

Brachyrhyncha: [bra-kee-rahyn-cha] From Brachy, which is Ancient Greek for short and Rrhyncha, which is Ancient Greek for a general term for a nose, snout, beak or trunk. It refers to the style and surrounding stamens resembling a nose or probiscus protruding from the petals. A good example is Halgania brachyrhyncha.

Brachyrrhyncha: [bra-kahy-rahyn-ka] From Brachy, which is Ancient Greek for short and Rrhyncha, which is Ancient Greek for a general term for a nose, snout, beak or trunk. It refers to the style and surrounding stamens resembling a nose or probiscus protruding from the petals. A good example was Hakea brachyrrhyncha, which is now known as Hakea decurrens subsp. brachyrrhyncha.

Brachyscapa: [bra-kee-ska-pa] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Skâpos/Skêptron, which is Ancient Greek for a scape or spike. It refers to scapes which are short. A good example was Arachnorchis brachyscapa, which is now known as Caladenia brachyscapa and is now considered extinct.

Brachyscias: [bra-kee-ski-as] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Scias, which is Ancient Greek for a canopy or an umbel. It refers to the growth habit of the trees, which have a distinct upper canopy and often lack branches lower down or flowers which form on short umbels. A good example is the flowers onBrachyscias verecundus.

Brachyscome: [bra-kee-skoh-me] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Kombe, which is Ancient Greek for neat hair. It refers to seeds which are covered in hairs. A good example is Brachyscome multifida.

Brachysema: [bra-kee-see-ma] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Sema, which is Ancient Greek for a sign. It refers to the standard petals on the flowers, which are rather small when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Brachysema celsianum.

Brachysiphonius: [bra-kee-sahy-fo-ni-us] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Síphōn/Sī́phōn, which are Greek or Sīphōn, which is Latin for a hose or tube. It refers to a structure or organ, which resembles a tube. A good example is the calyx lobes on Hibiscus brachysiphonius.

Brachysola: [bra-kee-soh-la] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and maybe Solida, which is Latin for solid. It refers to the flowers, which have a rather solid colour. A good example is Brachysola halganiacea.

Brachyspora: [bra-kee-spor-a] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Spora which is Ancient Greek for spore or small seeds. It usually It refers to the spores or seeds of ferns, fungi or Cryptogams like Bryophytes, Mosses, Lichens, Clubmosses, Hornworts & Liverworts. A good example is Graphina brachyspora.

Brachystachya: [bra-kee-stah-kee/chee-a] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek or later Stachys which is Latin  for a spike. It refers to the plants having short spikes. A good example is Acacia brachystachya.

Brachystachys: [bra-kee-sta-shis] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek or later Stachys which is Latin  for a spike. It refers to the flower spikes being smaller when compared to many other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia brachystachya.

Brachystachyum: [bra-kee-sta-chahy-um] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek or later Stachys which is Latin  for a spike. It refers to the flower spikes which are smaller than many other species in the genus. A good example was Myrtoleucodendron brachystachyum, which is now known as Melaleuca subfalcata.

Brachystelma: [bra-kee-stel-ma] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Stelma, which is Ancient Greek for a crown, wreath or garland. It refers to flower which have a small but very ornate, crown like appearance. A good example is Brachystelma glabriflorum.

Brachystelmoides: [bra-kee-stel-moi-deez] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short, Stelma, which is Ancient Greek for a crown, wreath or garland and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers, which have a very ornate, crown like appearance. A good example is Cynanchum brachystelmoides.

Brachystema: [bra-kee-ste-ma] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Stémma/Stéphos, which is Ancient Greek for a wreath or garland. It refers to flowers, which sit at the apex of a shoot and are often surrounded by leaves that give a crown like appearance. A good example is Spermacoce brachystema.

Brachystemonea: [bra-kee-ste-mo-nee-a] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Stḗmōn, which is Ancient Greek or Stḗmen, which is Latin for the male reproductive organs in a flower. It refers to flowers, which have very short stamens. A good example is Mitrasacme brachystemonea.

Brachystephanea: [bra-kee-ste-fa-nee-a] From Brachus, which is Ancient Greek for short and Stephana/Stephanae, which is Ancient Greek for a wreath or garland. It refers to flowers, which resemble a wreath or garland. A good example was Passiflora brachystephanea, which is now known as Passiflora aurantia var. brachystephanea.

Brachystephium: [bra-kee-ste-fi-um] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Stephium, which is Ancient Greek for a crown. It refers to flowers, which have a very ornate, crown like appearance. A good example is Brachystephium scapigerum, which is now known as Brachyscome scapigera.

Brachystylis: [bra-kee-stahy-lis] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a style. It refers to the flower styles which are much smaller than many other species in the genus. A good example is Apodytes brachystylis.

Brachythecium: [bra-kee-thee-si-um] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Thḗkē, which is Ancient Greek for a case, a box or at times a scabbard. It refers to leaves which have a somewhat scabbard form. A good example is the leaves of the moss Brachythecium plumosum, which have a broad scabbard form.

Brachytropis: [bra-kee-tro-pis] From Brachys, which is Ancient Greek for short and Tropis, which is Ancient Greek for the keel of a ship. It refers to the keel petals of legumes which are much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example is Pultenaea brachytropis.

Brackenridgea: [bra-ken-rid-jee-a] Is named in honour of William Brackenridge; 1810-1893, who was a Scottish botanist and horticulturalist. A good example is the bracts on Brackenridgea australiana.

Bracket: [bra-ket] From brāca, which is Latin for a pair of pantsIt refers to being attached around a trunk or object like a pair of trousers or a bracket. A good example is the bract fungus Trametes versicolor.

Brackish: [bra-kish] From Brackish which is Latin for slightly saline. It refers to water that has dissolved salts but not as saline as sea water and usually the salinity varies over a period of time.

Bract: [brakt] From Bractea which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to special type of leaves that surround the flower or pedicel and are further from the flower when there are bracteoles. A good example is the bracts on Brachyscome saxicola.

Bractea: [brak-tee-a] From Bractea which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to special type of leaves that surround the flower or pedicel and are further from the flower when there are bracteoles. A good example was Bracteantha bractea, which is now known as Xerochrysum bracteatum.

Bracteal: [brak-tee-al] From Bractea which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to pertaining to the bracts.

Bracteantha: [brahk-tee-an-tha] From Bractea which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to showy bracts, which surround the inner flowers in some Asteraceae or Compositae. A good example is Bracteantha acuminata.

Bracteata: [brak-tee-a-ta] From Bractea, which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to special type of leaves, which surround the flower or pedicel, are further from the flower than petals and bracteoles and are generally larger in this species than other species in the genus. A good example is Melaleuca bracteata.

Bracteate: [brak-tee-eit] From Bractea, which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to special type of leaves, which surround the flower or pedicel, are further from the flower than petals and bracteoles and are generally larger in this species than other species in the genus.

Bracteatum: [brak-tee-a/ei-tum] From Bractea, which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to special type of leaves which surround the flower or pedicel. A good example is the bracts on Xerochrysum bracteatum.

Bracteatus: [brak-tee-a/ei-tus] From Bractea, which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to special type of leaves, which surround the flower or pedicel. A good example is the bracts on Acianthopsis bracteatus.

Bracteolaris: [brak-tee-oh-lar-is] From Bractea, which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to special type of leaves that surround the flower or on the pedicel and are further from the flower when there are bracteoles. A good example is Leucopogon bracteolaris.

Bracteolata: [brak-tee-oh-la-ta] From Bractea, which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to special type of leaves, which surround the flower or on the pedicel and are further from the flower when there are bracteoles. A good example is Kunzea bracteolata.

Bracteolatum: [brak-tee-oh-la-tum] From Bractea, which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to special type of leaves, which surround the flower or on the pedicel and are further from the flower than the bracteoles. A good example is the New Zealand and Norfolk Island Pittosporum, Pittosporum bracteolatum.

Bracteolatus: [brak-tee-oh-la-tus] From Bractea, which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to special type of leaves, which surround the flower or on the pedicel and are further from the flower than the bracteoles. A good example is Ozothamnus bracteolatus.

Bracteole: [brahk-tee-oh-le] From Bractea which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to special type of leaves, which surround the flower or on the pedicel and are further from the flower than the bracteoles. A good example is the bracteoles on Brachyscome saxicola.

Bracteolosum: brahk-tee-oh-loh-sum] From Bractea which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to specialized leaves, which surround the flower or on the pedicel and are further from the flower than the bracteoles. A good example is the bracteoles on Gastrolbium bracteolosum.

Bracteolosus: [brak-tee-oh-loh-sus] From Bractea which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to special type of leaves, which surround the flower or on the pedicel and are further from the flower than the bracteoles. A good example is the bracteoles on Cupulanthus bracteolosus, which is now known as Gastrolobium bracteolosum.

Bracteosa: [brahk-tee-oh-sa] From Bractea, which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to plants, which bear conspicuous bracts when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Bossiaea bracteosa.

Bracteosum: [brahk-tee-oh-sum] From Bractea, which is Latin for a thin plate of shiny metal. It refers to plants, which bear conspicuous bracts when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Conospermum bracteosum.

Bradshawia: [brahd-shor-i-a] Is named in honour of Joseph Bradshaw; 1854-1916, who was a businessman, pastoralist who led an expedition in northern Western Australia and collected many speciemens and found the Bradshaw Paintings. A good example is Bradshawia macrosiphonia.

Bradshawii: [brad-shor-i-ahy] Is named in honour of Joseph Bradshaw; 1854-1916, who was a businessman, pastoralist who led an expedition in northern Western Australia and collected many speciemens and found the Bradshaw Paintings. A good example is Triumfetta bradshawii.

Brahei: [bra-e-ahy] Maybe named in honour of Tycho Brahe; 1546 1601, who was a Danish nobility astronomer, astrologer and alchemist. A good example is Miliusa brahei.

Brainei: [brah-nee-ahy] Is named in honour of Arthur Belgrave Braine; 1854-1945, who was an Australian teacher and iridologist. A good example is Prasophyllum brainei.

Bramia: [bra-mi-a] From Bramia, which is Latinized from the Indian vernacular for the plant found there. It refers to the origin of the swamp herb found throughout Asia through to Australia. A good example is the trunk on Bramia monnieri, which is now known as Bacopa monnieri.

Branch: [branch] From Branca which is Latin for a paw. It refers to the main off shoots of a tree. A good example is the smooth trunk and branches on Eucalyptus pilularis.

Branches on Eucalyptus pilularis.

Branchlets: [brahch-lets] From Branca, which is Latin for a paw. It refers to the current and previous season’s growth bearing the leaves or limbs.

Branderhorstii: [bran-der-hors-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Dr. Bastiaan Branderhorst; 1880-19.., who was a Dutch physician in the Dutch East Indies army. He joined a detachment that was exploring Dutch New Guinea (West Papua) and collected many botanical specimens. A good example is Syzygium branderhorstii.

Brandtiae: [brand-ti-ee] Is named in honour of Brandt. A good example was Dendrobium brandtiae, which is now known as Vappaculum superbiens and Dendrobium bigibum.

Brasenia: [brah-se-ni-a] Is probably named in honour of Christopher Brasen; 1738-1774, who was a Moravian missionary at Nain in Labrador. A good example is Brasenia schreben.

Brasiliensis: [brah-sil/zil-i-en-sis] From Brasa, which is Latinized or Spanish for a live coal and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from . It may refer to the warmth gained from the beauty of the plants similar to a red hot glowing piece of coal and also originating from Brazil. A good example is Ipomoea pes-caprae subsp. brasiliensis.

Brassaia: [brah-sahy-a] Is named in honour of Leonard J Brass; 1900-1971, who was an Australian botanical collector from New Guinee and northern Australian. A good example was Brassaia actinophylla, which is now known as Schefflera actinophylla.

Brassiana: [bra-si-a-na] Is named in honour of Leonard J. Brass; 1900-1971, who was an Australian botanical collector from New Guinee and northern Australian. A good example is Eucalyptus brassiana.

Brassica: [bra-si-ka] From Brassica which is Latin for the cabbage. It refers to the ancient name used for the horticultural cabbage family. A good example is the European horticultural vegetable turnip, Brassica rapa.

Brassii: [bra-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Leonard J Brass; 1900-1971, who was an Australian botanical collector from New Guinee and northern Australian. A good example is Peristrophe brassii.

Brauniana: [bror-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Alexander Carl Heinrich Braun; 1805–1877 who was a Barvarian (now German) botanist who pioneered work on phyllotaxis (The position of leaves on plants) and cell morphology. A good example is the bark on Festuca brauniana.

Braunii: [bror-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Alexander Carl Heinrich Braun; 1805–1877 who was a Barvarian (now German) botanist who pioneered work on phyllotaxis (The position of leaves on plants) and cell morphology. A good example is the bark on Scolopia braunii.

Brayleyana: [Brahy-lee-a-na] Is named in honour of Edward William Brayley; 1801-1870, who was a professor and a member of the royal society of London. A good example is Flindersia brayleyana.

Breba: [bre-ba] From Breba or Breva, which is Latinized from the Spanish for the first crop in figs. It refers to plants which produce two crops of fruits or rarely three crops of flowers in one season.The breba crop is the first or usually minor crop not the main crop. A good example is Ficus racemosa which produces the breba crop in spring and the main crop in autumn. The breba crop usually has fewer fruit of a poorer tasting and nutritional quality.

Breccia: [bre-kee-a] From Breccia, which is Latin or Brecha which is Old German for rocks which are composed of larger angular fragments of older rocks cemented together. It refers to clastic sedimentary rocks which are composed of large, angular fragments over two millimetres in diameter often with sea shells and other larger particles. The spaces between the large angular fragments can be filled with a matrix of smaller particles or a mineral cement that binds the rock together.

Different size Breccia in tidal zone Clairview Queensland.

Bredboensis: [bred-boh-en-sis] From Bredbo, which is Latinized for the district of Bredbo and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to the type specie originating from the Bredbo district south east of Canberra N.S.W. A good example is Gentiana bredboensis.

Bredemeyera: [bre-de-me-ye-ra] Is named in honour of Franz Bredemeyer; 1758-1839, who was an Austrian plant collector in Venezuela. A good example is Bredemeyera acerosa, which is now known as Comesperma acerosa.

Brennanii: [bren-na-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Brennan. A good example is Hibbertia brennanii which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to its real or correct classification.

Brevi: [bre-vi] From Brevis which is Latin for short.

Breviaculeata: [bre-vi-a-kyoo-lee-a-ta] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Aculeatus, which is Latin for prickly or to have stipular spines. It refers to fruits, which are covered in soft spines. A good example is Triumfetta breviaculeata.

Breviaristata: [bre-vi-var-is-ta-ta] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Aristata which, is Latin for a bristle. It refers to seeds which have a shorter bristle than other species in the genus. A good example is Gahnia breviaristata.

Breviarticulata: [bre-vi-ar-ti-kyoo-la/lei-ta] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Aculeatus which is Latin for prickly or to have stipular spines. It refers to plants, which have short prickles or spines. A good example is Bifaria breviarticulata.

Brevibracteata: [bre-vi-brahk-te-ah-tah] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Bracteus, which is Latin for a bract. It refers to the involucral bract being smaller in this species compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Trichosanthes brevibracteata, which is now known as Trichosanthes cucumerina var. cucumerina.

Brevibracteatus: [bre-vi-brak-tee–tus] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Bracteus, which is Latin for a bract. It refers to the involucral bract being smaller in this species compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Cyperus brevibracteatus.

Brevicallosum: [bre-vi-kal-loh-sum] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Callōsus, which is Latin for thick or to thicken. It refers to structures or organs, which have thickened margins or are swollen around the middle. A good example was the seeds on Sorghum brevicallosum, which is now known as Sorghum timorense.

Brevicarinatum: [bre-vi-kar-i-nei-tum] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Carīnātus, which is Latin for a keel. It refers to glumes, lemmas or palea which have a raised longitudinal line or a keel. A good example is Sorghum brevicarinatum, which is now known as Sorghum arundinaceum.

Brevicauda: [bre-vi-kor-da] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Caudātus which is Latin for a tail. It refers to the petals and sepals which are long and narrow somewhat resembling a tail. A good example is Dendrobium brevicauda, which is now known as Dendrobium brevicaudum and Dockrilla brevicauda.

Brevicaudum: [bre-vi-kawr-dum] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Caudātus which is Latin for a tail. It refers to the petals and sepals which are long and narrow somewhat resembling a tail. A good example is Dendrobium brevicauda, which is now known as Dendrobium brevicaudum.

Brevicilium: [bre-vi-sil-li-um] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Cilium, which is Latin for an eyelash. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a fringe of hairs along the margins. A good example is Helichrysum brevicilium, which is now known as Chrysocephalum baxteri.

Brevicompta: [bre-vi-komp-ta] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Comptus, which is Latin for adorned in beauty. It refers to the small flower heads standing erect, which are attractive but just not quite being really beautiful. A good example is Leiocarpa brevicompta.

Breviculmis: [bre-vi-kul-mis] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Culmus, which is Latin for a stem. It refers to the culms being rather short compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Cyperus breviculmis.

Breviculmus: [bre-vi-kul-mus] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Culmus, which is Latin for a stem. It refers to the culms which are rather short compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Carex breviculmus.

Brevicurrens: [bre-vi-kur-renz] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Culmus, which is Latin for a stem. It refers to the culms which are rather short compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Helichrysum brevidecurrens, which is now known as Ozothamnus cupressoides.

Brevicuspis: [bre-vi-kus-pis] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Cuspis, which is Latin for a point. It refers to the upper tepals which taper to a long narrow apex. A good example is Caladenia multiclavia var. brevicuspis.

Brevidens: [bre-vi-denz] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Dentātus, which is Latin for a tooth. It refers to leaflet apexes which have a small tooth. A good example is Indigofera brevidens.

Brevidentata: [bre-vi-den-ta-ta] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Dentātus, which is Latin for a tooth. It refers to the lealet apexes which have a small tooth. A good example is Banksia brevidentata.

Breviflora: [bre-vi-flor-a] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to the corollas or petals, which are much shorter than other species in the genus. A good example is Grewia breviflora.

Breviflorum: [bre-vi-flor-um] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to spikelets, which are much shorter than other species in the genus. A good example is Paspalidium breviflorum.

Breviflorus: [bre-vi-flor-us] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to spikelets, which are much shorter than other species in the genus. A good example is Leucopogon breviflorus.

Brevifolia: [bre-vi-foh-li-a] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves which are shorer than others pecies or sub species in the species and genus. A good example is Maireana brevifolia.

Brevifolium: [bre-vi-foh-li-um] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are much shorter than other species within the genus. A good example is Ripogonum brevifolium.

Brevifolius: [bre-vi-foh-li-us] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are much shorter especially when compared to other species within the genus. A good example is Ripogonum brevifolium.

Breviglumis: [Bre-vi-gloo-mis/mis] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Gluma, which is Latin for a glume or a husk. It refers to grass seeds, which have short glumes and lemmas. A good example is Austrostipa breviglumis.

Brevilabatum: [bre-vi-la-ba-tum] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and labrus, which is Latin for to have the shape or form of a pair of lips. It refers to the lips on the lower tepal which is smaller when compared to other species within the genus. A good example was Lysinema brevilimbatum, which is now known as Lysinema lasianthum.

Brevilabium: [bre-vi-la-bi-um] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Labrus, which is Latin for to have the shape or form of a pair of lips. It refers to the lips on the lower tepals which is smaller when compared to other species within the genus. A good example is Dendrobium brevilabium, which is now known as Pachystoma pubescens.

Brevilabre: [bre-vi-la-bre] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Labrus, which is Latin for a lip. It refers to the lip on the lower tepal, which is very short even compared to other species within the genus. A good example is Prasophyllum brevilabre.

Brevilabris: [bre-vi-la-bris] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and labrus, which is Latin for to have the shape or form of a pair of lips. It refers to the lips on the lower tepal which is smaller when compared to other species within the genus. A good example is Hybanthus brevilabris.

Brevilingueus: [bre-vi-lin-gyoo-ee-us] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Lingulatus, which is Latin for to be tongue like. It refers to floral ligules which resemble the tongue. A good example was Senecio brevilingueus, which is now known as Senecio glossanthus.

Brevipapposus: [bre-vi-pap-po-sus] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Papposa, which is Ancient Greek for a grandfather. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in short pale grey or white hairs like a grandfathers stubbled beard. A good example is Cephalosorus brevipapposus, which is now known as Cephalosorus carpesioides.

Brevipedata: [bre-vi-pe-da-ta] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi/Pedis, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to peduncles which are rather to very short. A good example is Ardisia brevipedata.

Brevipedunculata: [bre-vi-pe-dun-kyoo-la-ta] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and From Pous which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedi which is Latin for a foot or feet. A good example is Olearia brevipedunculata

Brevipes: [bre-vi-pes] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Pous which is Ancient Greek or Pedi/Pedis, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to plants, which creep across the ground for only short distances. A good example is Harmsiodoxa brevipes.

Breviracemosum: [bre-vi-ra-se-moh-sum] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Racēmōsus, which is Latin for a raceme. It refers to plants, which have short flowering spikes. A good example is Dendrobium breviracemosum, which is now known as Leioanthum bifalce.

Breviradiata: [bre-vi-ra-di-a-ta] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Radiatus, which is Ancient Greek for to have light rays. It refers to a structure or organ, which has organs spreading out From a central position. A good example is the hairs on the seeds of Calotis breviradiata.

Brevirhachis: [bre-vi-ra-kis] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Rháchis, which is Ancient Greek for a spine or stem. It refers to organs which are usually the flowers, which have short stalks. A good example is Persoonia brevirhachis.

Brevirostris: [bre-vi-ro-se-tris] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Rōstrātus, which is Latin for a bird’s beak. It refers to calyptras, which are shorter than most other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus brevirostris, which is now known as Eucalyptus camaldulensis var. brevirostris.

Brevis: [bre-vis] From Brevis, which is Latin for short. It refers to plants, which have short floral segments. A good example is Conostylis breviscapa.

Breviscapa: [bre-vi-ska-pa] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Sképē, which is Latin for a stalk or scape. It refers to flowering spikes, which are shorter than the foliage. A good example is Conostylis breviscapa.

Breviscapis: [bre-vi-skei-pis] From Brevis which is Latin for short and Sképē which is Latin for a stalk or scape. It refers to flowering spikes which are shorter than the foliage. A good example is Brachyscome breviscapis.

Breviscapum: [bre-vi-ska-pum] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Sképē which is Ancient Greek or Scape which is Latin for a leafless stalk. It refers to stalks which bear flowers and fruits. A good example is Stylidium breviscapum.

Brevisepala: [bre-vi-se-pa-la] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum which is Latin for a sepal. It refers to sepals which are much shorter than other species in the genus. A good example is the ground orchid Pterostylis brevisepala.

Brevisepalum: [bre-vi-se-pa-lum] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum which is Latin for a sepal. It refers to sepals which are much shorter than other species in the genus. A good example is Haemodorum brevisepalum.

Brevisepalus: [bre-vi-se-pa-lus] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum which is Latin for the specialized leaves behind a bud that often are cupular, the sepals. It refers to sepals which are much shorter when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Leucopogon fletcheri subsp. brevisepalus.

Breviseta: [bre-vi-se-ta] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Setus, which is Latin for a bristle. It refers to structures or organs, which have short bristles. A good example is Schoenus brevisetis.

Brevisetum: [bre-vi-se-tum] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Setus, which is Latin for a bristle. It refers to structures or organs, which have short bristles. A good example is the grass Rytidosperma setaceum var. brevisetum.

Brevisetis: [bre-vi-se-tis] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Setus, which is Latin for a bristle. It refers to structures or organs, which have short bristles. A good example is Schoenus brevisetis.

Brevissima: [bre-vi-si-si-ma] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to flowers, which are much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example is Diuris brevissima.

Brevistigmata: [bre-vi-stig-ma-ta] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Stigmatus, which is Latin fora point. It refers to stigmas which are smaller than other stigmas in the genus. A good example is Hypoxis vaginata var. brevistigmata.

Brevistyla: [bre-vi-stahy-la] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a part of the female reproductive organ between the ovaries and the stigma. It refers to flowers, which have much shorter styles than other species in the genus. A good example is Callicarpa brevistyla.

Breviumbellata: [bre-vi-um-bel-la-ta] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Umbellatum, which is Latin for a shadow. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow along rills or openings in the rainforest where more light is available. A good example is Litsea breviumbellata.

Brevivexillum: [bre-vi-vek-sil-lum] From Brevis, which is Latin for short and Vēlum, which is Latin for a sail, flag or banner. It refers to standard petals on legumes which are comparatively much shorter than the lateral and keel petals usually associated with legumes. A good example is Castanospermum brevivexillum, which is now known as  Castanospermum australe.

Breweria: [broo-wer-i-a] Is named in honour of James Alexander Brewer; 1818 -1886, who was a British born Australian botanist and naturalist. A good example is Breweria pannosa.

Brewsterii: [broo-ster-i-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Sarah Agnes Angus Brewster; 1874-1957, who was a headmistress and naturalist, who later accepted the post of demonstrator in nature studies and elementary science at Sydney Technical College; for her original work. A good example is Senna brewsteri.

Breynia: [brei-ni-a] Is named in honour of Jacob Breyn; 1637-1697, who was a German botanical author. A good example is Breynia oblongifolia.

Bridelia: [bri-de-li-a] Is named in honour of Samuel Élisée de Bridel; 1761-1828, who was a Swiss botanical expert on mosses and lichens. A good example is Bridelia leichhardtii.

Bridgesiana: [bridg-si-a-na] Is named in honour Frederick Bridges; 1840–1904, who was an education officer in New South Wales, with a career that spanned an important phase of development of education in New South Wales, which included the growth of a highly centralised system of educational administration under the control of a cabinet minister. A good example is Eucalyptus bridgesiana.

Brightiae: [brahy-ti-ee] Is named in honour of bright. A good example is the fern Teratophyllum brightiae.

Brillantaisia: [bril-yan-tahy-si-a] Is named in honour of M. Brillant-Marion; who was a French botanist who accompanied Palisot de Beauvois in his expeditions to Western Africa. A good example is the aggressive behaviour of Brillantaisia lamium which is likely to be a major environmental problem in Australia – A sleeper weed.

Brisbane: [briz-bein] Is named after the Brisbane river in turn it was named after Sir Thomas Makdougall Brisbane; 1773–1860, who was the 1st Baronet, a British soldier and administrator.

Brisbanica: [briz-ban-i-ka] From Brisbane, which is Latinized for Brisbane. It refers to plants, which originate from the Brisbane district. A good example is Lilaeopsis brisbanica.

Brisbanicum: [briz-ban-i-kum] From Brisbane, which is Latinized for Brisbane. It refers to plants, which originate from the Brisbane district. A good example is Crinum brisbanicum, which is now known as Crinum arenarium.

Brisbanicus: [briz-ban-i-kus] From Brisbane, which is Latinized for Brisbane. It refers to plants, which originate from the Brisbane district. A good example is Phyllanthus brisbanicus, which is now known as Phyllanthus tenellus.

Brisbaniensis: [briz-ban-i-en-sis] From Brisbane, which is Latinized for Brisbane and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to which originate along the Brisbane River. A good example is Alocasia brisbaniensis.

Bristle: [bris-el] From Byrst, which is Old English for a short, stiff hair. It refers to structures or organs which are covered in stiff hirtellous or if longer hirsute hairs.

Bristly: [bris-lee] From Byrst, which is Old English for a short, stiff hair. It refers to a structure or organ, which are covered in short bristles.

Brittanii: [bri-ta-ni-ahy] Maybe named in honour of Dr. Norman Henry Brittan; 1920-20.., who was an Australia botanist and botanical illustrator. A good example is Lomandra brittanii.

Brittenii: [bri-ten-i-ahy] Maybe named in honour of James Britten;1846-1924, who was an English Botanist who collected Australian flora. A good example is Decaisnina brittenii subsp. brittenii.

Brittle: [bri-tel] It refers to a twig which snaps or break easily and/or cleanly. A good example is the leaves and twigs of Bertya brownie.

Briza: [briz-a] From Briza, which is Ancient Greek for sleepy as in dozing off while sitting – Nodding off and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, on a grass which appear to be nodding off. A good example is Brachiaria brizantha.

Brizioides: [briz-i-oi-deez] From Briza, which is Ancient Greek for sleepy as in dozing off while sitting and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to structures or organs, which tend to be in a nodding position especially at maturity similar to the spikes on the Briza genus. A good example is the flowering spikes on Triodia brizioides that are normally rigid Triodia genus.

Brizochloa: [briz-o-klo-a] From Briza, which is Ancient Greek for sleepy as in dozing off while sitting and Khlóē,which is Ancient Greek for (young) green shoots – a grass. It refers to grass flower spikes which tend to be in a nodding position especially at maturity. A good example is Poa brizochloa, which is now known as Poa drummondiana.

Brizopyrum: [briz-o-pahy-rum] From Briza, which is Ancient Greek for sleepy as in dozing off while sitting – Nodding. It refers to an ancient grass genus of this name in Europe, Isopyron. A good example is Brizopyrum scirpoideum, which is now known as Spartochloa scirpoidea.

Brizula: [briz-oo-la] From Briza which is Ancient Greek for sleepy as in dozing off while sitting. It refers to flowers, and fruits which tend to be in a nodding position especially at maturity. A good example is Aphelia brizula.

Broadbentiana: [brord-ben-ti-a-na] Is named in honour of J. Broadbent, who collected herbarium samples from around the Mitta Mitta district in Victoria. A good example is Melicope broadbentiana.

Brochidodromous: [bro-ki-do-dro-mos] Maybe from Broch which is a circular stone tower and Dromous which is Ancient Greek for moving or running. It refers to a simple leaf venation which has a single primary vein with the lateral (secondary) first forming a circular motion then terminating at or close to the margins.

Brochododromous Venation.

Brochosiphon: [bro-ko-sahy-fon] Maybe from Broch, which is a circular stone tower and Sī́phōn, pipe which is Ancient Greek for a hollow tube. It refers to an organ, which resembles a long, hollow tube. A good example is the long petioles on Brochosiphon australis.

Brockiei: [bro-ki-ee] Is named in honour of Walter Boa Brockie who was a New Zealander who established the fine alpine rock garden at the main entrance to Otari Plant Museum in Wellington New Zealand. A good example is Scleranthus brockiei.

Brockii 1: [bro-ki-ahy] Is named in honour of John Brock 1951-20.., who was an Australian natural history photographer in the Northern Territory and or Margaret Anne Brock 1951-21.., who was an Australian botanist in the Northern Territory. A good example maybe Acacia brockii.

Brockii 2: [bro-kee-ahy] Is named in honour of Walter Boa Brockie who was a New Zealander who established the fine alpine rock garden at the main entrance to Otari Plant Museum in Wellington New Zealand. A good example maybe Acacia brockii.

Brockmania: [brok-man-i-a] Is named in honour of F. S. Brockman; 1857-1917, who was a Western Australian Explorer who spent a lot of his time in the Kimberley Range. A good example was , which is now known as Brockmania membranacea, which is now known as Hibiscus meraukensis.

Brockmaniana: [brok-ma-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Frederick Slade Brockman; 1857-1917, who was an Australian explorer and surveyor in the North west of Western Australia. A good example was Marsdenia brockmaniana, which is now known as Oxystelma esculentum.

Brockwayi: [brok-way-ahy] Is named in honour of George Ernest Emerson Brockway; 1900-1973 who was an Australian forester and forest research officer. A good example is Eucalyptus brockwayi.

Brogoensis: [bro-go-en-sis] From Brogo which is Latinized for the district around and on the Brogo River and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the plants coming from along the river near Brogo. A good example is Pomaderris brogoensis.

Brombya: [brom-bahy-a]  Is named in honour of John Edward Bromby; 1809-1889, who was an English clergyman, schoolmaster and public lecturer. A good example is Brombya platynema.

Bromeliifolius: [bro-mel-li-foh-li-us] Is named in honour of Olaf Bromel; 1639-1705, who was a well respected Swedish botanist and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. A good example is Dasypogon bromeliifolius.

Bromelioides: [bro-me-li-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Olaf Bromel; 1639-1705, who was a well respected Swedish botanist and Folium, which is Latin for  and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the leaves which resemble the leaves of the Bromelia genus or pineapple plants. A good example is Conostylis bromelioides.

Bromheadia: [brom-he-di-a] Is named in honour of Sir Edward Bromhead; 1789-1855, who was British landowner and mathematician. A good example is Bromheadia pulchra.

Bromilowiana: [brom-i-loh-a-na] Is named in honour of Bromilow. A good example is Acacia bromilowiana.

Bromoides: [bro-moi-deez] From Bromos, which is Ancient Greek for wild oats and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike orsimilar to. It refers to the plants close resemblance to the Bromus genus. A good example is the exotic weedy pasture grass in Western Australia of Vulpia bromoides.

Bromus:[bro/broh-mus] From Bromos, which is Ancient Greek for wild oats. It refers to the grasses which resemble the original wild oats which are now in the Avena genus. A good example is Bromus arenarius.

Bronwenae: [bron-we-nee] Is named in honour of Bronwen Keighery; who is a Western Australian Wildflower Society member and keen conservationist with her husband Greg. Greg and Bronwen are founding Perth Branch Wildflower Society and have been on the Perth Branch Committee since its inception, only retiring last June after 33 years.. A good example is Grevillea bronwenae.

Bronze: [bronz] From Bronzo, which is Latin for the metal made from Copper and tin. It refers to a reddish-brown, bronze colour of the new growth before it turns green. A good example is the new growth on the rare native rusty plum, Niemeyera whitei.

Brookeana: [broo-kee-a-na] Is named in honour of Sarah Theresa Brooks (Sometimes cited as Brooke); 1850-1928, who was an Australian who collected extensively for Ferdinand von Mueller in Western Australia particularly around Israelite Bay. A good example is Hakea brookeana.

Brookeriana: [broo-ker-i-ei-na] Is named in honour of Murray Ian Hill Brooker; 1934-2016 who was an Australian botanist and Eucalyptologist. A good example is Eucalyptus brookeriana.

Brooksiana: [brook-si-a-na] Is named in honour of Murray Ian Hill Brooker; 1934-2016 who was an Australian botanist and Eucalyptologist. This probably a spelling error for brookeriana. A good example is Eucalyptus brookeriana.

Broomensis: [broo-men-sis] From Broome, which is Latinized for the city area around Broom in Western Australia and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered near Broome. A good example is the sundew Drosera broomensis.

Brophyi: [bro-fahy-i] Is named in honour of Brophy. A good example is Melaleuca brophyi.

Brossaea: [bros-see-a] Is named in honour of Guy de La Brosse; 1586-1641, who was a French botanist, medical doctor, and pharmacist. He was a physician to King Louis XIII of France, and was also noted for the creation of a major botanical garden of Jardin des Plantes, medicinal herbs, which was commissioned by the king. This garden  was the first botanical garden in Paris, and the second in France. A good example was Brossaea lanceolata, which is now known as Gaultheria lanceolata.

Broviniensis: [bro-vin-i-en-sis] From Brovin which is probably Latinized for a cattle property or local name for an area near the Waroon State Forest in southern Queensland. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the district near Waroon. A good example is Eucalyptus broviniensis.

Browniana: [brour-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Robert Brown; 1773-1858, who was a naturalist who sailed with Mathew Flinders when he circumnavigated Australia and became South Australia’s first botanical collector. A good example was Caryodaphne browniana, which is now known as Cryptocarya triplinervis.

Brownianum: [brour-ni-a-num] Is named in honour of Robert Brown; 1773-1858, who was a naturalist who sailed with Mathew Flinders when he circumnavigated Australia and became South Australia’s first botanical collector. A good example is Cynanchum brownianum.

Brownii: [brour-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Robert Brown; 1773-1858, who was a naturalist who sailed with Mathew Flinders when he circumnavigated Australia and became South Australia’s first botanical collector. A good example is Limnophila brownii.

Brownlessiana: [brour-les-si-a-na] Is named in honour of T. H. Brownless, who collected herbarium species around 1897 around the Deliniquin district. A good example is Pouteria brownlessiana.

Brucea: [broo-se-a] Is probably named in honour of James Bruce; 1730-1894, who was a Scottish explorer who discovered the source of the Blue Nile but I have been unable to substantiated it. A good example is Brucea javanica.

Brucei: [broo-se-ahy] Is probably named in honour of James Bruce; 1730-1894, who was a Scottish explorer who discovered the source of the Blue Nile but I have been unable to substantiated it. A good example is Eriostemon brucei.

Bruguiera: [broo-gyoo-i-ra] Is named in honour of J.C. Bruguieres; 1750-1899, who accompanied Kerguelen on his expedition to Antarctica.

Bruhlii: [bru-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Bruhl. A good example is Homoranthus bruhlii.

Brumale: [bru-ma-le] From Brumalis, which is Latin for the winter soltice. It refers to plants, which bloom in the middle of winter. A good example is Racosperma brumale, which is now known as Acacia brumalis.

Brumalis: [bru-ma-lis] From Brumalis, which is Latin for the winter soltice. It refers to plants, which bloom in the middle of winter. A good example is Acacia brumalis.

Brunioides: [brun-ni-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Doctor Cornelius Brun, who was a Russian apothecary and avid plant collector in Russia and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. A good example is Acacia brunioides subsp. brunioides.

Brunnea: [brun-ni-a] From Braun/Brunnea, which is Latin for brown. It refers to structures or organs which are covered in brown hairs and thus have a brownish appearance. A good example is Pomaderris brunnea.

Brunneoceracea: [brun-nee-oh-ser-a-see-a] From Braun/Brunnea, which is Latin for pale brown or brown and Ceracea which is Latin for waxy. It refers to leaves or pileuses which have a brown or tan waxy appearance. A good example is Clitocybe brunneoceracea.

Brunnescens: [brun-nes-enz] From Braun/Brunnea, which is Latin for pale brown or brown. It refers to structures or organs, which are various shades of pale browns or greenish-brown. A good example is the pileus Epilobium brunnescens.

Brunneus: [bru-nee-us] From Braun/Brunnea, which is Latin for pale brown or brown. It refers to structures or organs, which are various shades of pale browns or greenish brown. A good example is the pileus Cortinarius brunneus.

Brunonia: [bru-noh-ni-a] Is named in honour of Robert Brown; 1773-1858, who was a Scottish naturalist who sailed with Mathew Flinders when he circumnavigated Australia. A good example is the leaves on Brunonia australis.

Brunoniana: [bru-noh-ni-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Robert Brown; 1773-1858, who was a Scottish naturalist who sailed with Mathew Flinders when he circumnavigated Australia. A good example is the leaves on Pisonia brunoniana.

Brunonianum: [bru-noh-ni-a-num] Is probably named in honour of Robert Brown; 1773-1858, who was a Scottish naturalist who sailed with Mathew Flinders when he circumnavigated Australia. A good example is the leaves on Lepidosperma brunonianum.

Bryantea: [brahy-an-tee-a] Is probably named in honour of Bryant but which Bryant is not known. A good example is Bryantea dealbata, which is now known as Neolitsea dealbatas.

Bryceana: [brahy-see-a-na] Is named in honour of Byrce. A good example is Caladenia bryceana.

Bryobium: [brahy-oh-bi-um] From Bryon which is Latin for moss and Bios which is Ancient Greek for life. It refers to plants, which extend life into the upper canopies or on trunks and limbs amongst mosses. A good example is Bryobium dischorense.

Bryoides: [brahy-oi-deez] From Brio which is Ancient Greek for mosses, lichens and clubmosses grouped together and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for similar to or alike. It refers to plants, which look similar to the bryophytes. A good example is Mielichhoferia bryoides.

Bryologist: [brahy-ol-o-jist] From Brio which is Ancient Greek for mosses, lichens and clubmosses, Ology which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person a who studies mosses, club mosses and liverworts.

Bryology: [brahy-ol-o-jee] From Brio which is Ancient Greek for mosses, lichens and clubmosses and Ology which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the scientific study of mosses, club mosses and liverworts.

Bryonia: [brahy-o-ni-a] From Bryonia which is the ancient Greek name for the vine used by Dioscorides. It refers to plants, which resembled the ancient Byronia genus. A good example is Bryonia laciniosa.

Bryonopsis: [brahy-o-nop-sis] From Bryonia which is the ancient Greek name for the vine used by Dioscorides and Opsis which is Ancient Greek for to appear like. It refers to plants, which resembled the ancient Byronia genus. A good example is Bryonopsis erythrocarpa.

Bryum: [Brahy-um] From Brúon, which is Ancient Greek for a tree-moss or oyster-green or Brúō, which is Ancient Greek for to be full to the point of bursting or Bryon, which is Latin for for a moss. The Greek refers to the copious quantities of sporangia on erect stipes which appear like a miniature forest. A good example is Bryum pachycladum.

Bubakii: [boo-ba-ki-ahy] Is most likely named in honour of František Bubák; 1866-1925, who was a Czecho mycologist and phytopathologist. A good example was Pterigeron bubakii, which is now known as Streptoglossa bubakii.

Bubalinoviscida: [bu-ba-li-noh-vis-si-da] From Bubalina, which is Latinized for the Buffel River in South Africa and Viscid, which Latin for sticky or a thick sticky semi liquid excrement. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered along the Buffel River and have a sticky viscid feel. A good example is Hygrocybe bubalinoviscida.

Bubbia: [bu-bi-a] From Bubbia, which is unknown but may be from Old English Bubba for a boy or brother. It probably refers to the prominence of the male reproductive organs or stamens. A good example where the stamens are prominent in the flower is found on Bubbia semecarpoides.

Buccal Cavity: [bu-kal, ka-vi-tee] From Bucca, which is Latin for swollen cheeks or full cheeks. It often It refers to fruits. Which have a cavity in them.

Bucculenta: [bu-kyoo-len-ta] From Bucca, which is Latin for swollen cheeks or full cheeks. It often refers to fruits which have a swollen appearance. A good example is the woody capsules on Hakea bucculenta.

Buchananensis: [bu-kan-a-nen-sis] From Buchanann which is Latin for the Lake Buchan west of Mackay in eastern Queensland (Is named after Francis Buchanan; 1762-1829, who was a Scottish botanist and superintendent of the Calcutta Botanic gardens.) and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers the types species being found on the edges of the lake. A good example is Dactyloctenium buchananensis.

Buchanania: [bu-kan-an-i-a] Is named in honour of Francis Buchanan; 1762-1829, who was a Scottish botanist and superintendent of the Calcutta Botanic gardens. A good example is Buchanania mangoides.

Buchananii: [bu-kan-a-ni-a] Is named in honour of Francis Buchanan; 1762-1829, who was a Scottish botanist and superintendant of the Calcutta Botanic gardens. A good example is Setaria buchananii, which is now known as Setaria dielsii.

Bucheria: [bu-cher-i-a] From Buca/Buchere, which is Latin for to puncture or pierce. It is a group or possibly a single species of extinct vascular plants from the Late Silurian period to Early Devonian around 426 to 393 million years ago.

Buchnera: [buk-ner-a] Is probably named in honour of Eduard Buchner; 1860–1917, who was a German chemist and zymologist. He was awarded the 1907 nobel Peace Prize in chemistry for his work on fermentation. A good example is Buchnera gracilis.

Buckinghamia: [bu-king-hei-mi-a] Is named in honour of Richard Grenville; 1823-1889, who was the Duke of Buckingham. A good example is Buchkinghamia celsissima.

Buckinghamii: [bu-king-hey-mi-ahy] Is named in honour of Richard Grenville; 1823-1889, who was the Duke of Buckingham. A good example is Asterolasia buckinghamii.

Buckleyi: [buk-lee-ahy] Is named in honour of Dr. Ralf Christopher Buckley; Dr. Ralf Buckley who is an Australian Environmental scientist. He has worked on environmental aspects of the arid central Australian dunefields since 1975, and prior to that in similar arid environments in East and South Africa and North America. He has a B.A. and M.A. in Natural Sciences from Cambridge, a Ph.D. on ‘Soils and vegetation of central Australian sand• ridge’ from the Department of Biogeography and Geomorphology, A.N.U., and has written 28 papers on the central Australian dunefields and a range of consultant reports. Currently Environmental Consultant at The Australian Mineral Development Laboratories, he maintains a close interest in all aspects of development in the Australian arid zone, particularly the central dune fields such as those overlying much of the western Eromanga Basin. He made several botanical collections in the southern Simpson Desert during the 1970’s.. A good example is Spermacoce buckleyi.

Bucknellii: [buk-nel-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Bucknell. A good example is Eucalyptus bucknellii.

Bucknera: [buk-ner-a] Is named in honour of Johann Buchner; 1783-1852, who was a German biopharmacologist who is credited with the isolation of salicin from the Salix genus.

Bud 1: [bud] From Budda, which is Old Nordic for a purse or Bodd which is Swedish for a head. It refers to a young shoot developing from the node or the apex like a little head.

Bud 2: [bud] From Budda, which is Old Nordic for a purse or Bodd which is Swedish for a head. It refers to a flower prior to the sepals or calyx opening to reveal the petals and or stamens and pistil.

Budawangensis: [bu-da-wang-en-sis] From Budawang, which is Latinized from the local aborginal vernacular for vantage point and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, originally discovered from the Budawang National Park south west of Ulladulla in NSW. A good example is Persoonia mollis subsp. budawangensis.

Budawangia: [bu-da-wang-i-a] From Budawang, which is Latinized from the local aborginal vernacular for vantage point. It refers toplants originally coming from the Budawang National Park south west of Ulladulla in NSW. A good example is Budawangia gnidiodes.

Buettneriana: [but-ner-i-a-na] Is named in honour of For Prof. Oscar. A. R. Büttner; 1858–1927, who was a German botanist and head of the research station in Togo from 1890–1891, later professor in Berlin. A good example is Labichea buettneriana.

Buettnerianum: [but-ner-i-a-num] Is named in honour of For Prof. Oscar. A. R. Büttner; 1858–1927, who was a German botanist and head of the research station in Togo from 1890–1891, later professor in Berlin. A good example is Syzygium buettnerianum.

Buffaloensis: [buf-fa-loh-en-sis] From Boúbalos, which is Ancient Greek for an antelope or wild Ox or later Būfalus, which is Latin for a buffalo and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on Mount Buffalo in Victoria. A good example is Juncus bufonius.

Bufonius: [bu-fo-ni-us] From Bufonius ,which is Latin for a toad. It refers to plants, which prefer wallum type habitats that are similar to those of toads, cool and moist. A good example is Juncus bufonius.

Buftonianum: [buf-to-ni-a-num] Is named in honour of John Bufton; 1858-1911 who was an Australian clergyman and plant collector in Tasmania. A good example was Prasophyllum buftonianum.

Buftonii: [buhf-to-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of John Bufton; 1858-1911 who was an Australian clergyman and plant collector in Tasmania. A good example was Helichrysum buftonii, which is now known as Ozothamnus costatifructus.

Bugloss: [bu-glos] From Boûs, which is Ancient Greek or Bū which is Latin for an Ox and Glōssos which is Ancient Greek or Glōssos which is Latin for a tongue. It refers to plants, which have fruits which resemble an ox’s tongue. A good example is the exotic weed Bugloss vulgare, which is now known as Echium vulgare.

Buglossoides: [bu-glos-si-oi-deez] From Boûs, which is Ancient Greek or Bū which is Latin for an Ox, Glōssos which is Ancient Greek or Glōssos which is Latin for a tongue and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the European Bugloss genus. A good example is Buglossoides arvensis.

Bulb: [bul-b] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus, which is Latin for a subterranean, globular bud which has fleshy leaves that emerge from the top with a reduced flat disk for a stem and rooting from the base. It refers to the modified leaves, which form the reproductive part of many monocotyledons especially common in lilies. A good example is Bulbine bulbosa.

Bulbifera: [bul-bi-fer-a] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus, which is Latin for a subterranean, globular bud having fleshy leaves which emerge from the top with a reduced flat disk for a stem and rooting from the base and Ferae/Ferārum, which are Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to fronds, which often develop miniature clones of the mother plant near the apexes of the veins or leaf axils where the flowers continue to form bulbils. A good example of a vine, which forms large tubers at the leaf axils is Dioscorea bulbifera.

Bulbiferum: [bul-bi-fer-um] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus, which is Latin for a subterranean, globular bud having fleshy leaves which emerge from the top with a reduced flat disk for a stem and rooting from the base and Ferae/Ferārum, which are Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to fronds or leaves, which often develop miniature clones of the mother plant near the apexes of the veins. A good example is Asplenium bulbiferum.

Bulbigena: [bul-bi-je-na] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus, which is Latin for a subterranean, globular bud having fleshy leaves which emerge from the top with a reduced flat disk for a stem and rooting from the base and Gena which is Ancient Greek for to be born. It refers to plants, which produce bulbs or bulbils to grow from. A good example is Drosera bulbigena.

Bulbil: [bul-bil] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus which is Latin for a subterranean, globular bud having fleshy leaves which emerge from the top with a reduced flat disk for a stem and rooting from the base. It refers smaller bulbs often attached to the mother bulb. A good example is the bulbil like plantlets along the mature fronds on Asplenium bulbiferum.

Bulbine: [bul-been] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus, which is Latin for a bulb. It refers to plants, which produce many bulbs or bulbils. A good example is the bulbils on Bulbine bulbosa.

Bulbinella: [bul-bi-ne-la] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus, which is Latin for a bulb and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to plants, which produce many bulbs or bulbils. Bulbinella was never an accepted name for Bulbine. A good example was Bulbinella Caudātus which has the accepted name of Bulbine bulbosa.

Bulbinopsis: [bul-bi-nop-sis] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus, which is Latin for a bulb and Ella which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to plants, which produce many bulbs or bulbils. Bulbinella was never an accepted name for Bulbine. A good example was Bulbinopsis bulbosa which has the accepted name of Bulbine bulbosa.

Bulblet: [bul-blet] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus, which is Latin for a bulb. It refers to the small propagules, which are produced on the fronds and leaves of some ferns and on rare occasions flowering plants. A good example is the fern Asplenium bulbiferum or the flowering plant Remusatia vivipara.

Bulbophyllum: [bul-bo-fil-lum] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus, which is Latin for a bulb and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the fleshy leaves and starch, which produce the bulbs. A good example is Bulbophyllum exiguum.

Bulbosa: [bul-boh-sa] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus, which is Latin for a bulb. It refers to plants, which have fleshy leaves at the base similar to a bulb. A good example is Bulbine bulbosa.

Brunonianus: [broo-noh-ni-a-nus] Is probably named in honour of Robert Brown; 1773-1858, who was a Scottish Scottish botanist and palaeobotanist who sailed with Mathew Flinders when he circumnavigated Australia. A good example is the leaves on Streblus brunonianus.

Brunoniella: [broo-noh-ni-el-la] Is named in honour of Robert Brown; 1773-1858, who was a Scottish naturalist who sailed with Mathew Flinders when he circumnavigated Australia. A good example is the leaves on Brunoniella acaulis.

Brunonis: [broo-noh-nis] Is named in honour of Robert Brown; 1773-1858, who was a Scottish naturalist who sailed with Mathew Flinders when he circumnavigated Australia. A good example is Brachyglottis brunonis.

Bulbostylis: [bul-bo-stahy-lis] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek for a bulb and stylis, which is Ancient Greek for a style. It refers to the style being somewhat bulb like. A good example is the sedge Bulbostylis barbata.

Bulbosum: [bul-boh-sum] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbine, which is Latin for a bulb. It refers to plants, which produce many bulbs or bulbils. A good example is the sedge Bulbine bulbosum.

Bulbosus: [bul-boh-sus] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus, which is Latin for a bulb. It refers to plants, which have fleshy leaves at the base similar to a bulb. A good example is Cyperus bulbosus.

Bulbous: [bul-bos] From Bulbos, which is Ancient Greek or Bulbus, which is Latin for a bulb. It refers to plants, which have bulbs.

Bulgaensis: [bul-ga-en-sis] From Bulga, which is Latinized from the aboriginal word and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered from near Bulga and the Yengo National Park. A good example is Acacia bulgaensis.

Bullata: [bul-la-ta] From Bullatus, which is Ancient Greek or Bulla, which is Latin for bubbled or blistered. It refers to a surface; usually the leaves, which have a bubbled, blistered or puckered appearance. A good example is the blistered leaves on Cloanthe parviflora.

Bullate: [bul-leit] From Bullatus, which is Ancient Greek or Bulla, which is Latin for bubbled or blistered. It refers to a surface; usually the leaves, which have a bubbled, blistered or puckered appearance. A good example is the blistered leaves on Chloanthes stoechadis.

Bullatum: [bul-la-tum] From Bullatus, which is Ancient Greek or Bulla, which is Latin for bubbled or blistered. It refers to a surface; usually the leaves, which have a bubbled, blistered or puckered appearance. A good example is the blistered leaves on Leptospermum bullatum, which is now known as Leptospermum scoparium.

Bulliarda: [bul-li-ar-da] Is named in honour of Jean Baptiste François Pierre Bulliard; 1752 1793 Paris, who was a French physician and botanist who specialized in mycology. A good example was Bulliarda recurva, which is now known as Crassula recurva.

Bullosus: [bul-loh-sa] From Bullatus, which is Ancient Greek or Bulla, which is Latin for bubbled or blistered. It refers to a surface; usually the leaves, which have a bubbled, blistered or puckered appearance. A good example is the puckered leaves on Aponogeton bullosus.

Bulweria: [bul-we-ri-a] Is named in honour of Bulwer. A good example is the puckered leaves on Bulweria nobilissima, which is now known as Deplanchea tetraphylla.

Bunburyanum: [bun-bu-rahy-a-num] Is named in honour of Dianna Richardson Bunbury; 1811-1898, and Mervyn Bunbury who were Irish born Australian plant collectors in Western Australia. It was probably Mervyn who collected the type specimen. A good example is Atriplex bunburyanum.

Bunburyense: [bun-bu-rahy-ens] Is named in honour of Dianna Richardson Bunbury; 1811-1898, who was an Irish born Australian plant collector in Western Australia who took a particular interest in Algae. A good example is  Thamnoclonium bunburyense.

Buncei: [bun-see-ahy] Is named in honour of Daniel Bunce; 1813-1872, who was an explorer and collector of plants who also set up the Geelong gardens with native plants from seeds he had collected on his travels. A good example is Panicum buncei.

Bundeyana: [bun-dee-a-na] Is named in honour of Bundey. A good example is Diospyros bundeyana.

Bungadinnia: [bun-ga-din-ni-a] From Bungadinnia, which is probably Latinized from the local Aboriginal Ayapathu, Binthii, Balnaggarr, Nhirrbanh, Wundall and Wunuurr clans of Cape York peninsular for the tree or fruit. It refers to the plants, which originate in the north of Cape York Peninsular. A good example is Syzygium bungadinnia.

Bunglensis: [bungl-en-sis] From Bungle, which is Latinized from the local Karjaganu Jaru Aboriginal people for the Bungle Bungle National Park and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Bungle Bungle National Park. A good example is Triodia bunglensis.

Bungoniensis: [bun-goh-ni-en-sis] From Bungonia, which is Latin from the local Gundungurra Aboriginal people for a sandy creek which only flows when it rainsand Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the plants, which were first discovered from the Bungonia National Park. A good example is Galium bungoniensis.

Bunicola: [Bu-ni-koh-la] From Bounos, which is Ancient Greek for a hill and Kola, which is Latin for a dweller or to dwell. It refers to the grasses preference for hilly terraines. A good example is Trioda bunicola.

Bunites: [bu-ni-teez] From Bunites which is unknown. A good example is the sedge Corymbia bunites.

Bunius: [bu-ni-us] Maybe from Bunium, which is Greek from the name Dioscorides gave to the Cummin herb, Cuminum cyminum. It may refer to the flavour of the leaves being similar to the herb Cummin. I fruits have a somewhat sweet strong cherry flavour. A good example is the prolific small fruits found on Antidesma bunius.

Bunnyana: [bun-yan-a] From Bunya, which is Latinized from the local Aboriginal vernacular for the Bunny district and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to the plants originating from the Bunny district in Western Australia. A good example is Cyanostegia bunnyana, which is now known as Cyanostegia cyanocalyx.

Bunyensis: [bun-yen-sis] From Bunya which is Latinized from the local Aboriginal vernacular for the Bunya nut trees and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the plants originating from the Bunya Mountains National Park. A good example is Bothriochloa bunyensis.

Bupleurifolia: [Bu-pler-i-foh-li-a] From Bupleurum, which is Latin for an oxn’s ribs and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have a series of prominent lateral veins which resemble an ox’s ribs. A good example is Hibbertia bupleurifolia.

Buprestium: [bu-pres-ti-um] From Buprestium which is unknown. A good example is Eucalyptus buprestium.

Bupthalmoides: [bup-tha-moi-deez] From Bous, which is Ancient Greek for an ox and Optikós/Opthalmos, which are Greek for an eye and and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flower heads which resembles an oxen’s eye. A good example is Helichrysum bupthalmoides which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to its real or correct classification.

Burbidgeae: [ber-bid-jee-e] Is named in honour of Frederick William Burbidge; 1847-1905, who was an English botanist, author, gardener at Kew and curator of the Trinity College gardens in Dublin. A good example is Acacia burbidgeae.

Burbidgei: [ber-bid-je-ahy] Is named in honour of Frederick William Burbidge; 1847-1905, who was an English botanist, author, gardener at Kew and curator of the Trinity College gardens in Dublin. A good example is Picris burbidgei

Burchardia: [ber-kar-di-a] Is named in honour of Johann Burchard; 1784-1817, who was a German Doctor who foreshadowed the plant sexual system of Karl Linnaeus. A good example is the lily genus Burchardia umbellata.

Burckiana: [ber-kar-i-a-na] Is unknown. A good example is Cryptocarya burckiana.

Burdekense: [ber-de-kens] From Burdiken, which is Latinized for the Burdekin River which was named by Ludwig Leichhardt in 1845 in honour of Thomas Burdekin, one of the sponsors of the expedition and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the Burdeken district or along the Burdiken River west of Cairns in Queensland. A good example is Racosperma burdekense, which is now known as Acacia burdekensis.

Burdekensis: [ber-de-ken-sis] From Burdiken, which is Latinized for the Burdekin River which was named by Ludwig Leichhardt in 1845 in honour of Thomas Burdekin, one of the sponsors of the expedition and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the Burdeken district or along the Burdiken River west of Cairns in Queensland. A good example is Acacia burdekensis.

Burdettiana: [ber-de-ti-a-na] Is probably named in honour of William Burdettii; 1871-1940, who was an Australian Orchardist, horticulturist and plant collector. A good example is Eucalyptus burdettiana.

Burdettii: [ber-de-ti-ahy] Is probably named in honour of William Burdett; 1871-1940, who was an Australian Orchardist, horticulturist and plant collector. A good example is Banksia burdettii.

Bureavella: [ber-ee-vel-la] Is named in honour of Louis Édouard Bureau; 1830-1918, who was a French physician and botanist who specialized in palaeobotany. A good example is Bureavella unmackiana, which is now known as Sersalisia unmackiana.

Burgesseana: [ber-jes-see-a-na] Is named in honour of Rev. Colin Ernest Bryce Hawthorne Burgess;1907-1987, who was an Australian botanical author. A good example is Eucalyptus burgesseana.

Burgessia: [ber-jes-see-a] Is probably named in honour of Rev.Colin Ernest Bryce Hawthorne Burgess;1907-1987, who was an Australian botanical author. A good example is Burgesia homaloclada.

Burgessiana: [bur-jes-see-uh] Is probably named in honour of Rev.Colin Ernest Bryce Hawthorne Burgess;1907-1987, who was an Australian botanical author. A good example is Eucalyptus burgessiana.

Burgessii: [ber-jes-si-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Rev.Colin Ernest Bryce Hawthorne Burgess;1907-1987, who was an Australian botanical author. A good example is Olearia burgessii.

Burgessiorum: [ber-jes-si-or-um] Is named in honour of Rev.Colin Ernest Bryce Hawthorne Burgess;1907-1987, who was an Australian botanical author. A good example is Conospermum burgessiorum.

Burgmansia: [berg-man-si-a] Is named in honour of Sebald Justinus Brugmans; 1763-1819, who was a Dutch botanist and physician. A good example is the angels trumpet Burgmansia suaveolens.

Burianum: [ber-i-a-num] From Burian, which is Latinized for Burian district and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Burian district. A fruit that is covered in spikes or thorns. A good example is the horrific noxious weed Haloragis burianum, which is now known as Haloragis exalata subsp. velutina.

Burkittii: [ber-ki-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Samual Burkitt, who was an Australian plant collector. A good example is Swainsona burkittii.

Burmanni: [ber-man-nahy] Is named in honour of Johannes Burman; 1706-1789, who was a Dutch Botanist and friend of Karl Linnaeus. A good example is the beautiful lily specie of Dodonaea burmanni.

Burmannia: [ber-man-ni-a] Is named in honour of Johannes Burman; 1706-1789, who was a Dutch Botanist and friend of Karl Linnaeus. A good example is the beautiful lily specie of Burmannia disticha.

Burmanniana: [ber-man-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Johannes Burman; 1706-1789, who was a Dutch Botanist and friend of Karl Linnaeus. A good example is Dodonaea viscosa subsp. burmanniana.

Burnettia: [ber-ne-ti-a] Is named in honour of Gilbert Burnett; 1800-1835, who was the first Professor of Botany at London’s King College. A good example is the orchid Burnettiia cuneata.

Burr: [ber] From Burre, which is Old English or Danish for a rough or prickly case. It refers to plants, which produce seeds in a hard prickly pod. A fruit that is covered in spikes or thorns. A good example is the horrific noxious weed Xanthium spinosum.

Burracoppinensis: [bur-ru-ko-pin-en-sis] From Burracoppin, which is Latinized from the local aboriginal vernacular for near a big hill and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to where the first plants were discovered. A good example is Eucalyptus burracoppinensis.

Burraensis: [bur-ree-en-sis] From Burra, which is Latinized from the local aboriginal vernacular Burra for big or large and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to where the first plants were discovered around Binna Burra a place where the large Antarctic Beech Trees Grow. A good example is Aristida burraensis.

Burragorang: [bur-ra-gor-ang] From Burragorang, which is Latinized from the local aboriginal vernacular from three combined words with a double meaning. Burro means a kangaroo, Booroon for small animals and gang for a hunt. It refers to a place for hunting Kangaroos or hunting small animals. It refers to the first plants, which were discovered from the area. A good example is Spyridium burragorang.

Burrana: [bur-ra-na] From Burra which is Latinized from the local aboriginal vernacular Burra for big or large and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to where the first plants were discovered around the large basalt landforms south west of Townsville. A good example is Acacia barrana.

Burrowii: [bur-roh-ee-ahy] Is named in honour of Robert John Gordon Burrow;1877-1957, who was an Australian forester. A good example is Acacia burrowi.

Burrowsiana: [buh-roh-see/zee-a-na] Is named in honour of Burrows. A good example is Acacia burrowsiana.

Bursaria: [ber-sar-i-a] From Bursa which is Latin for a purse. It refers to fruits, which resemble small purses. A good example is Bursaria spinulosa.

Bursariifolia: [ber-sar-i-foh-li-a] From Bursa which is Latin for a purse and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble little purses in that they surround their flowers and green fruits. A good example is Dodonaea bursariifolia.

Bursarioides: [ber-sar-i-oi-deez] From Bursa which is Latin for a purse and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the Bursaria genus. A good example is Daviesia bursarioides.

Bursera: [ber-ser-a] Is named in honour of Joachim Burser; 1583-1639, who was a German botanist and physician who lived and studied in Denmark. A good example is Bursera australasica, which is now known as Canarium australasicum.

Burtonia: [ber-toh-ni-a] Is named in honour of David Burton; 17??-1792, who was a botanist sent to Port Jackson by Sir Joseph Banks to collect seeds when off duty as a government surveyor and gardener. The genus Burtonia has been transferred to Hibbertia.

Burtonii: [ber-toh-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of David Burton; 17??-1792, who was a botanist sent to Port Jackson by Sir Joseph Banks to collect seeds when off duty as a government surveyor and gardener. A good example is Hibiscus burtonii.

Burtonioides: [ber-toh-ni-oi-deez] Is named in honour of David Burton; 17??-1792, who was a botanist sent to Port Jackson by Sir Joseph Banks to collect seeds when off duty as a government surveyor and gardener and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Hibbertia genus in form not flowers. The genus Gompholobium burtonioides.

Busbeckea: [bus/z-be-kee-a] Is probably named in honour of Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq; 1522-1592 who was a Flemish herbalist and diplomat. A good example is Busbeckea lorantifolia, which is now known as Capparis loranthifolia.

Busselliana: [buh-sel-li-a-na] Is most likely named in honour of one of the Bussell sisters Charlotte Harriet Bussell; 1858-1926, or Charlotte Josephine Bussell; 1849-1929, who collected for Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Boronia busselliana.

Busseuillia: [bus-see-u-il-li-a] Is named in honour of Busseuill. A good example is Busseuillia novae-hollandiae, which is now known as Eriocaulon scariosum.

Butneria: [but-ner-i-a] From Butneria, which is unknown. It may refer to flowers, which have the most exquisite fragrance which is faint near but lingers stronger the further away from the tree you are. A good example is the small sweetly scented Chinese garden tree Làméi 腊梅, Butneria praecox which was also known as Chimonanthus fragrance but is now known as Chimonanthus praecox. This would make a great addition to the horticultural industry in Australia for its perfume, ease of growing, pest resistant, low fertility rates and longevity as a cut flower.

Butomopsis: [bu-tom-op-sis] From Butom, which is unknown and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for to resemble. It refers to plants, which are very typical of other species and genre in the Butomaceae family. A good example was Butomopsis lanceolata, which is now known as Butomopsis latifolia.

Butonica: [bu-to-ni-ka] From Buton which is Latinized for the Indonesian Island of Buton. It refers to the original plant which was discovered on the Island. A good example was Butonica calyptrata, which is now known as Barringtonia calyptrata.

Button: [bu-ton] From Buton which is Latinized for the Indonesian Island of Buton. It refers to the original plant which was discovered on the Island. A good example was Butonica calyptrata, which is now known as Barringtonia calyptrata.

Buttress: [bu-tres] Are the roots which become plank like spreading growths near the base of the trunks usually acting as support structures usually in rainforest or trees associated with wet unstable ground. A good example of a tree with a large buttress is Elaeocarpus grandis.

Buxifolia: [buk-si-foh-li-a] From Buxus which is Latin for a European genus and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resembles the European Buxus genus. A good example is Acacia buxifolia subsp. buxifolia.

Buxifolium: [buk-si-foh-li-um] From Buxus, which is Latin for a European genus and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resembles the European Buxus genus. A good example is Phyllanthus buxifolium.

Buxifolius: [buk-si-foh-li-us] From Buxus, which is Latin for a European genus and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resembles the European Buxus genus. A good example is Isopogon buxifolius.

Buxijugum: [buk-si-joo-gum] From Buxus, which is Latin for a European genus and Jugum, which is Latin for a yoke. It refers to the leaves resembling those of the Buxus genus in pairs of opposite leaflets. A good example is Zieria buxijugum.

Buxus: [buh-sus] From Buxus, which is Latin for a European genus It refers to plants, which resembles the European Buxus genus. A good example is Buxus australis.

Byblis: [bib-lis] From Byblis, which is Ancient Greek for the beautiful mythical daughter of Miletus who was turned into a fountain. It refers to the deadly but glistening glandular secretions which resemble a fountain. A good example is Byblis gigantea.

Bynoeana: [bahy-noh-ee-na] Is named in honour of Doctor Benjamin Bynoe; 1803-1865, who was a English Surgeon and plant collector on the Beagle exploration. A good example is Acacia bynoeana.

Bynonia: [bahy-no-ni-a] From Bryonia, which is Ancient Greek for the name of the plants found around the Mediterranean Sea. A good example was Byronia arnhemensis, which is now known as Ilex arnhemensis.

Byrnesii: [brahy-ne-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Doctor Norman Brice Byrnes; 1922-1998, who was an Australian born in Adelaide, South Australia. He was a botanist stationed at Darwin, Northern Territory, from 1966 until 1973, before joining the Queensland Herbarium. His research was primarily  centred on Combretaceae and Myrtaceae, and his collections are found in BRI and DNA.. A good example is Arthrochilus byrnesii.

Bysymmetry: [bahy-si-me-tree] From Bi/Bis, which is Latin for two and Symmetry, which is Latin for the same. It refers to the flowers condition, which has two identical planes of symmetry when dissected.

Byttneria: [bahyt-ner-i-a] is named in honour of David Sigismund August Büttner; 1724-1768, who was a Hungarian Professor of medicine and botany in 1756, later in  Berlin, was professor of botany and zoology and Göttingen. A good example was Byttneria hermanniifolia, which is now known as Commersonia hermanniifolia.

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In the spirit of reconciliation we acknowledge the Bundjalung, Gumbaynggirr and Yaegl and all aboriginal nations throughout Australia and their connections to land, sea and community. We pay our respect to their Elders past, present and future for the pleasures we have gained.