C – Note: “As there is no “C” in Ancient Greek etymology the words start in “K” yet over the centuries the sound has been likened to “S”. I have included both what I consider correct with the letter “k” and “S”, which now is accepted. eg. Cephalocarpa: [ke/se-fa-loh-kar-pa] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek…….”

Cacaobrunnea: [Ka-kour-brun-nee-a] From Kakao, which is Mayan for chocolate and Brunnea, which is Latin for brown. It refers to the anthers, which are deep chocolate brown. A good example is Keraudrenia cacaobrunnea.

Cacatua: [Kah-kah-too-a] From Cacatua, which is Latin for a Cockatoo. It refers to plants, which have yellow or off yellow yellowish petals which stand out like a cockatoos crest. A good example is the tepals on Tetrabaculum cacatua.

Cacomorphus: [Ka-ko-mor-fus] From Kako, which is Ancient Greek for bad and Morphuhs, which is Greek to have many forms. It refers to plants, which have many forms which are not as pleasing to the eye as other species in the genus. A good example is Adenanthos cacomorphus.

Cactifolia: [Kak-ti-foh-li-a] From Cactus, which is Latin for a cactus and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have few leaves like a cactus. A good example is Hibbertia cactifolia.

Cadaba: [Ka-da-ba] From Cadaba, which is Latin for to fall, fall down or die. The reference is unclear however it may refer to leaves, which are scant falling early in dry conditions. A good example is Cadaba capparoides.

Cadamba: [Ka-dam-ba] From Kadamba, which is Latinized from the Sankrist vernacular for a dove. The reference is unclear however it may refer to the purity of the flowers. A good example is Neolamarckia cadamba.

Cadellia: [ka-del-li-a] Is named in honour of Francis Cadell; 1822-1879, who was a navigator, pioneer and collector of plants along the Murray River. A good example is Cadellia pentastylis.

Cadellii: [ka-de-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Francis Cadell; 1822-1879, who was a navigator, pioneer and collector of plants along the Murray River. A good example is Swainsona cadellii.

Cadens: [ka-denz] From Cadens, which is Latin for falling down. It refers to plants, which appear to be falling over that is to have a strong leaning habit of growth. A good example is Eucalyptus cadens.

Cadetia: [ka-de-ti-a] Is named in honour of Charles Cadet; 1769-1821, who was the author of the Chemistry Dictionary. A good example is Cadetia maideniana.

Cadophora: [ka-do-for-a] From Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a branch and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear. It refers to trees, which have many large or distinct branches. A good example is Corymbia cadophora.

Caduca: [ka-doo-sa] From Caducus, which is Latin for to fall off easily or not persistent. It refers to a description of an organ, which falls off prior to the flowers or leaves fully opening or the pistil is discarded on the fruits as they ripen. A good example is the scales between the leaf nodes on Drosera caduca.

Caducibracteata: [ka-dyoo-si-bra-tee-a-ta] From Caducus, which is Latin for to fall off easily or not persistent and Bracteatus, which is Latin for a bract. It refers to the bracts being discarded early. A good example is Zieria caducibracteata.

Caducous:[ka-doo-shus] From Caducus, which is Latin for to fall off easily or not persistent. It refers to a description of an organ, which falls off prior to the flowers or leaves fully opening or the pistil is discarded on the fruits as they ripen. A good example is the scales between the leaf nodes on Lophostemon confertus.

Caeca: [see-ka] From káykos, which is Latin for one eyed, almost blind or invisible or Caelātum which is Latin for to engrave, carve or embroided. It refers to structures or organs, which have a distinct looking eye at the apex or appear as though they have been carved into the structure or organ. A good example is the capsules on Melaleuca caeca.

Caelospermum: [see–lo-sper-mum] From káykos, which is Latin for one eyed, almost blind or invisible or Caelātum which is Latin for to engrave, carve or embroid and Spérma which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds or fruits, which have a distinct looking eye at the apex or appear as though they have been carved out. A good example is the fruits on Coelospermum paniculatum.

Caenopteris: [see-no-teer-is] From káykos, which is Latin for one eyed, almost blind or invisible or Caelātum which is Latin for to engrave, carve or embroided and Pteris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to sporangia or spore on ferns which are very small on fronds that appear to be carved out of plastic. A good example is Caenopteris appendiculata, which is now known as Asplenium appendiculatum.

Caerulea: [kar-ryoo-lee-a] From Caerulus, which is Latin for deep blue. It refers to a structure or organ, which is deep blue in colour. A good example is Prostanthera caerulea.

Caeruleopunctatus: [ka-ryoo-lee-oh-pun-ta-tus] From Caerulus, which is Latin for deep blue and Punctātus, which is Latin for punctured or pointed. It refers to the native blue cuckoo bee, which has a long pointed sting at its abdomen. A good example is Thyreus caeruleopunctatus.

Caerulescens: [ka-roo-le-senz] From Caerulesco, which is Latin for deep blue and from Escense which is Latin for changing the state of. It refers to the grasses which have blueish or glaucesent foliage and culms as they mature. A good example is Enneapogon caerulescens.

Caeruleum: [kar-roo-lee-um] From Caerulus, which is Latin for deep blue. It refers to the flowers being deep blue. A good example is Conospermum caeruleum.

Caesalpinia: [kees-sal-pi-ni-a] Is named in honour of Andrea Cesalpino; 1519-1603, who was a botanist, Phílosopher, physician and a professor of medicine. He used a systematic method of classifying plants. A good example is  the scales between the leaf nodes on Caesalpinia bondoc.

Caesalpinus: [kee-sal-pi-nus] Is named in honour of Andrea Cesalpino; 1519-1603, who was a botanist, Phílosopher, physician and a professor of medicine. He used a systematic method of classifying plants. A good example is the exotic garden shrub Caesalpinia pulcherrima.

Caesarea: [kee-sar-ee-a] From Caesus, which is Latin for pale blueish-grey to pale greyish-blue. It refers to flowers, or leaves which have a pale blueish-grey to pale greyish-blue tinge. A good example is Caladenia caesarea.

Caesareum: [kee-sar-ee-um] From Caesus, which is Latin for pale blueish-grey to pale greyish-blue. It refers to the pileus which has a pale blueish-grey to pale greyish-blue tinge. A good example was Calonema caesareum which is now a member of the Caladenia genus but which one has not been substantiated.

Caesareus: [kee-sar-ee-us] From Caesus, which is Latin for pale blueish-grey to pale greyish-blue. It refers to the pileus which has a pale blueish-grey to pale greyish-blue tinge. A good example is Boletus caesareus.

Caesariata: [kee-sar-i-a-ta] From Caesus, which is Latin for pale blueish-grey to pale greyish-blue. It refers to leaves , phyllodes or at times the flowers, which are pale blueish-grey to pale greyish-blue. A good example is Acacia caesariata.

Caesariatum: [kee-sar-i-a-tum] From Caesus, which is Latin for pale blueish-grey to pale greyish-blue. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or at times the flowers, which are pale blueish-grey to pale greyish-blue. A good example was Racosperma caesariatum, which is now known as Acacia caesariata.

Caesia: [kee-si-a] Is named in honour of Frederico Cesi; 1585-1630, who was the first person to realize the importance of spore in fern reproduction. A good example is the exotic garden shrub Eucalyptus caesia.

Caesiella: [kee-si-el-la] Is named in honour of Frederico Cesi; 1585-1630, who was the first person to realize the importance of spore in fern reproduction and Ella which is Latin for the feminine form. It refers to the delicate appeal of the plants like a young woman. A good example is Acacia caesiella.

Caesiellum: [kee-si-el-lum] Is named in honour of Frederico Cesi; 1585-1630, who was the first person to realize the importance of spore in fern reproduction and Ella which is Latin for the feminine form. It refers to the delicate appeal of the plants like a young woman. A good example is Racosperma caesiellm, which is now known as Acacia caesiella.

Caesiellus: [kee-si-el-lus] Is named in honour of Frederico Cesi; 1585-1630, who was the first person to realize the importance of spore in fern reproduction and Ella which is Latin for the feminine form. It refers to the delicate appeal of the plants like a young woman. A good example is Aspergillus caesiellus.

Caesius: [kee-si-us] From Caesus, which is Latin for pale blue or pale slatey-blue. It refers to the the colour of the drupes. A good example is the glaucous covering over the drupes Rubus caesius.

Caespiticium: [kee-spi-ti-ki-uhm] From Caespitose, which is Ancient Greek for to grow in a cluster or tufts. It refers to plants, which are much smaller and suitable as a lawn replacement. A good example is Gemmabryum caespiticium.

Caespiticius: [kee-spi-ti-kiu s] From Caespitose, which is Ancient Greek for to grow in a cluster or tufts. It refers to plants, which are much smaller and suitable as a lawn replacement. A good example is Juncus caespiticius Gemmabryum caespiticium.

Caespitiformis: [kee-spi-ti-for-mis] From Caespitose, which is Ancient Greek for to grow in a cluster or tufts and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which grow in small clumps. A good example is Fossombronia caespitiformis Fossombronia caespitiformis.

Caespitosa: [kee-spi-toh-sa] From Caespitose, which is Ancient Greek for to grow in a cluster or tufts. It refers to plants, especially grasses which grow in clumps. A good example is Austrodanthonia caespitosa.

Caespitose: [kee-spi-tohs] From Caespitose, which is Ancient Greek for to grow in a cluster or tufts. It refers to a description of a plant which grows in clumps. A good example is Xanthorrhoea caespitosa.

Caespitosissima: [kee-spi-toh-si-si-ma] From Caespitose, which is Ancient Greek for to grow in a cluster or tufts and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative. It refers to plants, which grow in very dense clumps. A good example is Eleocharis caespitosissima.

Caespitosum: [kee-spi-toh-sum] From Caespitose, which is Ancient Greek for to grow in a cluster or tufts. It refers to plants, which grow in clumps. A good example is Thelionema caespitosum.

Caespitosus: [kee-spi-toh-sus] From Caespitose, which is Ancient Greek for to grow in a cluster or tufts. It refers to plants, which grow in clumps. A good example is Echinopogon caespitosus.

Caespitulosa: [kee-spi-tyoo-loh-sa] From Caespitose, which is Ancient Greek for to grow in a cluster or tufts. It refers to plants, which grow in clumps. A good example is Septoria caespitulosa, which is a leaf rust found on many broad leaf trees and shrubs.

Caespitulosum: [kee-spi-tyoo-loh-sum] From Caespitose, which is Ancient Greek for to grow in a cluster or tufts. It refers to plants, which grow in clumps. A good example is Trichinium caespitulosum, which is now known as Ptilotus caespitulosus.

Caespitulosus: [kee-spi-tyoo-loh-sus] From Caespitose, which is Ancient Greek for to grow in a cluster or tufts. It refers to plants, which grow in clumps. A good example is Ptilotus caespitulosus.

Cagiana: [ka-ji-a-na] Probably from Occāsiō/Occāsiōnem, which is Latin for to cause. It probably It refers to the blunt spine like apexes on the leaves, which cause some discomfort when admiring the flowers. A good example is Grevillea cagiana.

Cahillii: [kahil-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Cahill but which Cahill cannot be substantiated. A good example is Senecio cahillii, which is now known as Senecio diaschides.

Cairica: [Kai-ri-ka] From Cairo, which is Latinized for of or from Cairo. It refers to the species being very common around Cairo. A good example Ipomoea cairica.

Cairnsiana: [Kan-zia-na] From Caines, which is Latinized for the Cairnes district and Ana/Ensis which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered in the Cairnes district. A good example Cycas cairnsiana.

Cajanus: [ka-ja-nus] From Cajanus, which is Latinized from the vernacular for the Malay word for a pigeon pea. It refers to the plants which resemble the pigeon pea. A good example is Cajanus cinereus.

Cajuputea: [kah-joo-poo-ti-a] From Kayu, which is Latinized from the local Indonesian vernacular for white and Puyih, which is Latinized from the local Indonesian vernacular for wood. It refers to trees, which yield a good oil similar to that of Melaleuca cajuputi. A good example is Eucalyptus cajuputea.

Cajuputi: [ka-ju-poo-ti] From Kayu, which is Latinized from the local Indonesian vernacular for white and Puyih, which is Latinized from the local Indonesian vernacular for wood. It refers to Melaleuca trees which yielded the best oil, cajeput oil. A good example is Melaleuca cajuputi.

Calacinum: [kal-la-si-um] From Kəladi, which is Latinized for the Malay vernacular for the Taro plant. It refers to plants, which have similarly large leaves as the Taro plants. A good example is Calacinum adpressum, which is now known as Muehlenbeckia adpressa.

Caladenea: [ka-la-de-nee-a] From Kalos, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful and from Aden which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to the glandular discs on the labellum. A good example is Caladenea carnea.

Caladenia: [ka-la-de-ni-a] From Kalos/Kallis, which are Ancient Greek for beautiful and from Aden which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to the glandular discs on the labellum. A good example is Caladenia alata.

Caladium: [ka-la-di-um] From Kalos/Kallis, which are Ancient Greek for beautiful and from Aden which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to the glandular discs on the labellum. A good example is Caladium macrorrhizon, which is now known as Alocasia brisbaniensis.

Calamagrotis: [ka-la-ma-gro-tis] From Kalamos, which is Ancient Greek for reed like and Agros, which is Ancient Greek for a field or pasture. It refers to plants, which are reed like and prefer to grow on the flat open country. A good example is the introduced pasture grass Calamagrostis epigejos.

Calamifolia: [ka-a-mi-foh-li-a] From Kalamos, which is Ancient Greek for to be reed like and from Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves resembling the leaves of a reed or grass. A good example is the leaves on Acacia calamifolia.

Calamifolium: [ka-a-mi-foh-li-um] From Kalamos, which is Ancient Greek for to be reed like and from Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves resembling the leaves of a reed or grass. A good example is the leaves on Racosperma calamifolium, which is now known as Acacia calamifolia.

Calamiformis: [ka-a-mi-for-mis] From Kalamos, which is Ancient Greek for to be reed like and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to lplants, which resemble the reeds or grass. A good example is the reed like leaves on the orchid Dockrillia calamiformis.

Calamiforme: [ka-a-mi-form] From Kalamos, which is Ancient Greek for to be reed like and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to lplants, which resemble the reeds or grass. A good example is the reed like leaves on the orchid Dendrobium calamiforme.

Calamphoreus: [ka-am-for-us] From Kalamos, which is Ancient Greek for to be reed like and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which have somewhat reed like leaves. A good example is Calamphoreus inflatus.

Calamus: [ka-lei-mus] From Kalamos, which is Ancient Greek for to be reed like. It refers to the stems being long and thin similar to the culms on many reeds. A good example is the many immature stems of Calamus muelleri.

Calandrina: [ka-lan-dri-na] Is named in honour of Jean Louis Caladrini; 1703-1758, who was a Swiss botanist. There is some dispute as to the correct spelling as Calandrina or Calandrinia. A good example is Calandrinia balonensis.

Calandrinia: [ka-lan-dri-ni-a] Is named in honour of Jean Louis Caladrini; 1703-1758, who was a Swiss botanist. There is some dispute as to the correct spelling as Calandrina or Calandrinia. A good example is Calandrinia balonensis.

Calandrinia: [ka-lan-dri-ni-a] From Kallis/Kalos, which is Ancient Greek for very beautiful and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are very beautiful. A good example is Calandrinia corrigioloides.

Calandrinioides: [ka-lan-dri-ni-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Jean Louis Calandrini who was a 19th century Swiss professor and botanical author. A good example is Tapheocarpa calandrinioides.

Calantha: [ka-lan-tha] From Kallis/Kalos, which is Ancient Greek for very beautiful and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are very beautiful. A good example is Acacia calantha.

Calanthe: [ka-lan-thee] From Kallis/Kalos, which are Ancient Greek for beautiful and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are very beautiful. A good example is the flowers found on Calanthe triplicata.

Calanthum: [ka-lan-thum] From Kallis/Kalos, which is Ancient Greek for very beautiful and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek forthe male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are very beautiful. A good example is Racosperma calanthum, which is now known as Acacia calantha.

Calcarata: [kal-kar-a-ta] From Calcis/Calcarius, which is Latin for chalky land or limestone soils. It refers to a plant usually the flower having a spur or spurs. A good example is Sclerolaena calcarata.

Calcarate: [kal-ka-reit] From Calcis/Calcarius, which is Latin for chalky land or limestone soils. It refers to a plant usually the flower having a spur or spurs.

Calcaratum: [kal-ka-rei-tum] From Calcarātum, which is Latin for to have a spur. It refers to flowers, which have a spur or spur like appendages. A good example is Stylidium calcaratum.

Calcaratus: [kal-ka-rei-tus] From Calcarātum, which is Latin for to have a spur. It refers to flowers, which have a spurs or spur like appendages. A good example is Chrysopogon calcaratus.

Calcarea: [kal-ka-ree-a] From Calcis/Calcāreum, which is Latin for chalky white, dull white or limestone soils. It refers to plants, which prefer rocks and soils that have been derived from limestone and are alkaline. A good example is Olearia calcarea.

Calcareana: [kal-ka-ree-ei-na] From Calcis/Calcāreum, which is Latin for chalky white, dull white or limestone soils. It refers to plants, which prefer rocks and soils that have been derived from such soils and are alkaline. A good example is Eucalyptus calcareana.

Calcareous: [kah-kar-ee-os] From Calcis/Calcāreum, which is Latin for limestone soils. It refers to plants, which prefer rocks and soils that have been derived from limestone or accumulated shell grit and are strongly alkaline. Soils and water are considered calcareous when the pH rises above 7.5. It includes sands with a high percentage of shell grit or limestone. A good example is Olearia calcarea

Calcareum: [kal-kar-ee-um] From Calcis/Calcāreum, which is Latin for chalky white, dull white or limestone soils. It refers to plants, which prefer rocks and soils that have been derived from such soils and are alkaline. A good example is Jasminum calcareum.

Calcareus 1: [kal-kar-ee-us] From Calcis/Calcāreus, which is Latin for chalky white or dull white. It refers to a description of plants, which have dull white flowers. prefer rocks and soils that have been derived from such soils and are alkaline.

Calcareus 2: [kal-kar-ee-us] From Calcis/Calcāreum, which is Latin for limestone soils. It refers to plants, which prefer rocks and soils that have been derived from limestone or accumulated shell grit and are strongly alkaline. Soils and water are considered calcareous when the pH rises above 7.5. It includes sands with a high percentage of shell grit or limestone.

Calcatus: [kal-ka-tus] From Calcātum, which is Latin for trampled. It refers to plants, which look as though have been trampled or continually trodden on. A good example is Schoenus calcatus.

Calceolate: [kal-see-oh-leit] From Calceo, which is Latin for a shoe. It refers to plants which have or form a slipper as is found on the shape of the labellum on many orchids. A good example is the exotic but popular slipper orchid Paphiopedilum lawrenceanum.

Calceoliflora: [kal-see-oh-flor-a] From Calceo, which is Latin for a shoe and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which have flowers shaped like a slipper and flower all spring. A good example of the spring flowering is Emblingia calceoliflora.

Calceolus: [kal-see-oh-lus] From Calceo, which is Latin for a shoe and Oleus which is Latin for a heel. It refers to plants, which have a slipper as is found on the shape of the labellum on many orchids. A good example is the exotic but popular slipper orchid Cypripedium calceolus.

Calcicola: [kal-ki-koh-la] From Calcis/Calcarius, which is Latin for calcium and Kola, which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which grow on limestone. A good example is Acacia calcicola.

Calcicultrix: [kal-ki-kul-triks] From Calcis/Calcarius, which is Latin for chalky land or limestone soils and Thrix, which ids Greek for a hair. It refers to plants, which have hairs and prefer soils which are strongly alkaline due to the calcium content. Soils or water are calcareous when the pH rises above 7.5. It includes sands with a high percentage of shell grit or limestone. A good example is Eucalyptus calcicultrix , which is now known as Eucalyptus porosa.

Calciphilous: [kal-ki-fil-los] From Calcis/Calcarius, which is Latin for lime an Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which love calcareous soils. A good example is Banksia ashbyi.

Calcitrapum: [kal-si-tra-pum] From Calcitrātum, which is Latin for to kick. Its reference is unclear. A good example is Triglochin calcitrapum.

Calcium: [kal-see-um] From Calcis/Calcarius, which is Latin for lime. Symbol Ca Atomic Number 20

Caldasia: [kal-da-si-a] Is named in honour of Francisco José de Caldas; 1768–1816, who was a military engineer, self-taught naturalist, mathematician, geographer and inventor, who was executed by orders of Pablo Morillo during the Spanish American Reconquista for being a forerunner of the fight for the independence of New Granada, modern day Colombia. A good example is Caldasia argentea, which is now known as Oreomyrrhis argentea.

Caldcluvia: [kald-kloo-vi-a] Is named in honour of Alexander Caldleugh who travelled and collected plants in South America. A good example is Caldcluvia paniculosa.

Caldesia: [kald-de-si-a] Is named in honour of Fransisco de Caldas; 1770-1829, who made several expeditions to South America to collect botanical samples. A good example is Caldesia oligococca var. acanthocarpa.

Caldwellii: [korld-wel-li-ahy] Is probably named in honour of R Caldwell, who was a plant collector around the Timbury Range in NSW. A good example is Bolboschoenus caldwellii.

Calea: [ka-li-a] Is probably named in honour of George Caley; 1770-1829 who was an English born collector of plants for Sir Joseph Banks in New South Wales. A good example is Calea spectabilis, which is now known as Apalochlamys spectabilis.

Caleana: [ka-lee-a/ei-na] Is probably named in honour of George Caley; 1770-1829 who was an English born collector of plants for Sir Joseph Banks in New South Wales. A good example is the magnificent little flying duck orchid Caleana nigrita.

Calectasia: [ka-lek-ta-si-a] From Kalos, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful and Ektasis, which is Ancient Greek for to develop. It refers to the way the deep blue slowly spreads along the perianth tubes to the lobes. A good example is Calectasia pignattiana.

Calendula: [kal-en-dyoo-la] From kalendae, which is Latin for pertaining to the first day of the month. The first day of the month was the day in which interest had to be paid. It refers to the plant’s long flowering season. A good example is the exotic, edible and brilliantly coloured flowers on Calendula officinalis.

Calendulacea: [kal-en-dyoo-la-see-a] From kalendae, which is Latin for pertaining to the first day of the month. It refers to the plant’s long flowering season being similar to that of the Calandula genus. A good example is Scaevola calendulacea.

Caletia: [kal-e-ti-a] From Caletia, which is unknown. A good example was Caletia divaricatissima, which is now known as Pseudanthus divaricatissimus.

Caleya: [kal-lee-ya] Is named in honour of George Caley; 1770-1829 who was an English born collector of plants for Sir Joseph Banks in New South Wales. A good example is Caleya sullivanii, which is now known as Paracaleana minor.

Caleyana: [kal-lee-a-na] Is named in honour of George Caley; 1770-1829 who was an English born collector of plants for Sir Joseph Banks in New South Wales. A good example is Viola caleyana.

Caleyi: [kal-lee-ahy] Is named in honour of George Caley; 1770-1829 who was an English born collector of plants for Sir Joseph Banks in New South Wales. A good example is Grevillea caleyi and Eucalyptus caleyi.

Calicaris: [ka-li-kar-is] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful and Kalyx, which is Ancient Greek for bearing a cup. It refers to the comparatively large calyxes surrounding the flowers. A good example is Litsea calicaris.

Caliculatus: [ka-li-kyoo-l-tus] From Calculatus which is Latin for to reckon. It refers to the seeds resembling those of the horticultural millet. A good example is found on Cenchrus caliculatus.

Calida: [ka-li-da] From Calidus, which is Latin for hot. It refers to the plants growing between warm rocks and crevices amongst rocks. A good example is Drummondita calida.

Calidestris: [ka-li-des-tris] From Calidus, which is Latin for hot. It refers to the plants growing between warm rocks and crevices amongst rocks. A good example is Acacia disparimma subsp. calidestris.

Calidirupium: [ka-li-di-roo-pi-um] From Calidus, which is Latin for hot and Rupes, which is Latin for a rock. It refers to theplants growing between warm rocks and crevices amongst rocks. A good example is Pellaea calidirupium

Caligans: [ka-li-ganz] From Cālīgāns, which is Latin for hot and steamy or very humid. It refers to plants, which have a preference for hot humid environments. A good example is Carpentaria acuminata.

Calignosa: [ka-lig-noh-sa] From Caligo, which is Latin for shady, heavy atmosphere with fogs, orographic precipitation or dark. It refers to plants, which prefer higher altitude environments which are cool with daily fogs. A good example is Eucalyptus calignosa.

Callerya: [kal-ler-ee-a] Is named in honour of Joseph Callery; 1810-1862, who was a French missionary in China and who is credited with discovering the commercial pear Pyrus calleryana. A good Australian example is Callerya megasperma.

Calliantha: [kal-li-an-tha] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers, which are very beautiful. A good example is Grevillea calliantha.

Callicarpa: [kal-li-kar-pa] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits being rather beautiful. A good example is the fruits on Callicarpa pedunculata.

Callicarpeum: [kal-li-kar-pee-um] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits with their seeds on display that are very beautiful. A good example is the fruits on Pittosporum callicarpeum, which is now known as Pittosporum rubiginosum.

Callicoma: [kal-li-koh-ma] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Coma which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to the flowers resembling a head with a very neat and beautiful hair style. A good example is Callicoma serratifolia.

Callifolia: [kah-li-foh-li-a] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which are very beautiful. A good example is the pale blue lichen Parmelia callifolia.

Callifolium: [kal-li-foh-li-um] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which are very beautiful. A good example is the fronds on Elaphoglossum callifolium.

Calligera: [kal-li-jeer-a] From Kallus, which is Ancient Greek for a hardened area of tissue and Gera which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which have a hardened spot. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia calligera

Calliphysa: [kal-li-fahy-sa] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Phŷsa, which is Ancient Greek for a bladder. It refers to organs, which resemble a bladder. A good example is the fronds on Utricularia calliphysa, which is now known as Utricularia minutissima.

Calliptera: [kal-lip-teer-a] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Pterá/Pterón, which are Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to petals, which have much broader wings than other species in the genus. A good example is Scaevola calliptera.

Callipteris 1: [kah-lip-teer-is] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Ptéris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern, which is any seedless, nonflowering vascular plant of the class Filicinae, of tropical to temperate regions, characterized by true roots produced from a rhizome, with fronds that uncoil upward and have a branching vein system. Reproduction is by spores contained in sporangia that usually appear as brown or yellow grains or powder from on the underside of the fronds. Graphos, which is Ancient Greek for written or to draw. It refers to plants, which are very typical of a fern. It refers to plants, which have fern like leaves which are very beautiful. A good example is Grevillea callipteris, which is now known as Grevillea dryandri subsp. dryandri.

Callipteris 2: [ka-lip-teer-is] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Ptéris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern, which is any seedless, nonflowering vascular plant of the class Filicinae, of tropical to temperate regions, characterized by true roots produced from a rhizome, with fronds that uncoil upward and have a branching vein system, and reproduction by spores contained in sporangia that usually appear as brown or yellow grains or powder from on the underside of the fronds and Graphos, which is Ancient Greek for written or to draw. It refers to plants, which is very typical of a fern. It refers to ferns which have typically very beautiful fronds. A good example is Callipteris esculenta, which is now known as Diplazium esculentum.

Callis: [ka-lis] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful. A good example is the overall appearance of Callistemon citrinus, which is now known as Melaleuca citrina.

Callistachys: [ka-li-stash-us] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek or later Stachys which is Latin for a flower spike. A good example of the beauty is found on Gastrolobium callistachys.

Callistemon: [ka-li-ste-mon] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Stemon, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ consisting of both the filament and anther. A good example was the overall beauty of the stamens on the flowers from the Callistemon genus which have now been transferred to the Melaleuca genus. A good example is Calliistemon viminalis, which is now known as Melaleuca viminalis.

A rare pink form of Melaleuca viminalis proudly displaying the beautiful stamens.

Callistemonea: [kal-li-ste-mo-nee-a] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Stemon, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs. A good example was the overall beauty of the stamens on the flowers from the Callistemon genus which have now been transferred to the Melaleuca genus. A good example is Melaleuca callistemonea, which is now known as Melaleuca lateritia.

Callistos: [kal-li-stos] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful. A good example of beauty is found in the sundew Drosera callistos.

Callitriche: [kal-li-trahy-ka] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to the single stamen which somewhat resembles a beautiful hair. A good example is Callitriche muelleri.

Callitrichoides: [kal-li-trahy-koi-deez] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful, Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for a hair and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the stamens which resembles a beautiful hair similar to the callitriche genus. A good example is Myriophyllum callitrichoides.

Callitris: [kal-li-tris] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Tri/Treis which is Ancient Greek for three. It refers to the leaves being in whorls of three and the fruiting cones having three large and three small scales. A good example is hairs on Callitris rhomboidea.

Callitrophila: [kal-li-tro-fi-la] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful, Pétra/Pétros, which is Ancient Greek for a rock and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to orchids which are rather beautiful and grow over rocks as lithophytes. A good example is Caladenia callitrophila.

Callitrophilum: [kal-li-tro-fi-lum] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful, Pétra/Pétros, which is Ancient Greek for a rock and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to orchids which are rather beautiful and grow over rocks as lithophytes. A good example is hairs on Dendrobium callitrophilum.

Callium: [kal-li-um] From Callēs/Callium, which is Latin for a stony track or rocky path. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in gravelly, stony or rocky soils on slopes. A good example is Solanum callium.

Callosa: [kal-lo/loh-sa] From Callōsus, which is Latin for a hardened skin or surface. It refers to a surface which is very hard or has hard callous like lumps. A good example is the stems, leaves, petioles and pedicels on Logania callosa which are all covered in hard callous lumps.

Callosity: [kal-lo-si-tee] From Callōsus, which is Latin for a hardened skin or surface. It refers to a surface which is very hard or have hard callous like lumps. A good example of Callous lumps is found on the phyllodes and seed pods of Acacia calamifolia.

Callous: [kal-los] From Callositos, which is Latin for to callous. Most cutting material callous at the site of the wound prior to rooting.

Callus: [kal-lus] From Callositos, which is Latin for to callous. Most cuttings callous prior to rooting.

Calobra: [ka-loh-bra] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful. It refers to plants, which have very attractive flowers. A good example is Ipomoea calobra.

Calocarpa: [ka-lo-kar-pa] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to plants, which have very attractive fruits. A good example is Bleekeria calocarpa.

Calocarpum: [ka-lo-kar-pum] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful or Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to plants, which have very attractive fruits. A good example is the exotic fruit sapote, Calocarpum mammosum.

Calocarpus: [ka-lo-kar-pus] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful or Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to plants, which have very attractive fruits. A good example is the preety dwarf swamp grass that does well in terrariums and aquiriums, Scirpus calpocarpus, which is actually known as Isolepis multicaulis.

Calocephala: [ka-lo-se-fah-la] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to the flowers being in beautiful compact heads. A good example is the bright pink paper daisy Pimelea rosea var. calocephala.

Calocephalum: [kah-lo-se-fah-luhm] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to the flowers being in beautiful compact heads. A good example is the bright pink paper daisy Actinodium calocephalum.

Calocephalus: [kah-lo-se-fah-luh s] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to the flowers being in beautiful compact heads. A good example is Calocephalus citreus.

Calochilus: [kah-lo-kahy-luh s] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to the flower’s lips having a beautiful ray of colourful appendages. A good example is Calochillus campestris.

Calochlaena [ka-lo-klee-na] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Khaina, is Greek which is Ancient Greek for a cloak. It refers to the covering of dense white hairs which adorn the genus like a glistening overcoat. A good example is Calochlaena dubia.

Calochortus: [ka-o-kor-tus] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Khórtos, which is Ancient Greek for a feeding ground. It refers to plants, which are beautiful flowers and prefer to grow in open fields. The name is incorrectly applied to Calochortus holtzei, which is actually known as Calochilus holtzei.

Calocysthus: [ka-lo-sahys-thus] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Kústis, which is Ancient Greek for an anatomical sac or a bladder. It refers to seed pods, which are somewhat bloated. A good example is Callicysthus volubilis, which is now known as Vigna marina.

Calodracon: [ka-lo-dra-kon] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Drákōn, which is Ancient Greek for a serpent or dragon. It refers to flower spikes which somewhat resemble a serpent or snake reaching out from the foliage. A good example is Calodracon terminalis, which is now known as Cordyline fruticosa.

Calogyne: [ka-lo-jahyn] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a woman. It refers to the plants being compared to a beautifully dainty woman. A good example is Calogyne pilosa.

Calogynoides: [ka-loh-jahy-noi-deez] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful, Gynos, which is Ancient Greek for a woman and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the substance which keeps the skin soft and pliable thus the flowers look beautiful even in the harshest of conditions. A good example is Goodenia calogynoides, which is now known as Goodenia pusilliflora.

Calomeria: [ka-lo-meer-i-a] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Marmaírō, which is Ancient Greek or Merum which is Latin for sheer, pure or undiluted. It refers to plants, which have are usually smal and have an undiluted beauty in a small way. A good example is Calomeria acoma , which is now known as Acomis acoma.

Calonema: [ka-o-nee-ma] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to the sepals and petals on orchids which are thread like. A good example is Calonema woolcockiorum, which is now known as Caladenia woolcockiorum.

Calophanoides: [kah-lo-fan-oi-deez] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful, Aphano, which is Ancient Greek for invisible or hard to see and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for a alike or similar to. It refers to a structure or organs, which are difficult to see. A good example is the fruits on Calophanoides hygrophiloides, which is now known as Harnieria hygrophiloides and are lime green and surrounded by large bracts until almost mature.

Calophleba: [ka-lo-flee-ba] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Phleps which is Ancient Greek for a vein. It refers to leavess which have the veins attractively laid out. A good example is Boehmeria calophleba.

Calophylla: [ka-lo-fahyl-la] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the venation making the leaves look rather attractive. A good example is Uncaria calophylla.

Calophyllum: [ka-lo-fahy-lum] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to a leaves, which are very beautiful. A good example is Calophyllum australianum.

Calopogonium: [ka-po-goh-n-um] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Pṓgōn, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to structures or organs, which a beautiful hairs or a beard. A good example is Calopogonium mucunoides.

Caloptera: [ka-lop-ter-a] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to stipules which asomewhat resemble a beautiful pair of wings. A good example isFimbristylis caloptera.

Calopteris: [kah-lo-teer-is] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Pteris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to ferns which are described as being very beautiful. A good example is Callipteris prolifera.

Calorohabdos: [ka-lo-roh-hab-dos] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Rhabdos, which is Latin for a rod like stripe. It refers to flowers, which have a beautiful longitudinal stripe/s. A good example is culms on Eremophila calorhabdos.

Calorophus: [ka-lo-roh-fus] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Strophos, which is Ancient Greek for twisted. It refers to the culms which have a beautiful twist which attracts attention. A good example is culms on Calorophus elongatus.

Calostachya: [ka-lo-sta-chi-a] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Stachyus, which is Ancient Greek for aa flowering spike. It refers to flower spikes which are more beautiful than other species in the genus. A good example was Chaetospora calostachya, which is now known as Schoenus calostachyus.

Calostachyum: [ka-lo-stah-chi-um] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Stachyus, which is Ancient Greek for aa flowering spike. It refers to flower spikes which are more beautiful than other species in the genus. A good example was Trichinium calostachyum, which is now known as Ptilotus calostachyus Chaetospora calostachya Schoenus calostachyus.

Calostachyus: [ka-lo-stah-shus] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Stachyus, which is Ancient Greek for aa flowering spike. It refers to flower spikes which are more beautiful than other species in the genus. A good example is Schoenus calostachyus.

Calostemma: [ka-lo-ste-ma] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Stemma, which is Ancient Greek for a crown or garland. It refers to the beautiful flowers, which resemble a crown upon a staff. A good example is Calostemma purpureum.

Calothamnoides: [ka-lo-tham-noi-deez] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful, thamnos, which is Ancient Greek for a shrub and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the overall beauty of the shrubs especially when in bloom resembling those of the Calothamnus genus. A good example is Melaleuca calothamnoides.

Calothamnus: [ka-lo-tham-nus] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and thamnos, which is Ancient Greek for a shrub. It refers to the overall beauty of the shrubs especially when in bloom. A good example is Calothamnus villosus.

Calotis: [ka-lo-tis] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and from Otis, which is Ancient Greek for an ear. A good example is on Calotis cuneifolia.

Calovaginata: [ka-lo-va-jin-a-ta] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and vaginatatus, which is Ancient Greek for a vaginal membrane or sheath. It refers to the membrane or sheath which surrounds the buds on the culms prior to breaking out into bloom. A good example is Hopkinsia calovaginata.

Calpidisca: [kahl-pi-dis-ka] Maybe from Kalpo, which is Ancient Greek for an urn and Dískos, which is Ancient Greek or Discus, which is Latin for a round dish. It refers to flowers, which resemble a dish with an urn held aloft to one side. A good example is Calpidisca calycifida, which is now known as Utricularia calycifida.

Calpocarpus: [ka-lo-khr-pus] From Kalpo, which is Ancient Greek for an urn and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a distinct urn shape and are usually held aloft. A good example is Scirpus calpocarpus, which is now known as Isolepis hookeriana.

Caltha: [kal-tha] From Kaltha, which is Ancient Greek for a goblet. It refers to flowers, which resemble a wide mouthed goblet. A good example is Caltha phylloptera, which is now known as Psychrophila phylloptera.

Calthifolia: [kal-thi-foh-li-a] From Kaltha, which is Ancient Greek for a goblet and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble a cupped hand. A good example is Ornduffia calthifolia.

Calthifolium: [kal-thi-foh-li-um] From Kaltha, which is Ancient Greek for a goblet and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble a cupped hand. A good example is on Limnanthemum calthifolium, which is now known as Ornduffia calthifolia.

Caltrop: [kal-trop] From Calcatrippa, which is Medieval Latin for a thistle that had fruits shaped like a caltrop and possibly Trippa, which is late Latin for to trip over or trip up. It refers to fruits which generally have four thick sharp spines or cluster fruits where at least one of the spines always points vertically upwards no matter how the fruits lie. A good example is Gunniopsis calva.

Caltrop.
The caltrop fruits on Tribulis cistioides.

Calva: [kal-va] From Calvitium which is Latin for to be bald. It refers to a structure or organ, which is glabrous. A good example is Gunniopsis calva.

Calvatia: [kal-va-ti-a] From Calvitium which is Latin for to be bald. It refers to a structure or organ, which is glabrous. A good example is Calvatia cyathiformis.

Calvertiana: [kal-ver-ti-a-na] Is named in honour of Caroline Louisa Waring Atkinson Calvert; 1834-1872, who was an Australian naturalist, botanical artist and a collector of herbarium samples. A good example is Epacris calvertiana var. calvertiana.

Calvertianum: [kal-ver-ti-a-num] Is named in honour of Caroline Louisa Waring Atkinson Calvert; 1834-1872, who was an Australian naturalist, botanical artist and a collector of herbarium samples. A good example is Helichrysum calvertianum.

Calvescens: [kal-ve-senz] From Calvitium, which is Latin for bald and Esences, which is Latin for becoming. It refers to most members in the species having hairless spikes and chaff while the others may have a few ciliate hairs on the margins. A good example is Miconia calvescens.

Calviceps: [kal-vi-seps] From Calvitium, which is Latin for bald and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to the flower heads which are glabrous in this species. A good example is Gnaphalium calviceps.

Calvum: [Kal-vam] From Calvitium, which is Latin for bald. It refers to most members in the species having hairless spikes and chaff while the others may have a few ciliate hairs on the margins. A good example is Iseilema calvum.

Caly: [ka-lee] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering. It refers to the calyx and sepals collectively.

Calybium: [ka-ee-bi-um] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for a husk or covering. It refers to a the single, hard loculed dry fruit derived from an inferior ovary.

Calycantha: [ka-lee/lahy-kan-tha] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to the overall, unusual beauty of the flowers and stamens. A good example Diospyros calycantha.

Calycanthus: [ka-lee/lahy-kan-thus] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering and ántha/ánthos, which are  Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to the overall, unusual beauty of the flowers and stamens. A good example was Calycanthus australiensis, which is now known as Idiospermum australiense.

Calyceroides: [ka-lee/lahy-ser-oi-deez] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering, Keros, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Calycera genus that have spiny calyxes. A good example is Ammobium calyceroides.

Calyciformis: [ka-lee/lahy-si-for-mis] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the specialized leaves which surround the bud and protect the developing sexual organs and ovaries. A good example is the calyx on Petalochilus calyciformis.

Calycina: [ka-lee/lahy-si-na] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering. It refers to plants, having a conspicuous cup shaped calyx and or sepals. A good example is the calyx on Thryptomene calycina.

Calycinum: [ka-lee/lahy-si-m] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a veil or covering. It refers to plants, which have a conspicuous cup shaped calyx and or sepals. A good example is the calyxes on Gastrolobium calycinum.

Calycinus: [ka-lee/lahy-si-nus] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a veil or covering. It refers to plants, which have a conspicuous cup shaped calyx and or sepals. A good example is the calyxes on Diasperus calycinus , which is now known as Phyllanthus calycinus.

Calycle: [ka-lee/lahy-kl] It refers to an epicalyx, as a whorl of bracts below the main calyx or corolla that resembles the true calyx.

Calycogona: [ka-lee/lahy-ko-goh-na] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering and Gona, which is Ancient Greek for an angle. It refers to calyptras which act somewhat like a calyx and have very distinct angles. A good example is Eucalyptus calycogona.

Calycomis: [ka-lee/lahy-koh-mis] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Eucomis, which is Ancient Greek for a beautiful head. It refers to the overall and unusual beauty of the flower heads. A good example Calycomis verticillatum, which is now known as Acrophyllum australe.

Calycomis: [ka-lee/lahy-koh-mis] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering and f Comis, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to the new growth on the branchlets. A good example is Calycomis australe, which is now known as Acrophyllum australe.

Calycopeplus: [ka-lee/lahy-ko-pe-plus] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk, veil or covering and Péplos, which is Ancient Greek for a long dress like robe. It refers to the specialized leaves which surround the bud and protect the developing sexual organs and ovaries like a dressy type robe. A good examples are Calycopeplus casuarinoides.

Calycothrix: [ka-lee/lahy-koh-thriks] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering and Thrix, which is a Greek a hair. It refers the calyxes which are beautiful and covered in golden to golden brown hairs. A good example is Calycothrix tetragonophylla, which is now known as Calytrix flavescens.

Calyculata: [ka-lee/lahy-kyoo-la-ta] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering and Kulatos, which is a Greek suffix for little. It refers to flowers, which have a small calyx. A couple of good examples are Acacia calyculata or Chamaedaphne calyculata.

Calyculatum: [ka-lee/lahy-kyoo-lei-tum] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering and Kulatos, which Greek for little. It refers to the small flowers, which are very beautiful. A good example is Racosperma calyculatum, which is now known as Acacia calyculata Metrosideros calyculatus Callistemon linearis.

Calyculatus: [ka-lee/lahy-kyoo-la-tus] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering and Kulatos, which Greek for little. It refers to the small flowers, which are very beautiful. A good example is Metrosideros calyculatus, which is now known as Melaleuca linearis.

Calyculus: [ka-lee/lahy-ku-lus] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Latin for a cup or calyx-like structure or covering. It refers to the overall, unusual beauty of the plants. A good example Acetabularia calyculus.

Calymega: [ka-lee/lahy-me-ga] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Mega which is a Greek suffix for very large. It refers to flowers, which have a very large calyxes. A couple of good examples are Bredemeyera calymega.

Calymella: [ka-lee/lahy-mel-la] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Mella/Mellis, which is Ancient Greek for honey water. It refers to structures or organs, which have a beautiful honey colour. A good example is the colour of the rhizome, rachis and new fronds on Calymella circinnata, which is now known as Gleichenia dicarpa.

Calymmodon: [ka-lee/lahy-mo-don] From Kallos/Kallis, which is Ancient Greek for beautiful or very beautiful and Modos, which is Latin for fashon or fashionable. It refers to a group of small ferns which are very modern or fashionale in appearance. A good example was Calymmodon luerssenianus, which is now known as Polypodium luerssenianum.

Calypstegia: [ka-lee/lahy-stee-ji-a] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering and from Stégē, which is Ancient Greek for a roof or covering. It refers to the way the stipules cover the calyx. A good example is Calypstegia marginata.

Calyptocalyx: [ka-lahyp-to-ka-liks] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk, veil or covering and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for a husk, veil or cover. It refers to Calyxes which prominently surround the bud and protect the developing sexual organs and ovaries. A good example is Calyptrocalyx australasicus, which is now known as Laccospadix australasicus.

Calyptocarpus: [ka-lahyp-to-kar-pus] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk, veil or covering and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a hood or are covered. A good example is Calyptocarpus vialis.

Calyptochloa: [ka-lip-to-kloh-a] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk or covering and Khlóē,which is Ancient Greek for (young) green shoots – a grass. It refers to the cleistogamos spikelets which are well hidden by the bracts. A good example is on Calyptochloa gracillima.

Calyptostegia: [ka-lip-to-ste-ji-a] From Kruptós, which is Ancient Greek for a covering as in the covering of compound eyes and Stégē, which is Ancient Greek for a roof or a covering. It refers to flowers, which are covered by very large calyxes when in bud. A good example is Calyptostegia hypericina, which is now known as Pimelea ligustrina subsp. hypericina.

Calyptra: [ka-lip-tra] From kalyptra, which is Ancient Greek for a cap or hood. It is that section that forms a cap at the end of a growing point such as the caps found on the buds of Eucalyptus flowers. A good example is Corymbia curtisii or Eucalyptus caesia.

Calyptrata: [ka-lip-tra-ta] From kalyptra, which is Ancient Greek for a cap or hood. It is that section that forms a cap at the end of a growing point such as the caps found on the buds of Eucalyptus flowers. A good example is Barringtonia calyptrata.

Calyptratum: [ka-lip-tra-tum] From kalyptra, which is Ancient Greek for a cap or to be well cover. It is that section that forms a cap or hood at the end of a growing point such as the caps found on the buds of Eucalyptus flowers. A good example is Huttum calyptratum, which is now known as Barringtonia calyptrata.

Calyptratus: [ka-lip-trus] From kalyptra, which is Ancient Greek for a cap or to be well cover. It is that section that forms a cap at the end of a growing point such as the caps found on the buds of Eucalyptus flowers. A good example is Schoenus calyptratus.

Calyptrocalyx: [ka-lip-tro-kah-liks] From kalyptra, which is Ancient Greek for a cap or hood and Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk, cup or covering. It refers to very distinct specialized leaves which surround the bud and protect the developing sexual organs and ovaries. A good example is Calyptrocalyx leptostachys.

Calyptroides: [ka-lip-troi-deez] From kalyptra, which is Ancient Greek for a cap or to be well covered and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. A good example is Melaleuca calyptroides.

Calyptrostigma: [ka-lip-tro-stig-ma] From kalyptra, which is Ancient Greek for a cap or a hood and Stígma/Stízein, which is Ancient Greek for the female reproductive organ upon the style which is receptive to receiving pollen. It refers to the stigmas which are very well covered initially by the calyxes and later by the anthers. A good example is Calyptrostigma ledifolium, which is now known as Beyeria lechenaultii.

Calystachys: [ka-l–stah-shus] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk, cup or covering and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek or later Stachys which is Latin  for an ear of corn. It refers to the flower spikes which are very attractive or very beautiful. A good example is Oxylobium callistachys.

Calystegia: [ka-l–ste-ji-a] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk, cup or covering and Stégē, which is Ancient Greek for a roof or similar covering. It refers to flowers, which are covered by very large calyxes when in bud. A good example is the Lord Howe Island morning glory Calystegia affinis

Calythropsis:[ka-li-throp-sis] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk, cup or covering and from Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for resembling. A good example is Calytrix aurea after it was transferred from Calythropsis aurea.

Calytrix: [ka-li-triks] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk, cup or covering and from Thrix or Tricos, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to the hairs on the apex and margins of the calyx. A good example is the calyx hairs on Calytrix fraseri.

Calyx: [ka-liks] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk, cup or covering. It refers to the calyx and or sepals collectively.

Calyx lobes on Coleus nitens

Calyxes: [ka-liks-ez] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk, cup or covering. It refers to the plural of calyx and or sepals collectively.

Calyxhymenia: [ka-li-zahy-me-ni-uh] From Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a husk, cup or covering and Humeníōn/Humḗn, which is Ancient Greek for a membrane. It refers to the calyx and or sepals collectively which are membranous. A poor example is Sida calyxhymenia as the sepals are rather thick and hairy.

Camaldulensis: [ka-mal-yoo-len-sis] From Camalduli, which is Latin for the Italian district in Tuscany known as Camalduli where the first specimen of the Eucalyptus is believed to have been planted and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for origin. It refers to the first cultivated specimens being grown at Canmaldui. A good example is Eucalyptus camaldulensis.

Camarotis: [ka-ma-roh-tis] From Kamarotis, which is Ancient Greek for a vault. It refers to a part of the labellum. An good example is the exotic orchid Camarotis purpurea.

Cambageana: [kam-bah-jee-a-na] Is named in honour of H. G. Cambage; 1859-1928, who was an early Australian geologist and botanist. A good example is Eucalyptus cambageana.

Cambagei: [kam-ba-jee-ahy] Is named in honour of Richard Hind Cambage; 1859-1928, who was a mining surveyor and botanical collector. A good example is Acacia cambagei.

Cambania: [kam-ban-ni-a] From Cambiare, which is Latin for to exchange or barta. It may refer to the layers of meristematic cells called the xylem or phloem in vascular plants, which exchange minerals and sugars throughout the plant. A good example is Cambania fraseriana, which is now known as Dysoxylum fraserianum.

Cambium: [kam-bi-um] From Cambiare, which is Latin for to exchange or barta. It refers to the layer of meristematic cells called the xylem or phloem in vascular plants, which exchange minerals and sugars throughout the plant.

Cameronii: [kah-mer-o-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Cameron but which Cameron cannot be substantiated. A good example is Eucalyptus cameronii.

Camfieldii: [kam-feel-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Julius Henry Camfield; 1852–1916, who was an English born Australian who was a dedicated and loyal overseer of Gardens and parks around Sydney. A good example is Eucalyptus camfieldii.

Camforosma: [kam-faor-os-ma] From Camphor, which is Latin for the camphor trees and Osme, which is Ancient Greek for a slightly offensive smell. It refers to plants, usually the leaves which smell like camphor. A good example is Hibbertia camforosma.

Camirium: [ka-mir-i-am] Maybe from Kamapua, which is Latinized from an early Asian dialect for the hog-man fertility demigod. Its reference is unclear but the use of the oil from the seeds in burning for light and scent may have some significance. A good example is Camirium moluccanum, which is now known as Aleurites moluccana.

Camouflage: [kam-o-flarj] From Camouflet, which is French for to disguise. It refers to the characteristic of organisms that rely upon its external colours, shape and form to blend into its surroundings.

Campanae: [kam-pan-nee] From Campanulatum, which is Latin for a bell. It refers to the fruits or flowers, which resemble a bell in shape. A good example is the bell shaped capsules on Eucalyptus campanifructa.

Campanifructa: [kam-pan-i-fruhk-tuh] From Campanulatum, which is Latin for a bell and Fructus, which is Latin for a fruit. It refers to the fruits or flowers, which have a bell shape. A good example is Eucalyptus campanifructa.

Campanula: [kahm-pan-yoo-la] From Campanulatum, which is Latin for a bell. It refers to the fruits or flowers, which have a distinct bell shape. A good example is Campanopsis saxicola, which is now known as Wahlenbergia saxicola.

Campanulaceae: [kam-pan-yoo-la-see-a] From Campanulatum, which is Latin for a bell and Acea, which is Latin for a family grouping. It refers to the family all having fruits or flowers, which have a bell shape.

Campanulata: [Kam-pan-yoo-la-ta] From Campanulata, which is Latin for a bell. It refers to flowers, or fruits which have a distinctive bell shape. A good example is Eucalyptus campanulata.

Campanulatum: [kam-pan-yoo-la-tum] From Campanulatum, which is Latin for a bell. It refers to flowers, or fruits which have a distinctive bell shape. A good example is shape of the buds as the flowers begin to open on Dipodium campanulatum.

Campanulatus: [kam-pan-yoo-la-tus] From Campanulatum, which is Latin for a bell. It refers to flowers, or fruits which have a distinctive bell shape. A good example is cupular shape of the fungus Cyathus campanulatus.

Campaspe: [kam-pas-pe] From Kampes, which is Ancient Greek for flexible or durable. It refers to flowers, which are inflexible or rather brittle and break easily. A good example is Eucalyptus campaspe.

Campbellii: [kam-bel-li-ahy] Is named in honour of R. A. Campbell who discovered the species. A good example is Diploglottis campbellii.

Campechiana: [kam-pe-chi-a-na] From Campechi, which is Latinized for Campechi district and Ensis/Ianaum, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in Campechi in Mexico. A good example is Pouteria campechiana.

Campechianum: [kam-pe-chi-a-u m] From Campechi, which is Latinized for Campechi district and Ensis/Ianaum, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in Campechi in Mexico. A good example is Haematoxylum campechianum.

Campephylla: [kam-pe-fahyl-la] From Campestre, which is Latin for a plain or other flat level ground and Phullon/Phyllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which have very flat leaves. A good example is Daviesia campephylla.

Campestre: [kam-pes-tre] From Campestre, which is Latin for a plain or other flat level ground. It refers to plants, which prefer flat open type country to grow on. A good example is Prasophyllum campestre.

Campestris: [kam-pes-tris] From Campestre, which is Latin for a plain or other flat level ground. It refers to plants, which prefer flat open type country to grow on. A good example is Cuscuta campestris.

Camphora: [kam-for-a] From Kamphora, which is Ancient Greek for the Camphor tree. It refers to foliage and growth habit which resemble the Camphor trees of Eurasia. A good example is Eucalyptus camphora subsp. relicta.

Camphorata: [Kam-for-a-ta] From Kamphoram, which is Ancient Greek for the Camphor tree. It refers to plants, which have a distinctly strong camphor smell. A good example is Baeckea camphorata.

Camphorosmae: [kam-for-os-mee] From Kamphoram, which is Ancient Greek for the Camphor tree and Osma, which is Ancient Greek for to smell. It refers to plants, which have a distinctly strong camphor smell. A good example is Babingtonia camphorosmae.

Campicola: [kam-pi-koh-la] From Campusm, which is Latin for a flat field or plains and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which prefer flat open environments. A good example is Pimelea campicola, which is now known as Pimelea glauca.

Campolochlamys: [kam-po-lo-kla-mis] From Kamptos, which is Ancient Greek for flexible and Chlamýs, which is Ancient Greek fora cloak. It refers to the calyx or sepals, which are united and much longer resembling a cloak surrounding the flowers and fruits. A good example is Hibiscus campylochlamys, which is now known as Hibiscus sturtii var. campylochlamys.

Camptacra: [kam-ta-kra] From Campus, which is Latin for a flat field or plains  and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which prefer flat open environments. A good example is Camptacra brachycomoides, which is now known as Camptacra brachycomoides and Camptacra gracilis.

Camptocarpa: [kam-to-kar-pa] From Kamptos, which is Ancient Greek for flexible and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are rather flexible when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia camptocarpa.

Camptocarpum: [kam-to-kar-pum] From Kamptos, which is Ancient Greek for flexible and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are rather flexible when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Racosperma camptocarpum, which is now known as Acacia camptocarpa.

Camptocentra: [kam-to-sen-tra] From Kamptos, which is Ancient Greek for flexible and Kentron, which is Ancient Greek for a spur. It refers to spurs which have some flexibility. A good example is Dendrobium bambusifolium.

Camptocentrus: [kam-to-sen-trus] From Kamptos, which is Ancient Greek for flexible and Kentron, which is Ancient Greek for a spur. It refers to spurs which have some flexibility. A good example is Eurycaulis camptocentrus.

Camptoclada: [kam-to-kla-da] From Kamptos, which is Ancient Greek for flexible and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stick, stem or small branch. It refers to stems which are very flexible. A good example is Melaleuca camptoclada.

Camptocladum: [kam-to-kla-dum] From Kamptos, which is Ancient Greek for flexible and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stick, stem or small branch. It refers to stems which are very flexible. A good example is Racosperma camptocladum, which is now known as Acacia camptoclada.

Camptostemon: [kam-to-stei-mon] From Kamptos, which is Ancient Greek for flexible and Stamen, which is Ancient Greek for the male sexual organs in a flower. It refers to stamens which are very flexible. A good example is the Western Australian mangrove tree with a small buttress known as Camptostemon schultzii.

Camptostylis: [kam-to-stahy-lis] From Kamptos, which is Ancient Greek for flexible and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column. It refers to styles which are very flexible. A good example is Darwinia camptostylis.

Campylachne: [Kam-pahy-lak-ne] From Kampylos, which is Ancient Greek for curved or bent and Achne, which is Ancient Greek for chaff. It refers to glumes and lemmas which are distinctly bent. A good example is Austrostipa campylachne.

Campylantha: [kam-pahy-lan-tha] From Kampylos, which is Ancient Greek for curved or bent and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to wing and keel petals which are bent to almost right angles. A good example is Swainsona campylantha.

Campylanthera: [kam-pahy-lan-thee-ruh] From Kampylos, which is Ancient Greek for curved or bent and Anthera/Antheros, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower. It refers to anthers, which have a distinct point. A good example is Campylanthera ericoides, which is now known as Rhytidosporum procumbens.

Campylicaulis: [kahm-pahy-li-kor-lis] From Kampylos, which is Ancient Greek for curved or bent and Kaulos, which is Ancient Greek for a stick, stem or branch. It refers to the woody part of stems and branches, which are bent. A good example is Meibomia campylicaulis.

Campylocarpa: [kam-pahy-lo-kar-pa] From Kampylos, which is Ancient Greek for curved or bent and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to stems which are bent. A good example is Brachyscome campylocarpa.

Campylocarpus: [kam-pahy-lo-kar-pus] From Kampylos, which is Ancient Greek for curved or bent and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to stems which are bent. A good example is the bent stems on Senecio campylocarpus.

Campylocaulon: [kam-pahy-lo-kor-lon] From Kampylos which is Ancient Greek for curved or bent and Caulis which is Latin for a stick, stem or branch. It refers to fruits, which are bent and form on the older wood. A good example is Desmodium campylocaulon.

Campylodromous: [kam-pahy-dro-mos] From Kampylos, which is Ancient Greek for curved or bent and Dromos, which is Ancient Greek for an entry or passageway. It refers to having several primary veins or their branches diverging at or close to a single point like dozens of passageways convering the surface before again converging at a single point near the apex.

Campylonema: [kam-pahy-lo-nee-ma] From Kampylos, which is Ancient Greek for to be curved or bent and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to a structure or organ, which is bent, curved and thread like. A good example is the stamens on Campynema lineare, which is now known as Campylonema lineare.

Campylophylla: [kam-pahy-lo-fahyl-la] From Kampylos, which is Ancient Greek for to be curved or bent and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which are bent or curved especially on the apical half. A good example is Acacia campylophylla.

Campylophyllum: [kam-pahy-lo-fahyl-lum] From Kampylos, which is Ancient Greek for to be curved or bent and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which are bent or curved especially on the apical half. A good example is Racosperma campylophyllum, which is now known as Acacia campylophylla.

Campylopora: [kam-pahy-lo-for a] From Kampylos, which is Ancient Greek for to be curved or bent and Poros, which is Ancient Greek for an opening. It refers to pores on the leaves or phyllodes which are set at an angle to the lamina. A good example is Campylopora australiana, which is now known as Brackenridgea australiana.

Campylopus: [kam-pahy-lo-pus] From Kampylos which is Ancient Greek for to be curved or bent and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek for a foot or feet. It refers to the stems as they approach the apexes bending 90 degrees. A good example is Campylopus incrassatus.

Campylotropous: [kam-pahy-lo-tro-pos] From Kampylos, which is Ancient Greek for to be curved or bent and Tropos, which is Ancient Greek for to bend. It refers to where the micropyle is in relation to the attachment of the funicullous tube.

Campynema: [kam-pahy-ne-ma] From Kampylos, which is Ancient Greek for to be curved or bent and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to flowers which appear to be held up on a thread. A good example is Campynema lineare.

Cana: [kan-a] From Cana, which is Latin for hoary, old and gray. It refers to wrinkled leaves which have a white lower lamina and white hairs all characteristics of an old man. A good example is Pomaderris gilmourii var. cana.

Canaliculata: [ka-na-li-kyoo-la-ta] From Kānna, which is Greek or Canāliculāta, which is Latin for a groove or water channel. It usually It refers to fleshy leaves, branches or trunks which have a distinct longitudinal groove. A good example is Eremophila canaliculata

Canaliculatum: [ka-na-li-kyoo-la-tum] From Kānna, which is Ancient Greek or Canāliculātum, which is Latin for a groove or water channel. It usually refers to fleshy leaves, branches or trunks which have a distinct longitudinal groove. A good example is Cymbidium canaliculatum.

Canaliculatus: [ka-na-li-kyoo-la-tus] From Kānna, which is Greek or Canāliculātus, which is Latin for a groove or water channel. It usually It refers to fleshy leaves, branches or trunks which have a distinct longitudinal groove. A good example is Acanthocarpus canaliculatus.

Canalis: [ka-na-lis] From Kānna, which is Greek or Canāliculātum, which is Latin for a groove or water channel. It usually It refers to the leaves having a deep, longitudinal furrow or groove. A good example is the leaves on Cycas canalis.

Cananga: [ka-ahn-guh] From Kenanga, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the Malay word for the Ylang Ylang tree. It refers to the Asian perfume tree. A good example is the Ylang Ylang, Cananga odorata.

Canangium: [kah-nan-ji-um] From Kenanga, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the Malay word for the Ylang Ylang tree. It refers to the Asian perfume tree. A good example is the Ylang Ylang, Canangium mitrastigma, which is now known as Cananga odorata.

Canarium: [ka-nar-i-um] From Kanariumm, which is Latinized from the Malay vernacular for a local nut tree in this genus. A good example is Canarium australisicum.

Canavalia: [ka-na-va-li-a] From Kānna, which is Greek or Canāliculātum, which is Latin for a groove or water channel and Valida, which is Latin for well developed. It refers to the upper surface of the petiole having a district groove. A good example is the leaflets on Canavalia rosea.A good example is Canavalia rosea.

Cancellata: [kan-sel-la-ta] From Cancellatusm, which is Latin for lattice. It refers to the flower heads or the pileus of fungi, which resemble a lattice work. A good example is the the green lichen Riccia cancellata.

Cancellatum: [kan-sel-la-tum] From Cancellatusm, which is Latin for lattice. It refers to the flower heads or the pileus of fungi, which resemble a lattice work. A good example is the fungus Dictydium cancellatum.

Cancellatus: [kan-sel-la-us] From Cancellatusm, which is Latin for lattice. It refers to the flower heads which resemble a lattice work. A good example is Gomphocarpus cancellatus.

Cancoides: [kan-koi-deez] From Cancroidm, which is Latin for a cancer stem or a crab and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers, which resemble a crab. A good example is Dendrobium cancroides.

Candelabroides: [kan-de-la-broi-deez] From Candēlābrum, which is Latin for a branched candle stick holder and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which take the form of a candle stick holder or candelabrum. A good example Grevillea candelabroides.

Candelabra: [kan-de-la-bra] From Candēlābrum, which is Latin for a branched candle stick holder and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which take the form of a candle stick holder or candelabrum. A good example Clavaria candelabra.

Candelabrum: [kan-de-la-brum] From Candēlābrum, which is Latin for a branched candle stick holder and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which take the form of a candle stick holder or candelabrum. A good example Stylidium candelabrum.

Candelabrus: [kan-de-la-brus] From Candēlābrum, which is Latin for a branched candle stick holder and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which take the form of a candle stick holder or candelabrum. A good example of a fungus, which rises ike a candelabrum with many branches is the beautiful pascal pink Artomyces candelabrus.

Candenatensis: [kan-den-a-ten-sis] Probably from Candenam, which is Latinized from a local Indian word for a district in southern India and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating form. It refers to the type species being found in the district. A good example Dalbergia candenatensis.

Candens: [kan-denz] From Candidusm, which is Latin for glittering white or brilliant white. It refers to petals which are brilliant white in contrast strongly against the sepals or petals or leaves which glisten in the sunlight. A good example is Drosanthemum candens.

Candida: [kan-di-da] From Candidusm, which is Latin for glittering white or brilliant white. It usually refers to flower organs, which are brilliant white and contrast strongly against the sepals, petals or leaves which glisten in the sunlight. A good example is Billardiera candida.

Candidissima: [kan-di-dis-si-ma] From Candidusm, which is Latin for glittering white or brilliant white and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to structures or organs, which are the most brilliant glistening white in the sunlight. A good example is Shawia candidissima, which is now known as Olearia axillaris.

Candidissimum: [kan-di-dis-si-mum] From Candidusm which is Latin for glittering white or brilliant white and Issima which is Latin for the superlative. It refers to structures or organs, which are the most brilliant glistening white in the sunlight. A good example is Gnaphalium candidissimum.

Candidissimus: [kan-di-dis-si-mus] From Candidusm which is Latin for glittering white or brilliant white and Issima which is Latin for the superlative. It refers to structures or organs, which are the most brilliant glistening white in the sunlight. A good example is the fungus Pleurotus candidissimus.

Candidus: [kan-di-dus] From Candidusm, which is Latin for glittering white or brilliant white. It refers to flowers, which conspicuously snowy white. A good example is Grevillea candelabroides.

Canditum: [kan-di-tum] From Candidusm, which is Latin for glittering white or brilliant white. It refers to flowers, which conspicuously snowy white. A good example was Helichrysum canditum, which is now known as Ozothamnus conditus.

Candollea: [kan-dol-lee-a] Is named in honour of Augustin Pyramus de Candolle; 1778-1841, who was a Swiss professor of botany, founder of a classification system of botany and notable biological author. A good example is Candollea barleei, which is now known as Stylidium barleei.

Candolleana: [kan-dol-lee-a-na] Is named in honour of Augustin Pyramus de Candolle; 1778-1841, who was a Swiss professor of botany, founder of a classification system of botany and notable biological author. A good example is Rhagodia candolleana subsp. candolleana.

Candolleanum: [kan-dol-lee- a-num] Is named in honour of Augustin Pyramus de Candolle; 1778-1841, who was a Swiss professor of botany, founder of a classification system of botany and notable biological author. A good example is Astroloma candolleanum.

Candolleanus: [kan-do-lee-a-nus] Is named in honour of Augustin Pyramus de Candolle; 1778-1841, who was a Swiss professor of botany, founder of a classification system of botany and notable biological author. A good example is Lotus candolleanus, which is now known as Lotus australis.

Candollei: [kan-do-lee-ahy] Is named in honour of Augustin Pyramus de Candolle; 1778-1841, who was a Swiss professor of botany, founder of a classification system of botany and notable biological author. A good example is Boronia candollei.

Candolliana: [kan-dol-li-a-na] Is named in honour of Augustin Pyramus de Candolle; 1778-1841, who was a Swiss professor of botany, founder of a classification system of botany and notable biological author. A good example was Ceriops candolliana, which is now known as Ceriops tagal.

Cane: [kein] From Kanna, which is Ancient Greek or Canna, which is Latin for a long stem. It refers to a long new shoot produced usually annually from plants, which are in the Rubus genus. A good example of a plant with canes is Rubus microphylum.

Canei: [ka-nee-ahy] Is named in honour of William Lancashire Cane; 1911-1987, who was an Australian farmer and foundation member of the Society for Growing Australian Plants. He also devised new methods for propagating Australian Native plants. A good example is Banksia canei.

Canens: [ka-nenz] From Cascus, which old Latin or Cānum, which is Latin for hoary, to become old and gray. It usually refers to structures or organs, which are covered in pale grey hairs or down. A good example is Craspedia canens.

Canescens: [ka-nes-senz] From Cascus, which old Latin or Cānum, which is modern Latin for grey and hoary, to become old and grey. It refers to structyures or organs, which are covered in straggly, unkempt, soft grey hairs. A good example is the stems on Syncarpha canescens subsp. canescens.

Canescent: [kan-es-sent] From Cascus, which old Latin or Cānum, which is Latin for grey and hoary and Esence, which is Latin for becoming. It refers to having a covering of short, soft hairs which eventually become grey. A good example is the hairs on the leaves on Hibiscus sp. baramba creek.

Canesjera: [ka-ne-jeer-a] From Canesjera, the Latinized form of a Malay word Tsjeroucansjeram which It refers to local tree. A good example is Cansjera leptostachya.

Cangaiense: [kan-gahy-ens] From Cangai, which is Latinized from the local aboriginal vernacular maybe for undulating hills and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the plants being first found or originating from the Cangai district. A good example was Acacia cangaiensis.

Cangaiensis: [kan-gahy-en-sis] From Cangai, which is Latinized from the local aboriginal vernacular maybe for undulating hills and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the plants being first found or originating from the Cangai district. A good example is Acacia cangaiensis.

Canicortex: [kan-ni-kor-teks] Maybe from Canīnus, which is Latin for pertaining to the tooth of a dog and Cortex/Corticēs, which is Latin for the outer layer of an organ. It refers to the bark of stems and trunks which are appear to have teeth marks in them. A good example is the hollow pits in the bark of Syzygium canicortex.

Canina: [ka-ni-na] From Canīnus, which is Latin for pertaining to the tooth of a dog. It refers to the shape of an organ, which resembles a dogs canine tooth. A good example is Bacularia canina.

Caninum: [ka-ni-num] From Caninum, which is Latin for pertaining to a dog. It may refer to the bite shape hollow in the in the seeds. A good example is the common pepper, Piper caninum.

Cannabina: [kan-na-bi-na] From Kannabis, which is Ancient Greek for the hemp plant. It may refer to the plants, which have bark fibres similar to Cannabis sativa. A good example is Sesbania cannabina var. cannabina.

Cannifolia: [kan-ni-foh-lei-a] From Kánna, which is Ancient Greek for the exotic Canna edulis. It refers to plants, which has leaves that resemble the Canna genus. A good example is Sesbania cannabina var. cannabina.

Cannonii: [Kan-non-i-ahy] Is named in honour of D. Cannon; 18??-19??, who was an Australian herbarium worker and collector. A good example is Eucalyptus cannonii.

Canobolensis: [ka-no-bo-len-sis] From Gaana Bula, which is Latinized from the aboriginal vernacular for two shoulders and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for coming from. It refers to the plants originally coming from from Mount Canobola which is an extinct volcano with two peaks. A good example is Eucalyptus canobolensis.

Cansjera: [kan-ze-jeer-a] From Cansjera, which is Latinized from the Malay vernacular for a small climber found there. It refers to the type species which originated from Malaya. A good example is Cansjera leptostachya.

Canterburyana: [kan-ter-beri-ree-a-na] Is named in honour of Sir John Henry Thomas Manners-Sutton; 1814-1877, who was a 19th century governor of Victoria and later named the 3rd Viscount of Canterbury. A good example is the fungus Hedyscepe canterburyana.

Canteriata: [kan-ter-i-a-ta] From Canteriatus, which is Ancient Greek for a light weight prop for vines or creepers usually in the shape of a horse or vase. A good example is Conostylis canteriata in which the flowers are propped atop of a long, fragile looking stalk.

Canteriata glasses displaying a long stem

Cantharellus: [kan-tha-rel-lus] From Kántharos, which is Greek a type of deep bowl of cup with two large handles at the side set upon a stem and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the female form. It refers to organs or fungi which have a deep cup like form. A good example is found on the fungi Hygrocybe cantharellus.

Cantharophily: [kan-tha-ro-fi-la] From Koleos, which is Ancient Greek for beetles and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which are pollinated by beetles. A good example is the beetle Aethina concolor that are found on the flowers of Hibiscus like Hibiscus splendens.

Cantharospermum: [kahn-tha-ro-sper-muh m] From Akantha, which is Ancient Greek for spine or thorns and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which are covered is short sine like appendages. A good example was Cantharospermum cinereum, which is now known as Cajanus cinereus.

Canthium: [kan-thee-a] From Kanthós, which is Ancient Greek for the corner of the eye and later Kanthos or Kanthus, which is Latin for what goes round a tyre. It refers to structures or organs, which are round. The Australian species have all been transferred to Psydrax, including Psydrax lamprophylla which was; until recently, previously known as Canthium lamprophyll.

Canthoides: [kan-thoi-deez] From Kanthós, which is Ancient Greek for the corner of the eye and later Kanthos or Kanthus, which is Latin for what goes round a tyre. It refers to structures or organs, which are round. It refers to plants, which resemble the old Canthium genus. A good example is Morinda canthoides.

Canum: [kan-um] From Cana, which is Latin for hoary, old and grey. It refers to leaves, which are ash grey coloured. A good example is Desmodium canum.

Canus: [kan-us] From Cana, which is Latin for hoary, old and grey. It refers to leaves, which are ash grey coloured. A good example is Loranthus canus.

Capense: [ka-pens] From Capense, which is Latin for from or around the Cape. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered around the Cape of Good Hope. Its reference here is unclear. A good example is Blechnum capense.

Capensis: [ka-pen-sis] From Cape, which is Latinized for coming from the Cape of Good Hope. It refers to the species, which were first discovered on peninsulars or capes. A good example is Rhodomyrtus trineura subsp. capensis.

Caperata: [ka-per-a-ta] From Caperata, which is Latin for wrinkled. It refers to seeds which are prominently wrinkled. A good example is Eremophila caperata.

Capillacea: [ka-pil-la-see-a] From Capillāre, which is Latin for a thread or tube and Acea, which is a group or family. It refers to organs, which are tube or hair like similar to other species and genre in the family. A good example is Carex capillacea.

Capillaceum: [ka-pil-la-see-um] From Capillāre, which is Latin for a thread or tube and Acea, which is a group or family. It refers to organs, which are tube or hair like similar to other species and genre in the family. A good example was Cladium capillaceum, which is now known as Tetraria capillaris.

Capillaceus: [ka-pil-la-see-us] From Capillāre, which is Latin for a thread and Acea, which is a group or family. It refers to organs, which are hair like. A good example is Juncus capillaceus.

Capillare: [ka-pil-lair] From Capillāre, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to structures or organs, which are thread like. A good example is the stems on Podolepis capillaris.

Capillaris: [ka-pil-ar-is] From Capillāre, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to structures or organs, which are thread like. A good example is the stems on A good example is Podolepis capillaris.

Capillary: [ka-pil-lar-ee] From Capillāre, which is Latin for a thread. It usually It refers to a hair like hollow tube.

Capillary action: [kah-pil-ahr-ee, ahk-shon] From Capillāre, which is Latin for a thread and Actio, which is Latin for something done or to do something. It refers to a hair like hollow tube where liquid flows between narrow spaces without assistance and in opposition to, external forces like gravity. Here it pertains to the waters ability to flow upwards From a deeper reservoir to the surface or from the roots to the leaves in a plant as is seen on the sides of a straw partially submerged in a liquid. – Capillary action occurs when the adhesion to the walls is stronger than the cohesive forces between the liquid molecule.

The narrower the tube the higher the water will travel. Thus inside cells the spaces are very minute thus the water can be lifed to the leaves on the tallest trees.

Capillata: [kap-il-la-ta] From Capillāre, which is Latin for root hairs. It refers to roots which are first produced after germination that are obviously hairy or roots with evident rootlets that are obviously covered in hairs. A good example is Acacia subflexuosa subsp. capillata.

Capillatum: [kap-il-la-tum] From Capillāre, which is Latin for root hairs. It refers to roots which are first produced after germination that are obviously hairy or roots with evident rootlets that are obviously covered in hairs. A good example was Racosperma subflexuosum subsp. capillatum, which is now known as Acacia subflexuosa subsp. capillata.

Capillatus: [kap-il-la-tus] From Capillāre, which is Latin for root hairs. It refers to roots which are first produced after germination that are obviously hairy or roots with evident rootlets that are obviously covered in hairs. A good example was Dicranum capillatus, which is now known as Campylopus pyriformis.

Capilliflora: [kap-pil-li-flor-a] From Capillāre, which is Latin for a thread or tube and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are held upon by filiformis or hair like stalk. A good example is Utricularia capilliflora.

Capilliflorum: [ka-pil-li-flor-um] From Capillāre, which is Latin for a thread or tube and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are held upon by filiformis or hair like stalks. A good example is the grass Capillipedium parviflorum subsp. capilliflorum.

Capillifolia: [ka-li-li-foh-li-a] From Capillāre, which is Latin for a thread and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the grasses leaf blades being somewhat filiformis or hair like. A good example is Aristida capillifolia.

Capillifolius: [kah-pil-li-foh-li-us] From Capillāre, which is Latin for thread and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves being somewhat acicular or like long hairs. A good example is Senecio capillifolius.

Capillipedium: [ka-pil-li-pe-di-um] From Capillāre, which is Latin for a thread and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedis, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to the leaves’ pedicels being very narrow. A good example is the flower heads of Capillipedium spicigerum.

Capillipes: [ka-pi-li-peez] From Capillāre, which is Latin for a thread and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pes/Pedis which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to stem bases, which are swollen similar to a foot. A good example is Acalypha capillipes.

Capillosa: [ka-pil-loh-sa] From Capillāre, which is Latin for long, wavy, curly hairs or a head of hair. It refers to a structure or organ, which is covered in long, wavy or curly hairs. A good example is the new growth or epicormic shoots on Eucalyptus capillosa Trichocolletes capillosus.

Capillosum: [ka-pil-loh-sum] From Capillāre, which is Latin for long, wavy, curly hairs or a head of hair. It refers to a structure or organ, which is covered in long, wavy or curly hairs. A good example is the fungus Pythium capillosum that kills seedlings off.

Capillosus: [ka-pil-loh-sus] From Capillāre, which is Latin for long, wavy, curly hairs or a head of hair. It refers to a structure or organ, which is covered in long, wavy or curly hairs. A good example is one of our solitary bees so important to the garden and bush Trichocolletes capillosus.

Capillus veneris: [ka-pil-lus, ve-neer-is] From Capillāre, veneris which is Latin for Venus’s hair. It refers to structures or organs which are black and covered in long hair. The reference to Adiantum capillus veneris which is unclear as the stipes and fronds are glabrous.

Capitanea:[ka-pi-ta-nee-a] From Capitaneus, from the Latin for a head or chief. It refers to the leaves, buds and fruits which are much larger especially when compared to the closely related Eucalyptus incrassata. A good example is the flower heads of Eucalyptus capitanea.

Capitata:[ka-pi-ta-ta] From Capillāta, which is Latin for a pin head. It refers to the flowers, which form in small, compact heads. A good example is the flower heads of Grevillea capitata.

Capitate: [ka-pi-teit] From Capillātum, which is Latin for a pin head. It refers to the flower heads being in a very densely packed. A good example is Melaleuca capitata.

Capitatum: [ka-pi-ta-tum] From Capillātum, which is Latin for a pin head. It refers to flowers, which are in small heads. A good example is the flower heads of Conospermum capitatum.

Capitatus: [ka-pi-ta-tus] From Capillātus, which is Latin for a pin head. It refers to flowers, which are in small heads. A good example is the flower heads of Eriostemon capitatus, which is now known as Microcybe multiflora.

Capitellata: [ka-pi-tel-la-ta] From Capillāta, which is Latin for a pin head and Ata which is Latin for pertaining to being smaller. It refers to the flower heads which are smaller when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus capitellata.

Capitellatum: [ka-pi-tel-lah-tum] From Capillāta, which is Latin for a pin head and Ata which is Latin for pertaining to being smaller. It refers to the flower heads which are smaller when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Lasiopetalum capitellatum, which is now known as Lasiopetalum discolor.

Capitellatus: [ka-pi-tel-la-tus] From Capillāta, which is Latin for a pin head and Ata which is Latin for pertaining to being smaller. It refers to the flower heads which are smaller when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Leucopogon capitellatus var. capitellatus.

Capitisyork: [ka-pi-tis-york] From Capillātum, which is Latin for a pin head and York, which is Latinized for Cape York Peninsular. It refers to the flower heads which are smaller when compared to other species in the genus especially those from cape York Peninsular. A good example is Dendrobium capitisyork.

Capitis-yorkii: [ka-pi-tis, yor-ki-ahy] From Capillātum, which is Latin for a pin head and York Is named in honour of the Duke of York the second son of the british monarch. It refers to the flower heads being much smaller compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Actinophloeus capitis-yorkii, which is now known as Ptychosperma elegans.

Capito: [ka-pi-toh] From Capillātum, which is Latin for a pin head. It refers to the plants having many heads.

Capitula: [ka-pi-tyoo-la] From Capillātum, which is Latin for a little pin head. It refers to the size of the flower heads being much smaller compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Eragrostis capitula.

Capitulata: [ka-pi-tyoo-la-ta] From Capillātum, which is Latin for a little pin head. It refers to the size of the flower heads being much smaller compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Molineria capitulata.

Capitulum: [ka-pi-tyoo-lum] From Capillātum, which is Latin for a little pin head. It refers to the size of the flower heads being much smaller compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Pseudanthium capitulum.

Capparioide: [ka-par-i-oi-de] From Capparis, which is Ancient Greek for an ancient group of plants in the Capparidaceae family and Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble those in the Caparis genus. A good example is Myoporum caprarioide.

Capparis: [ka-par-is] From Capparis, which is Ancient Greek for an ancient group of plants in the Capparidaceae family. A good example is Capparis arborea.

Capricormia: [ka-pri-kor-mi-a] From Cappricornus, which is Latin for a goats horn. It refers to plants, which are found mainly north of the Tropic of Capricorn. A good example is Corymbia capricormia.

Capricorni: [ka-pri-kor-ni] From Cappricornus, which is Latin for a goat’s horns or a goat’s head. It refers to the growth habit of the plants, which vaguely resembles goat’s horns sticking up out of the sand. A good example is Zostera muelleri subsp. capricorni.

Capricornia: [ka-pri-kor-ni-a] From Cappricornus, which is Latin for a goats horn. It refers to plants, which are found mainly north of the Tropic of Capricorn. A good example is Eucalyptus capricornia, which is now known as Corymbia dichromophloia.

Capricornicum: [ka-pri-kor-ni-kum] From Cappricornus, which is Latin for a goat’s horns or a goat’s head. It refers to the plants, which are located on or near the Tropic of Capricorn. A good example is Dendrobium speciosum var. capricornicum.

Capricornicus: [ka-pri-kor-ni-kus] From Cappricornus, which is Latin for a goat’s horns or a goat’s head. It refers to the plants, which are located on or near the Tropic of Capricorn. A good example is Thelychiton capricornicus.

Caprifoliaceous: [ka-pri-foh-li-a-see-os] From Capreolus, which is Latin for a goat and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the habit of many of the Honeysuckle species being good climbers like goats and using the leaves and stems as a support.

Capriola: [ka-pri-oh-la] From Capreolus, which is Latin for a goat. It refers to the habit of many of the Honeysuckle species being good climbers like goats and using the leaves and stems as a support. A good example was Brachyachne ciliaris, which is now known as Capriola ciliaris.

Capsella: [kap-sel-la] From Capsa, which is Latin for a little box or a case. It refers to the capsules or fruits of some plants resembling cases or boxes. A good example is the common exotic brassica Capsella bursa-pastoris.

Capsularis: [kap-syoo-lar-is] From Capsa, which is Latin for a little box or a case. It refers to dried fruits which resemble capsules. A good example was Pomaderris capsularis, which is now known as Colubrina asiatica var. asiatica.

Capsule: [kap-syool] From Capsula, which is Latin for a little box or a case. It refers to the dried fruits comprising of two or more carpels.

Captiosa: [kap-ti-oh-sa] From Captiōsum/Captiōsus, which is Latin for fallacious, deceptive, defects or faultfinding. It refers to plants, which are often trivialized because they are not quite as large or have prominent features. A good example is Eucalyptus captiosa.

Caput-casuarii: [kapoot, ka-soo-ar-i-ahy] From Caput, which is Latin for any head like extension and Cassuarii, which is Latinised for the Cassawary. It refers to the apex of the shoots which somewhat resemble a horned head covered in feathers like a Cassawary and extend further out from the apex. A good example is Sclerolaena caput-casuarii.

Caput-medusae: [kapoot, me-du-see] From Caput which is Latin for any head like extension, Maedusae which is Ancient Greek for the head of Medusae. It refers to Medusae’s head where snakes replace the hair, referring to the resemblance of many palms with the torso and head of leaves/fronds, plants, which have exaggerated long thick pedicles atop a thin spike or leaves stretching out like snakes being held in the hand. A really good example of the leaves isthe South American collectors plant Tillandsia caput medusae or closer to home the grass Aristida caput-medusae with wiry snake like spikes is a good example.

Caracana: [kar-a-ka-na] From Coracana, which is Latinized from the Sinhalese vernacular for the wild plants grown there. It refers to a porridge made from the grains which are ground to make flour. It has the potential to make an ideal cereal crop in Australia for arid locations where other cereal crops are marginal to very marginal. A good example is Eleusine caracana.

Carallia: [kar-al-li-a] From Karallia, which is Latinized from the Indian vernacular for the type species found there. A good Australian example is Carallia brachiata.

Carapa: [kar-a-pa] From Carapa, which is Latinized from the Carib Indian vernacular name for the type species found there. A good Australian example is Carapa moluccensis, which is now known as Xylocarpus moluccensis.

Caraxeron: [kar-ak-ser-on] From Cara, which is Latin fora spur and Xeron, which is Latin for dry. It refers to plants, which have spurs that have a dry appearance. A good Australian example is Caraxeron conicus, which is now known as Gomphrena breviflora.

Carbon: [kar-bon] From Carbo, which is Latin for coal. Symbol C Atomic Number 6

Carbonaria: [kar-bo-nar-i-a] From Karallia, which is Latinized from the Indian vernacular for the type species found there. A good example is the fungus Hohenbuehelia carbonaria.

Cardamine: [kar-da-mayhn] From Kardamon, which is Ancient Greek for spicy. It refers to plants, which exhibit a scent or structure that resembles the Indian Spice Cardamine. A good example is Cardamine hirsuta.

Cardaminoides: [kar-da-min-oi-deez] From Kardamon, which is Ancient Greek for spicy and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Indian Spice genus Cardamomum. A good example is Pachymitus cardaminoides.

Cardamomum: [kar-da-moh-mum] From Kardamon, which is Ancient Greek for spicy. It refers to plants, which are related Indian Spice genus Cardamine. A good example is Cardamomum dallachyi, which is now known as Amomum dallachyi.

Cardiacensis: [kar-di-a-sen-sis] From Cardiac, which is Latinized for Cardiac Hill and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on Cardiac Hill in the Mount Walsh National Park south eastern Queensland. A good example is Macrozamia cardiacensis.

Cardinalis: [kar-di-na-lis] From Cardinālis, which is Latin for a hinge or the colour red. It refers to flowers, which are scarlet or cardinal red. A good example is Correa cardinalis.

Cardiocarpa: [kar-di-oh-kar-pa] From Kardio, which is Ancient Greek for the heart and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits or acenes which have a heart shape. A good example is Allittia cardiocarpa.

Cardiochila: [kar-di-oh-chi-la] From Kardio, which is Ancient Greek for a heart and Cheîlos which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to theshape of the labellum which is heart shape. A good example is Caladenia cardiochila.

Cardiophylla: [kar-de-oh-fahyl-la] From Kardía, which is Ancient Greek for the heart or heart shape and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or pinnae which are heart shaped. A good example is Acacia cardiophylla.

Cardiophyllum: [kar-di-oh-fahyl-lum] From Kardía, which is Ancient Greek for the heart or heart shape and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or pinnae which are heart shaped. A good example is Myrtoleucodendron cardiophyllum , which is now known as Melaleuca cardiophylla.

Cardiophyllus: [kar-di-oh-fahyl-lus] From Kardía, which is Ancient Greek for the heart or heart shape and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or pinnae which are heart shaped. A good example is the aerial parasitic plant Loranthus signatus var. cardiophyllus.

Cardiopteris: [kar-di-oh-teer-is] From Kardía, which is Ancient Greek for the heart or heart shape and Pterón, which is Ancient Greek for a wing or a wing feather. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or pinnae which are heart shaped and fruits which have two prominent wings. A good example is the heart shape leaves and winged fruits on Cardiopteris moluccanaa.

Cardiosperma: [kar-di-oh-sper-ma] From Kardía, which is Ancient Greek for a heart and Sperma/Spermum, which is Ancient Greek for seeds or a seed. It refers to the seeds or pods which are heart shape or having spots on the seeds. A good example is Senna cardiosperma.

Cardiospermum: [kar-di-oh-sper-mum] From Kardía, which is Ancient Greek for a heart and Sperma/Spermum, which is Ancient Greek for seeds or a seed. It refers to the seeds or pods which are heart shape or having spots on the seeds. A good example is the highly invasive balloon vine Cardiospermum grandiflorum.

Cardiostegia: [kahr-di-oh-ste-ji-a] From Kardia, which is Ancient Greek for a heart and Stégē which is Ancient Greek for a roof or similar covering. It refers to the enlarged calyxes acting like a roof covering the flowers and fruits and heart shape leaves on some plants especially in the juvenile phase. A good example is Parietaria cardiostegia.

Carduacea: [kahr-du-a-see-a] From Carduī, which is Latin for wild thistles. It refers to plants, which resemble the leaves of the exotic Scotch thistle. A good example is Jacksonia carduacea.

Carduifolia: [kar-dwee-foh-li-a] From Carduī, which is Latin for wild thistles and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble the leaves of the exotic Scotch thistle. A good example is Grevillea carduifolia, which is now known as Grevillea cunninghamii.

Carduiforme: [kar-dwee-form] From Carduī, which is Latin for wild thistles and Form which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which resemble the exotic scotch thistle. A good example is Solanum carduiforme.

Cardwellia: [kahr-dwel-li-a] Is named in honour of Edward Cardwell; 1813-1886, who was a British politician and secretary to the colonies. A good example is Cardwellia sublimis.

Carens: [ka-renz] From Carēns, which is Latin for lacking. It refers to a structure or organ which lacks certain properties normally associated with the genus. A good example is Acacia carens.

Carex: [ka-reks] From Keiren, which is Ancient Greek or later Carex, which is Ancient Greek for to cut. It refers to leaf apexes, which appear to be roughly cut on many species or the spikelets being trimmed off along the spike. A good example is Carex appressa.

Careya: [ka-ree-ya] Is named in honour of Doctor William Careya; 1761-1834, who was an English minister and botanist who initiated and founded the Serampore Botanical Gardens and Agricultural Society of India. A good example is Planchonia careya.

Cargillea: [kar-jil-lee-a] Is named in honour of Dale Christine Cargill; 1957-2…, who was an Australian botanist, taxonomist and research officer. A good example is Diospyros cargillea, which is now known as Diospyros australis.

Cargillia: [kar-jil-li-a] Is named in honour of Dale Christine Cargill; 1957-20.., who was an Australian Botanist and curator of the National herbaria in Cryptogams. A good example is Cargillia pentamera, which is now known as Diospyros pentamera.

Caribaea: [ka-ri-bee-a] From Caribeae, which is Latin for the Caribbean. It refers to plants, which were first described that came from the Caribbean region. A good example is Eleocharis caribaea.

Carica: [ka-ri-ka] From Caricinus, which is Latin for like a sedge. It refers to the plants, which favour the same habitats where most sedges grow. A good example is the horticultural fig, Ficus carica.

Caricetum: [ka-ri-se-tum] From Caricinus, which is Latin for like a sedge. It refers to the plants, which favour habitats of most sedges grow. A good example is Prasophyllum caricetum.

Caricifolia: [ka-ri-si-foh-li-a] From Caricinus, which is Latin for like a sedge and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble sedges. A good example is Liparis caricifolia.

Caricifolium: [ka-ri-si-foh-li-um] From Caricinus, which is Latin for like a sedge and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble sedges. A good example is Stylidium caricifolium.

Caricina: [ka-ri-si-na] From Caricinus, which is Latin for like a sedge. It refers to the plants being somewhat like a sedge and a grass. A good example is Scleria caricina.

Caricinum: [ka-ri-si-num] From Caricinus, which is Latin for like a sedge and Inus which is Latin for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which are somewhat like a sedge and a grass. A good example is Diplacrum caricinum.

Caricinus: [ka-ri-si-nus] From Caricinus, which is Latin for like a sedge and Inus which is Latin for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which are somewhat like a sedge and a grass. A good example is Amphipogon caricinus.

Caricologist: [ka-ri-kol-o-jist] From Keiren which is Ancient Greek or Carex, which is Latin for to cut, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies sedges.

Caricology: [ka-ri-kol-o-jee] From Keiren, which is Ancient Greek or Carex which is Latin for to cut and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science which studies sedges.

Carina: [karri-na] From Carina, which is Latin for a keel. It usually It refers to the keel petals which are between the wing petals. A good example is the keel petals on Crotalaria cunninghamii.

Carinalis:[karin-a-lis] From Carina, which is Latin for a keel. It usually It refers to the keel petals between the wing petals wing petals. A good example is the keel petal on Bossiaea carinalis.

Carinata: [ka-rin-a-ta] From Carinatus, which is Latin for to have a keel like ridge. It refers to an organ, which has a longitudinally raised ridge. A good example is the keel shaped canal on Hakea carinata.

Carinatum: [ka-rin-a-tum] From Carina, which is Latin for a keel. It usually It refers to canal beneath a stem ridge associated with a vascular bundle or the base petal usually situated between the wing petals. A good example is the keeled pinnae on Chenopodium carinatum.

Carinatus: [ka-rin-a-tus] From Carina, which is Latin for a keel. It usually It refers to canal beneath a stem ridge associated with a vascular bundle or the base petal usually situated between the wing petals. A good example is the keel pinnae on Phlegmariurus carinatus.

Carinavalva: [ka-rin-a-val-va] From Carina, which is Latin for a keel and Valva which is Latin for having two halves which open. It refers to the keeled valves of the silicula. A good example is Carinavalva glauca.

Cariopsis: [ka-ri-op-sis] From Karyo, which is Ancient Greek for a nut, seed or kernel and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for to resemble or to have a similar appearance of by sight. It refers to small, one-celled, one-seeded, dry indehiscent fruit with pericarps which adhere to the seed coat, the typical fruit of grasses and grains. Alternate spelling – Caryopsis. A good example is the seeds of Ragtrostis spartinoides.

Carissa: [ka-ris-sa] From Carissa, which is Latin for the vernacular of an Indian word the this genus and Eîdos/Oides, which is Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants which closely but superficially resemble the Carissa genus. A good example is Carissa spinarum.

Carissoides: [ka-ris-soi-deez] From Carissa, which is Latin for the vernacular of an Indian word the this genus and Eîdos/Oides, which is Greek foe alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely but superficially resemble the Carissa genus. A good example is the seeds of Euphorbia carissoides.

Carlinoides: [kar-lin-oi-deez] From Karlina, which is Ancient Greek or Carlina which is Latin for a European daisy and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves which closely resemble the Carolina genus. A good example is Dryandra carlinoides, which is now known as Banksia carlinoides.

Carlquistii: [karl-kwis-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Dr. Professor, Sherwin Carlquist; 1930-20.., who was an American Botanist and educator Botanist, biologist. A good example is Stylidium carlquistii.

Carlsonii: [karl-son-i-ahy] Is named in honour of A. Carlson; who was a plant collector and prospector in Western Australia. A good example is Ptilotus carlsonii.

Carmichaelia: [kar-mahy-kee-li-a] Is named in honour of Captain Dugald Carmichael; 1772-1827, who was a Scottish army officer and botanist and was known as the father of marine botany. A good example is Carmichaelia muelleriana.

Carnabyi: [kar-nah-bee-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Ivan Clarence Carnaby; 1908-1974 who was an Australian agriculturalist, entomologist who had a keen interest in ornithology and botany. A good example is Eucalyptus carnabyi.

Carnarvonense: [kar-nar-vo-nens] From Carnarvon, which is Latinized for the Carnarvon Gorge (Carnarvon is named in honour of Henry Herbet Earl of Carnavon; 1831-1890) and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were discovered and are almost entirely found only in the Carnarvon Gorge in central Queensland. A good example is Asplenium carnarvonense.

Carnarvonensis: [kar-nar-vo-nen-sis] From Carnarvon, which is Latinized for the Carnarvon Gorge (Carnarvon is named in honour of Henry Herbet Earl of Carnavon; 1831-1890) and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were discovered and are only found in the Carnarvon Gorge in central Queensland. A good example is Thelychiton carnarvonensis.

Carnarvonia: [kar-nar-vo-ni-a] Is named in honour of Henry Herbet Earl of Carnavon; 1831-1890. A good example is Carnarvonia araliifolia var. montana.

Carnea: [kar-nee-a] From Carnea, which is Latin for flesh colour. It refers to flowers, which are flesh coloured. A good example is Caladenia carnea.

Carnegiei: [kar-nee-ji-ahy] From Carnea, which is Latin for flesh colour. It refers to flowers, which are flesh coloured. A good example is Dicrastylis carnegiei.

Carneorum: [kar-nee-or-um] From Carnea, which is Latin for flesh colour and nemorum, which is Latin for of the woods. It refers to seed pods and stems which are flesh coloured and the habitat of the plants being that of open woodlands. A good example is Acacia carneorum.

Carneum: [kar-nee-um] From Carnea, which is Latin for flesh colour. It refers to a structure or organ, which has the colours of flesh. A good example is the pileus on the fungi Hydnangium carneum.

Carneus: [kar-nee-us] From Carnea, which is Latin for flesh colour. It refers to a structure or organ, which has the colours of flesh. A good example is the tepals on the orchid Petalochilus carneus.

Carnivaria: [kar-ni-var-i a] May be from Carni, which is Latin for flesh, Varium/Vārus which are Latin for variable, varigated or different. It therefore may refer to plants, which have some variation in colour of the flowers that are somewhat flesh coloured. A good example is Corymbia trachyphloia subsp. carnivaria.

Carnivorous Plants: [kar-ni-vor-os, plan-ts] From Carni, which is Latin for flesh, Vorus which is Latin for devouring and Phyton which is Ancient Greek or Plantere which is Latin for a plant. It refers to plants, which trap and dissolve insects in order to gain their nutrients. A good example is Drosera spathulata and Utricularia aurea.

Carnosa: [kar-noh-a] From Carnosa, which is Latin for fleshy. It refers to flowers, which are rather fleshy and the colour of the flowers are flesh a coloured. A good example is Hoya carnosa.

Carnosipetalus: [kar-noh-si-pe-ta-lus] From Carnosa, which is Latin for fleshy and Petalon which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers topetals which are fleshy in colour. A good example is Artabotrys carnosipetalus.

Carnosula: [kar-noh-syoo-la] From Carnosum, which is Latin for fleshy. It refers to flowers, which are rather fleshy and or the  colour of the flowers that have a fleshy colour. A good example is Baeckea carnosula.

Carnosulum: [kar-noh-syoo-lum] From Carnea, which is Latin for slightly fleshy. It refers to the leaves which are somewhat fleshy. A good example is the phyllodes and stems on Racosperma carnosulum.

Carnosum: [kar-noh-sum] From Carnosum, which is Latin for fleshy. It refers to flowers, which are rather fleshy and or the colour of the flowers, which have a fleshy colour. A good example is Cynanchum carnosum Hoya carnosa.

Carnosus: [kar-noh-sus] From Carnosus, which is Latin for fleshy. It refers to flowers, which are rather fleshy and or the colour of the flowers that have a fleshy colour. A good example is Convolvulus carnosus.

Caroleae: [ka-ro-lee-e] Is named in honour of Mr. L. Pedley’s wife Carole. Mr. Pedley worked as an officer in Brisbane herbarium. A good example is Acacia caroleae.

Caroli: [ka-ro-li] Is named in honour of Jean Martin Carolus; 1808-1863, who was a Belgian scientist who worked in Brazil. A good example is Spoobolus Caroli.

Carolinae: [ka-ro-li-nee] From Carolina, which is Latinized for the U.S. state of Carolina. It refers to the type specimen coming from Carolina. A good example is Elaeocarpus carolinae.

Carolinianum: [kar-o-lin-i-num] From Carolina, which is Latinized for the U.S. state of Carolina and Anum, which is Latin for coming from or pertaining to. It refers to the type specimen coming from Carolina. A good example is Erodium carolinianum.

Carolorum-henricorum: [ka-ro-lor-um, hen-ri-kor-um] Is named in honour of Carolorum-Henricorum. A good example is Picris carolorum-henricorum, which is now known as Picris angustifolia subsp. carolorum-henricorum.

Carpel: [kar-pel] From Karpós, which is Ancient Greek or Carpellum, which is Latin for a fruit. It refers to the ovary, style and stigma spoken as a single entity.

Carpellate: [kar-pel-leit] From Karpós, which is Ancient Greek or Carpellum, which is Latin for a fruit. Is a plant which has non perfect, pistillate flowers only. A good example is Myriophyllum jacobsii which has both carpellate and staminate flowers.

Carpels: [kar-pelz] From Karpós, which is Ancient Greek or Carpellum, which is Latin for a fruit. It refers to a fruit which has many individual carpels.

Carpentariae: [kar-pen-ta ri-ee] Is named in honour of Pieter Carpentier a Dutch Govener. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Gulf of Carpentaria that was named after Pieter Carpentier. A good example is Phyllanthus carpentariae.

Carpesioides: [kar-pe-si-oi-deez] From Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit or Carpo, which is Latin for to harvest and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to fruits or seeds which are easy to harvest. A good example is Cephalosorus carpesioides.

Carpha: [kar-fa] From Karphós, which is Ancient Greek for a dry straw or dry stick. It refers to the plants appearing to be dry and dehydrated. A good example is Carpha alpina.

Carphalea: [kar-fah-lee-a] From Karphós, which is Ancient Greek for a dry straw or dry stick. It refers to the plants appearing to be dry and burnt. A good example is Carphalea Kirondron.

Carphiformis: [kar-fi-for-mis] From Karphós, which is Ancient Greek for a dry straw or dry stick and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which resemble the Carphea or Carpha genus in that they appear to be dry and dehydrated. A good example is Scleria carphiformis.

Carphoides: [kar-foi-deez] From Karphós which is Ancient Greek for a dry straw or dry stick and Oides, which is Ancient greek foir alike or similar to. It refers to the plants appearing to be dry and dehydrated similar to the genus Carpha. A good example is Rytidosperma carphoides.

Carpobrotus: [kar-po-broh-tus] From Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit and Brotus, which is Ancient Greek for edible. It refers to the fruits which are very sweet and palatable in this genus. Probably the best tasting fruits in Australia. A good example is the fruits of Carpobrotus edulis.

Carpodetoides: [kar-po-de-toi-deez] From Karpós which is Ancient Greek for a fruit, Detos which is Ancient Greek for being bound together and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which resemble the Carpodetus genus. A good example is Corokia carpodetoides.

Carpodetus: [kar-po-de-tus] From Karpós which is Ancient Greek for a fruit and detos which is Ancient Greek for being bound together. It refers to the flowers and fruits being produced very close together. The Australian genus’s of Abrophyllum and Cuttsia are closely related and have been removed from the Carpodetus genus.

Carpodontos: [kar-po-don-tos] From Karpós which is Ancient Greek for a fruit and Odón/Dontós which is Ancient Greek or Dens which is Latin for a tooth, teeth or tooth like. It refers to structures or organs, which have teeth. A good example is Carpodontos lucida, which is now known as Eucryphia lucida.

Carpologist: [kar-pol-o-jist] From Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies the structures of fruits and seeds.

Carpology: [kar-pol-o-jee] From Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science which studies the structures of fruits and seeds.

Carpophore: [kar-po-for] From Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit and Phoros, which is Ancient Greek for to bear. It refers to a slender stalk that supports each half of a dehisced fruit.

Carpopodium: [kar-po-poh-di-um] From Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit and Ped, which is Ancient Greek for a foot. It refers to pistillate stalks which are short and thick.

Carpotaxis: [kar-po-tak-sis] From Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit and Taxis which is Ancient Greek for to place in order. It refers to the study of the arrangement of fruits by a reproductive function.

Carrickiana: [kar-rik-ki-.na] Is named in honour of John Carrick; 1914-1978, who was a Scottish born Australian who specialized in the Prostanthera genus. A good example is Prostanthera carrickiana.

Carrii: [kar-ri-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Professor Dennis John Carr; 1915-2008 and or his wife Stella Grace Maise, Nee Fawcette; 1912-1988, who were English born Australian writers and specialists on the Eucalyptus genus. A good example is found on Australorchis carrii.

Carronia: [kar-ro-n-a] Is named in honour of William Carron; 1823-1876, who emigrated to Australia, followed his father’s profession as a gardener then worked as a forester. A good example is Carronia multisepalea.

Carronii: [kar-ro-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of William Carron; 1823-1876, who emigrated to Australia, followed his father’s profession as a gardener then worked as a forester. A good example is found on Lysiphyllum carronii.

Carronis: [kar-ro-nis] Is named in honour of William Carron; 1823-1876, who emigrated to Australia, followed his father’s profession as a gardener then worked as a forester. A good example is Psychotria carronis.

Carruthersia: [kar-ru-ther-si-a] Is probably named in honour of W. Carruthers who was a British born Australian Palaeobotanist around the 1870’s. A good example is Carruthersia daronensis, which is now known as Ichnocarpus frutescens.

Carruthersii: [kar-u-ther-si-ahy] Is probably named in honour of W. Carruthers who was a British born Australian Palaeobotanist around the 1870’s. A good example is Leionema carruthersii.

Carsei: [kar-see-ahy] Is named in honour of Harry Carse; 1857-1930, who was an English born new Zealander teacher and a self-taught amateur botanist and taxonomist who specialized in Aukland’s Filicales and Cypereace. A good example is Corybas carsei.

Carsonii: [kahr-so-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Duncan Carson; 1860-1931, who was an Australian wool broker, pastoralist and plant collector. A good example is Eriocaulon carsonii.

Carteri: [kar-ter-ahy] Is named in honour of Cater but which Cater cannot be substantiated. A good example is Triumfetta carteri.

Carthagenensis: [kar-tha-je-nen-sis] From Carthagen, which is Latinized for the coastal strip in Tunisia and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to the plants, which originally discovered along the coastal strip north of Darwin that resembles the Carthagen coastline and its harbours. A good example is Justicia carthagenensis.

Cartilaginea: [kar-ti-la-ji-nee-a] From Cartilaginosis, which is Latin for a whitish or yellowish gristle or Kartos which is Ancient Greek for strong. It refers to the plants which have tough, leathery leaves. A good example is Blechnum cartilagineum.

Cartilagineum: [kar-ti-la-ji-nee-um] From Cartilaginosis, which is Latin for a whitish or yellowish gristle or Kartos, which is Ancient Greek for strong. It refers to the plants having tough leaves. A good example is Blechnum cartilagineum.

Cartilagineus: [kar-ti-la-ji-nee-us] From Kartos, which is Ancient Greek for strong and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to the filaments being strong. A good example was Scirpus cartilagineus, which is now known as Isolepis marginata or Isolepis alpina.

Cartonema: [kar-to-nee-ma] From Kartos, which is Ancient Greek for strong and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to the filaments being strong. A good example is found on the seeds of Cartonema spicatum.

Carumbium: [ka-rum-b-um] From Carumb, which is unknown. A good example is found on the seeds of Carumbium platyneuron, which is now known as Homalanthus populifolium.

Caruncula: [ka-run-kyoo-la] From Carunculae, which is Latin for a little piece of flesh. A good example is found on the seeds of Acacia suaveolens and Scaevola aemula.

Left Acacia suaveolens – andi Mellis Right Thanks to Seeds of South Australian Herbarium.

https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1CHBF_en-GBAU820AU820&sxsrf=ALeKk031aFKbt1FRuA_bx4-YqYxfboXzTQ:1613362952641&source=univ&tbm=isch&q=seeds+of+south+australia++caruncula&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjY_L2thevuAhXf8XMBHUXMAC8QjJkEegQIBBAB&biw=1920&bih=937#imgrc=2iRTdwGEpGQtsM

Caryodaphne: [ka-rahy-oh-dahph-nee] From Karyon, which is Ancient Greek for a walnut and Daphne which is the Greek goddess of associated with moving water. It refers to the exquisite beauty of Daphne who attracted the attention and ardor of the god Apollo. Apollo pursued her and just before being overtaken, Daphne pleaded to her father, the river god Ladon, and Ge for help. So Ladon transformed Daphne into the Laurel tree. At the Pythian Games which were held every four years in Delphi to honour of Apollo, a wreath of laurel leaves were gathered as the prize for doing well in victory. Thus is the significance of the Laurel leaves at the modern Olympic Games. A good example is Caryodaphne australis, which is now known as Cryptocarya laevigata.

Caryophylloides: [ka-rahy-oh-fahyl-loi-deez] From Karyon, which is Ancient Greek for a walnut, Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to a leaves, which have scent that resembles walnuts. A good example is Wahlenbergia caryophylloides.

Caryopsis: [ka-rahy-op-sis] From Karyo, which is Ancient Greek for a nut, seed or kernel and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for to resemble or to have a similar appearance of by sight. It refers to small, one-celled, one-seeded, dry indehiscent fruit with pericarps which adhere to the seed coat, the typical fruit of grasses and grains. Alternate spelling – Cariopsis. A good example is the seeds Eragrostis spartinoides.

Caryopsis

Caryospermum: [ka-rahy-o-sper-mum] From Karyon, which is Ancient Greek for a walnut and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which resembles the walnuts from China. A good example is Caryospermum arborescens, which is now known as Perrottetia arborescens.

Caryota: [ka-rahy-oh-ta] From Karyon, which is Ancient Greek for a walnut. It refers to seeds which somewhat resemble the size and shape of the Chinese walnuts. A good example is Caryota rumphiana.

Caryotoides: [ka-rahy-oh-toi-deez] From Karyon, which is Ancient Greek for a walnut and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for a like or similar to. It refers to seeds which resemble those of the Caryota genus in that they somewhat resemble the size and shape of the Chinese walnuts. A good example is Calamus caryotoides.

Casearia: [ka-see-ri-a] From Cāseus/Cāseī/Cāseārium, which is Latin for cheese. It refers to fruits, which have a typical cheese wheel or barrel of cheese colour or smell. A good example is the colour of the fruits on Casearia grewiifolia.

Caseolaris: [ka-see-o-lar-is] From Cāseus/Cāseī/Cāseārium, which is Latin for cheese. It refers to fruits, which have a typical cheese wheel or barrel of cheese. A good example is Sonneratia caseolaris.

Cassia: [kas-see-a] From Kassía/Kasía/Kásia, which are Ancient Greek for the Cinnamon tree, cinnamon flavour or cinnamon colour. It refers to plants, which are releated to the exotic spice Cinnamon. Most Cassia species have been transferred to the Senna genus like Cassia acclinis, which is now known as Senna acclinis. A good example is Cassia marksiana.

Cassicula: [kas-si-kyoo-la] Is named in honour of Alexandre Henri Gabriel Comte de Cassini; 1781-1832, who was a French botanist and naturalist. It refers to plants, which have similar but smaller fruits to the Cassine genus. A good example is of Acacia cassicula.

Cassiculum: [kas-si-kyoo-lum] Is named in honour of Alexandre Henri Gabriel Comte de Cassini; 1781-1832, who was a French botanist and naturalist. It refers to plants, which have similar but smaller fruits to the Cassine genus. A good example is of Acacia cassicula, which is now known as Acacia cassicula.

Cassinia: [kas-si-ni-a] Is named in honour of Alexandre Henri Gabriel Comte de Cassini; 1781-1832, who was a French botanist and naturalist. A good example is of Cassinia quinquefaria.

Cassiniana: [kahs-si-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Alexandre Henri Gabriel Comte de Cassini; 1781-1832, who was a French botanist and naturalist. A good example is of Schoenia cassiniana.

Cassinianum: [kahs-si-ni-a-num] Is named in honour of Alexandre Henri Gabriel Comte de Cassini; 1781-1832, who was a French botanist and naturalist. A good example is of Helichrysum cassinianum, which is now known as Schoenia cassiniana.

Cassinianus: [kas-si-ni-a-nus] Is named in honour of Alexandre Henri Gabriel Comte de Cassini; 1781-1832, who was a French botanist and naturalist. A good example is of Pteropogon cassinianus, which is now known as Schoenia cassiniana.

Cassioides: [kas-si-oi-deez] From Kassia, which is Ancient Greek for the name Dioscorides gave to the plants and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the Cassia genus. A good example is Labichea cassioides.

Cassiope: [kas-si-o-pee] Is named in honour of the wife of king Cepheus of Phoenicia. She was one of the two most beautiful nymphs in Greece mythology but also arrogant and vain. The latter two characteristics led to Poseidon’s wish to punish Cassiopeia after his first attempt was foiled by Cepheus he placed her in the heavens chained to a throne in such a position that referenced Andromeda’s ordeal. As she circles the celestial pole in her throne near the Polar star, she is upside-down half the time. A good example of this rare beauty was Helichrysum cassiope, which is now known as Ozothamnus cassiope.

Cassytha: [kas-sahy-tha] From Kassyo, which is Ancient Greek for to sow or stiched up. It refers to the stems twinning tightly around its host. A good example is found on Cassytha glabella.

Cassytha glabella                 Cuscuta australia

Cassythoides: [kas-sahy-thoi-deez] From Kassyo, which is Ancient Greek for to sow or stiched up and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the stems twinning tightly around its host similar to the creeping parasites in the Cassytha genus. A good example is Erythrorchis cassythoides.

Castanae: [kas-ta-nee] From Castanea, which is Latin for the chestnut. It refers to structures or organs, which resembles a small chestnut. A good example was Isolepis castanae, which is now known as Isolepis congrua.

Castaneofulvus: [kas-ta-nee-o-ful-vus] From Castanea, which is Latin for the chestnut and Fulvus, which is Latin for reddish-yellow. It refers to structures or organs, which are reddish-yellow or tannish-yellow in colour. A good example is the stipes and or pileus on Cortinarius castaneofulvus.

Castaneum: [kas-ta-nee-um] From Castanea, which is Latin forthe chestnut. It refers to structures or organs, which are reddish-yellow to tannish-yellow in colour similar to that of the cultivated chestnut. A good example is Prasophyllum castaneum.

Castanocarpus: [kas-tan-o-kar-pus] From Castanea, which is Latin for the chestnut and Karpós, which is which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the size and shape of the fruits (seeds) which vaguely resemble those of the chestnuts in size and shape. A good example was Castanocarpus australis, which is now known as Castanosspermum australe.

Castanosperma: [kas-tan-o-sper-ma] From Castanea, which is Latin for the chestnut and Spérma which is Ancient Greek or Sporá which is Ancient Greek or Spora which is Latin for a seed. It refers to the large size and shape of the seeds resembling those of the chestnuts. A good example is Vanroyena castanosperma.

Castanospermum: [kas-tan-o-sper-mum] From Castanea, which is Latin for the chestnut and Spérma which is Ancient Greek or Spora which is Latin for a seed. It refers to the large size and shape of the seeds which resemble those of the chestnuts. A good example is Castanosspermum australe.

Castanospora: [kas-tan-o-sper-muh m] From Castanea, which is Latin for the chestnut and Sporá which is Ancient Greek or Spora which is Latin for a seed. It refers to the size and shape of the seeds which resemble those of the chestnuts. A good example is Castanospora alphandii.

Castanostegia: [kas-tan-o-ste-ji-a] From Castanea which is Latin for the chestnut and Stegia which is Ancient Greek for a roof. It refers to a structure or organ, which resembles the bracts on the flowers of the chestnuts. A good example is bract on the flower bud and later the pedicels on Acacia castanostegia.

Castanostegium: [kas-tan-o-ste-ji-um] From Castanea, which is Latin for the chestnut and Stegia which is Ancient Greek for a roof. It refers to a structure or organ, which resembles the bracts on the flowers of the chestnuts. A good example is bract on the flower bud and later the pedicels on Racosperma castanostegium, which is now known as Acacia castanostegia.

Castelli-arminii: [ka-stel-li-ahy, ar-hr-mi-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Castell-armin. A good example was Eremophila castelli-arminii, which is now known as Eremophila christopheri.

Castratus: [kas-trar-tus] From Castratus, which is Latin for to castrate. It may refer to the main form of reproduction; for these grasses, is rooting at the nodes placing less importance of the floral reproduction. A good example is Arthraxon castratus.

Castrensis: [kas-tren-sis] Maybe from Castre, which is Latinized for Newcastle and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the specimens originating from the Newcastle Cessnock area. A good example is Eucalyptus castrensis.

Castrisinensis: [kas-tri-si-nen-sis] Maybe from Kaustos, which is Ancient Greek for scorched, Sinai which is Ancient Greek for China and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It may refer to the tan colour of the petioles and stems appearing as though they have been scorched and the original trees which were found in China. A good example is Beilschmiedia castrisinensis.

Casuarina: [ka-su-ree-na] From Cassuarius, which is Latinized from the Malay word for a Cassowary. It refers to the branchlets which have the appearance of the feathers on the Cassowary. A good example is Casuarina cunninghamii.

Casuarinae: [ka-su-ree-nee] From Cassuarius, which is Latinized from the Malay word for a Cassowary. It refers to branchlets which have the appearance of the feathers on the Cassowary. A good example is Lysiana casuarinae.

Casuarinoides: [ka-su-ee-ni-oi-deez] From Cassuarius, which is Latinized from the Malay word for a Cassowary and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Casuarina genus in that the branchlets have the appearance of the feathers on the Cassowary. A good example is Calycopeplus casuarinoides.

Catacolea: [ka-ta-koh-lee-a] From Katá, which is Ancient Greek for down, through, against, according to, towards, during and Coleio, which is Latin for to wiggle or wag like a tail or a worm crawling. It refers to the movements the plants make when a slight breeze is encountered. A good example is Catacolea enodis.

Catadromum: [ka-ta-droh-mum] From Katá, which is Ancient Greek for down, through, against, according to, towards, during and Dromos, which is Greek to run. It usually It refers to fish, which return to the rivers or the sea to spawn so the reference here is unclear. A good example is Helichrysum catadromum, which is now known as Ozothamnus decurrens.

Catadromus: [ka-ta-droh-mus] From Katá, which is Ancient Greek for down, through, against, according to, towards, during and Dromos, which is Greek to run. It usually It refers to fish which return to the rivers or the sea to spawn so the reference here is unclear. A good example is Ozothamnus catadromus, which is now known as Ozothamnus decurrens.

Catakidozamia: [ka-ta-ki-do-zei-m-a] Maybe from Katá/Katák, which is Ancient Greek for from downwards, down or towards and Azaniae which is a misspelling applied to the Latin word from Pliny for Zamia which is a pine cone. It may therefore refer to the fruits of many species which have large scales similar to many pine cones and the plants come from the land down under Australia. A good example is Catakidozamia macleayi, which is now known as Lepidozamia peroffskyana.

Catalepidia: [ka-ta-le-pi-di-a] Maybe from Catalpa, which is Latin for a winged head and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It may refer to the individual flowers in the head in which the corolla lobe’s petals spread out like the wings of a bird about to take flight upon the short pedicels and short corolla tubes. A good example is the cataphylls on Catalepidia heyana.

Catalepsy: [ka-ta-lep-see] From Katalepsis, which is Ancient Greek or Catalepsis, which is Latin for grasping for life. It refers to organisms which feign death to avoid being eaten.

Cataphracta: [ka-ta-frak-ta] From Cataphractae, which is Latin and later French for a coat of metal. It refers to leaf axils which have a thorn for protection. A good example is the cataphylls on Flacourtia cataphracta.

Cataphractum: [ka-ta-frahk-tum] From Katáphraktos/Kataphrássein, which is Ancient Greek or Cataphractus, which is Latin for fully clothed for battle. It refers to every structure and organ on a plant which is armed with spines or thorns and are usually toxic. A good example is the spines on and alkaloides in Solanum cataphractum.

Cataphylls: [ka-ta-fahyls] From Katálepsis, which is Ancient Greek or Catalepsis which is Latin for grasping for life and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves whose primary function is something other than photosynthesis. They may offer protection from the elements, be sacrificial food for animals or even storage containers. A good example is the cataphylls on Juncus continuus.

Catapodium: [ka-ta-poh-di-um] From Katá, which is Ancient Greek for down, through, against, according to, towards, during and Pous which is Ancient Greek or Pedi which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to plants, which are short and firmly rooted into the top layer of soil. A good example is Catapodium marinum.

Catappa: [kah-ta-pa] From Catappa, which is Latinized from the Malaysian word for the Indian almond tree and nut. It refers to trees and or fruits, which resemble the commercial almond. A good example is Catapodium marinum.

Catapycnon: [ka-ta-pahyk-non] From Katá, which is Ancient Greek for down, through, against, according to, towards, during and Pyce which is Latin for thick or dense. Its reference is unclear. A good example is Lepidium catapycnon.

Cataractae: [ka-tar-ahk-tee] From Catarractea, which is Latin for growing near waterfalls or cascades. It refers to a plants, which grow near tumbling or fast moving water. A good example is Acacia cataractae.

Catechu: [ka-te-choo] From kacu, which is Latinized for the Malayan vernacular for the tree found there. It refers to plants, which. A good example is Acacia catechu.

Catenaria: [ka-te-nar-i-a] From Catēnātum, which is Latin for forming a chain or joined together. It refers to the flower heads which form a loose oblong chain rather than the normal corymb. A good example is Corymbia catenaria.

Catenata: [ka-te-na-ta] From Catēnāta, which is Latin for forming a chain or joined together. It refers to tepals, which are joined together at the base. A good example is Caladenia catenata.

Catenatus: [ka-te-na-tus] From Catēnātus, which is Latin for forming a chain or joined together. It refers to tepals which are joined together at the base. A good example is found on the orchid Petalochilus catenatus.

Catenulata: [ka-te-nyoo-la-ta] From Catenata, which is Latin for forming a chain or joined together. It refers to pods which have strongly restricted areas between the seeds thus resembling a chain. A good example is Acacia catenulata.

Catenulatum: [ka-te-nyoo-la-tum] From Catēnātum, which is Latin for forming a chain or joined together. It refers to pods which have distinctly restricted zones between the seeds thus resembling a chain. A good example is Racosperma catenulatum, which is now known as Acacia catenulata.

Catenulatus: [ka-te-nyoo-la-tus] From Catēnātum, which is Latin for forming a chain or joined together. It refers to pods which have distinctly restricted zones between the seeds thus resembling a chain. A good example is the fungus Chondromyces catenulatus.

Caterva: [ka-ter-va] From Caterva, which is Latin for a crowd or to band together. It refers to plants, which crowd together in their habitats or organs, which crowd together along the stems. A good example is the flowers on Westringia cephalantha subsp. caterva.

Cathartica: [ka-thar-ti-ka] From Katharticos, which is Ancient Greek for fit for cleansing. It probably referred to parts of the plant which were used for cleansing the body in tribal medicines. A good example is the exotic vine Allamanda acthartica.

Cathemeral: [ka-the-me-ral] From Káthexis, which is Ancient Greek for holding or retention and Marmaírō, which is Ancient Greek or Merum, which is Latin for not comparable. It refers to animals which are active both during the day and at night. A good example is the red neck wallaby Macropus rufogriseus.

Cathiforma: [Ka-thi-for-ma] From Kyatheon, which is Ancient Greek for a broad lipped cup and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to structures or organs, which take the form of an elongated cup or mug. A good example is the bracteoles, calyx and sepals on Petrophile cyathiforma.

Cathormion: [ka-thor-mi-on] Maybe from Katharticos, which is Ancient Greek for fit for cleansing. It probably referred to parts of the plant which were used for cleansing the body in tribal medicines. A good example is Cathormion umbellatum sub sp. moniliforme.

Catipes: [ka-ti-peez] From Cati, which is Latin cat and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to the apexes of the flowering stems which resemble a cat’s paw reaching or stretching outwards. A good example is Ewartia catipes.

Catoglypta: [ka-to-glahy-ta] From Khtós, which is Ancient Greek for to sharpen and Glypto, which is Ancient Greek for to carve or engrave. It refers to leaves, which appear to be carved as the edges and teeth are sharp and precise. A good example is Banksia catoglypta.

Catosperma: [ka-to-sperm-a] From Khtós, which is Ancient Greek for to sharpen and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which appear to be carved as the edges are sharp and precise. Catosperma is a spelling error for Caospermum which has appeared in some journals. A good example is Catosperma muellerii.

Catospermum: [ka-to-sperm-um] From Khtós, which is Ancient Greek for to sharpen and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which appear to be carved as the edges and are sharp and precise. A good example is Catospermum goodeniaceum, which is now known as Pentaptilon careyi.

Cattleyanum: [katl-lahy-num] Is named in honour of William Cattley who imported the plant from South America. It refers to the long stem like flower spikes. A good example is the Brazillian Cherry is Psidium cattleyanum.

Caturus: [ka-tyoo-rus] Maybe from Cauda/Auro, which is Ancient Greek for to be drawn out like a long tail. It therefore would refer to flowers, which resemble a long tail. A good example is Caturus oblongatus, which is now known as Streblus anthropophagorum

Caudata: [kor-dei-ta] From Caudāta, which is Latin for to be drawn out like a longtail. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which have the apex drawn out like a tail. A good example is the extended pinnae on Cheilanthes caudata.

Caudate: [kor-deit] From Caudātum, which is Latin for to be drawn out like a longtail. It refers to the pinnaea being rather long and thin like a tail.

Caudatum: [kor-deit-tum] From Caudātum, which is Latin for to be drawn out like a long tail. It refers a leaf apex which is rather long and thin like a tail. A good example is the extended pinnae on Abrodictyum caudatum.

Caudatus: [kor-deit-tus] From Caudātus, which is Latin for to be drawn out like a long tail. It refers a leaf apex which is rather long and thin like a tail. A good example is the exotic Amaranth seed Amaranthus caudatus.

Caudex: [kor-deks] From Caudex, which is Ancient Greek for a woody stem. It refers to roots, which form a trunk like structure. A good example is the trunks on Cyathea cooperii and Cyathea australis.

Caudiculum: [kor-di-kyoo-lum] From Caudātum, which is Latin for to be drawn out like a long tail. It refers to a leaf apex which is rather long and thin like a tail. A good example is Prasophyllum caudiculum.

Caulescens: [kor-le-senz] From Kaulós, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or much later Caulis, which is Latin for a stem. It refers to the prominence of the stems which are more like a trunk but not of the same structure. A good example is Stylidium amoenum var. caulescens.

Caulescent: [kor-le-sent] From Kaulós, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or much later Caulis, which is Latin for a stem. It refers to the prominence of the stems which are more like a trunk but not of the same structure. A good example is Macrozamia moorei.

Caulialata: [kor-li-a-la-ta] From Kaulós, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or much later Caulis, which is Latin for a stem and Alatus which is Latin for a wing. It refers to the petioles from the type specimens which have a wing which extended back to the stems. A good example is Embelia caulialata.

Cauliflora: [kor-li-flor-a] From Kaulós, which is Ancient Greek or much later Caulis, which is Latin for a stem or branch and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to the flowers which are produced along the stems. A good example is Syzygium moorei.

Cauliflorous: [kor-li-flor-os] From Kaulós, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or much later Caulis, which is Latin for a stem and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to the flowers which are produced prolifically along the stems and trunk. A good example is Ficus coronata.

Cauline: [kor-lahyn] From Kaulós, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or much later Caulis, which is Latin for a stem or trunk. It refers to where the leaves, petioles or peduncles half surround the stem, not fully as in the case in clasping. A good example is Syzygium cormiflorum.

Caulinia: [kor-li-ni-a] From Kaulós, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or much later Caulis, which is Latin for a stem or trunk. It refers to where the leaves, petioles or peduncles half surround the stem, not fully as in the case in clasping. A good example is Caulinia oceanica, which is now known as  Posidonia australis while the exotic form is now known as Posidonia oceanica.

Caulis: [kor-lis] From Kaulós, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or much later Caulis, which is Latin for a trunk or stem. It refers to the prominence of the stems which are more like a trunk but not of the same structure. A good example is the exotic pasture grass Hymenachne amplexicaulis.

Caulobotrya: [kor-loh-bo-trahy-a] From Kaulós, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or much later Caulis, which is Latin for a twig, stem or branch and Botrys which is Greek for a bunch of grapes. It refers to fruits, which are produced among the stems and branches. A good example is Ficus caulobotrya, which is now known as Ficus virens var. virens.

Caulocarpic: [kor-loh-kr-pik] From Kaulós, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or much later Caulis, which is Latin for a stem  and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to stems and branches which bear flowers and fruits over many years. A good example is Ficus variegata.

Cauloptera: [kor-loh-teer-a] From Kaulós, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or much later Caulis, which is Latin for a stem and Pteron which is Ancient Greek for awing or wings. It refers to seeds, which have wings. A good example is Dampiera cauloptera, which is now known as Dampiera coronata.

Caulo-rapa: [kor-loh-ra-pa] From Kaulós, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or much later Caulis, which is Latin for a stem and rapa which is Latin for a turnip. It refers to the long stem like flower spikes.

Caulorapa: [kor-loh-ra-pa] From Kaulós, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or much later Caulis, which is Latin for a stem and Rapa which is Latin for a turnip. It refers to long stem like flower spikes which are common on the commercial Brassia and Rapa genus.

Caustis: [kos-tis] From Kaustos, which is Ancient Greek for scorched or burnt. It refers to the leaf bases or leaf sheaths which are decidedly deeper in colour or deep reddish-brown. A good example is the leaf bases Caustis flexuosa.

Cauticola: [kos-ti-koh-la] From Cautus, which is Latin for a cliff  and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which grow on cliffs and cliff faces. A good example is the leaf bases Phyllanthus cauticola.

Cavealis: [ka-vee-a-lis] From Cavus, which is Latin for a large cavity or hollow. It refers to pods which have relatively large hollows. A good example is Acacia cavealis.

Cavealum: [ka-vee-a-lum] From Cavus, which is Latin for a large cavity or hollow. It refers to pods which have relatively large hollows. A good example is Racosperma cavealum, which is now known as Acacia cavealis.

Caven: [ka-ven] From Kavernosus, which is Latin for full of holes. It refers to leaves, which have many holes or it may refer to the large spaces (holes gaps) between the leaves. A good example is Rhaphidospora cavernarum.

Cavendishii: [ka-ven-dish-i-ahy] Is named in honour of William George Spencer Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire KG, PC; 1790–1858, who was a keen horticulturalist. A good example is Correa cavendishii.

Cavernarum: [ka-ver-nar-um] From Kavernosus  which is Latin for full of holes. It refers to leaves, which have many holes or it may refer to the large spaces (holes gaps) between the leaves. A good example is Rhaphidospora cavernarum.

Cavernicola: [ka-ver-ni-koh-la] From Kavernosus, which is Latin for full of holes  and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants which grow at the entrances of caves or large overhangs. A good example is Cheilanthes cavernicola.

Cayennensis: [kei-en-nen-sis] From Cayen, which is Latinized for a district probably in New Guinee or Malaysia and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants which were first discovered in or around Cayen. A good example is Stachytarpheta cayennensis.

Cayratia: [kei-ra-ti-a] Is Latinized from the Annamese tribe in Vietnam for tha name of the Palms found there. A good Australian example is Cayratia clematidea.

Cayzerae: [kei-zer-ee] Is named in honour of L. W. Cayzer who was an Australian botanist. A good example is Bursaria cayzerae.

Ceanothus: [see-a-noh-thus] From Keánōthos, which is for a spiny plant. It refers to plants, which are very spiny. A good example is Ceanothus spatulatus, which is now known as Trymalium spatulatum.

Cebatha: [se-ba-tha] From Kebath, which is Latinized from the Arabic word for a plant that usually produces coccus type fruits. It refers to plants, which have fruits which resemble a dried single or two seeded capsule. A good example is Cebatha pubescens, which is now known as Pachygone ovata.

Cecarria: [se-kar-r-a] From Cercaria, which is Latin for wax usually of candle wax. It refers to structures or organs, which have a waxy film or feel waxy. A good example is Cecarria obtusifolia.

Ceciliae: [se-si-li-ee] Is named in honour of Cecil Rollo Payton Andrews; 1870-1951, who was an English amateur botanist and collector of plants. A good example is Sarcochilus ceciliae.

Cedrela: [se-dre-la] From Cedrus, which is Ancient Greek for the old name for a tree with a fragrant wood. It refers to plants, which have leaves or the scent which resembles that of Cedrus deodora. A good example is Cedrela toona, which is now known as Toona ciliata.

Cedroides: [se-droi-deez] From Cedrus, which is Ancient Greek for the old name for a tree with a fragrant wood and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have leaves resembling Cedrus deodora. A good example is Acacia cedroides.

Ceiba: [see-buh] From Ceiba which is Latinized from the South American name of a large tree in the Ceiba genus. It refers to plants, which have structures or organs that resemble the Ceiba Genus. A good example is Bombax ceiba.

Ceilonica: [see-lo-ni-ka] From Ceylon, which is Latinized for the old name Shi Lanka or Ceylon. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in Ceylon. A good example is Hydrolea ceilonica, which is now known as Hydrolea zeylanica.

Celans: [see-lanz] From Cēlantia, which is Latin for to conceal or concealing. It refers to plants, which are well camouflaged in their environments. A good example is Pterostylis celans.

Celastrifolia: [se-la-stri-foh-li-a] From Kelastros, which is Ancient Greek for bitter-sweet and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves that resemble the modern genus Celastrus. A good example is Acacia celastrifolia.

Celastrifolium: [se-la-stri-foh-lei-um] From Kelastros, which is Ancient Greek for bitter-sweet and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves that resemble the modern genus Celastrus. A good example is Racosperma celastrifolium, which is now known as Acacia celastrifolia.

Celastroides: [se-la-stroi-deez] From Kelastros, which is Ancient Greek for bitter-sweet and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar too. It refers to parasitic plants, which resemble the Celastrus genus. A good example is the leaves of the parasitic plant which mimics its hosts leaves often being plants in the Ligustrum genus. A good example is Muellerina celastroides.

Celastrus: [se-las-trus] From Kelastros, which is Ancient Greek for the bitter-sweet. It refers to the overall appearance of the trees which resemble the common privet tree. A good example is Celstrus bilocularis.

Celata: [se-la-ta] From Celatus, which is Latin for appearing to be dead. It refers to plants, which often look half dead amongst other heath plants. A good example is Epacris celata.

Cell Structure: [sel, struk-cher] From Cell, which is English for a room or any chamber in a tissue or organism having specific function and strūctūra, which is Latin for to erect or construct. It refers to the inner make up of a single cell.

Celmisia: [sel-mi-si-a] From Celmis, which is Ancient Greek for the goddess who supposedly insulted Rhea and he had her turned into iron. Thus she was the goddess for smelting the iron that was based with nickel and would not rust. It may refer to plants, which grow in environments that have little red soil or iron. A good example is Celmisia pugioniformis.

Celosioides: [se-los-i-oi-deez] From Kelastros, which is Ancient Greek for the Privet tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the common privet tree. A good example is noxious weed Deeringia celosioides.

Celsa: [sel-sa] From Celsa, which is Latin for lofty, high, tall or haughty, arrogant, proudly prominent, or elevated, erect or noble. It refers to the trees which display any of the above characteristics. A good example is Acacia celsa.

Celsiana: [sel-si-a-na] Is named in honour of Jaques Philippe Martin Cels; 1740-1806, who was a French botanist, nurseryman and horticulturalist. A good example was Acacia celsiana, which is now known as Acacia anceps.

Celsianum: [sel-si-ei-num] Is named in honour of Jaques Philippe Martin Cels; 1740-1806, who was a French botanist, nurseryman and horticulturalist. A good example was Gastrolobium celsianum.

Celsii: [sel-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Jaques Philippe Martin Cels; 1740-1806, who was a French botanist, nurseryman and horticulturalist. A good example was Hovea celsii.

Celsissima: [sel-sis-si-ma] From Celsum, which is Latin for high, lofty or tall and Issima which is Latin for the superlative or the most. It refers to plants, which have very high standards. A good example is the flowering habits on Buckinghammia celsissima.

Celsum: [sel-sum] From Celsa, which is Latin for lofty, high, tall or haughty, arrogant, proudly prominent, or elevated, erect or noble. It refers to the trees which display any of the above characteristics. A good example is racosperma celsum, which is now known as Acacia celsa.

Celtis: [sel-tis] From Keltos, which is Ancient Greek for a tree with sweet tasting fruit. It refers to any fruits, which taste sweet from a tree. A good example is Celtis australiensis.

Cenarrhenes: [sen-ar-rhee-nes] Maybe from Cēnae, which is Latin for dinner and Arrhen, which is Ancient Greek for males or men. It may refer to the way the anthers sit down on the petals facing the ovary which could be taken as the table. A good example is Cenarrhenes nitida.

Cenchrus: [sen-krus] From Kenchros, which is Ancient Greek for a millet. It refers to the seeds which look resemble those of the horticultural millet seeds. A good example is Cenchrus caliculatus.

Centaurea: [sen-tor-ee-a] Is named in honour of Centaur Chiron, which in Greek mythology was a person known for his youthfulness. It refers to the supposed qualities of the plant to maintain youth. A good example in Australia is the exotic thistle Centaurea calcitrapa.

Centaurium: [sen-tor-ee-um] Is named in honour of Centaur Chiron, which in Greek mythology was a person known for his youthfulness. It refers to the supposed qualities of the plant to maintain youth. A good example in Australia is the European herb Centaurium erythraea.

Centella: [sen-tel-la] May be from Gianapieiti (pronounced something like senipiella), which is Ancient Greek for to sip or to savour or Scintillae, which is Latin for to glisten or to shine brightly. If Greek it may refer to the edible qualities and health benefits of the leaves and if Latin may refer to the leaves which shine brightly in the sun light especially after rain. There is also a reference to Kenteo, which is Ancient Greek for to prick or to pierce. The reference here may be to the formation of the health benefits of Asiatic acid found in the green parts. A good example is Centella asiatica.

Centipeda: [sen-ti-pe-da] From Kentos, which is Ancient Greek for one hundred and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to structures or organs which appear to have 100 parts or have a creeping growth habitat on the ground. A good example is the flowerheads on Centipeda cunninghamii.

Centotheca: [sen-to-thee-ka] From Kenteo, which is Ancient Greek for to prick (ones fingers) or to pierce and Theka, which is Ancient Greek for a box. It refers to the shape of the prickly glumes. A good example Centotheca lappacea.

Central Canal: [sen-tral, Ka-nal] From Centralis, which is Latin for to being in the middle and Canalis, which is Latin for a channel. It refers to the large centrally located air space in the stem.

Centrale: [sen-treil] From Centralis, which is Latin for to being in the middle. It refers to plants, which are confined to the middle of their environment or more often to the center of the continent or country. A good example is Solanum centrale, which is found in central Australia.

Centralis: [sen-tra-lis] From Centralis, which is Latin for to being in the middle. It refers to plants, which are confined to the middle of their environment or more often to the center of the continent or country. A good example is Austrostipa centralis, which is found in central Australia.

Centranthera: [sen-tr-an-theer-a] From Kentron, which is Ancient Greek for a spur and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which have a spurred appendage. A good example is Centranthera cochinchinensis.

Centrantherum: [sen-tran-theer-um] From Kentron, which is Ancient Greek for a spur and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which have a spurred appendage. A good example is Centratherum muticum.

Centrifuga: [sen-tri-fyoo-ga] From Centris, which is Latin for in the middle and Phugḗ which is Ancient greek for to flee, escape or to be in exile. It refers to where the development of growth takes place from the inside outward similar to that found in fungi. A good example is Graphis centrifuga.

Centrifugal: [sen-tri-fyoo-gal] From Centris, which is Latin for in the middle and Phugḗ which is Ancient greek for to flee, escape or to be in exile. It refers to where the development of growth takes place from the inside outward similar to that found in fungi.

Centrinervia: [sen-tri-ner-vee-uh] From Centris, which is Latin for in the middle and Neûron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve or vein. It refers to midveins which are almost exactly in the centre of the leaf, phyllode or fronds. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia centrinervia.

Centrinervium: [sen-tri-ner-vi-um] From Centris, which is Latin for in the middle and Neûron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve or vein. It refers to midveins which are almost exactly in the centre of the leaf, phyllode or fronds. A good example is Racosperma centrinervium, which is now known as Acacia centrinervia.

Centripetal: [sen-tri-pe-tal] From Centris, which is Latin for the middle and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metalic leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators.

Centristigma: [sen-tri-stig-ma] From Centris, which is Latin for in the middle and Stígma/Stízein, which is Ancient Greek for the receptive part of the female reproductive organ, which receives the pollen. It refers to stigmas, which are centrally positioned on the style. A good example is Grevillea centristigma.

Centrocarpa: [sen-tro-kar-pa] From Kenton, which is Ancient Greek for a spur and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have small spur like appendages. A good example is Triglochin centrocarpa.

Centrocarpum: [sen-tro-kar-pum] From Kenton, which is Ancient Greek for a spur and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have small spur like appendages. A good example is Triglochin centrocarpum.

Centrolepis: [sen-tro-le-pis] From Kentron, which is Ancient Greek for a spur and Lepis which is Ancient Greek for a scale. It refers to scale like floral bracts, which have spur like appendages. A good example is the two floral bracts on Centrolepis alepyroides.

Centropappus: [sen-tro-pa-pus] From Kentron, which is Ancient Greek for a spur and Pappos, which is Ancient Greek for a grandfather. It refers to spur like appendages, which are covered in greyish-white hairs like grandfathers whiskers. A good example is the two Centropappus brunonis, which is now known as Brachyglottis brunoniss.

Centroramous: [sen-tro-ra-mos] From Centris, which is Latin for the middle and Ramosus which is Latin for a branch. It refers to an organ, which is at the center of the branch.

Centurionis: [sen-tyoo-ri-oh-nis] Is named in honour of Centaur Chiron who was a Greek mythological person known for his youthfulness. It refers to the supposed qualities of the plant to maintain youth. A good example is Melicytus novae-zelandae subsp. centurionis.

Cepa 1: [see-pa] From Cepa which is Latin for an onion. It refers to plants, which are in the onion family. A good example is Allium cepa.

Cepa 2: [see-pa] From Cepa which is Latin for an onion. It refers to plants, which appear to have bulbs that resemble onions. A good example is the puff ball fungi Scleroderma cepa.

Cephaelis: [ke/se-fei-lis] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flowers, which resemble small heads that form at intervals around the spike. A good example is Cephaelis reniformis, which is now known as Geophila repens.

Cephalantha: [ke/se-fa-lan-tha] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which resemble small heads that form at intervals around the spike or at the apex of stems. A good example is Microcorys cephalantha.

Cephalanthera: [ke/se-fa-lan-theer-a] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which resemble small heads that form at intervals around the spike or at the apex of stems. A good example is Cephalanthera cucullata.

Cephalaralia: [ke/se-fa-lar-a-li-a] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and Aralie, which is Latinized from the French-Canadian word for the Aralia genus. It refers to the fruits, which form in small heads while the leaves look similar to the exotic Aralia genus. A good example is Cephalaralia cephalobotrys.

Cephalipterum: [ke/se-fa-lip-teer-rum] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to the petal like wings on the seeds. A good example is Cephalipterum drummondii.

Cephalobotrys: [ke/se-fa-loh-bo-trahy-is] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and Botrys, which is Ancient Greek for a bunch of grapes. It refers to flowers and fruits, which form in small grape like bunches. A good example is the fruits of Cephalaralia cephalobotrys.

Cephalocarpa: [ke/se-fa-loh-kar-pa] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the plants, which bear compact heads of several individual heads. A good example is the fruits of Eucalyptus cephalocarpa.

Cephalocarpum: [ke/se-fa-loh-kar-pum] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the plants, which bear compact heads of several individual heads. A good example is the fruits of Bassia biflora var. cephalocarpum, which is now known as Dissocarpus biflorus var. biflorus.

Cephalocarpus: [ke/se-fa-loh-kar-pus] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the plants, which bear compact heads of several individual heads. A good example is the fruits of Dissocarpus biflorus var. cephalocarpus.

Cephaloformis: [ke/se-fa-lo/lo-for-mis] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which bear small, compact heads. A good example is Centrolepis cephaloformis.

Cephaloideum: [ke/se-fa-loi-dee-um] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head, Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to and Um which is Greek/Latin for a degree. It refers to the flowers, which bear many, small, compact heads. A good example is the fruits of Eucalyptus cephalocarpa.

Cephalomanes: [ke/se-fa-lo-meinz] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and Manes, which is Ancient Greek for a kind of deep cup. It refers to ferns which bear cup like sporangia with a larger than normal indusium than other species in the genus. A good example is the sporangium on Cephalomanes bauerianum.

Cephalophora: [ke/se -fa-loh-for-a] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear. It refers to plants, which bear compact heads of several individual heads. A good example is the fruits of Fimbristylis cephalophora.

Cephalos: ke/se-fa-los] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flowers, which form in heads.

Cephaloschoenus: [ke/se-fa-lo-shoo-nus] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and Schoinos which is Ancient Greek for a rush or reed. It refers to reeds and rushes, which bear compact flowering heads. A good example is the fruits of Cephaloschoenus longisetis, which is now known as Rhynchospora longisetis.

Cephalosorus: [ke/se-fa-lo-sor-us] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and Sorus, which is Ancient Greek for a heap or a pile. It refers to seeds which are produced in compact heads. A good example is Cephalosorus carpesioides.

Cephalostigma: [ke/se-fa-lo-stig-ma] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head and Stígma/Stízein, which is Ancient Greek for the female reproductive organ upon the style which is receptive to receiving pollen. It refers to stigmas, which are much larger than other species in the genus. A good example was Cephalostigma fluminale, which is now known as Wahlenbergia fluminalis.

Cephalotes: [ke/se-fa-lo-tes] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to plants, which bear compact heads. A good example is the fruits of Carex cephalotes.

Cephalotus: [ke/se-fa-lo-tus] From Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for with a head. It refers to the pitchers which resemble small mounted heads on the ground. A good example is the top of the hood of Cephalotus follicularis.

Cepiodora: [se-pi-oh-dor-a] From Cepa, which is Latin for an onion and Odora, which is Latin for an odour. It refers to the odour of the freshly cut bark when crushed smelling of onions. A good example is the odour of the freshly scraped bark Owenia cepiodora.

Cepobaculum: [se-po-ba-kyoo-lum] From Cepa, which is Latin for an onion and Baculum, which is Latin for a stick or staff. It refers to the canes, which are softer than other species in the genus in reference to Baculum being the bony support in the penis of certain mammals and when damaged has a smell reminiscent of onions. A good example is Cepobaculum semifuscum.

Ceracea: [ser-a-see-a] From Ceracea, which is Latin for waxy. It refers to the leaves and new growth having a waxy feel or appearance. A good example is the leaves on Eucalyptus ceracea.

Ceraceum: [ser-a-see-um] From Ceracea, which is Latin for waxy. It refers to structures or organs, which have a waxy feel or appearance. A good example is the fungi Corticum ceraceum.

Ceraceus: [ser-a-see-us] From Ceracea, which is Latin for waxy. It refers to structures or organs, which have a waxy feel or appearance. A good example is the fungi Hygrophorus ceraceus.

Cerasicarpa: [ker/ser-a-si-kar-pa] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have soft horn like appendages at the apex. A good example is the fungi Ficus cerasicarpa.

Cerasifera: [ker/ser-as-i-feer-a] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to organs usually the fruits which have a horn or horns. A good example is the small horny appendages over each side on Owenia cerasifera, which is now known as Pleiogynium timorense.

Cerasiformis: [ker/ser-a-si-for-mis] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn, Cēra, which is Latin for waxy or Cerasi which is Latin for a cherry and Forme which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to operculum on the buds, which appear like little, waxy horns. A good example is Eucalyptus cerasiformis.

Cerasinomutata: [ker/sera-si-no-myoo-t-ta] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Komutata, which is Ancient Greek for variable or changeable. It refers to organs, which have hornlike structures which are quite variable in shape and size. A good example is found on the pileus of the fungi Hygrocybe cerasinomutata.

Cerastes: [ker/ser-as-tes] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn. It refers to wiry like stems which have horny nodes where the flowers develop from. A good example is Acacia cerastes.

Ceratanthus: [ker/ser-ah-tan-thus] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have a distinct horn at the base of the corolla tube. A good example is Ceratanthus longicornis, which is now known as Platostoma longicorne.

Ceratocarpa: [ker/sera-to-kar-pa] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits which sit between horn shape bracts. A good example is Dodonaea ceratocarpa.

Ceratocaule: [ker/sera-to-kor-le] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Caulis, which is Latin for a stem. It refers to the flowers sitting on a horn shaped projections from the trunk or stems. A good example is  the variation in the spelling of the toxic Angels Trumpet Brugmansia ceratocaule.

Ceratocaules: [ker/sera-to-kor-les] From Kerat/Keras which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Caulis which is Latin for a stem. It refers to the flowers sitting on a horn shaped projections from the trunk or stems. A good example is  the variation in the spelling of the toxic Angels Trumpet Datura ceratocaules.

Ceratocaulis: [ker/sera-to-kor-lis] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Caulis, which is Latin for a stem. It refers to the flowers sitting on a horn shaped projections from the trunk or stems. A good example is the variation in the spelling of the toxic Angels Trumpet Datura ceratocaulis.

Ceratocentra: [ker/sera-to-sen-tra] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Centris, which is Latin for in the middle. A good example amongst Cacti collectors is the popular Mexican cactus Mammalaria ceratocentra.

Ceratocorys: [ker/sera-to-kor-eez] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Corys, which is Latin for a small helmet. It refers to calyptras which resemble a small helmet. A good example is Eucalyptus ceratocorys.

Ceratogyne obionoides: [ker/sera-to-jahyn, o-bi-on-oi-deez] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a woman. It refers to ovaries or achenes which have very distinct horn like projections. A good example is Ceratogyne obionoides.

Ceratogynum: [ker/ser-a-to-jay-num] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a woman. It refers to the fruits or seeds which have a horn. A good example is Leionema ceratogynum.

Ceratonia: [ker/sera-to-ni-a] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn. It refers to the horny apex of the pods. A good example is the Carob tree Ceratonia siliqua.

Ceratopetalum: [ker/sera-to-pe-ta-lum] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and petalon which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to the shape of the petal’s apexes having a small hook or horn. A good example is the New South Wales Christmas tree Ceratopetalum gummiferum.

Ceratophora: [ker/sera-toh-or-a] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Phoros, which is Ancient Greek for bearing or to carry as in a cup. It refers to the shape of the two horns on the head. A good example is the small Australian Death Adder which often inhabits bush gardens away from the cities Atheris ceratophora who often inhabits bush gardens away from the cities.

Ceratophorum: [ker/sera-to-for-um] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn andPhóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to petals or tepals usually the upper pair which resemble horns having very distinct horny appendages. A good example is Stylidium ceratophorum.

Ceratophylla: [ker/sera-to-fahyl-la] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a hornand Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for leaves. It refers to the leaves which have very distinct horny appendages. A good example is Hakea ceratophylla.

Ceratophylloides: [ker/sera-to-fahyl-loi-deez] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn, Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf, phylode or frond and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves of semi submerged fresh water plants, which have two or more long horns. A good example oddly enough was Utricularia ceratophylloides in which the lower petal forms two very distinct horns and is now known as Utricularia leptoplectra.

Ceratophyllum: [ker/sera-to-fahyl-lum] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for leaves. It refers to the leaves of this submerged aquatic plants, which have two or more long horns. A good example is the leaves on Ceratophyllum demersa .

Ceratophyllus: [ker/sera-to-fahyl-lus] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for leaves. It refers to the leaves which have a distinct horny extensions. A good example is Isopogon ceratophyllus.

Ceratopteris: [ker/sera-to-teer-is] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Pteris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to the horn like cleft on the fronds of this partially submerged aquatic fern. A good example is the fern Ceratopteris thalictroides.

Ceratostigma: [ker/sera-to-stig-ma] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Stigma, which is Ancient Greek for the female reproductive organ of a flower. It refers to the stigma, which has three, bilobed extensions. A good example is Ceratostigma australis.

Ceratotheca: [ker/ser-a-to-thee-ka] From Kerat/Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn and Theca, which is Ancient Greek for a box or container. It refers to the seed capsules which have a horn. A good example is the exotic annual Ceratotheca triloba which has been recorded as an escapee from gardens around eastern state cities.

Cerbera: [ker/serbeer-a] From Kerberus, which is Ancient Greek for the mythical three headed dog. It refers to the plants, which are very toxic. A good example is all the structures and organs on Cerbera floribunda.

Cercodia: [ker/serkoh-di-a] Maybe from Cercrops, which is Ancient Greek for the mythical founder of Athens. Its reference is unclear. A good example is Cercodia racemosa.

Cereale: [ker/serreal] From Ceres, which is Ancient Greek for the goddess of agriculture. It refers to plants, which are closely related to the horticulturally important rye grass. A good example was Tritcum cereale, which is now known as Secale cereale and Triticum aestivum.

Cerebriforme: [ker/serin/een-uh s] From Kerberus, which is Ancient Greek for the mythical three headed dog and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the Cerbera genus. A good example is Dysoxylum cerebriforme.

Ceriflora: [ke/seri-flor-a] From Keros, which is Ancient Greek or Cera, which is Latin for wax and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have a waxy appearance. A good example is Epacris ceriflora.

Cerinthoides: [ker/serin-thoi-deez] From Keros, which is Ancient Greek or Cera which is Latin for wax and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves, which have a very waxy appearance. A good example is Epacris cerinthoides.

Cerinus: [ker/serin-us] From Keros, which is Ancient Greek or Cera which is Latin for wax. It refers to leaves, which have a very waxy appearance. A good example is the very rare and sought after South African cycad Encephalartos cerinus.

Ceriops: [Her/seree-ops] From Kephalots, which is Ancient Greek for a horn. It refers to a small curved horn on the apex of the fruits. A good example is Ceriops tagal var. australis.

Cernua: [ser-nyoo-a] From Cernuum, which is Latin for facing downwards. It refers to structures or organs usually the flowers, which face down towards the soil. A good example is Isolepis cernua.

Cernuus: [ser-nyoo-us] From Cernuum, which is Latin for facing downwards. It refers to structures or organs usually the flowers, which face down towards the soil. A good example is the stems and flowers on Scirpus Cernuus.

Ceropegia: [Kerser-o-pe-ji-a] From Keros, which is Ancient Greek for wax and Pege, which is Ancient Greek for a fountain. It refers to the leaves which appear rather waxy when wet. A good example is the stems on Ceropegia cumingiana.

Cerviana: [ser-vi-ei-nuh] From Cervina, which is Latin for a fawn colour. It refers to the colour of the flowers. A good example is Mollugo cerviana.

Cervicina: [ser-vi-si-na] From Cervīx/Cervīcēs, which is Latin for a neck. It refers to corolla tubes, which resemble the neck of an animal or bottle. A good example was Cervicina gracilis, which is now known as Wahlenbergia gracilis.

Cervicorne: [ser-vi-kor-ne] From Cervina, which is Latin for a fawn colour and Cornus, which is Latin for a horn. It refers to the colour of the horn like structures at the apex of the leaves being fawn in colour. A good example is Leptosema cervicorne.

Cervicularis: [ser-vi-kyoo-la-ris] From Cervina, which is Latin for a fawn colour. It refers to the colour of the flowers and seeds. A good example is Vittadinia cervicularis var. cervicularis.

Cervifolia: [ser-vi-foh-li-a] From Cervīx/Cervīcēs, which is Latin for a neck and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to corolla tubes which resemble the neck of an animal or bottle. A good example is Synaphea cervifolia.

Cervina: [ser-vi-na] From Cervina, which is Latin for a fawn colour. It refers to flowers, and or seeds which are fawn in colour. A good example is Vittadinia cervicularis var. Cervicularis.

Cesatia: [se-sa-ti-a] From Cesatia, which is unknown. A good example is the stems on Cesatia ornata, which is now known as Trachymene ornata.

Cespitose: [ses-pi-tohs] From Cespitosa, which is Latin for a tuft. It refers to looking like a tuft of grass having stems from a single root stock or from many entangled stems. A good example is the stipes on Hypericum gramineum.

Cestichis: [ses-ti-kis] From Cespitosa, which is Latin for a tuft and órkhis, which is Ancient Greek for a mans testicles. It refers to the combination of two genre names, one is the apparent resemblance to Cespitosa and the other to its synonym Stichorchis. A good example is the stems on Cestichis reflexa which is now known as Liparis reflexa.

Chaetanthus: [chee-tan-thus] From Chaete, which is Ancient Greek for loosely flowing hair and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers on rushes and reeds which have long , rusty-brown hairs flowing from within the bracts. A good example is Chaetanthus tenellus.

Chaetaria: chee-tar-i-a] From Chaete, which is Ancient Greek for loosely flowing hair and Aria which is Ancient Greek for a place. It refers to petals and styles especially on rushes which resemble long flowing hairs From A, moderate distance. A good example was Chaetaria ramosa, which is now known as Aristida ramosa or Eleocharis chaetaria.

Chaetocarpa: [chee-toh-kar-pa] From Chaete, which is Ancient Greek for loosely flowing hair and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in both knotted and free flowing hairs. A good example is Triumfetta chaetocarpa.

Chaetocephalis: [chee-to-ke-fa-lis] From Chaete, which is Ancient Greek for loosely flowing hair and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to the flower heads which resemble small cones bobbing about in the breeze. A good example is Lepidobolus chaetocephalus.

Chaetophora: [chee-to-for-a] From Chaete, which is Ancient Greek for loosely flowing hair and Phoros, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to flowers, which bear sparsely covered in long, flowing hairs. A good example is the tepals on Pterostylis chaetophora.

Chaetopoda: [chee-to-poh-da] From Chaete, which is Ancient Greek for loosely flowing hair and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi/Pedis, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to plants, which have short, loose stems creeping along the ground with compact leaves. A good example is Asteridea chaetopoda.

Chaetospora: [chee-to-spawr-a] From Chaete, which is Ancient Greek for loosely flowing hair and Spora, which is Ancient Greek for a seed or fern spore. It refers to seeds which have long flowing hairs rising from between the bracts. A good example was Chaetospora cruenta, which is now known as Schoenus cruentus.

Chalaza: [ka-la-za] From Khalazae, which is Greek/Latin for a hailstone or lump. It refers to one of the two albuminous, twisted cords which fasten the egg yolk to the air cell on the shell membrane at one end and the shell membrane on the other.

Chalazogamy: [Ka-la-zo-ga-mee] From Khalazae, which is Greek/Latin for a hailstone or lump and Gameo, which is Ancient Greek for united as in marriage. It refers to one of the two albuminous, twisted cords which fasten the egg yolk to the lump on the shell membrane at one end and the shell membrane on the other. It refers to the pollen tube entry being behind the micropyle and coming through the chalaza.

Chalcodoide: [Chal-co-doi-dieez] From Chalkos, which is Ancient Greek for metallic and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the colouration of the wasps and flies. Here It refers to the super family of the metallic coloured wasps, which carry out the fertilization of the flowers within the fruits of the Ficus genera. The flowers bloom within the fruiting chamber. A good example is the symbiotic relationship between Ficus rubiginosa and its wasp Pleistodontes imperialis or Ficus microcarpa and its wasp Pleistodontes froggattii.

Chalkeri: [chorl-ker-ahy] Is named in honour of Thomas Michael Chalker; 1865-1927, who was an Australian Botanist. A good example is Acacia chalkeri.

Chalmersii: [charl-mer-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Chalmers. A good example is Aristolochia cahalmersii.

Chamaeclada: [ka-mee-kla-da] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or branch. It refers to plants, which are rather twiggy or have few leaves. A good example is the leaves on Indigofera chamaeclada.

Chamaecladum: [ka-mee-kla-dum] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or branch. It refers to plants, which are rather twiggy or have few leaves. A good example is the leaves on Rumicastrum chamaecladum, which is now known as Atriplex chamaeclada.

Chamaecladus: [ka-mee-kla-dus] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or branch. It refers to plants, which are rather twiggy or have few leaves. A good example is the leaves on Ptilotus chamaecladus.

Chamaecrista: [ka-mee-kris-ta] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and Crista, which is Latin for a crest, tuft or ridge. It refers to plants, which have a tuft like crest. A good example is the tuft of hairs along the ridge on the sepals of Chamaecrista concinna.

Chamaelaucium: [ka-mee-lour-si-um] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and Leucos, which is Ancient Greek for white. It refers to the plants being small shrubs with many having white flowers. A good example is the leaves on Chamaeleucium uncinatum.

Chamaelea: [ka-me-lee-a] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground. It refers to plants, which have a much smaller size when compared to other many other species in the genus. A good example is Microstachys chamaelea.

Chamaeleon: [ka-mee-lee-on] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground. It refers to plants, which have a much smaller size than many other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia chamaeleon.

Chamaepeuce: [Ka-mee-pyoo-se] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and Peuce which is Ancient Greek for a fir tree. It refers to plants, which resemble dwarf European fir trees. A good example is Persoonia chamaepeuce.

Chamaephila: [ka-mee-fi-la] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or dwarfed and Phílos/Philein, which are Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to dwarf shrubs which prefer to grow in the company of other dwarf species. A good example is Eremophila chamaephila.

Chamaephylla: [kah-me-fahyl-la] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or dwarfed and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to dwarf shrubs which prefer to grow in the company of other dwarf species. A good example is the small ground orchid Caladenia chamaephylla.

Chamaephyllus: [ka-mee-fahyl-lus] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or dwarfed and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to dwarf shrubs which prefer to grow in the company of other dwarf species. A good example was Petalochilus chamaephyllus, which is now known as Caladenia chamaephylla.

Chamaephyton: [ka-mee-phay-ton] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and phyton which is Ancient Greek for a plant. It refers to plants, which are much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example is Banksia chamaephyton.

Chamaepitys: [ka-mee-pi-tis] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and Pitys which is Ancient Greek for a pine tree. It refers to plants, which resemble dwarf pine trees. A good example is Persoonia chamaepitys.

Chamaeraphis: [ka-mee-ra-fis] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and Raphis, which is Ancient Greek for a needle. It refers to awns which resemble needle like points of the central axis that are rather small. A good example is Chamaeraphis hordeacea.

Chamaescilla: [ka-mee-ski-la] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and Skilla, which is Ancient Greek for the classic sea onion genus. It refers to plants, which have superficial look of the sea onion. A good example is Chamaescilla dyeri.

Chamaesphaerion: [ka-mee-s-fee-ri-on] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and Sphaîra, which is Ancient Greek or Sphaera, which is Latin for a shere or global shape and form. It refers to flowers, which strongly sherical or orb shape. A good example was Chamaesphaerion pygmaeum, which is now known as Siloxerus pygmaeus.

Chamaesyce: [ka-mee-sahy-ke] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and Skyon, which is Ancient Greek for a fig. It refers to plants, which have prostrate growth habits and fig like fruits. A good example is Euphorbia chamaesyce.

Chamaexerox: [ka-mee-ser-oks] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and Xeros, which is Ancient Greek for dry or arid. It refers to plants, which have habitat preferences for existing on small quantities of water in dry or arid areas. A good example is Chamaexeros macranthera.

Chamber: [cheim-ber] From Kamara, which is Ancient Greek or Camara which is Latin for a room. It refers to the hollow area or the pith of twigs, grasses and reeds. A good example is the chambers in the culms of Eleocharis sphaecelata.

Chamberlainii: [cheim-ber-lei-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Thomas Carrick Chambers; 1930-20.., who was a New Zealand born Australian Botanist who was director of the Sydney Botanic Gardens. A good example is Cycas chamberlainii.

Chambersii: [cheim-ber-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Thomas Carrick Chambers; 1930-20.., who was a New Zealand born Australian Botanist who was director of the Sydney Botanic Gardens. A good example is Blechnum chambersii.

Chambigne: [cheim-big-ne] Is Latinized from the Chambigne Nature Reserve between Grafton and Buccarumbi in northern NSW. It refers to the locality to where the plants are restricted to. A good example is Blechnum chambersii.

Chamelaucium: [ka-me-lour-si-um] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground and possibly Kamēlaúkion/Kalymmaúchion, which are Greek for a veil or covering. It would refer to the flowers, which completely cover the shrubs for a long time when in flower. A good example is Chamaexeros macranthera.

Cheiroanthos: [chei-roh-an-thos] From Kheir, which is Ancient Greek for a hand and ántha/ánthos, which are  Greek the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to refers to flowers, which resemble a person’s hand with spreading fingers. A good example is Utricularia cheiranthos.

Cheiroloma: [chei-roh-loh-ma] From Kheir, which is Ancient Greek for a hand and Loma, which is Ancient Greek for an edge, margin or fringe. It refers to structures or organs, which have hairs or scales on the margins. A good example is Cheiroloma hispidulum.

Cheiropterophily: [chei-roh-ter-o-fi-lahy] From Kheir, which is Ancient Greek for a hand, Pteris, which is Ancient Greek for a wing and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or for being loved. It refers to plants, being pollinated by bats. A good lee-on] From Chamai, which is Ancient Greek for a dwarf or to lie on the ground. It refers to plants, which have a much smaller size than many other species in the genus. A good example is Racosperma chameleon, which is now known as Acacia chamaeleon.

Chapmaniana: [chap-mah-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Wilfrid Dinsey Chapman; 1891-1955, who was a British born Australian engineer and amateur botanist. A good example is Eucalyptus chapmaniana.

Chapmanii: [chap-ma-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Chapman but which Chapman cannot be substantiated. A good example is Aecia chapmanii.

Chappilliae: [chap-pil-li-ee] Is named in honour of Chapman but which Chapman cannot be substantiated. It may be named in honour of Jennifer Anne Chappill; 1959-2006, who was an Australian botanist who studied the Jacksonia genus. A good example is Jacksonii chappilliae.

Charantica: [char-an-ti-ka] From Charanta, which is Latinized for the given of the bitter melon Mormordica charantica. It refers to the local name for the bitter melon and was later adopted by Carl Linnaeus for the fruit. A good example is Mormordica charantica.

Charlesiana: [char-lzi-ei-na] Is named in honour of Charles. A good example is Senna charlesiana.

Charlioi: [char-l-oi] Is named in honour of Charles but which Charles cannot be substantiated. A good example is Musa charlioi, which is now known as Musa banksii.

Charlwoodia: [charl-wood-i-a] Is named in honour of Charlewoodia. A good example is Charlwoodia stricta, which is now known as Cordyline stricta.

Charnleyensis: [charn-lay-en-sis] From Charnley, which is Latinized for the charnley River and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered along the Charney River a tributary of the Gibb River in north west Western Australia. A good example is Utricularia charnleyensis, which is now known as Utricularia caerulea.

Charophyton: [char-oh-fahy-ton] From Charo, which is Latin for the stone warts and Phyton, which is Ancient Greek for a plant. It refers to plants, which have a preference for environments that very stony and rocky or soils that are very gravelly or stony. A good example is Asperula charophyton.

Charsleyae: [chars-li-ee] Is probably named in honour of Fanny Ann Charsley; 1828-1915, who was an English water colour botanical artist of Australian flora but it cannot be substantiated and friend of Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Rhodanthe charsleyae.

Chartaboma: [char-ta-boh-ma] From Chartacea, which is Latin for papery and Boma which is Latinized from the Swahili vernacular for a fortress or hide. It refers to hypanthium, which are strongly ribbed with the resemblance of a hide. A good example is Eucalyptus chartaboma.

Chartacea: [char-ta-see-a] From Chartacea, which is Latin for papery. It refers to a physical structure, which has a papery appearance and or touch. A good example is the leaves on Planchonella chartacea.

Chartaceum: [char-ta-see-um] From Chartacea which is Latin for papery. It refers to a structure or organ, which is like paper or is papery. A good example is the feel of the leaves once discarded on Chrysophyllum chartaceum, which is now known as Niemeyera chartacea.

Chartaceus: [char-ta-see-us] From Chartacea, which is Latin for papery. It refers to a structure or organ, which is like paper or is papery. A good example is the papery wings on Atractocarpus chartaceus.

Chasmantheric Pollination: [kas-man-ther-ik, pol-lin-ei-shon] From Chasma, which is Ancient Greek for a rift or gaping, ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower and Pollen, which is Latin for mill dust. It refers to where the pollen in the mitosis stage is transferred From a normally dehisced anther by a pollinating agent, with the pollen grain germinating on the stigma and subsequent growth of the pollen tube through the stigma, down the style and the ovule into the embryotic sac.

Chasmatocoleus: [kas-ma-to-ko-lee-us] From Chasma, which is Ancient Greek for a rift or gaping and Koleos, which is Ancient Greek for a sheath. It refers to flower buds, which have a protective sheath around them or where the male and female organs are separated by a sheath. A good example is the separation of the male and female sexual organs by a sheath on Restio chasmatocoleus, which is now known as Chordifex laxus.

Chasmogamama: [kas-mo-gam-ma] From Chasma, which is Greek/Latin for a rift or gaping and Gamous, which is Ancient Greek for to marry or wedded. It refers to flowers; usually orchids, which have the male and female organs near each other but are seperated by a deep valley like rift. A good example is Thelymitra chasmogama.

Chasmogamous: [kas-mo-ga-mos] From Chasma, which is Ancient Greek for a rift or gaping and Gamous, which is Ancient Greek for to marry or wedded. It refers to flowers, which have the male and female sexual organs seperated by a relatively large distance. A good example is seen on Passiflora aurantia.

Chasmogamum: [kas-mo-ga-mum] From Chasma, which is Ancient Greek for a rift or gaping and Gamous which is Ancient Greek for to marry or wedded. It refers to flowers, which have the male and female sexual organs seperated by a relatively large distance. A good example is Prasophyllum chasmogamum.

Chatawaiana: [cha-ta-wa-i-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Dr. Mary Margaret Chataway; 1899-1997,who was an Australian botanist and wood technologist but it cannot be substantiated 100mm. A good example is Flindersia chatawaiana, which is now known as Flindersia brayleyana.

Chaunocoleus: [khor-no-ko-lee-us] Maybe from Chaun, which is Early English for to yawn and Koleos, which is Ancient Greek for a sheath. It refers to flowers, which have wide gap between each head and or a wide gap between the times ofthe stigmas being receptive and the dehiscing of the pollen. A good example of the flower spacing is on Chordifex chaunocoleus.

Chavica: [cha-vi-ka] Maybe from Chavibetol, which is Latin for an oil. It refers to an oil which has a warm peppery flavour extracted from the leaves and fruits of the plants. A good example was Chavica huegeliana, which is now known as Piper hederaceum.

Cheelii: [chee-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Edwin Cheel; 1872-1951, who was an Australian collector and head botanist at the National Herbarium. A good example is Westringia cheelii.

Cheesemania: [cheez-ma-ni-a] Is named in honour of Thomas Cheeseman (1846-1923) who was New Zealand’s greatest botanist. A good example is Cheesemania wallii.

Cheesemanii: [cheez-ma-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Thomas Cheeseman (1846-1923) who was New Zealand’s greatest botanist. A good example is Potamogeton cheesemanii.

Cheilanthes: [chee-lan-thus] From Kheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to the edges of the fronds which curve back over the sori and maybe it refers to the white indusial of some species, which look somewhat like a flower at first glance.A good example is Cheilanthes sieberi subsp. sieberi.

Cheilocarpa: [chee-lo-kar-pa] From Kheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip  and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the edges of the fronds curving back over the sori and maybe the flower It refers to the white indusial of some species looking somewhat like a flower at first glance. A good example is Brachyscome aff. cheilocarpa.

Cheirantha: [chei-ran-tha] From Kheir, which is Ancient Greek for a hand and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers which open out like an outstretched hand.

Cheiranthera: [chei-ran-ther-a] From Kheir, which is Ancient Greek for a hand and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to the anthers, which resemble the outspread fingers of a hand all on one side of the flower. A example isfound on the flowers of Syzygium moorei.

Cheirostylis: [chei-ro-stahy-lis] From Kheir, which is Ancient Greek for a hand and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a style. It refers to the flower buds, which appear like an outstretched hand when fully opened. A good example is Cheirostylis notialis.

Chenolea: [che-no-lee-a] From Chenolea, which is unknown. A good example is Chenolea astrocarpa, which is now known as Bassia astrocarpa.

Chenopodiaceae: [che-no-poh-di-a-see-e] From Khen, which is Ancient Greek for a Goosefoot, Podion, which is Ancient Greek for a small foot and Aceae which is Ancient Greek for a family. It refers to the leaves of some species which are a similar shape to that of the goose foots or Chenopodium family. A good example is Chenopodium cristatum.

Chenopodina: [chen-o-poh-di-na] From Khen, which is Ancient Greek for a Goosefoot and Podion, which is Ancient Greek for a small foot. It refers to the leaves of some species which are a similar shape to that of a goose’s foot. A good example is Chenopodina australis, which is now known as Suaeda australis.

Chenopodinum: [chen-o-poh-di-nuh m] From Khen, which is Ancient Greek for a Goosefoot and Podion, which is Ancient Greek for a small foot. It refers to the leaves of some species which are a similar shape to that of a goose’s foot. A good example is Solanum chenopodinum.

Chenopodioides: [chen-oh-poh-di-oi-deez] From Khen, which is Ancient Greek for a Goosefoot, Podion, which is Ancient Greek for a small foot and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the structures or organs, which resemble those of the Chenopodium genus. A good example is Rhagodia chenopodioides.

Chenopodium: [chen-o-poh-di-um] From Khen, which is Ancient Greek for a Goosefoot and Podion, which is Ancient Greek for a small foot. It refers to the leaves of some species which are similar in shape to that of a goose’s foot. A good example is Chenopodium carinatum.

Cheraphila: [cher-a-fi-la] From Kheras, which is Ancient Greek for alluvial or silted and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or for being loved. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on alluvial flood plains or silts. A good example Pterostylis cheraphila.

Chermsideana: [cherm-si-dee-a-na] Is named in honour of Lady Chermside who was a botanical enthusiast and supporter. A good example is Phaleria chermsideana.

Cherryi: [cheer-ree-ahy] Is named in honour of Cherry. A good example is Ternstroemia cherryi.

Cheumatophila: [chee-u-ma-to-fi-la] From Kheumato which is Ancient Greek for alluvial or silted and Phílos which is Ancient Greek for loving or for being loved. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on alluvial flood plains or silts. A good example Xyris cheumatophila.

Chevalieri: [che-va-li-er-ahy] Is named in honour of Auguste Jean Baptiste Chevalier; 1873–1956, who was a French botanist, taxonomist and explorer of tropical Africa. A good example is Zieria chevalieri.

Cheynia: [chei-ni-a] Is named in honour of Cheyn. A good example is Cheynia pulchella, which is now known as Balaustion pulcherrimum.

Chiddarcoopingense: [chi-dar-koo-ping-ens] From Chiddarcooping, which is Latinized for Chiddarcooping Hill and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on chiddarcooping Hill between Perth and Kalggorlie in southern Western Australia. A good example is Stylidium chiddarcoopingense.

Chillagoanum: [chil-la-goh-a-num] From Chillagoe, which is Latinized for the township and district of Chillagoe in far north Queensland and Ana/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Chillagoe district. A good example is Panicum chillagoanum.

Chillagoense: [chil-a-go-ens] From Chillagoe, which is Latinized for the township and district of Chillagoe in far north Queensland and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Chillagoe district. A good example is Malvastrum chillagoense.

Chillagoensis: [chil-a-go-en-sis] From Chillagoe, which is Latinized for the township and district of Chillagoe in far north Queensland and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Chillagoe district. A good example is Brachychiton chillagoensis.

Chillagoanum: [chil-a-goh-a-num] From Chillagoem which is Latinized for the township and district of Chillagoe in far north Queensland and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to grasses which were first discovered around Chillagoe. A good example is Panicum chillagoanum.

Chilocarpoides: [chi-lo-kar-poi-deez] From Kheîlos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip, Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for a like or similar to. It refers to fruits, which have a distinct lip around the apex similar to previously known Chilocarpus genus. A good example is Melodinus chilocarpoides.

Chilocarpus: [chi/ki-lo-kahr-pus] From Kheîlos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to ripe fruits, which are green on the basal half and ruby or lipstick red or the apical half. A good example is Chilocarpus australis, which is now known as Melodinus australis.

Chiloglottis: [chi/ki-lo-glot-tis] From Kheîlos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip and glottis, which is Ancient Greek for a small tongue. It refers to the tongue like labellum which have a lip. A good example is Chilloglottis trilabra.

Chiloschista: [chi/ki-lo-shis-tuh] From Kheîlos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip and Schistos, which is Ancient Greek for divided. It refers to roots, which are divided into two functions those of roots and those of the leaves. A good example is Chiloschista phyllorhiza.

Chiloscyphus: [chi/ki-lo-sahy-fuh s] From Kheîlos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip and Kī’fŏs/Kyphos, which is Ancient Greek for a bent cup. It refers to labellum or other organs, which are cup shape and bent somewhat like puckered lips. A good example is the leaf apexes on Chiloscyphus coadunatus var. rivularis which are divided and bend from the hand cup shaped laminas.

Chinchillense: [chin-chil-lenz] From Chinchilla, which is Latinized from the local Barunngamm people’s vernacular for Cypress Pine but spelt Jinchilla (Ludwig Leichardt’s diary) and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Chinchilla district. A good example was Racosperma chinchillense which is now known as Acacia chinchillensis.

Chinchillensis: [chin-chil-len-sis] From Chinchilla, which is Latinized from the local Barunngamm people’s vernacular for Cypress Pine but spelt Jinchilla (Ludwig Leichardt’s diary) and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which originated from the Chinchilla district. A good example is Acacia chinchillensis.

Chinensis: [shi/chi-nen-sis] From Qing which is Latinized from the Chinese word for the Qing Dynasty清代 and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered and named from China or more precisely from within the boundaries of the old Ching Dynasty. A good example is Gonocarpus chinensis.

Chingia: [chin-ji-a] Is named in honour of Ching Ren-Chang (秦 仁昌); 1898–1986, who was a prodigious, workaholic, botanist who specialized in pteridology (ferns) and Rhododendrons. Altogether he published some 165 books, book chapters, translations, papers, and articles, including over 3,400 nomenclatural novelties took over 18,300 photographs of Chinese plants. A good example is Chingia australis.

Chionachne: [chi-o-nak-ne] From Khion, which is Ancient Greek for snow and Achne, which is Ancient Greek for a glume. It refers to several of the earlier species, which had pale coloured, almost white glumes. A good example is Chionachne cyathopoda.

Chionanthus: [chi-o-nan-thus] From Khion which is Ancient Greek for snow and Antha/Anthos, which are Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to several of the earlier species, which had snow white flowers. A good exampleis Chionanthus quadristamineus.

Chionochloa: [Chi-no-noh-kloh-uh] From Khion, which is Ancient Greek for snow and Kloa, which is Ancient Greek for a grass. It refers to several of the earlier grass species which were named for being rather pale in colour overall. A good example is Chionochloa frigida.

Chionogentias: [chio-no-jen-ti-as] From Chion, which is Ancient Greek for snow and Gentius, who was a king of the Ardiaei people181–168 BC, a powerful tribe in Illyria. He was the last Ardiaei ruler. It refers to flowers, which are snow white and blood-red. A good example is Chionogentias barringtonensis, which is now known as Gentianella barringtonensis.

Chionohebe: [Chi-o-no-hee-bee] From Khion, which is Ancient Greek for snow and Hebe, which is the Greek goddess for youth and spring. It refers to plants, which resemble the Hebe genus in that they have pure white flowers or dwell above the snow line. A good example is Chionohebe densifolia, which is now known as Veronica densifolia.

Chionolepis: [Chi-ono-le-pis] From Khion, which is Ancient Greek for snow and Lepis, which is Ancient Greek for a scale or scaly. It refers to the snowy white ligules or ray florets, which are somwhat scaly. A good example is Helipterum chionolepis, which is now known as Rhodanthe floribunda.

Chippendalei: [chi-pen-dei li-ahy] Is named in honour of George McCartney Chippendale; 1921-2010, who was an Australian botanist and plant collector who had a passion for all native plants especially the Eucalyptus genus. A good example is Acacia chippendalei.

Chironiifolia: [chi-ro-ni–i-foh-li-a] From Kheiron, which is from Greek mythology for the superlative centaur amongst his brethren, as he was called as the “wisest and justness of all the centaurs and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. Its reference to Keiron and the leaves is unclear. A good example is Boronia chironiifolia, which is now known as Boronia denticulata.

Chisholmii: [chiz-hoh mee-ahy] Is named in honour of Caroline Chisholm; 1808-1877, who dedicated her life to the welfare of convict and immigrant women in Australia. A good example is Coopernookia chisholmii.

Chisocheton: [chi-zo-kahy-ton] From Schizos, which is Ancient Greek for a split or to split and Khiton/Chiton, which is Ancient Greek for a tunic or long ancient dress worn by Greek women with a split down one side. It refers to structures or organs, which are long and draped similar to the ancient Greek garments and often have a split down one side. A good example is Chisocheton longistipitatus.

Chithonanthus: [chi-tho-nan-thus] From Khiton, which is Ancient Greek for a tunic or long ancient dress worn by Greek women and ántha/ánthos, which are  Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to corollas, which are long and drape similarly to the ancient Greek garments. A good example is Chithonanthus restiaceus, which is now known as Acacia restiacea

Chiton: [khahy-ton] From Khiton, which is Ancient Greek for a tunic or long ancient dress worn by Greek women. It refers to bracts or tubular corollas, which are long and draped similar to the ancient Greek garments. A good example is Brachychiton acerifolium.

Chiton or Tunic

Chlaenosciadium: [klee-no-ski-a-d-um] From Khlaina, which is Ancient Greek for a cloak and sciadeion, which is Ancient Greek for an umbrella. It refers to the very large sepals which spread out like an open umbrella. A good example is Chlaenosciadium gardneri.

Chlamydeous: [klah-mahy-dee-os] From khlamús/Khlamýs, which is Ancient Greek for a short woolen cloak worn over the shoulders by men. It refers to a plants which have both sepals and petals. A good example is Dichromochlamys dentatifolia.

Chlamydospores: [klah-mahy-do-sporz] From khlamús/Khlamýs, which is Ancient Greek for a short woolen cloak worn over the shoulders by men and Sporá, which is Greek for a seed or to sow. It refers to asexual spores formed by the breaking up of fungal hyphae parting similar to a chlamys. A good example is Sarcoscypha austriaca.

Chlamydosporum: [klah-mahy-do-spor-um] From khlamús/Khlamýs, which is Ancient Greek for a short woolen cloak worn over the shoulders by men and Sporá, which is Greek for a seed or to sow. It refers to asexual spores formed by the breaking up of fungal hyphae parting similar to a chlamys. A good example is the problemsome root attacking fungus Fusarium chlamydosporum, where plnts are grown in poorly drained soils.

Chlamys: [klah-mis] From khlamús/Khlamýs, which is Ancient Greek for a short woollen cloak worn over the shoulders by men. It refers to the bracts surrounding the floral tubes which appear to be nice and snug within the bracts. A good example is the flowers on Ixiochlamys filicifolia.

Chloantha: [kloh-an-tha] From Khlóē, which is Greek for (young) green shoots – a grass and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have hairs within the corolla, which resemble a field of grass beyond or surrounding the anthers. A good example is the small gray moth covered in short gray hairs Chloantha dilutior, which often frequents our gardens.

Chloanthes: [kloh-an-thes] From Khlóē, which is Ancient Greek for (young) green shoots – a grass and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have hairs within the corolla, which resemble a field of grass beyond or surrounding the anthers. A good example is Chloanthes parviflora.

Chloraefolia: [klor-ee-foh-li-a] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for greenish-yellow and Folium, which is Ancient Greek for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are yellow-green in colour. A good example is Erythraea chloraefolia, which is now known as Sebaea ovata.

Chloraefolium: [klor-ee-foh-li-um] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for greenish-yellow and Folium, which is Ancient Greek for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are yellow-green in colour.

Chlorantha: [klor-an-tha] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have green or yellowish green markings or anthers. A good example is the inner corolla on the early species discovered on Prostanthera chlorantha.

Chloranthum: [klor-an-thum] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have green or yellowish green markings or anthers. A good example is the inner corolla on the early species discovered on Astroloma chloranthum.

Chlorella: [klor-el-la] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to the leaves which are deep green compared to the other subspecies which are grey to silvery. A good example is Eremophila chlorella, which is now known as Eremophila glabra subsp. chlorella.

Chloridiformis: [klor-i-di-for-mis] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the grasses leaves being somewhat similar in colour and form to many other grasses. A good example is Dimeria chloridiformis.

Chlorine: [klor-een] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green. Symbol Cl, Atomic Number 17.

Chloris: [klor-is] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green. It refers to leaves, which stand out because of their colour. A good example is the deep green leaves and stems on the grass of Chloris divaricatum.

Chlorocarpa: [klor-o-kar-pa] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are yellowish when ripe. A good example is the flowers on Terminalia chlorocarpa.

Chlorocephala: [klor-o-ke/se-fa-la] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads which have outstanding or exquisite beauty. A good example is the flowers on Rhodanthe chlorocephala subsp. rosea.

Chlorocephalum: [klor-o-ke/se-fa-lum] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads which have outstanding or exquisite beauty. A good example is the flowers on Helipterum chlorocephalum, which is now known as Rhodanthe chlorocephala subsp. splendida.

Chloroclada: [klor-o-kla-da] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a trunk, branch or stem. It refers to old wood, which produces flowers like on the trunk, branches or stems. A good example is the flowers on Eucalyptus chloroclada.

Chlorocyanea: [klor-o-sahy-a-nee-a] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Kúanos, which is Ancient Greek or Cȳaneum, which is Latin for deep blue. It refers to a group of fungi, which have a deep blue-green colour. A good example is Arrhenia chlorocyanea.

Chlorogramma: [klor-o-gram-ma] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Gramma, which is Ancient Greek for written or drawn on. It refers to structures or organs, which have green or yellowish-green line drawn on them. A good example is the tepals on Pterostylis chlorogramma.

Chlorolampra: [klor-o-lam-pra] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Lampra, which is Ancient Greek for shinny or glistening. It refers to flower heads which are greenish-yellow. A good example is the flowers on Corymbia chlorolampra.

Chloroleuca: [klor-o-loo-ka] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Leukos, which is Ancient Greek for white or without colour. It refers to structures or organs usually the flowers, which are pale greenish-yellow or pale greenish-yellow and white. A good example is the flowers on Ixiolaena chloroleuca, which is now known as Leiocarpa leptolepis.

Chlorophyll: [klo-ro-fil] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the green cells in the leaves or at times along the stems which contain chlorophyll. The green colouring in a plant’s cells is the chloroplasts that is responsible for photosynthesis or the conversion of water and carbon dioxide to simple sugars.

Chlorophylla: [klor-o-fahy-la] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the green cells in the leaves or at times along the stems which contain chlorophyll. A good example is the leaves and stems on Eucalyptus chlorophylla.

Chlorophyllum: [klo-ro-fahyl-lum] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaf like gills of certain fungi, which are greenish-yellow or turn greenish-yellow when bruised. A good example is the gills on Chlorophyllum s.

Chlorophyllus: [klo-ro-fahyl-lus] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaf like gills of certain fungi, which are greenish-yellow or turn greenish-yellow when bruised. A good example is the gills on Lichen chlorophyllus.

Chloroplasts: [klo-ro-plasts] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Plasts, an internal organ of a plant. It refers to the organ, which contains the chlorophyll. The chloroplast organelles found in plant cells and eukaryotic algae that conduct photosynthesis in the presence of sunlight.

Chloropsis: [klor-op-sis] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for to resemble. It refers to grasses which are bright green to bright yellowish-green. A good example was Chloropsis pumilio, which is now known as Chloris pumilio.

Chlorospora: [klor-o-spor-a] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Sporum, which is Ancient Greek for a fern seed. It refers to spores which are green to yellowish-green. A good example was Gautieria chlorospora, which is now known as Austrogautieria chlorospora.

Chlorosporum: [klor-o-spor-um] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Sporum, which is Ancient Greek for a fern seed. It refers to spores which are green to yellowish-green. A good example is the black, clubbed spiked sporangia on the the lichen  Calicium chlorosporum.

Chlorostachys: [klor-o-sta-shus] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Sporum, which is Ancient Greek for a fern seed. It refers to spores which are green to yellowish-green. A good example is Erythrophleum chlorostachys.

Chlorostylus: [klor-o-stay-lus] From Khloris/Khloros, which is Ancient Greek for green or yellowish-green and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a part of the female reproductive organ between the ovaries and the stigma. It refers to the outer surfaces of the tepals, which are pale green to pale yellowish-green. A good example is Petalochilus chlorostylus.

Chnoodes: [ch-noodz] From Chnoodes, may be a miss spelling of Chloodes, which is Latin for grass green. It refers to the colour of the leaves and stems which are grass green. A good example is Oxalis chnoodes.

Choisiana: [choi-si-a-na] From Coeo, which is Latin for to come together, meet or up against and Anus/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which are often crowded together in their favourite habitats. A good example is the littoral environments preferred by Ipomoea choisiana, which is now known as Ipomoea littoralis.

Cholmondeleyi: [cholm-lee] Is named in honour of George Henry Hugh Cholmondeley; 1858–1923, who was the 4th Marquess of Cholmondeley and a British peer and a hereditary joint Lord Great Chamberlain of England. He exercised the office of Lord Great Chamberlain during the reign of King Edward VII (1901–1910). A good example is the horticulturally grown ginger, Zingiber cholmondeleyi, which is now known as Zingiber officinale.

Chomelia: [cho-me-li-a] Maybe from Melia, which is Ancient Greek for the European Ash tree. It refers to the colour of the leaves and stems being grass green. A good example is Chomelia dallachiana, which is now known as Tarenna dallachiana subsp. dallachiana.

Chondrachne: [chon-drak-ne] From Chondros, which is Greek wheat and Achne, which is Ancient Greek for chaff. It refers to glumes, lemmas and palae which resemble the chaff on wheat. A good example is Chondrachne articulata, which is now known as Lepironia articulata.

Chondropyxis: [kon-dro-pahyk-sis] From Khondros, which is Ancient Greek for a cartilage and Pyxis, which is Ancient Greek for a box. It refers to fruits capitulum, which consist of persistent cartilaginous scales that hold the achenes onto the receptacles. A good example is Chondropyxis halophila.

Chondrosperma: [kon-dro-sper-ma] From Kondron, which is Ancient Greek for a big grain of wheat and Spermum, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the type specimen, which have a large wheat like seed. A good example is Montia fontana subsp. chondrosperma.

Chooreechillum: [koo-ree-chil-lum] From Chooreechillum, which is Latinized for the vernacular of the local Aboriginal word for Mount Bartle Frere in far north east Queensland. A good example is Acronychia hooreechillum.

Chordifex: [kor-di-feks] From Khord, which is Ancient Greek for string or cordage and Fecs, which is Latin for a maker or to make. It refers to plants, which yield good fibres to make cordage or strings. A good example is Chordifex amblycoleus.

Chordophylla: [kor-do-fahyl-la] From Khord which is Ancient Greek for string or cordage and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllodes. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble cords. A good example was Acacia chordophylla, which is now known as Acacia rigens.

Chordorhizos: [kor-do-rahy-zos] From Khord, which is Ancient Greek for string or cordage and Rhiza, which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to roots, which resemble cords. A good example is the roots on the orchid Sarcochillus falcatus.

Choreanthum: [kor-ee-an-thum] From Khoris, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Antha/Anthos, which are Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to flower petals, which at first appear to be separated from each other. A good example is Stylidium choreanthum.

Choretroides: [kor-e-troi-deez] From Khoris, which is Ancient Greek for to separate, Etron, which is Ancient Greek for abdomen and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Choretrum genus  with their disjunct fruits that look similar to small swollen bellies along the flowering stems. A good example is Choretrum candollei.

Choretrum: [kor-ee-trum] From Khoris, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Etron, which is Ancient Greek for abdomen. It refers to the disjunct fruits, which resemble small, swollen bellies along the flowering stems. A good example is Choretrum candollei.

Choricarpia: [ko-ri-kar-pi-a] From Khoris, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits which appear to be disjunct along the flowering stems. A good example was Chorocarpia leptopetala, which is now known as Backhousia leptopetala.

Choriceras: [ko-ri-se-ras] From Khoris, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Keras, which is Ancient Greek for a horn. It refers to the horns which are completely disintegrating by the time the seeds are shed. A good example is seen on Choriceras majus.

Chorilaena: [ko-ri-lee-na] From Khoris, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Khlaina, which is Ancient Greek for a cloak. It refers to calyxes which separate into individual sepals by the time of anthesis. A good example is seen on Chorilaena quecifolia.

Chorilaenoides: [ko-ri-lee-noi-deez] From Koris, which is Ancient Greek for to separate, Khlaina, which is Ancient Greek for a cloak and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to calyxes, which separate into individual sepals by the time of anthesis. A good example is Asterolasia chorilaenoides.

Chorion: [ko-ri-on] From Khoriso, which is Ancient Greek for to separate. It refers to the outermost membrane around the embryo in mammals, birds and reptiles that are. It develops from an outer fold on the surface of the yolk sac, which lies outside the vitteline envelope and is developed by the follicle cells while the egg is in the ovary.

Choriophylla: [ko-ri-h-fahyl-la] From Koris, which is Ancient Greek for to separate, Khlaina, which is Ancient Greek for a cloak and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to calyxes, which separate into individual sepals by the time of anthesis. A good example is Acacia choriophylla.

Choripetalous: [ko-ri-pe-ta-los] From Khoris, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Petánnumi ,which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators. It refers to the petals being well separated. A good example is seen with the flowers on Dendrophthoe vitellina.

Choripetalum: [ko-ri-pe-ta-lum] From Khoris, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators which usually separate prior to anthesis or shortly after anthesis. A good example is seen with the flowers on Choripetalum australianum, which is now known as Embelia australiana.

Chorisepala: [ko-ri-se-pa-la] From Khoris, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or much later Sepalum, which is Latin for a covering or roof. It refers to the specialized leaves known as sepals, which cover and protect the petals and sexual organs in the bud stage which usually separate prior to anthesis or shortly after anthesis. A good example is seen with the flowers on Pityrodia chorisepala.

Chorisepalous: [ko-ri-se-pa-los] From Khoris, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or much later Sepalum, which is Latin for a covering or roof. It refers to the specialized leaves known as sepals, which cover and protect the petals and sexual organs in the bud stage separating prior to anthesis.

Choristemon: [ko-ri-stei-mon] From Khoris, which is Ancient Greek for I separate and stamen, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs comprising of the filament and anther. It refers to filaments, which are well spaced apart comaparively to the size of the individual flowers. A good example was Choristemon humilis, which is now known as Leucopogon virgatus.

Chorizandra: [ko-ri-zan-dra] From Khoriso, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to filaments, which are well spaced apart. A good example is seen on Chorizandra cymbaria.

Chorizema: [ko-ri-zee-ma] From Khoriso, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to the very fine filaments, which are separated into two groups. A good example is seen on Chorizema parviflorum.

Chorizemifolia: [ko-ri-ze-mi-foh-li-a] From Khoriso which is Ancient Greek for to separate, Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread.  which is Ancient Greek for a thread and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the fine thread like foliage of some Chorizema species. A good example is seen on Hovea chorizemifolia.

Chorizemifolium: [ko-ri-ze-mi-foh-li-um] From Khoriso, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the foliage of some Chorizema species in that they have disjunct teeth on the margins. A good example is seen on Plagiolobium chorizemifolium.

Chorizotheca: [ko-ri-zo-thee-ka] From Khoriso, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Theka, which is Ancient Greek for a case or container. It refers to fruits, which separate from the plant shortly before the seeds ripen. A good example is Chorizotheca micrantheoides, which is now known as Stachystemon virgatus.

Chortophytum: [kor-to-fahy-tum] From Khoriso, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Phytum, which is Ancient Greek for a plant. It refers to plants, which grow in small clumps but appear to be separate identities. A good example is Trichinium chortophytum, which is now known as Ptilotus chortophytus.

Chortophytus: [kor-to-fahy-tus] From Khoriso, which is Ancient Greek for to separate and Phytum, which is Ancient Greek for a plant. It refers to plants, which grow in small clumps but appear to be separate identities. A good example is Ptilotus chortophytus.

Christatella: [kris-ta-tel-la] From Cristātus, which is Latin for to be crested or to have a crest and Ella, which is the feminine form. It refers to organs usually the leaves which have a crest. A good example is Davallia cristatella.

Christella: [kris-te-la] From Cristātus, which is Latin for to be crested or to have a crest and Ella, which is the feminine form. It refers to organs usually the leaves which have a crest. A good example is Christella hispidula.

Christineae: [kris-ti-nee-a] Is named in honour of Stephen Hopper’s wife, Christine Hopper, who was an Australian botanist in Western Australia and the co-author with Andrew Brown of this orchid’s description. A good example is Cynanchum christineae.

Christopheri: [kris-to-fer-ahy] Is named in honour of Christopher but which Christopher cannot be substantiated. A good example is Eremophila christopheri.

Christophori: [kris-to-for-ahy] Is named in honour of Christopher but which Christopher cannot be substantiated. A good example is Eremophila christophori which is a spelling error for Eremophila christopheri.

Christophorii: [kris-to-for-i-ahy] Is named in honour of Christopher but which Christopher cannot be substantiated. A good example was Eremophila christophorii which is a spelling error for Eremophila christopheri.

Chromacea: [kro-ma-see-a] From Khrôma, which is Ancient Greek for the intensity or saturation of colour or density of a hue in refraction of light from a surface. It refers to a structure or organ, which is multi or brightly coloured. A good example is the beautiful yellow-orange colour of the stalk and pileus on Omphalina chromacea.

Chromatism: [kroh-ma-tism] From Khrôma, which is Ancient Greek for the intensity or saturation of colour or density of a hue in refraction of light from a surface. It refers to the study of plants that display colours in their foliage or other parts that are normally green

Chromatologist: [kroh-ma-tol-o-jist] From Khrôma, which is Ancient Greek for the intensity or saturation of colour or density of a hue in refraction of light from a surface, Ology which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist which is Ancient Greek for a person. Botanically it refers to a person who studies the different colours in plant foliages plants.

Chromatology: [kroh-ma-to-lo-jee] From Khrôma, which is Ancient Greek for the intensity or saturation of colour or density of a hue in refraction of light from a surface and Ology which is Ancient Greek for to study. Botanically it refers to the science of studying the different colours in plants.

Chromochiton: [kroh-mo-khay-ton] From Khrôma, which is Ancient Greek for the saturation of colour or density of a hue in refraction of light from a surface and Chitṓn/Khitṓn, which is Ancient Greek for a tunic. It refers to organs usually corollas which are vibrantly colourful. A good example is Chromochiton aculeata, which is now known as Cassinia aculeata.

Chromolimonea: [kroh-mo-li-mo-nee-a] From Khrôma, which is Ancient Greek for the intensity or saturation of colour or density of a hue in refraction of light from a surface and Līmōn which is Latin for a lemon fruit or its colour. It refers to a structure or organ, which is a bright lemon-yellow colour. A good example is Hygrocybe chromolimonea.

Chromoplasts: [kroh-mo-plasts] From Khrôma, which is Ancient Greek for the intensity or saturation of colour or density of a hue in refraction of light from a surface and Plasts which is Ancient Greek for an internal organ in plants. It refers to the yellow, orange and red colours in plants leaves, fruits, roots and stems. They are associated with increases in the accumulation of carotenoid pigments and are responsible for the conversion of chloroplasts into chromoplasts. This is evident in fruit as it ripens. Other reactions include the synthesis of complex sugars, starches, lipids, aromatic compounds, vitamins and hormones.

Chromoxantha: [kro-mo-zan-tha] From Khrôma, which is Ancient Greek for the intensity or saturation of colour or density of a hue in refraction of light from a surface and Xanthós which is Ancient Greek for yellow. It refers to a structure or organ, which is a bright lemon-yellow in colour. A good example is Hygrocybe chromoxantha.

Chrozophorifolia: [kro-zo-fo-ri-foh-li-a] From Chrozo, which is Latin for a European plant, Phóros/Phére, in which is Ancient Greek for to carry or to bear and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves somewhat resembling the Chrozophora genus. A good example is Nettoa chrozophorifolia, which is now known as Corchorus chrozophorifolium.

Chrozophorifolium: [kro-zo-for-i-foh-li-um] From Chrozo, which is Latin for a European plant, Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to carry or to bear and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves somewhat resembling the Chrozophora genus. A good example is Corchorus chrozophorifolium.

Chrozophorifolius: [kro-zo-for-i-foh-li-us] From Chrozo, which is Latin for a European plant, Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to carry or to bear and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves somewhat resembling the Chrozophora genus. A good example is Corchorus chrozophorifolius.

Chrys: [krahys/kris] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour.

Chrysadena: krahys/kris-sa-de-na] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Adena, which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to plants, which have yellow glands. A good example was Leptomeria chrysadena which is now known as Leptomeria scrobiculata.

Chrysantha: [krahys/kris-san-tha] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are either pastel or rich golden yellow. A good example is Diuris chrysantha.

Chrysanthella: [krahys/kris-san-thel-la] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to flowers, which are a rich golden yellow. A good example is Verticordia chrysanthella.

Chrysanthemifolium: [krahys/kris-san-the-mi-foh-li-um] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to flowers, and leaves which are a rich golden yellow. A good example is Diuris chrysantha.

Chrysanthemoides: [krahys/kris-san-the-moi-deez] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the colour of the flowers being similar to those of the Chrysanthemum genus. A good example is seen in the exotic weed species Chrysanthemoides monilifera, which has was introduced by the sand mining companies to stabilize the sand dunes and has become real environmental problem.

Chrysantherum: [krahys/kris-san-ther-um] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are a rich golden yellow. A good example is Chlamysporum chrysantherum, which is now known as Thysanotus chinensis.

Chrysantherus: [krahys/kris-san-ther-us] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are a rich golden yellow. Chrysantherus is a spelling error forchrysantherum which is seen in some older articles. A good example is Chlamysporum chrysantherus, which is now known as Thysanotus chinensis.

Chrysanthes: [krahy-san-theez] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to the colour of the flowers, which are rich golden yellow. A good example is Pycnosorus chrysanthes.

Chrysanthum: [krahys/kris-san-thum] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on the flower or the flower. It refers to the colour of the flowers which are a rich golden yellow. A good example is Choretrum chrysanthum.

Chrysanthus: [krahys/krissan-thus] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on the flower or the flower. It refers to the colour of the flowers which are a rich golden yellow. A good example is Xanthóstemon chrysanthus.

Chryseides: [krahys/kris-see-deez] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers which are a rich golden-yellow similar to the colour of the Chrysanthemum genus. A good example is Ipomoea chryseides, which is now known as Merremia hederacea.

Chrysella: [krahys/kris-se-la] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to the colour of the flowers which are a delicate but rich golden yellow similar to the colour of the Chrysanthemum genus. A good example is Acacia chrysella Aspergillus chrysellus.

Chrysellum: [krahys/kris-se-lum] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to the colour of the flowers which are a little more delicate but still have a rich golden-yellow colour similar to the Chrysanthemum genus. A good example is Racosperma chrysellum, which is now known as Acacia chrysella.

Chrysellus: [krahys/kris-se-lus] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to the colour of the flowers which are a delicate but rich golden yellow similar to the colour of the Chrysanthemum genus. A good example is Aspergillus chrysellus.

Chryseopsis: [krahys/kris-see-op-sis] From Khrū́seos which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum which is Latin for a golden colour and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for to have the appearence of or to look the same. It refers to flowers, which have the same colour as a Chrysanthemum. A good example is Diuris chryseopsis.

Chryseus: [krahys/kris-see-us] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour. It refers to structures or organs usually the flowers, which are a golden-yellow colour. A good example is Pseudanthus chryseus, which is now known as Stachystemon polyandrus.

Chrysitrix: [krahys/krissi-triks] From Khrū́seos which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Hystrix, which is Ancient Greek for a hedgehog. It refers to spines which are yellowish to golden-yellow in colour. A good example is Chrysitrix distigmatosa.

Chrysobasis: [krahys/kris-so-ba-sis] From Básis, which is Ancient Greek or Basis which is Latin for a foundation, base or platform. It refers to the base of the stems, which are a golden-yellow in colour.A good example is Ottelia chrysobasis.

Chrysobotrya: [krahys/kris-so-bo-trahy-a] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Botrys, which is Ancient Greek for a bunch of grapes. It refers to fruits, which resemble a bunch of yellow grapes. A good example is Acacia chrysobotrya.

Chrysocalyx: [krahys/kris-soh-kei-liks] From Khrū́seos which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for a husk, veil or cover. It refers to the specialized leaves known as calyxes which surround the bud and protect the developing sexual organs and ovaries that are yellowish in colour. A good example is Pityrodia chrysocalyx.

Chrysocephala: [krahys/kris-so-ke/se-fa-la] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to the colour of the flower heads which are a rich golden yellow. A good example is Acacia hrysocephala.

Chrysocephalum: [krahys/kris-soh-ke/se-fa-lum] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers the flower heads which are a rich golden yellow. A good example is Chrysocephalum apiculatum.

Chrysochaeta: [krahys/kris-soh-chei-ta] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Chaeto, which is Ancient Greek for long and hairy. It refers to stems, peduncles and leaves which have long hairs. A good example is Acacia chrysochaeta.

Chrysochaetum: [krahys/kris-soh-chei-tum] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Chaeto, which is Ancient Greek for long and hairy. It refers to stems, peduncles and leaves which have long hairs. A good example is Racosperma chrysochaetum, which is now known as Acacia chrysochaeta.

Chrysocoma: [krahys/kris-so-koh-ma] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Kómē, which is Ancient Greek for the long hair of the head. It refers to flower heads which are covered in long, yellowish or golden-yellow hairs. A good example is Chrysocoma cinerea, which is now known as Ozothamnus turbinatus.

Chrysocoryne: [krahys/kris-soh-korn] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a type of club. It refers to golden-yellow flower heads which have a club form. A good example is the pale yellow flower heads on Chrysocoryne angianthoides, which is now known as Gnephosis tenuissima.

Chrysodendrum: [krahys/kris-so-den-drum] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree or tree like. It refers to stems, peduncles and leaves which have long hairs. A good example is Lepidium chrysanthemifolia , which is now known as Lepidium foliosum.

Chrysoderma: [krahys/kris-so-der-ma] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Dérma/Dérein, which is Ancient Greek for the skin. It refers to structures or organs usually the leaves which have a yellowish outer layer. A good example is Lawrencia chrysoderma.

Chrysoderma: [krahys/kris-so-der-ma] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Dérma/Dérein, which is Ancient Greek for the skin. It refers to structures or organs usually the leaves which have a yellowish outer layer. A good example is Lawrencia chrysoderma.

Chrysodiscus: [krahys/kris-so-dis-kus] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Skli̱rós, which is Ancient Greek or Dískos which is Ancient Greek for a disc, plate or Diskeîn to throw. It refers to structures or organs usually which have the form of a disc and are yellowish in colour. A good example is Chrysodiscus niveus, which is now known as Asteridea nivea.

Chrysodium: [krahys/kris-so-di-dum] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Natrium, which is Latin for sodium. It refers to plants, which are more golden-yellow than other plants in the genus and prefer saline habitats and environments. A good example is Chrysodium aureum, which is now known as Acrostichum aureum.

Chrysoglossa: [krahys/kris-so-glos-sa] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for long and hairy. It refers to stems, peduncles and leaves which have long hairs. A good example is Brachyscome chrysoglossa.

Chrysogonum: [krahys/kris-so-goh-num] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Gonia, which is Ancient Greek for a joint or node. It refers to golden-yellow flowers appearing from a node joint and contrasting strongly against the deep green foliage. A good example is Chrysogonum virginianum var. Australe which has the added name from this American plant australe which emphasizes Australia’s national colours.

Chrysophaea: [krahys/kris-so-fee-a] From Khrysos which is Ancient Greek for golden and Phae, which is Ancient Greek for deep or dark as per the colour. It refers to flowers, which have a rich, deep, golden-yellow colour. A good example is Grevillea chrysophaea.

Chrysophyla: [krahys/kris-so-fahyl-la] From Khrysos which is Ancient Greek for golden and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves which are a golden yellow-green in colour. A good example is seen with the flowers on Newcastelia chrysophylla.

Chrysophylum: [krahy-so-fahyl-lum] From Khrysos which is Ancient Greek for golden and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves which are a golden yellow-green in colour. A good example is seen with the flowers on Chrysophyllum roxburgii.

Chrysoplectra: [krahys/kris-soh-plek-tra] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Plectra, which is Ancient Greek for a spur. It refers to flowers, which have a golden spur. A good example is Lindernia chrysoplectra.

Chrysopoda: [krahys/kris-so-poh-da] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or beard. It refers to pedicels and or pulvivus which are a golden-yellow. A good example is Acacia chrysopoda.

Chrysopodum: [krahys/kris-so-poh-duh m] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or beard. It refers to pedicels and or Pulvinus which are a golden-yellow. A good example is Acacia chrysopodum, which is now known as Acacia chrysopoda.

Chrysopogon: [krahys/kris-so-poh-gon] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to the golden colour of the hairs on the lemma and glumes with possibly the yellow anthers. A good example is Chrysopogon fallax.

Chrysorhoe: [krahys/kris-so-rhoh] From Khryso which is Ancient Greek for golden and Rhoeo which is Ancient Greek for a woman in Greek mythology who, while pregnant, was put to sea in a dinghy. It refers to the golden–yellow bracts which are shaped like a dinghy. A good example is seen with the flowers on Chrysorhoe serrata, which is now known as Verticordia serrata.

Chrysosepalous: [krahys/kris-so-se-pa-lus] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and sepalous, which is Ancient Greek for a sepal. It refers to the sepals, which are a golden colour. A good example is seen with the flowers on Diplatia furcata.

Chrysostemon: [krahys/kris-so-ste-mon] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Stemom, which is Ancient Greek for a the male reproductive organ in a flower which includes the filament and anther. It refers to stamens which are a golden-yellow colour. A good example is Chrysostemon virgatus, which is now known as Stachystemon virgatus.

Chrysotricha: [krahys/kris-so-trahy-ka] From Khrū́seos, which is Ancient Greek or Chrȳseum, which is Latin for a golden colour and Trichos, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to the golden colour of the hairs on the stems, rachis and petioles. A good example is Acacia chrysotricha.

Chthonocephala: [chon/thon-o-ke/se-fa-la] From Khthonos, which is Ancient Greek for the earth as in the soil and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to plants, which have few leaves with the head of flowers appearing on a spike straight from the earth. A good example is Goodenia chthonocephala.

Chthonocephalata: [chon/thon-o-ke/se-fa-la-ta] From Khthonos, which is Ancient Greek for the earth as in the soil and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to a spelling error for chthonocephala. A good example is Goodenia chthonocephalata.

Chthonocephalus: [chon/thon-o-ke/se-fa-lus] From Khthonos, which is Ancient Greek for the earth as in the soil and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. A good example is Chthonocephalus tomentellus.

Chudaei: [choo-dee-ahy] Is named in honour of Chudae. A good example is seen at the base of the seeds on Tulostoma chudaei.

Chundra: [chun-dra] From Chundra, which is Latinized for the vernacular Sankrist word for to shine or glow. It refers to the flowers having a moon like glow. A good example is seen at the base of the seeds on Acacia chundra.

Cibaria: [si-bar-i-a] From Cibarius, which is Latin for edible. It refers to structures or organs on a plant which are edible. A good example was Acacia cibaria, which is now known as Acacia brachystachya.

Cibarium: [si-bar-i-um] From Cibarius, which is Latin for edible. It refers to organs on plants, which are edible. A good example was Ileodictyon cibarium, which is now known as Clathrus cibarius.

Cibarius: [si-bar-i-us] From Cibarius which is Latin for edible. It refers to organs on plants, which are edible. A good example was Clathrus cibarius.

Cibotium: [si-bo-ti-um] From Kibotion, which is Ancient Greek for a little chest. It refers to the sporangia which resemble little boxes or chests. A good example is Cibotium billardierei, which is now known as Dicksonia antarctica.

Cicatricata: [si-ka-tri-ka-ta] From Cica, which may be Latin for a scar and Tricatus which is Latin for tangled. It may refer to stems which are somewhat tangled and have the scars of fallen leaves. A good example is Leucopogon cicatricatus.

Cicatricatus: [si-ka-ti-ka-tus] From Cica, which may be Latin for a scar and Tricatus, which is Latin for tangled. It may refer to stems which are somewhat tangled and have the scars of fallen leaves. A good example is Leucopogon cicatricatus Agiortia cicatricata.

Cicatricosa: [si-ka-tri-koh-sa] From Cica, which may be Latin for a scar and Tricatus, which is Latin for tangled. It may refer to stems which are somewhat tangled and have the scars of fallen leaves. A good example is Poranthera cicatricosa, which is now known as Poranthera ericoides.

Cicatricosum: [si-ka-tri-koh-sum] From Kikkos, which is Ancient Greek or Ciccōrum, which is Latin for worthless, trifle or imitative and Tricatus which is Latin for unevenly swollen. It refers to plants, which are less attractive than other species in the genus and have stems which are somewhat unevenly swollen along their length. A good example was Stylidium cicatricosum, which is now known as Stylidium fasciculatum.

Ciccoides: [sik-koi-deez] From Kikkos, which is Ancient Greek or Ciccōrum, which is Latin for worthless, trifle or imitative and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which are less attractive than other similar species in the genus. A good example is Phyllanthus ciccoides.

Cicutarium: [si-kyoo-tar-i-um] From Cicuta, which is Latin for the poison hemlock. It refers to leaves, which closely resemble the leaves of the Cicuta genus. A good example was Erodium cicutarium.

Cienfuegosia: [si-en-foo-e-go-s-a] Is named in honour of Cienfuegos but which one cannot be substantiated. Web inclusions include several Spanish botanists with this name between the 16th century and 18th century. Several species world wide are named in honour of the various persons from grasses to shrubs citing works and paintings of plants attributed to them. A good example was Cienfuegosia gossypioides, which is now known as Gossypium sturtianum

Cilia: [si-li-a] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash. It refers to the hairs on the margins of leaves, sepals, petals, ligules or other parts of a plant and some microscopic animals. A good example is the labellum on Genoplesium baueri.

Ciliare: [si-ar-e] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash. It refers to the margins of leaves, tepals, petals, ligules or other parts of a plant and some microscopic animals which have a fringe of hairs. A good example is seen at the base of the seeds on Galium ciliare subsp. ciliare.

Ciliaris: [si-li-ar-is] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash and Are which is Latin for pertaining to. It refers to the hairs on the margins of leaves, sepals, petals, ligules or glumes and lemmas of a plant and some microscopic animals looking similar to an eyelash. A good example is the leaves on Brachyscome ciliaris.

Ciliata: [si-li-a-ta] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash. It refers to the hairs on the margins of leaves, sepals, petals, ligules or other organs of a plant and some microscopic animals. A good example is seen at the base of the seeds on Toona ciliata.

Ciliate: [si-li-eit] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash. It refers to the hairs on the margins of leaves, sepals, petals, ligules or other parts of a plant and some microscopic animals. To have the margins covered in hairs. A good example is the keel petals on Gompholobium latifolium and the leaves on Podolepis neglecta.

Ciliate hairs on the sepals of Geranium homeanum

Ciliatum: [si-li-a-tum] From Ciliāre, which is Latin fora fringe of hair or an eye lash. It refers to hairs on leaves, sepals, petals, ligules or other structures of a plant and some microscopic animals which are on the margins or borders. A good example is seen on the leaves of Astroloma ciliatum.

Ciliatus: [si-li-a-tus] From Ciliāre, which is Latin fora fringe of hair or an eye lash. It refers to the hairs on the margins of leaves, sepals, petals, ligules or other parts of a plant and some microscopic animals. A good example is seen on the leaves of the exotic Plectranthus ciliatus.

Ciliifera: [si-li-if-er-a] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Ancient Greek for bearing or to bear. It refers to the margins of leaves, sepals, petals, ligules or other parts of a plant bearing ciliate type hairs. A good example is the early life forms found in Jurassic rocks like Oxalis ciliifera.

Ciliiferus: [si-li-if-er-us] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Ancient Greek for bearing or to bear. It refers to the margins of leaves, sepals, petals, ligules or other parts of a plant bearing ciliate type hairs. A good example is the early life forms found in Jurassic rocks like Daohugouthallus ciliiferus.

Ciliiflorum: [si-li-if-er-um] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, usually the petals which have a short fringe. A good example is Eriocaulon ciliiflorum, which is now known as Eriocaulon cinereum.

Ciliocarpa: [si-li-ohi-kar-pa] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the hairs on the margins of leaves, sepals, petals, ligules or other parts of a plant. A good example is seen on the capsules of Brachyscombe ciliocarpa.

Cilioglossum: [si-li-o-glos-sum] From Ciliāre, which is Latin fora fringe of hair or an eye lash and Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to the labellum (tongue of an orchid or the lower petal), which are quite hairy. A good example is Bulbophyllum cilioglossum.

Ciliolaris: [si-li-o-lar-is] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the hairs on the margins of leaves, sepals, petals, ligules or other parts of a plant. A good example is Pimelea ciliolaris.

Ciliolata: [si-li-o-la-ta] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the hairs on the margins of leaves, sepals, petals, ligules or other parts of a plant. A good example is Chionohebe ciliolata.

Ciliolate: [si-li-o-leit] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash. It refers to where the margins are sparsely to moderately covered in hairs.

Ciliolatum: [si-li-o-lei-tum] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash. It refers to where the margins are sparsely to moderately covered in short hairs. This is presently an unresolved name awaiting further research to determine which genus, species or sub species or variety it should be allocated to. A good example is Leptospermum ciliolatum.

Ciliolatus: [si-li-o-la-tus] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash. It refers to where the margins are sparsely to moderately covered in short hairs.

Ciliosa: [si-li-o-sa] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash. It refers to where the margins are sparsely to moderately covered in long hairs. A good example is Melaleuca ciliosa.

Ciliosum: [si-li-o-sum] From Cilium which is Latin fora fringe of hair or an eye lash. It refers to where the margins are sparsely to moderately covered in long hairs. A good example is Myrtoleucodendron ciliosum, which is now known as Melaleuca ciliosa.

Cilium: [si-li-um] From Ciliāre, which is Latin for a fringe of hair or an eye lash. It refers to organs, which have  margins that are sparsely to moderately covered in long hairs. A good example is the stigma on Stylidium cilium.

Cimicifera: [si-mis-i-fer-a] From Cimex/Cimiicis, which is Latin for a bed bug and Ferae/Ferārum which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to the plants, which resemble the Cimicina genus in that they were used to help control bed bugs overseas. A good example is Myristica cimicifera.

Cimicina: [si-mi-si-na] From Cimex/Cimiicis, which is Latin for a bed bug. It refers to the plants, which are used overseas to help control bed bugs. A good example is Alloteropsis cimicina.

Cincinnata: [sin-sin-na-ta] From Cincinare, which is Latin for to make round. It refers to the seed pods, which are round in cross section. A good example is seen on the pods of Acacia cincinnata.

Cincinnatum: [sin-sin-na-tum] From Cincinare, which is Latin for to curl a ringlet, or curly hair. It refers to a spike, which recurves especially while still expanding. A good example is Racosperma cincinnatum, which is now known as Acacia cincinnata Agaricus cincinnatus  Inocybe cincinnata.

Cincinnatus: [sin-sin-na-tus] From Cincinare, which is Latin for to curl a ringlet, or curly hair. It refers to a spike, which recurves especially while still expanding. A good example is the mushroom Agaricus cincinnatus, which is now known as Inocybe cincinnata.

Cincinnus: [sin-sin-nus] From Cincinare, which is Latin for to curl a ringlet, or curly hair. It refers to a spike, which recurves especially while still expanding. A good example is Xanthorrhoea latifolia.

Cineolifera: [si-nee-oh-li-fer-a] From Cinae, which is Latin for oil of wormwood and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or carry. It refers to the old name of oil from wormwood however the modern Australian oil It refers to a common component of most Eucalyptus oils. A good example is Prostanthera cineolifera.

Cinerascens: [sin-er-a-senz] From Cinereous, which is Latin for ash coloured or ashen. It refers to leaves which are blueish-grey to greyish with or without a coppery tinge. A good example is Pultenaea cinerascens.

Cinerea: [sin-eer-ee-a] From Cinereous, which is Latin for ash coloured or ashen. It usually It refers to the leaves being blueish-grey to greyish with or without a coppery tinge. A good example is seen on the leaves of Eucalyptus cinerea.

Cinereum: [sin-er-ee-um] From Cinereous, which is Latin for ash coloured. It usually It refers to the leaves which are greyish to blueish-grey with or without a coppery tinge. A good example is seen on the leaves of Solanum cinereum.

Cinereus: [sin-er-ee-us] From Cinereous, which is Latin for ash coloured. It usually It refers to the leaves being blueish-grey to greyish with or without a coppery tinge. A good example is the Koala bear Phascolarctos cinereus.

Cinericolor: [sin-er-i-ku-lor] From Cinereous, which is Latin for ash coloured and From Krôma, which is Ancient Greek, Colores which is Greek or Color, which is Latin for the measurement of the hue, saturation and brightness of the reflected light as a tone or hue of its chroma. It usually refers to the leaves being blueish-grey to greyish with or without a coppery tinge. A good example is Indigofera cinericolor.

Cinerium: [sin-air-i-um] From Cinereous, which is Latin for ash coloured It usually refers to the leaves being blueish-grey to greyish with or without a coppery tinge. A good example is the foliage on Solanum cinerium.

Ash coloured leaves on Solanum cinerium

Cineroannulosa: [sin-er-oh-an-nyoo-loh-sa] Maybe from Cinerin, which is Latin for an oily compound and Annulosa, which is Latin for to have a body in a series of rings. It refers to growth habit and possibly chemicals derived from the fungus. A good example is the fungus Amanita cineroannulosa.

Cinnabarina: [si-na-bar-i-na] From Kinnabari, which is Ancient Greek or Cinnabaris which is Latin for mercuric sulfide. It refers to a structure or organ being vermillion red in colour. A good example is the petals and sepals on Passiflora cinnabarina.

Cinnamomea: [sin-na-mo-mee-a] From Kinnamomon, which is Ancient Greek for the Cinnamon tree and spice. It refers to a structure or organ’s colour, which is cinnamon brown. A good example is the pileus on Lepiota cinnamonea.

Cinnamometorum: [sin-na-mo-me-tor-um] From Kinnamomon, which is Ancient Greek for the Cinnamon tree and spice and Aroma, which is Ancient Greek for an aroma or scent. It refers to the cinnamon aroma being similar to that of Cinnamomum verum. A good example is Fimbristylis cinnamometorum.

Cinnamomifolia: [sin-na-mo-mi-foh-li-a] From Kinnamomon, which is Ancient Greek for the Cinnamon tree and spice and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have a distinct Cinnamon scent ot taste. A good example is Cryptocarya cinnamomifolia.

Cinnamomneus: [sin-na-momnee-us] From Kinnamomon, which is Ancient Greek for the Cinnamon tree and spice. It refers to the plants, which reveal a distinct cinnamon fragrance to the cinnamon tree Cinnamomum verum. A good example is Marasmius cinnamoneus.

Cinnamomum: [si-na-mo-mum] From Kinnamomon, which is Ancient Greek for the Cinnamon tree and spice. It refers to the superficial appearance of the trees to the cinnamon tree Cinnamomum verum. A good example is Cinnamomum oliverii.

Circadian Clock: [ser-kei-di-an, klok] From Circā, which is Latin for about, Diēs, which is Latin for a day and Clocke which is Dutch or Clocge which is Old English for a bell. It refers to the 24 hour clock that is based on a day. A good example is the leaves of Albizia lebbeck that open and close like clockwork over a 24 hour period with day light and darkness.

Circadian rhythms: [ser-kei-di-ahn, ri-thumz] From Circā, which is Latin for about, Diēs, which is Latin for a day and Clocke which is Dutch or Clocge which is Old English for a bell. It refers to the 24 to 24.5 hour clock that is based on a day. The 24 to 24.5 hour clock is based on a day and reset at noon every day.

Circinale: [ser-si-na-le] From Circinus, which is Latin for to make round or circular. It refers to flowers, which rotate around the spike similar to a third or fourth ranked leaf. A good example is Chorizema circinale.

Circinalis 1: [ser-si-na-lis] From Circinus, which is Latin for to make round or circular. It refers to the male flowers, which strongly spirals around the style. A good example is the seeds on Cycas circinalis.

Circinalis 2: [ser-si-na-lis] From Circinus, which is Latin for to make round or circular. It refers to any organ, which coils or twists in a clockwise direction in the southern hemisphere. A good example is the leaf opposite tendrils on Cissus hypaglauca.

Circinata: [ser-si-na-ta] From Circinus, which is Latin for to make round or circular. It refers to the frond’s pinnules, which are tightly held in the cozier or fungi which have quite noticeable circular rings. A good example is the lawn and rice crop yellowing fungus Waitea circinata.

Circinate: [ser-si-neit] From Circinus, which is Latin for to make round or circular. It refers to the frond’s pinnules which are circular. A good example is Adiantum hispidulum.

Circinatum: [ser-si-nei-tum] From Circinus, which is Latin for to make round or circular. A good example was Gleichenia circinnata var. mendellii in which the Australian specie is now known as Gleichenia dicarpa.

Circinatus: [ser-si-nei-tus] From Circinus, which is Latin for to make round or circular. It refers to the flowers making a circle like a wheel. A good example is Petrophile circinata.

Circinnata: [ser-sin-nei-ta] From Circinus, which is Latin for to make round or circular. It refers to plants, which have leaves or phyllodes , which are moire circular than other species or sub species in the genus. A good example is the leaves on artemisiodes subsp. circinnata.

Circularis: [ser-kyoo-lar-is] From Circinus, which is Latin for to make round or circular. It refers to seeds or other organs, which have a circlar shape. A good example is Hibbertia circularis which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to its real or correct classification.

Circumalata: [ser-kum-a-la-ta] From Circumlare, which is Latin for to encircle. It refers to seeds or other organs, which have a wing encircling it. A good example is the seeds on Hakea circumalata.

Circumalate: [ser-ku-ma-leit] From Circumlare, which is Latin for to encircle. It refers to seeds or other organs, which have a wing encircling it. A good example is the seeds on Grevillea banksii.

Circumdans: [ser-kum danz] From Circumdantis, which is Latin for to encircle. It refers to seeds or other organs, which have a wing or sheath surrounding it. A good example is Hibbertia circumdans.

Circumferential: [ser-kum-fer-en-shl] From Circumlare, which is Latin for to encircle. It refers to being near or on the circumference of an orb structure.

Circumfusa: [ser-kum-fyoo-a] From Circumlare, which is Latin for to encircle and Fusa, which is Latin for to spread out. It refers to plants, which spread out from a central position. A good example is the the growth habit of the Lichen Graphis circumfusa.

Circumnavigate: [ser-kum-na-vi-geit] From Circumlare, which is Latin for to encircle and Navigatus (Navis – Navy) which is Latin for to sail. It refers to travelling around an object by means of its circumference.

Circumpinnatum: [ser-kum-pin-na-tum] From Circumdantis, which is Latin for to encircle and Pinnātus, which is Latin for a feather. It refers to a structure or organ, which resemble a bird’s feather. A good example is the flower spikes on Homalium circumpinnatum.

Circumscissile: [ser-kum-si-sahyl] From Circumlare, which is Latin for to encircle. It refers to something that opens by a circular action. A good example is the buds on Eucalyptus planchoniana.

Circumsepta: [ser-kum-sep-ta] From Circumlare, which is Latin for to encircle and Saeptum, which is Latin for an enclosure. It refers to the petals and sepals which are completely surrounded by the labellum. A good example is Thelymitra circumsepta.

Circumvoluta: [ser-kum-vo-loo-ta] From Circumlare, which is Latin for to encircle and Volta, which is Latin for to roll up together. It refers to a structure or organ, which roll backwards from the margins or the apex. A good example is Utricularia circumvoluta.

Cirratum: [ser-ra-tum] From Cirratus, which is Latin for a tendril. A good example is the tendrils on Cissus antarctica.

Cirratus: [ser-ra-tus] From Cirratus, which is Latin for a tendril. Its reference here is not clear. A good example is Helipterum cirratum, which is now known as Rhodanthe floribunda.

Cirrhatus: [ser-ra-tus] From Cirratus, which is Latin for a tendril. A good example is the tendrils on clematis aristata.

Cirrhopetalum: [ser-hoh-pe-ta-lum] From Cirrhus, which is pseudo in Greek or Cirrus, which is Latin for a mucus-bound mass of spores that are exuded from a fungus often on a thread or threads and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to petals that are held onto by a thread or several threads and appear like a fungus at the ends. A good example is the flowers on Bulbophyllum gracillimum, which was previously known as Cirrhopetalum gracillimum.

Cirrhosa: [ser-oh-sa] From Cirrhosa, which is Latin for a curly hair or a curly tendron. It refers to the wiry tendrils being curly. A good example is Entada cirrhosa.

Cirrhous: [ser-ohs] From Cirrhosa, which is Latin for a curly hair or curly tendrons. It refers to the wiry tendrils being curly. A good example is Entada cirrhosa.

Cirrifica: [ser-ri-fi-ka] From Cirrus, which is Latin for to curl as in tendrons and Horrificus, which is Latin for to induce fear. It refers to plants, which at first glance appear to be like a mass of short spined, tendrils with no leaves and in many species are quite benign. A good example is Goodenia cirrifica.

Cirrosa: [ser-roh-sa] From Cirrhosa, which is Latin for a curly hair or curly tendrons. It refers to the wiry tendrils being curly. A good example is Petermannia cirrosa.

Cirsifolia: [ser-si-foh-li-a] From Kírsion, which is Ancient Greek for a kind of thistle and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which closely resemble the leaves of certain thistles. A good example is Banksia cirsioides.

Cirsioides: [ser-si-oi-deezs] From Kírsion, which is Ancient Greek for a kind of thistle. It refers,to leaves, which resemble the leaves of certain thistles. A good example is Banksia cirsioides.

Cismontana: [sis-mon-ta-na] From Cis, which is Latin for on the side of and Montanum, which is Latin for a mountain. It refers to habitats or environments, which positioned on the side of mountains. A good example is the wavy petals on Frankenia crispa.

Cismontanum: [sis-mon-ta-num] From Cis, which is Latin for on the side of and Montanum, which is Latin for a mountain. It refers to habitats or environments, which positioned on the side of mountains. A good example is the wavy petals on Leptospermum polygalifolium subsp. cismontanum.

Cissampelos: [sis-am-pe-los] From Cissus, which is Latin foran ivy and amplus, which is Latin for large or huge. It refers to plants which resemble a large domestic grape vine. A good example is the flowers on Cissampelos pareira var. hirsuta.

Cissodéndron: [sis-o-den-dron] From Cissus, which is Latin for an ivy and Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree. It refers to a tree which has leaves which resemble those of a grape vine. A good example is Polyscias cissodéndron.

Cissoides: [si-soi-deez] From Cissus which is Latin for an ivy and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants which closely resemble a grape vine in appearence. A good example of a typical vine is Cissus antarctica.

Cissus: [si-sus] From Cissus, which is Ancient Greek for an ivy. It refers to vines which grow and resemble the commercial grape vines. A good example of a typical vine is Cissus stercullifolia.

Cistiflora: [sis-ti-flor-uh] From Kústis which is Ancient Greek or much later Cystis, which is Latin for an anatomical sac or cyste and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have a larger swelling at the base than other species in the genus. A good example is Hibbertia cistiflora.

Cistifolia: [sis-ti-foh-li-a] From Kústis which is Ancient Greek or much later Cystis, which is Latin for an anatomical sac or cyste and Folia, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves which have a swellon cyste like form. A good example is the leaves on Rulingia cistifolia, which is now known as Commersonia amystia.

Cistoidea: [sis-toi-dee-a] From kísthos, which is Ancient Greek for a genus of plants (Rock Rose) found on rocky ground around the Mediterranean Sea and named by the early Greeks and Oides, which is Latin for alike or similar to. It refers to the leaves, and the variable rocky habitats which resemble those of the Rock Rose Cistus. A good example is Hibbertia cistoidea.

Cistoides: [sis-toi-deez] From kísthos, which is Ancient Greek for a genus of plants (Rock Rose) found on rocky ground around the Mediterranean Sea and named by the early Greeks and Oides, which is Latin for alike or similar to. It refers to the leaves, and the variable rocky habitats which resemble those of the Rock Rose Cistus. A good example is Tribulus cistoides.

Citraceus: [si-tra-see-us] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus. It refers to plants, which have a sweet, mild lemon scent. A good example is Pandanus citraceus, which is now known as Pandanus solmslaubachii.

Citrata: [si-tra-ta] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus. It refers to leaves, which have a sweet, mild lemon scent. A good example is Boronia citrata.

Citratum: [si-tra-tum] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus. It refers to plants, which have a sweet, mild lemon scent. A good example is Leptospermum citratum, which is now known as Leptospermum petersonii subsp. petersonii.

Citrea: [si-tree-a] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus. It refers to plants, which have a sweet, mild lemon scent. A good example is Leucophyta citrea, which is now known as Calocephalus sonderi.

Citreus: [si-tree-us] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus. It refers to plants, which have a sweet, mild lemon scent. A good example is Elionurus citreus.

Citrifera: [si-tri-fer-a] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus and Ferae/Ferārum which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which bear fruits wthat are sweet, mild lemon scented or are lemon-yellow in colour. A good example is Capparis citrifera, which is now known as Capparis umbonata.

Citrifolia: [si-tri-foh-li-a] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the foliage looking somewhat like a lemon tree from a distance. A good example is shape and colour of the leaves on Morinda citrifolia.

Citrina: [si-trahy-na] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus. It refers to the colour or scent of lemon. A good example is the scent from the leaves of Melaleuca citrina.

Citrine: [si-trahyn] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus. It refers to the description of a structure or organ having the colour or scent of lemon.

Citrinoviridis: [si-trahy-no-vir-i-dis] From Citrinus, which is Latin/Old Anglo-French for Citrus or lemon yellow and Viridis, which is Ancient Greek for green. It refers to any structure or organ, which is lemon-green in colour. A good example Acacia citrinoviridis.

Citrinum: [si-trahyn-um] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus (lemon). It refers to the colour or scent of a lemon. A good example was Helipterum citrinum, which is now known as Hyalosperma cotula.

Citrinus: [si-trahyn-us] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus (lemon). It refers to the colour or scent of a lemon. A good example was Callistemon citrinus, which is now known as Melaleuca citrina.

Citriobatus: [si-tri-oh-ba-tus] From Citrio, which is Latin for lemon scented and Bátos, which is Ancient Greek or Batus which is Latin for a bramble or blackberry bush. It refers to the plants, which resemble common brambles such as the many native rubus species. A good example was Citriobatus australisica, which is now known as Citrus australisica.

Citriodora: [sitri-oh-dor-a] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus and Odour, smell or scent. It usually refers to plant’s leaves having a lemon scent. A good example is the leaves on Eucalyptus citriodora, which is now known asCorymbia citriodora.

Citriodorum: [sitri-oh-dor-um] From Citrinus which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus and Odor, which is Latin for an odour, smell or scent. It refers to plant’s leaves wich have a lemon scent. A good example is Ochrosperma citriodorum.

Citrolens: [si-tro-lenz] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus. It refers to the plant’s leaves having a lemon scent. A good example is the leaves on Melaleuca citrolens.

Citronella: [sitro-nel-la] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow, later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus and Ella which is Ancient Greek and latin for feminine. It refers to the plant’s leaves having a soft, hint of a lemon scent. A good example is the leaves on Citronella moorei.

Citrullus: [si-trul-lus] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus. It refers to the fruits having a similar appearance. A good example is the colour of the fruits on the exotic melon Citrullus colocynthis.

Citrus: [si-trus] From Citrinus, which is old Anglo-French for yellow and later Citrinus, which is Latin for Citrus. It refers to plants, being related to the exotic lemon tree. A good example is Citrus australisica.

Cladarophylla: [clah-dar-o-fahyl-la] From Kládos which is Ancient Greek or Clādes, which is Latin for breaking, destruction or brittle and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to herbaceous plants, which have many brittle twiggy like stems. A good example is Plantago cladarophylla.

Clade: [kleid] From Kládos which is Ancient Greek or Clādes, which is Latin for breaking, destruction or brittle. It refers to flowers which seem to be brittle and break off easilly. A good example is Oeceoclades pulchra which is presently being disputed as not being native to Australia and may in fact be a garden escapee.

Cladium: [kla-di-um] From Kládos which is Ancient Greek or Clādes, which is Latin for breaking, destruction or brittle. It refers to culms and culm spikes which tend to be rather brittle. A good example is Cladium procerum.

Cladocalyx: [klad-do-ka-liks] From Kládos, which is Ancient Greek or Clādes, which is Latin for breaking, destruction or brittle and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for a husk or covering – the calyx. It refers to the flower’s calyxes which tend to be brittle. A good example is Eucalyptus cladocalyx.

Cladochaeta: [kla-do-chee-ta] From Kladodes/Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a flat stick, stem or small branch and Chaite, which is Ancient Greek for a bristle. It refers to stems which are covered in short bristles. A good example is Phacellothrix cladochaeta.

Cladochaetum: [klah-do-chee-tum] From Kladodes/Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a flat stick, stem or small branch and Chaite, which is Ancient Greek for a bristle. It refers to stems which are covered in short bristles. A good example is Helichrysum cladochaetum, which is now known as Phacellothrix cladochaeta.

Cladodes: [kla-doh-deez] From Kladodes/Klados, which is Ancient Greek for flattened organ arising from the stem of a plant. It refers to the flower petioles having several small branches and the flowers being well covered. A good example is the flowers on Cladodes ilicifolia, which is now known as Alchornea ilicifolia.

Cladodromous: [kla-doh-dro-mos] From Kladodes/Klados, which is Ancient Greek for flattened organ arising from the stem of a plant and Dromos, which is Ancient Greek for running. It refers to having a single primary vein with the lateral veins not terminating at the margin and are freely ramified toward it.

Cladogram: [kla-do-gram] From Kladodes/Klados, which is Ancient Greek for flattened organ arising from the stem of a plant and Gramme, which is Ancient Greek for to be written in lines. It refers to a branching line diagram which shows the flora or fauna heirarchial relationships. A good example is the linage of Asplenium australasicum and Asplenium nidus.

Cladophylla: [kla-do-fahyl-la] From Kladodes/Klados, which is Ancient Greek for flattened organ arising from the stem of a plant and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaves being found at the apexes of the small stems. A good example is Plantago cladarophylla.

Cladoptosic: [kla-do-to-sik] From Kladodes/Klados, which is Ancient Greek for flattened organ arising from the stem of a plant and Ptosic, which is probably Greek for to drop. It refers to the shedding of stems, twigs and leaves simultaneously. A good example is found among many of the Eucalyptus and Corymbia species like Corymbia henryii.

Cladostachys: [kla-do-sta-shis] From Kladodes/Klados, which is Ancient Greek for flattened organ arising from the stem of a plant and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek or later Stachys which is Latin  for an ear of corn. It refers to a spike which resembles an ear of corn when in fruit. A good example is found the fruiting spikes on Deeringia cladostachys.

Cladotricha: [kla-do-trahy-ka] From Kladodes/Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a small branch and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek or later Stachys which is Latin  foran ear of corn. It refers to a spikes which resembles a compact ear of corn. A good example is Newcastelia cladotricha.

Clambering: [klam-ber-ing] From Clambren, which is Middle English for to climb. It refers to plants, which sprawl across objects or climb over other plants, without the use of tendrils. A good example is Pandorea jasminoides.

Clamboides: [klam-boi-deez] Maybe from Clamm, which is Old English for a type of sea shell that clamps together Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It may refer to the shape of the flowers appearing similar to a molusc beneath the stems. A good example is Phyllanthus clamboides.

Clammy: [kla-mee] From clam, which is Middle English for cold, damp. It refers to the appearance of being cold, moist and sticky to touch. A good example is Olearia decurrens.

Clandestina: [klan-des-ti-na] From Clande, which is Latin for to be executed in secrecy and Stinus, which is Latin for internal or Clandestinus which is Latin for hidden and covered in secrecy. It refers to the funguis ability to kill its host from the inside out, that is by killing off the phloem and xylem system or being insignificant that they go unnoticed in their environment or for the plants which often go unnoticed. A good example of a small insignificant plant is Glycine clandestina.

Clandestine: [klan-des-tahyn] From Clande, which is Latin for to be executed in secrecy and Stinus, which is Latin for internal or Clandestinus which is Latin for hidden and covered in secrecy. It refers to the fungi’s ability to kill its host from the inside out that is by killing off the phloem and xylem system or being insignificant that they go unnoticed in their environment or for the plants, which often go unnoticed. A good example is the root attacking fungus Phytophthora clandestine.

Clandestinum: [klan-des-ti -num] From Clande, which is Latin for to be executed in secrecy and Stinus which is Latin for internal or Clandestinus which is Latin for hidden and covered in secrecy. It refers to the fungi’s ability to kill its host from the inside out that is by killing off the phloem and xylem system or being insignificant that they go unnoticed in their environment orfor the plants, which often go unnoticed. A good example is the invasive but popular pasture grass Kykua known as Pennisetum longistylum var. clandestinum.

Clandestinus: [klan-des-ti-nus] From Clande, which is Latin for to be executed in secrecy and Stinus which is Latin for internal or Clandestinus which is Latin for hidden and covered in secrecy. It refers to the fungi’s ability to kill its host from the inside out that is by killing off the phloem and xylem system or being insignificant that they go unnoticed in their environment orfor the plants, which often go unnoticed. It refers to the plants seeds being well hidden. A good example of a small insignificant plant is Cenchrus clandestinus.

Clandullense: [klan-dyool-len-se] From Clandulla, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the local aboriginal word for the district and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It may refer to plants, which originate from or near the Kandos district west of Sydney. A good example is Racosperma clandullense, which is now known as Acacia clandullensis.

Clandullensis: [klan-dyoo-len-sis] From Clandulla, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the local aboriginal word for the district and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which originate from or near the Kandos district west of Sydney. A good example is Acacia clandullensis.

Claoxyloides: [klei-o-zahy-loi-deez] From Klao, which is Ancient Greek for to break off, Xylon, which is Greek wood and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to woody stems, which are easy to break similar to the Claoxylon genus. A good example is Mallotus claoxyloides.

Claoxylon: [klei-o-zahy-lon] From Klao, which is Ancient Greek for to break off and Xylon, which is Greek wood. It refers to stems which are rather brittle and easy to break. A good example is the stems found on Claoxylon australe.

Clarae: [kla-ree] Is named in honour of Clare. A good example is Lycopodium clarae, which is now known as Phlegmariurus dalhousieanus.

Clarkeae: [klar-kee-e] Is named in honour of Clarke but which Wood cannot be substantiated. A good example is Lactarius clarkeae.

Clarkei: [klar-kee-ahy] Is named in honour of Charles Baron Clarke; 1832–1906, who was a British botanist who specialized in the Cyperaceae Family. A good example is Gahnia clarkei.

Clarksoniana: [kark-so-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Clarkson unknown. A good example is Arthragrostis clarksoniana.

Clarus: [kla-rus] From Kaléō which is Ancient Greek or Calō/Clāmō/Clāmus which is Latin for clear and bright or famous and upstanding. It refers to plants, which stand out in their habitats especially when in flower compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Cyperus clarus.

Clasping: [klars-ping] From Clypann, which is Old English for to clasp. It refers to a structure which partly surrounds the stem. A good example is the leaves on Goodenia robusta.

Class: [klas/klars] From Classis, which is Latin for the rank of an animal or plant which is below the rank of the Phylum and above the rank of the Order.

Clathrate:[klath-reit] From Clat/Clath, which is Latin for to fit with bars – to make a lattice. It refers to rhizomes which form a lattice work to help trap debris, leaves and dust particles. A good example is Belvisia mucronata.

Clathrus:[klath-rus] From Clat/Clath, which is Latin for to fit with bars – to make a lattice. It refes to pileus structures, which resemble gaols. A good example is Clathrus rubra.

Claudiana: [klor-di-a-na] From Claudie, which is Latinized for the Caudie River and Iana/Ensis which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered along the Claudie River. A good example is Cryptocarya claudiana.

Claudiensis: [klor-di-en-sis] From Claudie, which is Latinized for the Caudie River and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which have originally being found along the Claudie River. A good example is Lasjia claudiensis.

Clausa: [klor-sa] From Clausa, which is Latin for closed. It refers to flowers, or leaves which don’t fully open or appear to not fully open. A good example is the flowers on Lindernia clausa which remain closed for extended periods prior to opening.

Clausena: [klor-se-na] Is named in honour of Peter Claussen; 1545-1614, who was a Danish Priest and an author on natural history. A good example is Clausena brevistyla.

Clausospicula: [klor-soh-spi-kyoo-la] From Clausa, which is Latin for closed and Spīcātus, which is Latin for a spike. It refers to flower spikes, which appear to never fully open or where only one or a few flowers are ever open at one time. A good example is the spikes on the grass Clausospicula extensa.

Clavarioides: [kla-var-i-oi-deez] From Clavatum, which is Latin for club and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to buds or flowers, which resemble a club. A good example is Thismia clavarioides.

Clavata: [kla-va-ta] From Clavatum, which is Latin for a club. It refers to organs, which are shaped like a club. A good example is the buds on Boronia clavata.

Clavate: [kla-veit] From Clavatum, which is Latin for a club. It refers to organs, which are shaped like a club. A good example is Eucalyptus botryoides.

Clavatus: [kla-va-tus] From Clavatus, which is Latin for a club. It refers to any organ, which is shaped like a club. A good example is the shape of the shoots on Campylopus clavatus.

Clavellatum: [kla-vel-la-tum] From Clavatum which is Latin for a small club. It refers to leaves or buds which have take the form of a club. A good example is the leaves on Disphyma clavellatum.

Clavellifolia: [kla-vel-li-foh-li-a] From Clavatum, which is Latin for a club and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which have a club shape. A good example is the leavess on Boronia clavellifolia.

Claviflora: [klah-vi-flor-a] From Clavatum, which is Latin for a club and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to buds or flowers, which are shaped like a club. A good example is the flowers on Eugenia claviflora.

Claviflorum: [klah-vi-flor-um] From Clavatum, which is Latin for a club and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to buds or flowers, which are shaped like a club. A good example is the flowers on Acmenosperma claviflorum.

Clavifolia: [kla-vi-flor-um] From Clavatum, which is Latin for a club and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have a club shape. A good example is the flowers on Acmenosperma claviflorum.

Clavifolius: [kla-vi-fo-li-us] From Clavatum, which is Latin for a club and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have a club shape. A good example is the flowers on Seorsus clavifolius.

Clavigera: [kla-vi-jeer-a] From Clavatum which is Latin for a club. It refers to organs, which have a club shape. A good example is the buds on Eucalyptus clavigera.

Claviseta: [kla-vi-se-ta] From Clavatum which is Latin for a club. It refers to organs, which have a club shape. A good example is the buds on Acacia claviseta.

Clavula: [kla-vyoo-la] From Clāvula, which is Latin for a club which is more staff like. It refers an organ, which has a shape like a club. A good example is the flower spikes on Caladenia clavula.

Clavulata: [kla-vyoo-la-ta] From Clāvula, which is Latin for a club which is more staff like. It refers a structure or organ, which has a shape like a small club. A good example is the stamens on Astartea clavulata.

Claw: [klor] From Klawo, which is Old English for a talon. It refers tothe narrowed, stalk like basal part of the petals or sepals on some flowers, which resemble a talon. A good example is the lateral petals found on Diuris chrysantha.

Claytoniacea: [klei-to-ni-a-see-a] Is named in honour of Clayton. A good example is Goodenia claytoniacea.

Claytonii: [klei-to-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Clayton. A good example is Triodia claytonii.

Claytonioides: [klei-to-ni-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Clayton. A good example is Stylidium claytonioides.

Cleft: [kleft] From Clyft, which is Old English for a crevice or split. It refers to where indentations or incisions occur, usually in the leaves or at times in the petals. A good example is the deep clefts on the fronds of Blechnum cartilagineum.

Cleidion: [klei-di-on] Maybe from Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in and Dionaea, which is Ancient Greek for Venus. Its reference is unclear. A good example of the name is Cleidion javanicum.

Cleisocalyx: [klei-so-ka-liks] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for a husk, veil or cover. It refers to the specialized leaves which surround the bud and protect the developing sexual organs and ovaries. It refers to calyxes which completely enclose the bud and petals. A good example is Sida cleisocalyx.

Cleistandra: [klei-stan-dra] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to the male reproductive organs, which are situated well inside the corolla tubes. A good example is Lindernia cleistandra.

Cleistantheric Pollination: [klei-stan-ther-ik, pol-lin-ei shon] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for en/closed and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers, which remain enclosed and where the pollen is not transferred from normally dehisced anthers by a pollinating agent. The pollen grain germinates within the anther with subsequent growth of the pollen tube through the anther wall and ovary wall into the ovule and embryotic sac.

Cleistantha: [klei-stan-tha] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers which remain closed up until the time the anthers begin to dehisc. A good example is Caladenia cleistantha.

Cleistanthum: [klei-stan-thum] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers which remain closed up until the time the anthers begin to dehisc. A good example is Glossostigma cleistanthum.

Cleistanthus: [klei-stan-thus] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers which remain closed until the time the anthers begin to dehisc. A good example is the flowers on Cleistanthus cunninghamii.

Cleistocalyx: [klei-sto-ka-liks] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for the specialized leaves behind the petals or bud. It refers to calyxes which are tightly held against the petals. A good example is Cleistocalyx fullagarii, which is now known as Syzygium fullagarii.

Cleistochloa: [klay-sto-kloh-a] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in and Khlóē,which is Ancient Greek for (young) green shoots – a grass. It refers to some of the flowers on the spikelets which remain closed and are self pollinated from within. A good example is Cleistochloa sclerachne.

Cleistogamoides: [klahy-sto-gah-moi-deez] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in, Gammous which is Ancient Greek for marriage and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers tosome of the spikelets being cleistogamous. A good example is Viola cleistogamoides.

Cleistogamos: [klahy-stoh-ga-mos] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in and Gamos, which is Ancient Greek for marriage. It refers to flowers, which remain closed and are self pollinated. The flowers are usually smaller and require less energy to produce with the sexual organs being in close contact with each other. A good example is Calyptochloa cylindropserma.

Cleistogamous 1: [klei-sto-ga-mos] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in and Gamos, which is Ancient Greek for marriage. AIt refers to flowers that remain closed and are self pollinated. The flowers are usually smaller and require less energy to produce. The sexual organs are in close contact with each other that creates self pollination. A good example of the later is Ottelia ovalifolia.

Cleistogamous 2: [klei-sto-ga-mos] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in and Gamos, which is Ancient Greek for marriage. It refers to the female organs of the flowers, which are covered up like the ancient Greek ladies with their tunics meaning the flowers require specific insects for fertilization. A good example is Thelychiton kingianus or Ficus rubiginosa.

Cleistogamum: [klei-sto-ga-mum] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in and Gamos, which is Ancient Greek for marriage. It refers to the female organs of the flowers which are covered up like the ancient Greek ladies with their tunics meaning the flowers require specific insects for fertilization or are self pollinated. A good example is Solanum cleistogamum Caladenia bicalliata subsp. cleistogama.

Cleistogamy: [klei-sto-ga-mee] From Kleistos, which is Ancient Greek for enclosed or closed in and Gamos, which is Ancient Greek for marriage. Are flowers that remain closed and are self pollinated. The flowers are usually smaller and require less energy to produce. The sexual organs are in close contact with each other. A good example is the flowers on Viola betonicifolia which may or maynot fully open however the sexual organs are in close contact to allow self pollination – autogamy or cross pollination.

Clelandia: [kle-lan-di-a] Is named in honour of Sir John Burton Cleland; 1870-1971, who was an Australian Professor ofPathology and amateur botanist from Adelaide. A good example is the Lord Howe Island Syzygium Clelandia convallis.

Clelandii: [kle-lan-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Sir John Burton Cleland; 1870-1971, who was an Australian Professor of Pathology and amateur botanist from Adelaide. A good example is Platysace clelandii.

Clematicissus: [kle-ma-ti-sis-sus] From Klematis, which is Greek/Latin for any woody climbing plants and Kissus, which is Ancient Greek for an ivy. It refers to plants, which have stems or leaves which resemble those of a typical vine especially those that have characteristics of botht he Clematis genus and the Cissus genus. A good example is found in Clematisicissus opaca.

Clematidea: [kle-ma-ti-dee-a] From Klematis, which is Greek/Latin for any woody climbing plants. It refers to plants, which have stems or leaveswhich resemble those of a typical vine. A good example is the leaves on Praxelis clematidea.

Clematideum: [kle-ma-ti-dee-um] From Klematis, which is Greek/Latin for any woody climbing plants. It refers to plants, which have stems and or leaves that resemble those of a typical vine. A good example is the leaves on Aphanopetalum clematideum.

Clematis: [kle-ma-tis] From Klematis, which is Greek for any woody climbing plants derived earlier from Klema which is Ancient Greek for a twig or twiggy. It refers to plants, which have stems that resemble those of a typical vine. A good example is the branches on Clematis aristata.

Clementii: [kle-men-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Emile Louis Bruno Clemment; 1844-1928, who was an English collector of plants from north west Western Australia. A good example is Stackhousia clementii.

Cleome: [klee-ohm] From Cleome, which is Latin for an old name given by Octavius Horatius in the 4th century for an unknown mustard like herb. A good example is the herb Cleome viscosa.

Cleomella: [klee-oh-me-la] From Cleome, which is Latin for an old name given by Octavius Horatius in the 4th century for an unknown mustard like herb and Ella which is Greek/Latin for feminine. It refers to plants which resemble the Cleome genus but are daintier. A good example is Cleomella obtusifolia.

Cleomoides: [klee-oh-moi-deez] From Cleome, which is Latin for an old name given by Octavius Horatius in the 4th century for an unknown mustard like herb and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the mustard or brassica genus. A good example was Gynandropsis cleomoides, which is now known as Cleome cleomoides.

Clerodendron: [kler-oh-den-dron] From Kleros, which is Ancient Greek for a lottery or by chance and Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree. It refers to the uncertainty of the medical properties even within a given species which is so variable. A good example is Phaleria clerodéndron.

Clerodendrum: [kler-oh-den-drum] From Kleros, which is Ancient Greek for a lottery or by chance and Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree. It refers to the uncertainty of the medical properties even within a given species, which is very variable. A good example is Cleodendrum floribunda.

Clianthus: [kli-an-thus] From Kleos, which is Ancient Greek for glorious and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which are very beautiful. A good example is the stunningly red flowers on Clianthus formosa, which is now known as Swansonia formosa.

Clidanthera: [kli-dan-ther-a] Maybe from Klidemea, which is Greek an ancient Greek botanist and Anthera/Anthos, which is Ancient Greek for the reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. Its reference is unclear. A good example was Clidanthera psoralioides, which is now known as Glycyrrhiza acanthocarpa.

Cliffortioides: [klif-for-ti-oi-deez] From Cliffort which is unknown and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. A good example is Melaleuca cliffortioides.

Cliftoniana: [Klif-to-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of George Clifton; who was an Australian Police officer and collector of algae in Western Australia. A good example is Acacia congesta subsp. cliftoniana.

Cliftonii: [Klif-to-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of George Clifton; who was an Australian Police officer and collector of algae in Western Australia. A good example was Lachnostachys cliftonii, which is now known as Lachnostachys verbascifolia subsp. verbascifolia.

Climbing: [klahy-ming] From Climban, which is Old English for climbing. It refers to ascending by means of twinning, the use of tendrils, petioles, or adventitious roots. A good example is Melodorum leichhardtii.

Clinanthium: [klahy/kli-nan-thi-um] From Klin, which is Ancient Greek for a bed or receptacle and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to the compound receptacle of a composite head. A good example is the flower heads on Xerochrysum bracteatum.

Cline: [klahyn] From Klínein, which is Ancient Greek for a slope or a bend. It refers to the gradual difference in characteristics in a specie population from one geographical district to a different geographical district bought about by changes in altitude and rainfall.

Environmental or habitat gradiation – Courtesy of http://www.sbs.utexas.edu/levin/bio213/evolution/races.html

Clinostigma: [klin-o-stig-ma] From Klínein, which is Ancient Greek for a slant or slope and Stigma, which is Greek for the female reproductive organ, which receives the pollen. It refers to the stigma which sits at an inclined angle on the style. A good example is Clinostigma mooreanum.

Clinous: [klin-nos] From Kline, which is Ancient Greek or Clinus, which is Latin for having the androecium (male reproductive organs) and gynoecium (female reproductive organs) in a single flower compared to a diclinous flower where the androecium and gynoecium organs are in different or adjacent flowers on the same plant. A good example is Hibiscus splendens.

Clipeicola: [kli-pei-koh-la] This may have been a spelling error for Clivius, which is Latin for a slope or hills and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for a dweller or to dwell at. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on hilly terrains. Plants with this name all have slopes and hills in common on bare parent rocks or skeletal soils over parent rocks on slopes. A good example is Lepidosperma clipeicola.

Clitocyba: [kli-to-sahy-ba] From Kleitoris, which is Ancient Greek for the goddess of divinity or to be goddess like and Cyba or Kuba which are Ancient greek for devine governance. Its exact reference is unclear as the genus Clitocyba forms a large group of mushrooms of which some are pleasant to eat some are toxic while others taste pleasant and affect the mind. Clitoris refers to the way the gills extend down and around the stalk. A good example is the fungus Clitocybe clitocyboides.

Clitoria: [kli-tor-ri-a] From Kleitoris, which is Ancient Greek for the goddess of divinity or to be goddess like. It refers to floral organs, which resemble a woman’s clitoris in shape or form. A good example is the pantropic Asian species Clitoria ternatea, which is now found in far northern Australia.

Clitorioides: [kli-tor-i-oi-deez] From Kleitoris, which is Ancient Greek for the goddess of divinity or to be goddess like and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers, which somewhat resemble the Clitoria genus but often have a much smaller clitoria projection. A good example is Clematis clitorioides.

Clivia: [kli-vi-a] Is named in honour of Lady Charlotte Flornetina Clive, who was Lady Charlotte Flornetina Clive, who was the 18th century Duchess of Northumberland. A good example is the old garden lily specie of Clivia caulescens.

Clivicola: [kli-vi-koh-la] From Cilvius, which is Latin for a slope or hills and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for a dweller. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on hilly terrains. A good example is Poa clivicola.

Clivicolum: [kli-vi-koh-lum] From Cilvius, which is Latin for a slope or hills  and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for a dweller. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on hilly terrains. A good example is Genoplesium clivicolum.

Clivicolus: [kli-vi-koh-lus] From Cilvius, which is Latin for a slope or hills  and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for a dweller. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on hilly terrains. A good example is Ptilotus clivicolus.

Clivorum: [kli-vor-um] From Cilvorum, which is Latin for a slope or of the hills. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in hilly environments. A good example is Triumfetta clivorum.

Cloanthes: [kloh-an-thes] From Chloa, which is Ancient Greek for grass and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive parts of a flower or the flower. It refers to the flower corolla’s pilose hairs which resemble a field of grass below the two anthers. A good example is Cloanthes parviflora.

Cloeziana: [kloh-zi-a-na] Is probably named in honour of F. S. Cloez; 1817-1883, who was a French chemist but I have been unable to substantiated it 100mm. A good example is Eucalyptus cloeziana.

Clompanus: [klom-pan-us] From Clomp, which is Old English for a clump and Panax, which is Ancient Greek for the Panacea genus to cure all. It refers to a structure or organ, which resembles the Panacea genus and are clumped near the apexes of the stems. A good example is the leaves on Clompanus acerifolium, which is now known as Brachychiton aceriFolium.

Cloncurriensis: [klon-kur-ri-en-sis] From Cloncurry, which is Latin for Cloncurry district in far north western Queensland and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Cloncurry district. A good example was Acacia cloncurrensis, which is now known as Acacia hemignosta.

Clone 1: [klohn] From Klon, which is Ancient Greek for a slip or twig. It refers to an organism that is identical in every aspect to its parent because of the DNA sequencing. To be grown by using DNA material.

Clone 2: [klohn] From Klon, which is Ancient Greek for a slip or twig. It refers to an organism that is identical in every aspect to its parent because of the DNA sequencing. To be grown by using a group of cells or material such as cuttings division or offsets from the mother stock. A good example is the off sets from Juncus vaginatus.

Closterostigma: [Klos-ter-o-stig-ma] From Cluster, which is Old English or Kluster, which is German for grouped together and Stígma, which is Ancient Greek for the end of a branding iron. It refers to a the female reproductive organ, which receives the pollen which is found in small groups in each flower. A good example is the sundew, Drosera closterostigma.

Clotteniana: [Klot-ten-ni-a-na] From Clotten, which is Latinized for Mount Clotten and Ensis /Iana, which are Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on Mount Clotten in far north eastern Queensland between Irvinebank and Herberton. A good example is Prostanthera clotteniana.

Clouded: [klour-ded] From Klud, which is Old English for a a mystery or full of clouds. It refers to where colours are unequally blended together.

Clunies-rossiae: [kloon-ee, ro-si-ee] Is named in honour of Hannah Elizabeth Clunies-Ross Nee Tilley; 1862-1947, who was an active member of the Wattle Day league which campaigned to have an Acacia recognised as Australia’s National Floral Emblem. A good example is Acacia clunies-rossiae.

Clutioides: [Klu-ti-oi-deez] From klúdōn, which is Ancient Greek for to billow and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Clutei which both have a prolific number of long, thin,semi erect stems. A good example is the stems on Euphorbia clutioides, which is now known as Euphorbia tannensis subsp. tannensis.

Cluytioides: [Klahy-ti-oi-deez] From klúdōn, which is Ancient Greek for to billow and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the prolific number of leaves and stems on the species compared to other species in the genus. A good example was Pimelea cluytioides, which is now known as Pimelea serpyllifolia.

Clydonophora: [Klahy-do-noh-fora] From Klydonos, which is Ancient Greek for a wave and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to an organ usually the leaves or phyllodes, which has an undulating appearance. A good example is Acacia clydonophora.

Clydonophorum: [Klahy-do-no-for-um] From Klydonos, which is Ancient Greek for a wave and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to an organ usually the leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which has an undulating appearance. A good example was Racosperma clydonophorum, which is now known as Acacia clydonophora.

Clypea: [Klahy-pee-a] Maybe from kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for to cover or to be cup like. It refers to an organ usually the flower’s sepals or calyx, which forms the shape of a cup. A good example was Clypea discolor, which is now known as Stephania japonica var. discolor.

Cneorifolia: [nee-oh-ri-foh-li-a] From Knēorum, which is Ancient Greek for daphne and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the leaves of the Daphne or Cneorum genus of Europe. A good example is Eucalyptus cneorifolia.

Cnesmocarpon: [nes-mo-kar-pon] From Knēmis, which is Ancient Greek for to grieve and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the seeds, especially the arils which resemble tears hanging from the ripe split fruits. A good example is Cnesmocarpon dasyantha.

Coacta: [Koh-ak-ta] From Coactil, which is Latin for to be felt like. It refers to leaves and or flowers, which feel like felt to touch and look at. A good example is Eremophila coacta.

Coactiliferum: [Koh-ak-ti-li-fer-um] From coactil, which is Latin for to be felt like and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to leaves and or flowers, which feel like felt to touch and look at. A good example is Solanum coactiliferum.

Coactilifolia: [Koh-ak-ti-foh-li-a] From Coactil which is Latin for to be felt like and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves which feel like felt to touch and look at. A good example is Pomaderris coactilifolia, which is now known as Spyridium coactilifolium.

Coactilifolium: [Koh-ak-ti-foh-li-um] From Coactil, which is Latin for to be felt like and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which feel like felt to touch and look at. A good example is Spyridium coactilifolium.

Coactilis: [Koh-ak-ti-lis] From Coactil, which is Latin for to be felt like. It refers to leaves, which feel like felt to touch and look at. A good example is Petalochilus coactilis, which is now known as Caladenia coactilis.

Coadunata: [koh-a-dyoo-na-ta] From Coadūnātum, which is Latin for to unite. It refers to structures or organs, which appear to be joined together. A good example is the way the leaves appear to be joined at the base and the flowers and individual fruits that are tightly compressed together as though united in Nauclea coadunate, which is now known as Nauclea orientalis.

Coadunation: [koh-ad-u-nei-shon] From Coadūnātum, which is Latin for to unite. It refers to descriptions of structures or organs, which appear to be joined together.

Coadunatus: [koh-ad-u-nei-tus] From Coadūnātum, which is Latin for to unite. It refers to descriptions of structures or organs, which appear to be joined together. A good example was Sarcocephalus coadunatus, which is now known as Nauclea orientalis.

Coalesced Roots: [koh-al-esd, roots] From Coalescere, which is Latin for to nourish or to make grow and rot which is Old English for a root. It refers to roots which grow down from the branches to the ground and eventually look like stems or trunks. A good example is Ficus obliqua.

Coalescent: [koh-es-sent] From Coalescere, which is Latin for to nourish or to make grow. It refers to organs which are incompletely separated or are partially fused in a more or less irregular fashion.

Coangustata: [koh-an-gus-ta-ta] From Coangustātum which is latin for confined, compressed, enclosed, limited or restricted. It refers to organs, which are variably generally enclosed, compressed or restricted in some way. A good example is the sheaths and glumes on Meeboldina coangustata.

Coangustatus: [koh-an-gus-ta-tus] From Coangustātum which is latin for confined, compressed, enclosed, limited or restricted. It refers to organs, which are variably generally enclosed, compressed or restricted in some way. A good example is the sheaths and glumes on Leptocarpus tenax.

Coarctata: [koh-ar-ta-ta] From Coarctātum/Coarctātī, which is Latin for to contain in a hard shell. It refers to flower heads which are very close together as though bound together. A good example is the floral heads of Wehlia coarctata, which is now known as Homalocalyx coarctatus.

Coarctatum: [koh-ar-ta-tum] From Coarctātum/Coarctātī, which is Latin for to contain in a hard shell. It refers to the flower heads which are very close together as though bound together. A good example is the floral heads of Gnaphalium coarctatum.

Coarctatus 1: [koh-ar-ta-tus] From Coarctātus/Coarctātī, which is Latin for to contain in a hard shell. It refers to flower heads, which are rather close together as though bound together. A good example is the floral heads of Homalocalyx coarctatus.

Coarctatus 2: [koh-ar-ta-tus] From Coarctātus/Coarctātī, which is Latin for compressed or contained in a hard shell. It refers to a pupa which is enclosed in a hard casing or cocoon.

Coateana: [koh-a-tee-ei-na] Is named in honour of Coate but which Coate cannot be substantiated. A good example is Philotheca coateana.

Coatesia: [koh-ah-te-si-a] Is named in honour of Coates but which Coates cannot be substantiated.. A good example is Coatesia paniculata.

Coatesii: [koh-te-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Coates but which Coates cannot be substantiated. A good example is Hibiscus coatesii.

Coatesianum: [koh-te-si-a-num] Is named in honour of Coates but which Coates cannot be substantiated. A good example is Stylidium coatesianum.

Cobarensis: [koh-bar-en-sis] From Cobar, which is Latin fortownship of Cobar and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Cobar district. A good example is Pterostylis cobarensis.

Cobbe: [ko/koh-bee] Is named in honour of Lorraine Cobb; 1951-2008, who was a botanical illustrator and botanist dedicated to Western Australia’s wildfolower flora. A good example is Allophyllus cobbe.

Cobonii: [koh-bon-i-ahy] Is named in honour of Lorraine Cobbon. A good example is Arundinaria cobonii which is now known as Neololeba atra.

Cocci: [koh-ki] From Kokkos, which is Ancient Greek for a scale. It refers to a single fruit which contains a single seed that seperates from the whole fruit at maturity and are usually surrounded by the scale like remnants of the sepals or petals. Often the whole is referred to as a schizocarp. A good example is the fruits on Boronia umbellate orDodonaea viscosa.

Cocci on Dodonaea viscosa subsp. cuneata

Coccidologist: [kok-ki-do-lo-jist] From Kokkos, which is Ancient Greek for a scale, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies the branch of zoology which deals with scale insects like, mealy bugs, and other members of the family Coccideacea.

Coccidology: [kok-ki-do-lo-jee] From Kokkos, which is Ancient Greek for ascale and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the branch of zoology that studies scales, mealy bugs, and other members of the family Coccidea.

Coccifera: [kok-ki-feer-a] From Coccineus, which is Latin for scarlet red and Ferra, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to the plants, which have scarlet red marings on the trunk, buds or flowers. A good example is the fruits from Eucalyptus coccifera.

Coccinea: [ko-ki-ki-neea] From Coccineus, which is Latin for scarlet red. It refers to the plants, which have scarlet-red markings on the trunk or scarlet red buds or flowers.A good example is the scarlet red flowers of Banksia coccinea.

Coccineum: [kok-ki-nee-um] From Coccineus, which is Latin for scarlet-red. It refers to the plants, which have scarlet red marings on the trunk, buds or flowers. A good example is  the scarlet-red petioles, buds and calyxes Haemodorum coccineum.

Coccineus: [kok-ki-nee-us] From Coccineus, which is Latin for scarlet-red. It refers to structures or organs, which are scarlet red. A good example is found with the deep orange-red wood fungus Pyconoporus coccineus.

Coccinia: [kok-ki-ni-a] From Coccineus, which is Latin for scarlet-red. It refers to the plants, which have scarlet red marings on the trunk, buds or flowers. A good example is the orange-red flowers on Kennedia coccinea.

Cocculifolia: [kok-kyoo-li-foh-li-a] From Coccineus, which is Latin for scarlet red and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the foliage which has a scarlet-red tinge. A good example is the Norfolk island Clematis, Clematis aristata subsp. cocculifolia.

Cocculearifolium: [kok-kyoo-lear-i-foh-li-um] From Coccineus, which is Latin for scarlet red and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the foliage which has a scarlet-red tinge. A good example is Leucopogon cochlearifolium.

Cocculus: [kok-kyoo-lus] From Coccineus, which is Latin for scarlet red. It refers to the myriad of small scarlet-red berries produced by the vines. A good example was Cocculus selwynii, which is now known as Hypserpa laurinas.

Cochinchinensis: [kok-chi-nen-sis] From Koccin, which is Latin for the area known now as Vietnam, Chin, which is Latin for China and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the original plants, which were first discovered in the Vietnam and southern China districts of Asia. A good example is Maclura cochinchinensis.

Cochleare: [kok-leer-ree] From Cochleārium, which is Latin for spoon shaped. It refers to leaves, which are spoon shape. A good example is Typhonium cochleare.

Cochlearina: [kok-leer-i-na] From Cochleārium which is Latin for spoon shaped. It refers to leaves, which are spoon shape. A good example is Bursa cochlearina, which is now known as Phlegmatospermum cochlearinum.

Cochlearinum: [kok-leer-i-num] From Cochleārium, which is Latin for spoon shaped. It refers to leaves, which are spoon shape. A good example is Phlegmatospermum cochlearinum.

Cochlearis: [kok-lear-is] From Cochleārium, which is Latin for spoon shaped. It refers to leaves, which are spoon shape. A good example is phyllodes on Acacia cochlearis.

Cochleata: [kok-lee-at-a] From Cochleārium which is Latin for spoon shaped. It refers to a leaves, which are spoon shape. A good example is leaves on Drosera spathulata.

Cochleate: [kok-lee-eit] From Cochleārium which is Latin for spoon shaped. It refers to a leaves, which are spoon shape. A good example is leaves on Drosera spathulata.

Cochleatum: [kok-lee-a-tum] From Coccineus which is Latin for scarlet-red. It refers to a structure or organ, which is scarlet-red. A good example is the deep orange-red, dried or dead foliage on Isolepis cochleata, which is now known as Fimbristylis acicularis.

Cochleatus: [kok-lee-a-tus] From Coccineus, which is Latin for scarlet red. It refers to a structure or organ, which is scarlet-red. A good example is the bright scarlet-red inner fruits on Pandanus cochleatus, which is now known as Pandanus conicus.

Cochleitepals: [kok-lei-te-pals] From kochlarian, which is Ancient Greek for spoon shaped and Tepalon, which is Ancient Greek for a tepal or sepals and petals as a single unit. It refers to tepals which resemble a spoon in shape. A good example is Amaranthus cochleitepalus.

Cochloboides: [kok-lo-boi-deez] From kochlarian, which is Ancient Greek for spoon shaped, Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to organs, which resemble an elongated ear lobe. A good example is Muehlenbeckia coccoloboides, which is now known as Duma coccoloboides.

Cochlocarpa: [kok-lo-kar-pa] From Kokle, which is Ancient Greek for to twist and turn and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits which have many twists. A good example is the pods on Acacia cochlocarpa subsp. cochlocarpa.

Cochlocarpum: [kok-lo-kahr-puh] From Kokle, which is Ancient Greek for to twist and turn and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits which have many twists. A good example is the pods on Racosperma cochlocarpum, which is now known as Acacia cochlocarpa subsp. cochlocarpa or Acacia cochlocarpa subsp. velutinosa.

Cochlospermum: [kok-lo-asper-mum] From Kokle, which is Ancient Greek for to twist and turn and Spermum, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which have a distinct spiralling twist like a cockle shell. A good example is Cocklospermum fraseri.

Cockertoniana: [kok-ker-t-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Cockerton. A good example is Acacia cockertoniana.

Cocoparrana: [ko-koh-par-ra-na] From Cocoparrna, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the local aboriginal language for Forest of the Gods. It refers to the trees which were first found in the Cocoparra National Park. A good example is Pomaderris cocoparrana.

Cocos: [koh-kos] From Coco, which is Portugese for to grimace. It refers to the three holes on the end of the seeds which look like a person grimacing. A good example is Cocos nucifera.

Cocosoides: [koh-ko-soi-deez] From Coco, which is Portugese for to grimace and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the three holes on the end of the seeds which look like a person grimacing. A good example is Cryptocarya cocosoides.

Codia: [koh-di-a] From Kṓde/Kṓdia, which is Ancient Greek for codeine. It refers to plants, which may have traces of the alkaloides coseine. A good example is Codia serratifolia, which is now known as Callicoma serratifolia.

Codiaeum: [koh-di-ee-um] From Kodiho, which is Latinized from the Malay vernacular for a tree with thick deep evergreen leaves. A good example is Codiaeum membranaceum.

Codium: [koh-di-um] From Kṓde/Kṓdia, which is Ancient Greek for codeine. It refers to plants, which may have traces of the alkaloides coseine. A good example is Codium sursum.

Codonocarpa: [ko-don-o-kar-pa] From Kodon, which is Ancient Greek for a criers bell  and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have the shape of a criers bell. A good example is the campanulate or bell shaped fruits on Atriplex codonocarpa or Eucalyptus codonocarpa.

Codonocarpus: [ko-don-o-kar-pus] From Kodon, which is Ancient Greek for a criers bell and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the shape of the fruits having a bell shape. A good example is the campanulate or bell shaped fruits on Codonocarpus attenuatus.

Codonopappus: [ko-don-o-pap-pus] From Kodon, which is Ancient Greek for a criers bell and Páppos which is Ancient Greek for a pale grey or white grandfather’s beard. It refers to flower heads which resemble a crier’s bell, when ripe and splitting with the seeds completely surrounded whith a dense white beard. A good example is Angianthus codonopappus.

Coelachne: [koh-el-ak-nee] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow and Achne, which is Ancient Greek for a glume or chaff. It refers to the chaff which is often being empty or devoid of a seed. A good example is the hollow glumes on Coelachne pulchella though some species have been moved to the genus Micraira like Coelachne subulifolia, which is now known as Micraira subulifolia.

Coelandria: [koh-el-an-dri-a] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to a description of plants, which have hollow anthers or anthers devoid of pollen. A good example is Coelandria smillieae.

Coelanthera: [koh-el-an-ther-a] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to a description of plants, which have hollow anthers or anthers devoid of pollen.

Coelebogyne: [koh-el-bo-jahyn] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which are Ancient Greek for a woman. It refers to stigmas, which have deep depression. A good example is Coelebogyne ilicifolia, which is now known as Alchornea ilicifolia.

Coelegyne: [koh-el-e-jahyn] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow and  Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a woman. It refers to stigmas which have deep depression. A good example is Coelogyne lycastoides.

Coelegynoides: [koh-el-jahy-noi-deez] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow, Gýnos/Gunḗ, which are Ancient Greek for a woman and Eîdos/Oides, which are Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to stigmas which have deep depression very similar to the Coelegyne genus. A good example is Liparis coelogynoides.

Coelestis: [koh-el-es-tis] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow. It refers to flowers, which are tubular. A good example is Burmannia coelestis.

Coelogynoides: [koh-el-o-jahy-noi-deez] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow, Gýnos/Gunḗ, which are Ancient Greek for a woman and Eîdos/Oides, which are Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to stigmas, which have deep depression very similar to the Coelegyne genus. A good example is Sturmia coelogynoides.

Coelophylla: [koh-el-o-fahyl-la] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to seeds, which have a hollow or are deeply pitted. A good example is the concaved seeds on Coleanthera coelophylla.

Coelophyllum: [koh-el-o-fahyl-lum] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to seeds which have a hollow or are deeply pitted. A good example is Pultenaea sect. Coelophyllum.

Coelophyllus: [koh-el-o-fahyl-lus] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to seeds which have a hollow or are deeply pitted. A good example is the concaved seeds on Leucopogon coelophyllus, which is now known as Coleanthera coelophylla.

Coelosperma: [koh-el-o-sper-ma] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow and Spermum, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the seeds being hollow. A good example is the concaved seeds on Psychotria coelosperma.

Coelospermum: [koh-el-0-sper-mum] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow and Spermum, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the seeds being hollow. A good example is the concaved seeds on Coeleospermum paniculatum.

Coelrachis: [koh-el-ra-chis] From Koilos, which is Ancient Greek for hollow and Rachis, which is Ancient Greek for a rachis or axis. It refers to the rachis, which is concave on the upper surface. A good example is the concave petioles on Cordyline petiolaris.

Coencola: [koh-en-koh-la] From Coenum, which is Latin for wet, dirty or muddy and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for a dweller or to dwell. It refers to plants, which prefer wet, muddy habitats subject to periodic flooding. A good example is Digitaria coencola.

Coenocarpium: [koh-en-o-kahr-pi-um] From Coelscens, which is Latin for to grow together as one and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits; usually berry like fruits that growing together. A good example is the fruits of the commercial Pinapple Anus comos or Rubus parvifolia.

Coerulea: [koh-roo-lee-a] From Caerulea, which is Latin for deep blue. It refers to a structure or organ, which is deep blue. A good example is thee leaves on Eucalyptus coerulea, which is now known as Eucalyptus caleyi.

Coeruleo-punctata: [koh-roo-lee-oh, punk-ta-ta] From Caerulea, which is Latin for deep blue and Escens, which is Latin for becoming. It refers to flowers, which become deep blue as they age. A good example was Billardiera coeruleo-punctata, which is now known as Marianthus coeruleopunctatus.

Coeruleopunctatus: [koh-roo-lee-o-puhnk-ta-tus] From Caerulea which is Latin for deep blue and Escens which is Latin for becoming. It refers to flowers, which become blueish as they age. A good example is Marianthus coeruleopunctatus.

Coerulescens: [koh-roo-les-enz] From Caerulea, which is Latin for deep blue and Escens, which is Latin for becoming. It refers to flowers, which become blueish as they age. A good example is Boronia coerulescens subsp. coerulescens.

Coetaneous: [koh-ta-tei-nee-os] From Coaetaneus, which is Latin for of the same age or duration. It refers to plants, in which the flowers which begin to expand while the new growth grows out at the same time. An example of a tree which partially defoliates at the end of the dry season and regains its foliage in conjunction with its flowers is Xylomelum pyriforme.

Coffea: [koh-fee-a] From Kahve, which is Turkish, Qahwah, which is Arabic or later Caffè which is Italian for coffee. It refers to the drink which is made from the Coffee tree or coffee bean. A good example isexotic Coffee tree Coffea arabic.

Coghlanii: [kog-lan-i-ahy] Is named in honour of Coghlan. A good example is Euphorbia coghlanii.

Cognata: [kog-na-ta] From Cognatum, which is Latin for of the same age or duration. It refers to plants, which are closely related through having the same parental lineage. A good is Acacia cognata.

Cognatum: [kog-na-tum] From Cognatum, which is Latin for of the same age or duration. It refers to plants, which are closely related through having the same parental lineage. A good example is the many forms of Racosperma cognatum, which is now known as Acacia cognata.

Cognatus: [kog-na-tus] From Cognatum, which is Latin for of the same age or duration. It refers to plants, which are closely related through having the same parental lineage. A good example is Juncus cognatus.

Coherent: [koh-heer-ent] From Cohaerens, which is Latin for being connected. It refers to a description where the organs are joined together.

Cohering: [koh-hear-ing] From Cohaerens, which is Latin for being connected. It refers to where the organs are joined together. A good example is the anthers of Acmena smithii.

Coilocarpus: [koi-lo-kar-pus] From Cōleus, which is the Latin for a small leather pouch or scrotum. It refers to fruits or seeds which resemble a man’s scrotum or small pouch. A good example is the seeds on Coilocarpus brevicuspis, which is now known as Sclerolaena anisacanthoides.

Coix: [koi] From Coix, which is the Greek name given to a Palm (Hyphaena coriacea) by Theophrastus. It refers to grass seeds which resemble the shape of the fruits of this palm. A good example is Coix lingulata.

-Cola: [kol-a] From Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell. It refers to the habitats, which the plants predominate in. A good example is Callitris monticola.

Coldenia: [kol-den-i-a] Is named in honour of Cadwallader Colden; 1688-1776, who corresponded frequently with Linnaeus. A good example is Coldenia procumbens.

-Colea: [kol-ee-a] From Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell. It refers to the habitats which the plants predominate in.

Coleanthera: [ko-lee-an-ther-a] From Koleos, which is Ancient Greek for a sheath and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for an anther. It refers to the sheaths surrounding the flowers and fruit. A good example is the anthers of Coleanthera myrtoides.

Colei: [Koh-lee-ahy] Is probably named in honour of E. W. Cole, who was a seed collector and botanical illustrator. A good example is Acacia colei.

Colemaniae: [kol-ma-ni-ee] Is probably named in honour of Edith Coleman, nee Harms; 1874-1951, who was an Australian collector, but I have been unable to substantiated it. A good example is Diuris colemaniae.

Colensoi: [kol-en-soi] Is named in honour of William Colenso; 1811–1899, who was an English born New Zealander, printer, botanist, explorer and politician. A good example is Blechnum colenso.

Coleocarpy: [ko-le-oh-kar-pahy] From Koleós, which is Ancient Greek for a protective sheath and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a nut. It refers to fruits, which have the appearance of a small walnut.

Coleocary: [ko-lee-oh-kar-ee] From Koleós, which is Ancient Greek for a protective sheath and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a prominent sheath attached. A good example is the nuts of Coleocary gracilis.

Coleocoma: [ko-lee-oh-koh-ma] From Koleós, which is Ancient Greek for a protective sheath and Kome, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to the protective sheath which surrounds the new growth especially the first leaf in monocotyledons. A good example is Coleocoma centa, which is Latin for useful.

Coleoptile: [ko-lee-oh-tahyl] From Koleós, which is Ancient Greek for a protective protective sheath and Ptílon, which is Ancient Greek for a feather. It refers to a sheath, which protects the new shoots especialy those of preemergent seedlings. A good example is the nuts of Coleocary gracilis.

Coleorhiza: [koh-lee-oh-rahy-za] From Koleós, which is Ancient Greek for a protective sheath and Rhiza, which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to the protective sheath which surrounds the new growth of radicles (especially the new root) in monocotyledons.

Coleostylis: [koh-lee-oh-stahy-lis] From Koleós, which is Ancient Greek for a protective sheath and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column. It refers to a protective layer which surrounds the style or column between the stigma and the ovary. A good example is Coleostylis umbellulata, which is now known as Levenhookia stipitata.

Coleus: [koh-lee-us] From Koleós, which is Ancient Greek for a sheath. It refers to the protective sheath surrounding the fruits. A good example is the fruits on Plectranthus scutellarioides, which are very closely related to the Coleus genus in which all the Australian species have been removed to A good example is Coleus parviflora.

Collaris: [kol-ar-is] From Colere, which is Latin for a neck chain. It refers to the flowers, which often are seen as a crowded whorled collar near the apex of the stems. A good example is Scaevola collaris.

Collema: [ko-lee-ma] Maybe from Collum, which is Latin for a neck or neck collar. It refers to the black lichens which somewhat resemble a collar in growth habits. A good example is found on the stipules of Collema leptaleum.

Collenchyma: [ko-len-chahy-ma] From Kolla, which is Ancient Greek for a glue, Enkhyma, which is Ancient Greek for contents and Ma, which is Ancient Greek for an action taking place. It refers to the strengthening and supporting tissue in plants, which are elongated cells whose walls are thickened with cellulose and pectins.

Colleter glands: [kol-let-er, glahnz] From Collum, which is Latin for a neck or neck collar. It refers to glands with a ring of finger shaped or hair like appendages, which are found on the leaves or bud scalea that produces a sticky secretion. A good example is found on the stipules of Vesselowskya rubifolia.

Colletia: [ko-le-ti-a] From Colletia, which is Latin for a neck or neck collar. It refers to plants, which have a ring of flowers around the stems at the leaves or spines. A good example is Colletia cunninghamii, which is now known as Discaria pubescens.

Colletioides: [kol-le-toi-deez] From Colletia, which is Latin for a neck and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants resembling some of the Collettia genre especially Colletia spinosissima. A good example is Acacia colletioides.

Collicola: [kol-li-koh-la] From Collīnum/Collīnī, which is Latin for hills From Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for to live or dwell at. It refers to plants, which prefer growing on hills. A good example is Lachnagrostis collicola.

Colliculosa: [ko-li-kyoo-loh-sa] From Colliculus which is Latin for mound or little hills. It usually refers to the habitats, which are more or less smooth and undulating. A good example is the follicles of Trametes colliculosa Lenzites acuta.

Colliculate: [kol-li-kyoo-leit] From Colliculus, which is Latin for a mound or little hills. It usually It refers to the uneven surface on the seeds. A good example is the seeds on Portulaca oleracea.

Colliculose: [ko-li-kyoo-lohs] From Colliculus which is Latin for mound or little hills. It usually refers to the habitats, which are more or less smooth and undulating. A good example is the follicles of Banksia spinulosa subsp. collina.

Collina: [ko-li-na] From Collīnum/Collīnī, which are Latin for hills. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on hilly terrains. A good example is Banksii spinulosa subsp. collina.

Collinsii: [Kol-lin-si-ahy] Maybe named in honour of June Collins; who was a botanical artist concentrating on Eucalyptus buds and fruits. She contributed to many of the paintings in G. A. M. Chippendale’s books on Eucalyptus. A good example is Endiandra collinsii.

Collinum: [ko-li-num] From Collīnum/Collīnī, which are Latin for mounds or small hills. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on hilly terrain. Good examples are Gnaphalium collinum or Helichrysum collinum which have now been divided and transferred into Phacellothrix cladochaeta and Rutidosa cladochaeta.

Collīnus: [ko-li-nus] From Collīnum/Collīnī, which are Latin for mounds or small hills. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on hilly terrain. A good example is Leucopogon collīnus.

Collucera: [kol-lu-seer-a] From Collūcēre, which is Latin for bright to brighten up or illumination. It refers to plants, which when seen bighten up the area. A good example is Hygrocybe collucera.

Collybia: [ko-lahy-bi-a] From Kolibia, which is Ancient Greek for a small coin. It refers to the pilios which are often small round and silvery or white like a silver coin. A good example is Collybia eucalyptorum.

Colmeiroa: [kol-mei-roh-a] From Colmeiroa, which is unknown. A good example is Colmeiroa carpodetoides, which is now known as Corokia carpodetoides.

Colobandra: [ko-lo-ban-dra] From Kolobos, which is Ancient Greek for stunted or mutilated and Andros, which are Ancient Greek for a male. A good example is Colobandra platyphylla, which is now known as Hemigenia platyphylla.

Colobanthus: [ko-lo-ban-thus] From Kolobos, which is Ancient Greek for stunted or mutilated and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. A good example is one of the two flowering plants found on Antarctica Colobanthus quitensis or Colobanthus apetalus.

Colocassia: [ko-lo-ka-si-a] From Kolos, which is Ancient Greek for food and kazein, which is Ancient Greek for to decorate. It refers to the roots of the Egyptian Lotus. A good example is the Australia lily Colocassia antiquorium.

Colona: [kol-oh-na] From Colōnōrum, which is Latin for a farmer. It refers to the grasses which thrive on cultivated land. A good example is Echinochloa colona.

Colonorum: [kol-oh-nuh] From Colōnōrum, which is Latin for a female farmer. It refers to plants, which thrive on cultivated land. A good example is Ranunculus colonorum.

Colophona: [ko-lo-fo-na] From Kolophon, which is Greek/Latin for the finishing touch. It refers to the plants which are pretty as a picture. A good example is Latrobea colophona.

Colorans: [ko-lor-anz] From Krôma, which is Ancient Greek. Colores, which is Greek or Color which is Latin for the reflective intensity of a hue, tone, tint or shade of a division of the light spectrum. It refers to flowers, which come in many different shades and colours. A good example is the horticultural exotic Erica colorans.

Colorata: [ko-lor-ra-ta] From Krôma, which is Ancient Greek. Colores, which is Greek or Color which is Latin for the reflective intensity of a hue, tone, tint or shade of a division of the light spectrum. It refers to flowers, which come in many different shades and colours. A good example is the leaves on the aquatic Caladenia colorata.

Coloratum: [ko-lor-a-tum] From Krôma, which is Ancient Greek, Colores, which is Greek or Color which is Latin for the reflective intensity of a hue, tone, tint or shade of a division of the light spectrum. It refers to plants usually the leaves or flowers, which are variegated or having several shades of different colours. A good example is the leaves on the orchid Dendrobium coloratum.

Coloratus: [ko-lor-ra-tus] From Krôma, which is Ancient Greek, Colores, which is Greek or Color which is Latin for the reflective intensity of a hue, tone, tint or shade of a division of the light spectrum. It refers to plants usually the leaves or flowers, which are variegated or having several shades of different colours. A good example is the leaves on the aquatic Potamogeton coloratus.

Colossea: [ko-los-see-a] From Colossēum, which is Latin for collosal, huge or gigantic. It refers to a structure, organ ot a plant that is much larger than most other species in the genus. A good example is the overall size of Eucalyptus colossea, which is now known as Eucalyptus diversicolor.

Coltricia: [kol-tri-ki-a] From Coltricia, which is Latin for a couch or seat. It refers to the appearance of most species looking like a comfortable modern seat that you could drop down in. A good example is the aquatic leaf stems of Coltricia cinnamomea.

Colubrina: [ko-lu-bri-na] From Colubrina, which is Latin for a snake. It refers to the stems having a slight zig zag and reaching far horizontally like a tree snake. A good example is  the aquatic leaf stems of Colubrina asiatica.

Columbea: [ko-lum-bee-a] Is named in honour of Christopher Columbus;1451–1506who was a Spanish explorer. It refers to the resemblance of the trees to those in found in Central America and Columbia. A good example is Columbea bidwillii, which is now known as Araucaria bidwillii.

Columella: [ko-lu-mel-la] From Columnar which is Latin for a column or pillar. It refers to a small column of tissue which runs up vertical through the centre of a spore or seed capsule. A good example is found in the fruiting cones on Callitris rhomboidea.

Columellaris: [ko-lu-mel-lar-is] From Columnar which is Latin for a column or pillar. It refers to a small column of tissue which runs up vertical through the centre of a spore or seed capsule. A good example is found in the fruiting cones on Callitris columellaris.

Column 1: [ko-lum] From Columna which is Latin for a column or pillar. It refers to a sheath formed by united stamens around the pistil. A good example is the trigger post on Stylidium armeria.

Column 2: [ko-lum] From Columna which is Latin for a column or pillar. It refers to a stigma that usually sits at the apex of the column and points downwards. A good example is  the trigger post on Stylidium graminifolium.

Column Foot: [ko-lum, foot] From Columna which is Latin for a column and Fot which is Old English or Fuss which is German for a foot or feet. It refers to the attachment of the lip at the base protruding part of the column. A good example is found on the labellum’s of most orchids like Cymbidium canaliculatum.

Column wings: [ko-lum, wingz] From Columna, which is Latin or Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek fora column or pillar. It refers to the column on orchids having extension like wings. A good example is found on the labellum’s of most orchids like Thelymitra apiculata.

Columnar: [ko-lum-nar] From Columna, which is Latin or Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column or pillar. It refers to an organ or structure which has pillar a shape.

Colus [koh-lus] From Kúklos, which is Ancient Greek for a wheel. It refers to the beautiful formation or the arms which form a wheel on the fruiting body of this beautifulgenus of fungi. A good example Colus hirudinosus.

Colus hirudinosus Note the circle at the apex of the arms.

Colutea[kol-yoo-tee-a] From Colutea, which is Latin for a local name meaning bastard Senna. It refers to the foliage resembling the foliage on the Eurasian Colutea genus or those of the Senna genus. A good example Indigofera colutea.

Coluteoides: [kol-yoo-te-oi-deez] From Colutea, which is Latin for a local name meaning bastard Senna and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to leaves, which closely resemble the foliage on the Eurasian Colutea genus or those of the Senna genus here in Australia. A good example is Daviesia coluteoides.

Colutoides: [kol-yoo-toi-deez] From Colutea, which is Latin for a local name meaning bastard Senna and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to thethe leaves resembling the foliage on the Eurasian Colutea genus or those of the Senna genus. A good example is Swainsona colutoides.

Colwillii: [kol-wil-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Colwillii. A good example is Haptotrichion colwillii.

Colysis: [kol-ahy-sis] From Koliós, which is Ancient Greek or Colius which is Latin for a a green woodpecker. It refers to ferns, which are deep green and grow on tree trunks which resembles the colour and habits of woodpeckers. A good example is Colysis ampla.

Coma: [koh-ma] From Kómē which is Ancient Greek or Comōsum, which is Latin for hairy. It refers to a dense tuft of hairs which resemble a beard that surrounds a seed.

Comans: [ko-manz] From Kómē which is Ancient Greek or Comōsum, which is Latin for hairy. It refers to the leaves or fronds growing bushy like a head of hair. A good example is Pteris comans.

Comata: [ko-ma-ta] From Kómē which is Ancient Greek or Comōsum, which is Latin for hairy. It refers to labellums which bear tufts of long thick hair like structures. A good example is Flickingeria comata.

Comatum: [ko-ma-tum] From Kómē which is Ancient Greek or Comōsum, which is Latin for hairy. It refers to a dense tuft of hairs which resemble a beard surrounding a seed. A good example is the orchid Dendrobium comatum.

Comatus: [ko-ma-tus] From Kómē which is Ancient Greek or Comōsum, which is Latin for hairy. It refers to a dense tuft of hairs which resemble a beard surrounding a seed. A good example the fungus Coprinus comatus.

Comaumensis: [ko-mour-men-sis] From Comaum, which is Latinized for Camaum and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on the property at Camaum which is now bare land and east of the Glen Roy Conservation Park. A good example is Rumex comaumensis.

Comberi: [kom-ber-ahy] Is named in honour of Harold Frederick Comber; 1897-1969, who was an English gardener and botanist who concentrated on lilies. A good example is Archeria comberi.

Comboynensis: [kom-boi-nen-sis] From Comboyne, which is Latinized from the local Birpai Aboriginal word for a doe or female kangaroo and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on the Comboyne Plateau west of Kendall in central New South Wales. A good example is Rumex comaumensis.

Comesperma: [kom-e-sper-ma] From Kome, which is Ancient Greek for hair and sperma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which are covered in unkempt hairs. A good example is Comesperma ericinum.

Comespermum: [kom-e-sper-mum] From Kómē which is Ancient Greek or Comōsum, which is Latin for hairy and Spérmum, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which are densely covered in unkempt hairs. A good example is the nuts on Comespermum taxifolium.

Cometes: [ko-me-teez] From Kómē which is Ancient Greek or Comōsum, which is Latin for hairy. It refers to the outer stems and phyllodes which are covered in fine transparent hairs. A good example is Acacia cometes.

Comitae-vallis: [ko-mi-tee, val-lis] From Comitae-vallis, which maybe a local name for a region around Lake Yeo in south western Western Australia. A good example is Eucalyptus comitae-vallis.

Commelina: [kom-me-li-na] Is named in honour of Johannes Comelin; 1629-1692, who was a Dutch botanist who helped set up the Amsterdam Botanic Gardens and friend of Carl Linnaeus. A good example is Commelina cyanea.

Commersonia: [kom-mer-so-ni-a] Is named in honour of Philibert Comerson; 1727-1773, who was a French naturalist and explorer. A good example is Commersonia bartramia.

Commersonii: [kom-mer-so-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Philibert Comerson; 1727-1773, who was a French naturalist and explorer. A good example is Rubus rosifolia var. commersonii.

Commixta: [kom-miks-ta] From Comunis, which is Latin for gregarious or of a community. It refers to plants, which can form dense thickets. A good example is Macrozamia communis.

Commixtum: [kom-miks-tum] From Comunis, which is Latin for gregarious or of a community. It refers to plants, which can form dense thickets. A good example is Panicum commixtum, which is now known as Paspalidium distans.

Communalis: [ko-myoo-na-lis] From Comunis, which is Latin for gregarious or a community. It refers to plants, which can form dense thickets. A good example is Eucalyptus communalis.

Commune: [ko-myoon] From Comunis which is Latin for gregarious or of a community. It refers to plants, which can form dense thickets. A good example is Trichodesma zeylanicum var. commune.

Communis: [ko-myoo-nis] From Comunis which is Latin for gregarious or of a community. It refers to plants, which can form dense thickets where they grow in harmony with each other. A good example is Macrozamia communis.

Commutata: [ko-myoo-ta-ta] From Comunis, which is Latin for gregarious or a community. It refers to plants, which can form dense thickets. A good example is Grevillea commutata.

Commutatum: [ko-myoo-ta-tum] From Comunis, which is Latin for gregarious or a community. It refers to plants, which can form dense thickets. A good example is Conospermum commutatum.

Commutatus: [ko-myoo-ta-tus] From Comunis, which is Latin for gregarious or a community. It refers to plants, which can form dense thickets. A good example is Juncus commutatus, which is now known as Juncus prismatocarpus subsp. prismatocarpus.

Comocarpa: [ko-mo-kar-pa] From Comunis, which is Latin for gregarious or a community  and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which often form clumps and adhere together. A good example is Hydrocotyle comocarpa.

Comosa: [ko-moh-sa] From Kómē, which is Ancient Greek or Comōsum, which is Latin for hairy. It refers to a structure or organ, which is very hairy. A good example of a fern that is very bushy is Verticordia comosa.

Comose: [ko-mohs] From Kómē, which is Ancient Greek or Comōsum, which is Latin for hairy. It refers to a structure or organ, which is very hairy. A good example of a fern that is very bushy is Pteris comans.

Comosperma: [ko-mosper-ma] From Kómē, which is Ancient Greek or Comōsum, which is Latin for hairy and Spérma which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which are very hairy. A good example of a fern that is very bushy is Comosperma volubile.

Comospermum: [ko-mo-sper-mum] From Kómē, which is Ancient Greek or Comōsum, which is Latin for hairy and Spérma which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which are very hairy. A good example of a fern that is very bushy is Conospermum huegelii.

Comosum: [ko-mohsum] From Kómē, which is Ancient Greek or Comōsum, which is Latin for hairy. It usually It refers to seeds which are extremely hairy. A good example is Muscari comosum.

Compact 1: [kom-pakt] From Compāctum, which is Latin for joined or packed closely together, dense to make solid, as in the compacted soil. It refers to leaves, which are very dense. A good example of a small very compact plant is Prostanthera cuneata.

Compact 2: [kom-pakt] From Compāctum, which is Latin for to make solid, as in the compacted soil. It refers to soils which have been rammed down very hard.

Compacta: [kom-pak-ta] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Pacta, which is Latin for to put away or bind together. It refers to the flowers being tightly packed together. A good example is Laxmannia compacta.

Compacted: [kom-pak-ted] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Pactum, which is Latin for to put away or bind together. It refers to the persistent bark that is hard with narrow fissures and usually impregnated with kino. A good example is Eucalyptus creba.

Compactum: [kom-pak-tum] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Pactum, which is Latin for to put away or bind together. compacted together. A good example is Hypolytrum compactum.

Compactus: [kom-pak-tus] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Pactum, which is Latin for to put away or bind together. It refers to flower heads, which are rather compressed or compacted together. A good example is Sticherus flabellatus var. compactus.

Compare: [kom-pair] From Comparāre, which is Latin for to bring together and match or to match. It refers to plants, which are comparably the similar. A good example is Banksia integrifolia subsp. compare.

Complanare: [kom-pla-nair] From Complanatum, which is Latin for flat or to make level. It refers to descriptions of stems which are flattened.

Complanata: [kom-plan-at-a] From Complanata, which is Latin for flat or to make level. It usually refers to plants, which have flattened stems. A good example of a shrub with flattened stems is Acacia complanata.

Complanatum: [kom-plan-a-tum] From Complanatum, which is Latin for flat or to make level. It usually refers to plants, which have flattened stems. A good example of a shrub with flattened stems is Psilotum complanatum.

Complanatus: [kom-pla-na-tus] From Complanatus, which is Latin for flat or to make level. It usually It refers to the stems being flattened. A good example is Phacelocarpus complanatus.

Complete Flower: [kom-pleet-flour-er] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for coming together, Pletus which is Latin for to fill up and Floris which is Latin for a flower or Flos which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have all four floral parts – sepals, petals, pistil and stamens. A good example is the flowers on Hibiscus heterophyllus.

Complete Leaf: [kom-pleet, leef] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for coming together, Pletum, which is Latin for to fill up and Lef which is Old English for a leaf. It refers to leaves which have all three parts – blade, petiole, and stipules. A good example is the leaves on Rubus roseifolia.

Complexa: [kom-pleks-a] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and plexare, which is Latin for intertwined, tangled, woven together or embraced. It refers to any organ or structure, which is tangled ot meshed together. A good example is the stems on Muehlenbeckia complexa.

Complicata: [kom-pli-kei-ta] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Plicatum, which is Latin for to fold. It refers to where organs are rolled longitudinally together. A good example is the brown spot Teratosphaeria complicate, fungus which is often seen on Eucalypyus leaves.

Complicate: [kom-pli-keit] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Plicatum, which is Latin for to fold. It refers to where organs are rolled longitudinally together. A good example is the base of the leaves on Hypoxis pratensis.

Complicatum: [kom-pli-kei-tum] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Plicatum, which is Latin for to fold. It refers to where the organs are rolled longitudinally together. A good example is the leaves on Spyridium complicatum which roll upwards from the midvein then downwards near the margins.

Complicatus: [kom-pli-kei-tus] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Plicatum, which is Latin for to fold. It refers to where an organ/s are rolled longitudinally together. A good example is the leaves on Adenocarpus complicatus.

Composita: [kom-po-si-ta] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Ponere, which is Latin for to be made up of disparate or separate parts or elements. It refers to flowers, which have more than one type of flower together in a single head. A good example is the flowers of Trachymene composita.

Composite: [kom-po-sit] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Ponere, which is Latin for to be made up of disparate or separate parts or elements. It refers to flowers, which have more than one type of flower together in a single head. A good example is the flowers on Xerochrysum bracteatum.

Xerochrysum bracteatum is a typical composite flower.

Compositum: [kom-po-si-tum] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Ponere, which is Latin for to be made up of disparate or separate parts or elements. It refers to flowers, which have more than one type of flower together in a single head. A good example is the flowers of Panicum compositum, which is now known as Oplismenus compositus.

Compositus: [kom-po-si-tus] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Ponere, which is Latin for to be made up of disparate or separate parts or elements. It refers to flowers, which have more than one type of flower together in a single head. A good example is the flowers of Oplismenus compositus.

Compositae: [kom-po-si-tee] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Ponere, which is Latin for to be made up of disparate or separate parts or elements. It refers to flowers, which have many types of flower parts together. A good example is the flowers of Calotis glandulosa.

Compound: [kom-pound] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for coming together and Ponere, which is Latin for to put. It refers to flower heads which are in compound clusters. A good example is Clerodéndron tomentosa.

Compressa: [kom-pres-sa] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Primere, which is Latin for to squeeze together. It refers to stems which are flattened. A good example is the stems and leaves of the aquatic plant Alvu compressa.

Compressum: [kom-pres-sum] From Com/Cum, which are Latin for to come together and Primere, which is Latin for to squeeze together. It refers to stems which are flattened. A good example is the stems and leaves of the aquatic plant Pennisetum compressum, which is now known as Cenchrus purpurascens.

Compta: [komp-ta] From Comptum, which is Latin for adorned or attractive. It refers to organs usually flowers, which are very attractive. A good example is the flowers on Verticordia compta.

Comptoniana: [komp-toh-ni-ei-na] Is named in honour of the Compton family of Newby Hall, Yorkshire. A good example is the flowers on Hardenbergia comptoniana.

Conantha [kon-an-tha] From Con/Com, which is Greek/Latin for to come together and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to a flowers grouped together in twos or threes from the leaf axis. A good example is Styphelia conantha, which is now known as Conostephium drummondii.

Concava: [kon-keiv] From Concava, which is Latin for hollow. It refers to a surface that bends inwards. (Antonym convex). A good example is the leaves on Xanthorrhoea concava.

Concave: [kon-keiv] From Concava, which is Latin for a hollow. It refers to a surface that bends inwards. (Antonym convex).

Concavum: [kon-kei-vum] From Concava, which is Latin for a hollow. It refers to a surfaces usually the seeds, which bends inwards. A good example is Lepidosperma concavum.

Concentric: [kon-sen-trik] From Concentricus, which is Latin for a center. It refers to two or more circles which have a common center. A good example is Cymatoderma elegans var. lamellatum or Coltricia cinnamomea.

Conchifera: [kon-chi-fer-a] From Concho, which is Latin for a shape like the Conch shell and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for alike or similar to. It refers to two or more circles which have a common center. A good example was Banksia conchifera, which is now known as Banksia serrata.

Conchifolia: [kon-chi-foh-li-a] From Concho, which is Latin for a shape like the Conch shell and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the opening of a conch shell and as a consequence often surround the flowers, which appear in the leaf axis. A good example is Hakea conchifolia.

Conchifolium: [kon-chi-foh-li-um] From Concho, which is Latin for a shape like the Conch shell and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the opening of a conch shell and as a consequence often surround the flowers, which appear in the leaf axis. A good example is Leucopogon conchifolium.

Conchifolius: [kon-chi-foh-li-us] From Concho, which is Latin for a shape like the Conch shell and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the opening of a conch shell and as a consequence often surround the flowers, which appear in the leaf axis. A good example is Leucopogon conchifolius.

Conchium: [kon-chi-um] From Concho, which is Latin for a shape like the Conch shell. It refers to fruits, which resemble the sea shells. A good example was Conchium acicular, which is now known as Hakea sericea.

Conchocarpus: [kon-koh/choh-kar-pus] From Concho, which is Latin for a shape like the Conch shell and from Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits, which are shell shaped. A good example is the fruits on Connarus conchocarpus.

Conchologist: [kon-kol-o-jist] From Concho, which is Latin for a shape like the Conch shell, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies Shells & molluscs.

Conchology: [kon-kol-o-jee] From Concho, which is Latin for a shape like the Conch shell and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the branch of zoology, which studies shells and mollusks.

Concinna: [kon-sin-na] From Con, which is Latin for to come together and Cinnātus, which is Latin for skillfully joined, well made or very neatly done. It refers to plants, which are neat and tidy and have an overall beauty. A good example is Livistona concinna.

Concinnum: [kon-sin-num] From Con, which is Latin for to come together and Cinnātus, which is Latin for skillfully joined, well made or very neatly done. It refers to flowers, which are joined along the rachis. A good example is Aceratium concinnum.

Concinnus: [kon-sin-nus] From Con, which is Latin for to come together and Cinnus, which is Latin for skillfully joined, well made or very neatly done. It refers to flowers, which are skillfully placed along the rachis for pollination. A good example is Cyperus concinnus.

Concolor: [kon-ku-lor] From Com/Con, which are Latin for to come together, Krôma, which is Ancient Greek, Colores, which is Greek or Color, which is Latin for a hue or colour. It refers to a structure or organ usually the leaves, which have the same colour on both surfaces. A good example is Pratia concolor

Concolorans: [kon-ku-lor-anz] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together, Krôma, which is Ancient Greek, Colores, which is Greek or with and Color, which is Latin for a hue or colour. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have the same colour on both surfaces as opposed to discolourous where the leaf surfaces have different colours. A good example is Acacia concolorans.

Concolourous: [kon-ku-loros] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Color, which is Latin for a hue or colour. It refers to the leaves which have the same colour on both surfaces as opposed to discolourous where the leaf surfaces have different colours. A good example is the bak on Corymbia curtisi.

Concreta: [kon-kree-ta] From Concrētus, which is Latin for concrete. It refers to plants, which often grow on very heavy soils almost like concrete or on calcarious soils. A good example is Melaleuca concreta.

Concretum: [kon-kree-tum] From Concrētus, which is Latin for concrete. It refers to plants, which often grow on very heavy soils almost like concrete or on calcarious soils. A good example is Eriocaulon concretum Melaleuca concreta.

Concurrens: [kon-ku-renz] From Com/Con which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and currens which is Latin forrunning to a point. It refers to veins on the leaves or phyllodes which start together near the base and coming together again near the apex. A good example is Acacia concurrens.

Concurva: [kon-ker-va] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Curvum, which is Latin forbent or to turn inwards. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which bend upwards from the mid vein towards the margins. A good example is Styphelia concurva.

Concurvus: [kon-ker-vus] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Curvum, which is Latin forbent or to turn inwards. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which bend upwards from the mid vein towards the margins. A good example is Leucopogon concurvus.

Condensata: [kon-den-sa-ta] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Densa, which is Latin for crowded. It refers to growth habits which are very dense. A good example is the growth habit of Gnaphalodes condensata, which is now known as Actinobole condensatum.

Condensatum: [kon-den-sei-tum] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Densa, which is Latin for crowded. It refers to growth habits, which are very dense. A good example is the growth habit of Actinobole condensatum.

Condensed: [kon-densd] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Densa, which is Latin for crowded. It refers to plants, which have dense foliage. A good example is Syzygium paniculatum or Syzygium australe.

Conditum: [kon-di-tum] From Conditum, which is Latin for a secret, hidden or concealed. It refers to plants, which have fine foliage and blending into the background when not in flower. A good example is Helichrysum conditum, which is now known as Ozothamnus conditus.

Conditus: [kon-di-tus] From Conditus, which is Latin for a secret, hidden or concealed. It refers to plants, which have fine foliage and blending into the background when not in flower. A good example is Ozothamnus conditus.

Conduplicata: [kon-dyoo-pli-ka-ta] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Duplicatus, to duplicate. It refers to leaves in the bud stage, which fold length wise so that the upper laminas are facing each other. A good example is Philotheca conduplicata.

Conduplicate: [kon-dyoo-pli-keit] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Duplicatus, to duplicate. It refers to leaves which are in the bud stage folding length wise so that the upper laminas are facing each other. A good example is the leaves of Burchardia umbellata.

Conduplicatum: [kon-dyoo-pli-kei-tum] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Duplicatus, to duplicate. It refers to leaves in the bud stage, which fold length wise so that the upper laminas are facing each other. A good example is Atriplex halimoides var. conduplicatum.

Conduplicatus: [kon-dyoo-pli-kei-tus] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Duplicatus, to duplicate. It refers to leaves in the bud stage, which fold length wise so that the upper laminas are facing each other. A good example is Plagiocarpus conduplicatus.

Condylobulbon: [kon-dahy-lo-bul-bon] From Kondylos, which is Ancient Greek for a knuckle joint and Bulbous which is Latin for a bulb or bulbs. It refers to plants, which have knuckle shape bulbs or pseudobulbs. A good example is the pseudobulbs on the orchid Liparis condylobulbon.

Condyloides: [kon-dahy-loi-deez] From Kondylos, which is Ancient Greek for a knuckle joint and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to joints which are very swollen similar to knuckle bones where two bones join. A good example is Vittadinia condyloides.

Condylosa:[kon-dahy-loh-sa] From Kóndulos, which is Ancient Greek for knuckle. It refers to woody fruits which are embedded into the stems and resemble a joint or knuckle. A good example is Melaleuca condylosa.

Cone 1: [kohn] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek for conical woody type fruit. It refers to aggregation of sporangia, which bear structures at the tip of a stem as seen in the woody, scaly fruits in Gýmnosperms and Cycads. A good example is the cones of Wollemia nobilis.

Cone 2: [kohn] From konos, which is Ancient Greek for conical woody type fruit. It refers to geometrical woody capsules, which have a circle at one end and usually with the sides taper to a point. A good example is the woody cones of Allocasuarina equisetifolia.

Cone 3: [kohn] From konos, which is Ancient Greek for conical woody type fruit. It refers to aggregation of sporangia, which bear structures at the tip of a growth such as in mosses or the sporophylls in ferns. A good example is the cones of Wollemia nobilis.

Conferruminata: [kon-fer-ru-min-a-ta From Confertus, which is Latin for crowding together and Minatum, which is Latin for to be driven forth. It refers to a structure or organ, which is crowded near the apexes of the branchlets and are pushed further out further than other species in the genus. A good example is the flowers and capsules on Eucalyptus conferruminata.

Conferruminatus: [kon-fer-ru-min-a-tus] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together, Ferruginea, which is Latin for a rust colour and Minatum, which is Latin for I threaten. It refers to plants, which are toxic and have a distinct attractive reddish-maroon ring near the apex of the buds. A good example is the flower buds and plants of Senecio conferruminatus.

Conferta: [kon-fer-ta] From Conferta, which is Latin for crowding together. It usually structure or organ which is more or less crowded near the apexes of the branchlets or along the stems. A good example is the leaves of Acacia conferta.

Confertiflora: [kon-fer-ti-flor-a] From Confertum, which is Latin for crowding together and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are crowded together near the apexes of the stems. A good example is Mirbelia confertiflora.

Confertifloris: [kon-fer-ti-flawr-is] From Confertum, which is Latin for crowding together and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are crowded together near the apexes of the stems. A good example is Cajanus confertifloris.

Confertiflorum: [kon-fer-ti-flor-um] From Confertum, which is Latin for crowding together and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are crowded together near the apexes of the stems. A good example is Chamelaucium confertiflorum.

Confertiflorus: [kon-fer-ti-flor-us] From Confertum, which is Latin for crowding together and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are crowded together near the apexes of the stems and are more pronounced than other species in the genus. A good example is Cajanus confertiflorus.

Confertifolia: [kon-fer-ti-foh-li-a] From Confertum, which is Latin for crowding together and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are crowded together near the apexes of the stems. A good example is Hibbertia confertifolia which is now known a Hibbertia commutata.

Confertifolium: [kon-fer-ti-foh-li-um] From Confertum, which is Latin for crowding together and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves which are crowded together near the apexes of the stems. A good example is Gonocarpus confertifolium Gonocarpus confertifolius.

Confertifolius: [kon-fer-ti-foh-li-us] From Confertum, which is Latin for crowding together and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves which are crowded together near the apexes of the stems. A good example is Gonocarpus confertifolius.

Confertospicata: [kon-fer-to-spik-ta] Latin for crowding together and Spicatus which is Latin for a flower spike. It refers to the spikes which are crowded together at the apexes. A good example was, which is now known as Harperia confertospicata.

Confertospicatus: [kon-fer-to-spik-tus] From Confertum, which is Latin for crowding together and Spicatus, which is Latin for a flower spike. It refers to the spikes which are crowded together at the apexes. A good example was Harperia confertospicatus, which is now known as Harperia confertospicata.

Confertum: [kon-fer-tum] From Confertum, which is Latin for crowding together. It refers to leaves, which are more or less crowded near the apexes of the branchlets. A good example is the leaves of Gompholobium confertum.

Confertus: [kon-fer-tus] From Confertus which is Latin for crowding together. It refers to leaves, which are more or less crowded closer to the apexes of the branchlets. A good example is the leaves of Lophostemen confertus.

Confine: [kon-fahyn] From Confine, which is Greek/Latin for borders or boundary. It refers to plants, which have rather restricted confinements within their environment. A good example is Lepidosperma confine, which is now known as Lepidosperma striatum.

Confinis: [kon-fin-is] From Confine, which is Greek/Latin for borders or boundary. It refers to plants, which have rather restricted confinements within their environment. A good example is Restio confinis, which is now known as Chordifex ornatus.

Confluens: [kon-floo-enz] From Con/Com, which is Greek/Latin for to come together and Fluentum, which is Latin for flowing. It refers to where two waterways like streams come together however in botany It refers to 2 parts of an organ, which come together to form a “V or Y” similar to two rivers meeting. A good example is the sori of Pyrrosia confluens.

Confluent: [kon-floo-ent] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together and Fluentia, which is Latin for flowing. It refers to where two waterways like streams come together. In botany It refers to 2 bodies coming together to form a “V” similar to two rivers meeting.

Conforme: [Kon-form] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin forto come together and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to species which have structures or organs that resemble other species in the genus. A good example is Galium binifolium subsp. conforme.

Confusa: [kon-fyoo-sa] From Confusa, which is Latin for uncertain or confounding. It refers to flower heads which appear to be in confusion that is don’t have a regular pattern. A good example is Mackinlaya confusa.

Confusum: [kon-fyoo-sum] From Confusus, which is Latin for uncertain or confounding. It refers to flower heads which appear to be in confusion that is don’t have a regular pattern. A good example is Gymnosporangium confusum.

Confusus: [kon-fyoo-sus] From Confusus, which is Latin for uncertain or confounding. It refers to flower heads which appear to be in confusion that is don’t have a regular pattern. A good example is Acianthus confusus.

Congener: [kon-jee-ner] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Genus, which is Latin for a kind or type. It refers to plants which are very typical of the genus but vary enough to be a specific species. A good example is Amyema congener subsp. congener.

Congesta: [kon-jes-ta] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Genus, which is Latin for a kind or type. It refers to flowers and/or fruits, which are more tightly packed along the spikes than other species in the genus. A good example is the leaves of Cordyline congesta.

Congestiflora: [kon-jes-ti-flor-a] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Genus which is Latin for a kind or type, Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are packed tightly along a spike. A good example is Villarsia congestiflora.

Congestiflorum: [kon-jes-ti-flor-um] From Com/Con, which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Genus, which is Latin for a kind or type and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are packed tightly along a spike. A good example is Liparophyllum congestiflorum.

Congestum: [kon-jes-tum] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Genus which is Latin for a kind or type. It refers to flowers and fruits, which are packed tightly along the spike. A good example is the flower heads on Lepidosperma congestum.

Congestus: [kon-jes-tus] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Gestum which is Latin for to heap up or bring together. It refers to flowers, and fruits which are packed tightly along the spike. A good example is Plectranthus congestus.

Conglobata: [kon-glo-ba-ta] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin which is Latin for come together and globātum, which is Latin for to accumulate. It refers to flower heads which are in dense heads. A good example is Eucalyptus conglobata.

Conglomerata: [kon-glom-er-a-ta] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Glomeratum, which is Ancient Greek for cohering a mass of particles. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in soils that comprise of conglomerate soils. A good example is the fruit of Eremophila congolmerata.

Conglomerate 1: [kon-glom-er-eit] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin, for to come together or with and Glomeratum, which is Ancient Greek for cohering a mass of particles. It refers to where the individual parts are dense and usually irregularly overlap or adjacent to each other. A good example is the fruit of Morinda citrifolia.

Conglomerate 2: [kon-glom-er-eit] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin, for to come together or with and Glomeratum, which is Ancient Greek for cohering a mass of particles. It refers to where different size geological particles are cemented together.

Congrua: [kon-groo-a] From Congrea, which is Latinized from the vernacular forthe East Indian word for this plant. It refers to the seeds being similar in appearance to the plant now known as Parthenium hysterophorous. A good example is Isolepis congrua.

Conica: [kon-i-ka] From Konicos, which is Ancient Greek for taking the form of a pine cone. It refers to the vague similarity to the fruits of a pine tree. A good example is Eucalyptus conica.

Conical: [kon-i-kal] From Konicos, which is Ancient Greek for taking the form of a pine cone. It refers to an organ or structure that looks similar to a pine cone. An example of the name’s use is found on one of our small stingless native bees often seen in the garden Antrocephalus conicalis in which the resemblance is a total puzzle to me.

Conicobulbosa: [kon-i-ko-bul-boh-sa] From Konicos, which is Ancient Greek for taking the form of a pine cone and Bulbosa which is Latin for bulbous. It refers to roots just below the ground which resemble a long bulb shaped like a pine cone. A good example is Amanita conicobulbosa.

Conicum: [kon-i-kum] From Konicos, which is Ancient Greek fortaking the form of a pine cone. It refers to fruits which have a vague similarity to those of a pine tree. A good example is Haptotrichion conicum.

Conicus: [kon-i-kus] From Konicos, which is Ancient Greek for taking the form of a pine cone. It refers to the vague similarity to the fruits of pine tree. A good example is Pandanus conicus.

Conifer: [kon-i-fer] From Conifer, which is Latin for to bear a cone. It refers to non flowering Gýmnosperms, which bear their seeds in a cone. A good example is the fruits on Podocarpus elatus.

Conifera: [kon-i-fer-a] From Conifer, which is Latin for a cone and Ferum which is Latin for to bear. It refers to non flowering Gýmnosperms, which bear their seeds in a cone. A good example is the fruits on Callitris columellaris.

Coniferous: [kon-i-fer-os] From Conifer, which is Latin for a cone and Ferum which is Latin for to bear. It refers to non flowering Gýmnosperms, which bear their seeds in a cone. A good example is the overall appearance of Callitris macleayana resembling a conifer.

Coniferum: [kon-i-fer-um] From Conifer which is Latin for a pine cone and Ferum which is Latin for to bear. It refers to non flowering Gýmnosperms, which bear their seeds in a cone or flowering plants which have fruits, which resemble a pine cone. A good example is the overall appearance of Callitris endlicheri which resembles a conifer.

Coniferus: [kon-i-fer-us] From Conifer which is Latin for a pine cone and Ferum which is Latin for to bear. It refers to non flowering Gýmnosperms, which bear their seeds in a cone or flowering plants which have fruits, which resemble a pine cone. A good example is the fruits on Scirpus coniferus, which is now known as Lepironia articulata.

Confluens: [kon-floo-enz] From Con/Com, which is Greek/Latin for to come together and Fluentum, which is Latin for flowing. It refers to where two waterways like streams come together however in botany It refers to 2 parts of an organ, which come together to form a “V” similar to two rivers meeting. A good example is the sporangia on Pyrossia confluens.

Coniogeton: [kon-i-oh ge-ton] From Konios, which is Ancient Greek for dusty and Geton, which is Ancient Greek for a neighbour. Its reference is unknown. A good example is the overall appearance of Coniogeton arborescens, which is now known as Buchanania arborescens.

Coniophloia: [kon-i-oh-floi-a] From Konios, which is Ancient Greek for dusty and Phloia, which is Ancient Greek for a bark. Its It refers to barks which have a powdery look and often powdery to touch. A good example is Eucalyptus coniophloia, which is now known as Eucalyptus dichromophloia.

Conium: [ko-ni-um] From Kṓneion, which is Ancient Greek for the Poison Hemlock. It refers to both the plant and the poison, which was derived from it and given to Socratese. A good example is the overall appearance of Conium maculatum.

Conjugata: [kon-joo-ga-ta] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Jugatus, which is Latin for a yoke. It refers to a temporary or permanent sexual union in certain fungi and algae in which both the male and female gametes are united. An example of tissues uniting in a non-sexual response can be seen in Dipteris conjugata.

Conjugate: [kon-joo-geit] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Jugate, which is Latin for joining together. It refers to the fusing of two physical parts or in the case of pinnate leaves having only one pair.

Conjugatum: [kon-joo-gei-tum] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Jugatus which is Latin for a yoke. It refers to a temporary or permanent sexual union in certain fungi and algae where both the male and female gametes are united. An example of tissues uniting in a non-sexual response can be seen in Paspalum conjugatum.

Conjugatus: [kon-joo-gei-tus] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Jugatus which is Latin for a yoke. It refers to a temporary or permanent sexual union in certain fungi and algae where both the male and female gametes are united. An example of tissues uniting in a non-sexual response can be seen in local mosses like Chiloscyphus conjugatus var. dentatus.

Conjuncta: [kon-junk-ta] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Junctio, which is Latin for joined at a point. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which come together and are joined at the base. A good example is Eucalyptus conjuncta.

Conjunctiflora: [kon-junk-ti-flor-a] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with, Junctio, which is Latin for joined at a point and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are subsessile or sessile and have their petioles or bases joined together. A good example was Helicia conjunctiflora, which is now known as Helicia glabriflora.

Conjunctifolia: [kon-junk-ti-foh-li-a] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with, Junctio, which is Latin for joined at a point and Folia, which is Latin for . It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which come together and are joined at the base. A good example is Acacia conjunctifolia.

Conjunctifolium: [kon-junk-ti-foh-li-um] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with, Junctio, which is Latin for joined at a point and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which come together and are joined at the base. A good example is Racosperma conjunctifolium, which is now known as Acacia conjunctifolia.

Conluens: [kon-loo-enz] From Con/Com, which is Greek/Latin for to come together and Fluentum, (Most likely a spelling error for confluens) which is Latin for flowing. It refers to where two waterways like streams come together however in botany It refers to 2 parts of an organ, which come together to form a “V” similar to two rivers meeting. A good example is the lobes on the fronds of Tectaria conluens.

Connaricarpa: [kon-na-ri-kar-pa] Maybe from Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with, Natal which is Latin for to be born and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It may refer to the Cocci, which are born very close together in this species compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Bosistoa pentacocca var. connaricarpa.

Connaroides: [kon-nar-io-deez] From Konnaros, which is Ancient Greek for a type prickly evergreen probably referred to by Theophrastus. It refers to the stiff hairs on many organs and the short prickle on the apex of the fruits. A good example is Tricholobus connaroides, which is now known as  Connarus conchocarpus.

Connarus: [kon-ar-us] From Konnaros, which is Ancient Greek for a type prickly evergreen as probably referred to by Theophrastus. It refers to the stiff hairs on many organs or the short prickle on the apex of the fruits. A good example is Connarus conchocarpus.

Connata: [ko-na-ta] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Natal, which is Latin for to be born. It refers to a structure of organ being fused together as though being born at the same time. A good example is Wendlandia connata.

Connate: [kon-eit] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Natal, which is Latin for to be born. It refers to a structure of organ being fused together as though being born at the same time. A good example is the filaments and petals of Echinostephia aculeata and the juvenile leaves of Eucalyptus pilularis.

Connate Attachment on juvenile leaves of Eucalyptus pilularis.

Connatum: [kon-a-tum] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Natal, which is Latin for to be born. It refers to a structure of organ being fused together as though being born at the same time. A good example is the way appear Lyophyllum connatum, in clusters as though being born all at the same time.

Connatus: [kon-a-tus] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Natal, which is Latin for to be born. It refers to a structure of organ being fused together as though being born at the same time. A good example is Alectryon connatus.

Connerensis: [kon-ner-en-sis] From Conner, which is Latinized for Mount Conner in the southern part of the Northern Territory and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were orally discovered near Mount Conner. A good example was Eucalyptus connatus is now known as Corymbia eremaeas.

Conniana: [kon-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Conn. A good example is Prostanthera conniana.

Connianum: [kon-ni-a-num] Is named in honour of Conn. A good example is Racosperma conniana, which is now known as Acacia connianum.

Connivens: [kon-ni-venz] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin forto come together and Nivens, which is Latin for to wink. It refers to petals which close up together. A good example is Marsdenia connivens.

Connivent: [kon-nivent] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with. It refers to the physical parts touching or overlapping but not being fused together.

Connorsii: [kon-or-si-ahy] Maybe named in honour of Henry Eamonn Conner; 1922-2016, who was a New Zealand botanist devoted to the study of toxic plants and plant toxins. A good example is Litsea connorsii.

Conocephala: [kon-o-se/ke-fa-la] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek fora cone and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads which are shaped like cylindrical cones. A good example is the flowers and seeds of Cratystylis conocephala.

Conocephalum: [kon-o-se/ke-fa-lum] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek fora cone and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads which are shaped like cylindrical cones. A good example is the liverwort, Conocephalum conicum.

Conocephalus: [kon-o-se/ke-fa-lus] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek fora cone and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads which are shaped like cylindrical cones. A good example is the flowers and seeds of Angianthus conocephalus.

Conocybe: [kon-o-sahy-be] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek fora cone and Kybele/Cybele, which is Latinized for the ancient Anatolian mother goddess of nature. It reference is unclear. A good example is Conocybe weema.

Conoglossa: [kon-o-glos-sa] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek for a cone and Glôssa, which  is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to the lower labellum on orchids which stick out like a tongue. A good example is Pterostylis conoglossa.

Conogyne: [kon-o-jahyn] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek for a cone and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a woman. It appears to refer to a small group of Grevillea species classified as Grevillea subsect. Conogyne (R.Br.) Pfeiff. A good example is Grevillea trifurcata, which belongs to Grevillea sect. Conogyne.

Conoidea: [kon-oi-dee-a] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek for a cone and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It appears to refer to a small group of Grevillea species classified as Grevillea subsect. Conogyne (R.Br.) Pfeiff. A good example is Eucalyptus conoidea, which is now known as Eucalyptus erythronema.

Conosideniana: [kon-o-si-de-ni–na] Is named in honour of Den(n)is Considen; who was the British assistant-surgeon to the Colony of NSW on the first fleet and pioneering many pharmacticals from native plants. He sailed on the Scarborough the same ship as my great, great father Mathew Everingham who was convict for 7 years for stealing a book on law. A good example is the fruits of Conosperma conferta.

Conosperma: [kon-o-sper-ma] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek for a cone and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the woody like cones. A good example is the fruits of Conosperma conferta.

Conospermum: [kon-o-sper-mum] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek for a cone and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the woody like cones. A good example is the fruits of Conospermum burgessiorum.

Conospermumoides: [kon-o-sper-mum-oi-deez] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek fora cone, Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants which resemble the Conosperma genus. A good example is the fruits of Dampiera conospermoides.

Conostalix: [kon-o-sta-liks] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek fora cone and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the woody like cones. A good example is the fruits of Conostalix paludicola.

Conostephioides: [kon-o-ste-fi-oi-deez] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek for a cone, Stephanos, which is Ancient Greek for a crown and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the characteristics of the Conostephium genus. A good example is Astroloma conostephioides.

Conostephiopsis: [kon-o-ste-fi-op-sis] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek for a cone, Stephanos, which is Greek for a crown and Opsis which is Ancient Greek for to look the same as. It refers to plants, which look almost the same as the Conostephium genus. A good example is Conostephiopsis drummondii.

Conostephium: [kon-o-ste-fi-um] From Konos. which is Ancient Greek fora cone and Stephanos, which is Ancient Greek for a crown. It usually It refers to corollas which have many crowns or the floral tube ending in a crown like apex. A good example is the flowers of Conostephania pendulum.

Conostylis: [kon-o-sti-lis] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek for a cone and Stylos, which is Latin for a column. It refers to the shape of the style. A good example is the styles on Conostylis aculeata.

Conothamnoides: [kon-o-tham-noi-deez] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek fora cone, Thamnos which is Ancient Greek for a shrub and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to shrubs which have fruits that resemble small woody cones similar to the Conothamnus genus. A good example is Melaleuca conothamnoides.

Conothamnus: [kon-o-tham-nus] From Konos, which is Ancient Greek fora cone and Thamnos, which is Ancient Greek for a shrub. It refers to the shrubs , which have cone like fruits. A good example is the fruits on Conothamnus aureus.

Consanguinea: [kon-san-gwee-nee-a] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Sanguineus, which is Latin for of the same blood. It refers to a plant, which is closely related to another species. A good example is Acacia consanguinea.

Consanguineum: [kon-san-gwee-nee-um] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Sanguineus, which is Latin for of the same blood. It refers to a plant which is closely related to another species. A good example is Racosperma consanguineum, which is now known as Acacia consanguinea.

Consideniana: [kon-si-de-ni-a-na] Is named after Denis Considens (17..-1815) who was a surgeon on the first fleet and noted the medicinal uses of oil extracted from Eucalyptus piperita. A good example is Eucalyptus condensiana.

Consimilis: [Kon-si-mi-lis] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together and Similis, which is Latin for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which very closely resemble another or other species in the genus. A good example is Wahlenbergia consimilis.

Consobrina: [Kon-so-bri-na] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Sōbrīna, which is Latin for a maternal cousin. It refers to plants, which prefer or can tolerate saline soils. A good example is Acacia consobrina.

Consobrinum: [Kon-so-bri-num] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Sōbrīna, which is Latin for a maternal cousin. It refers to plants, which prefer or can tolerate saline soils. A good example was Racosperma consobrina, which is now known as Acacia consobrina.

Conspecific: [kon-spe-si-fik] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Specie, which is Ancient Greek fora specific. It refers to where two different species cross pollinating to form a new plant, usually a mule.(Hybrid) Example is Grevillea banksii and Grevillea pteridifolia to produce Grevillea Sandra Gordon.

Conspersa: [kon-sper-sa] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Spersa, which is Latin for scattered or speckled. It refers to plants, which come grow in colonies but have a space between each other. A good example is Acacia conspersa.

Conspersum: [kon-sper-sum] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Spersum, which is Latin for scattered or speckled. It refers to plants, which come grow in colonies but have a space between each other. A good example is Racosperma conspersum, which is now known as Acacia conspersa.

Conspersus: [kon-sper-sus] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Spersus, which is Latin for scattered or speckled. It refers to plants, which come grow in colonies but have a space between each other. A good example is Scirpus conspersus, which is now known as Isolepis inundata.

Conspicillata: [kon-spik-il-la-ta] From Conspicillāta, which is Latin forto be clearly visible or to watch out for. It refers to flowers, which are clearly visible. A good example is Diuris conspicillata.

Conspicua: [kon-spi-kyoo-a] From Conspicua, which is Latin forto be clearly visible. It refers to the flowers being clearly visible both on the plant and when fallen on the ground. A good example is Amyema conspicua.

Conspicuum: [kon-spi-kyoo-um] From Conspicuum, which is Latin forto be clearly visible. It refers to the flowers which are clearly visible both on the plant and when fallen on the ground. A good example is Lysinema conspicuum.

Conspicuus: [kon-spi-kyoo-us] From Conspicuum, which is Latin for to be clearly visible. It refers to the flowers which are clearly visible both on the plant and when fallen on the ground. A good example is Loranthus conspicuus, which is now known as Amyema conspicua.

Constablei: [kon-sta-ble-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Ernest Francis Constable; 1903-1986, who was an Australian and intrepid herbarium collector in off beat districts. A good example is Apatophyllum constablei.

Constipata: [kon-sti-pa-ta] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Stipitata, which is Latin for a stipe. It refers to the unusual flowering stipe, which is actually the fruit. A good example is Morinda constipata.

Constipatus: [kon-sti-pa-tus] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Stipitata, which is Latin for a stipe. It refers to the unusual flowering stipe, which is actually the fruit. A good example is the algae Apatococcus constipatus.

Constricta: [kon-strik-ta] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Stringo, which is Latin for to be drawn or pulled. It refers to the panicles branches, which are drawn close together. A good example is Sclerolaena constricta.

Constricted pods: [kon-strik-ted, podz] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Strictus, which is Latin for to be restricted, shrink or compressed. It usually It refers to the pods, which are tightly bound around the seeds on the flat surface as opposed to the margins which are restricted. A good example is the pods on Acacia fimbriata.

Constrictum: [kon-strik-tum] From Com/Con, which are Latin for to come together and Strictum, which is Latin for upright or erect. It refers to thelateral flowering spikes, which are erect and tightly hugging the main spike. A good example is Paspalidium constrictum.

Contermina: [kon-ter-mi-na] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Terminalis, which is Latin for the end or apex. It refers to leaves and flowers, which are clustered near the ends of the branches. A good example is Melicope contermina.

Conterminus: [kon-ter-mi-nus] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Terminalus, which is Latin for the end or apex. It refers to leaves and flowers, which are clustered near the ends of the branchlets. A good example was Diasperus conterminus, which is now known as Phyllanthus virgatus subsp. virgatus.

Contigua: [kon-ti-gyoo-a] From Contigua, which is Latin for bordering on. It refers to 2 things which run close to each other (at times parallel) but do not actually make contact with each other. A good example is the veins on the fronds of Prosaptia contigua.

Contiguum: [kon-ti-gyoo-um] From Contiguum, which is Latin for bordering on. It refers to 2 things running close to each other (at times parallel) but do not actually make contact with each other. A good example is the veins on the fronds of Blechnum contiguum.

Contiguus: [kon-ti-gyoo-us] From Contiguus, which is Latin forbordering on. It refers to 2 things running close to each other (at times parallel) but do not actually make contact with each other. A good example is the veins on the leaves of Sporobolus contiguus.

Continentale: [kon-ti-nen tal] From Continental, which is modern English for a continent. It refers to plants, which are found over a large area of a continental zone. A good example is Leptospermum continentale which is widespread over the south and east of the Australian continent.

Continentis: [kon-tin-en-tis] From Continens, which is Latin forto contain. It refers to the or a continent. A good example is Richea continentis which comes from the Australasian continents.

Continifolia: [kon-ti-ni-foh-li-a] From Continus, which is Latin forthe Continus genus and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves, which resemble the Continus genus in shape or colour. A good example is Hymenotheca cotinifolia, which is now known as Codonocarpus cotinifolium.

Continifolium: [kon-ti-ni-foh-li-um] From Continus, which is Latin for the Continus genus and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves that resemble the Continus genus in shape or colour. A good example is Codonocarpus cotinifolium.

Continua: [kon-tin-yoo-a] From Continua, which is Latin for continuing on. It refers to a physical organ which continues past an expected point. A good example is the thorns on Acacia continua.

Continuum [kon-tin-yoo-uhm] From Continuus, which is Latin for continuing on. It refers to the lemma’s stipe which is twisted. A good example is the culms continuation well past the flowers as is compared to other species within the genus Racosperma continuum.

Continuus [kon-tin-yoo-us] From Continuus, which is Latin for continuing on. It refers to the lemma’s stipe which is twisted. A good example is the culms continuation well past the flowers as is compared to other species within the genus Juncus continuus.

Contorta: [kon-tor-ta] From Contorta, which is Latin for twisted. It refers to a physical organ being twisted. A good example is Aristida contorta.

Contorted 1: [kon-tor-ted] From Contortum, which is Latin for to twist back on itself or overlapping. It refers to where one margin of a petal, pinnae or leaf overlaps the margin of an adjacent petal, pinnae or leaf in the bud stage. A good example is the petals on Byblis gigantea.

Contorted 2: [kon-tor ted] From Contortum, which is Latin for to twist back on itself or overlapping. It refers to where the branches of a planted cross over each other. A good example is  the branches of Melicytus dentatus.

Contortiplicate: [kon-tor-ti-pli-keit] From Contortum, which is Latin for to twist back on itself or overlapping and Plicate, which is Latin for folded or pleated. It refers to structures or organs, which are twisted and folded at the same time. A good example is the petals on Hibiscus tilaceus.

Contortum: [kon-tor-tum] From Contortus, which is Latin for twisted. It refers to structures or organs, which are twisted and folded at the same time. A good example is Sphagnum contortum.

Contortus: [kon-tor-tus] From Contortus, which is Latin for twisted. It refers to structures or organs, which are twisted and folded at the same time. A good example is Heteropogon contortus.

Contracta: [kon-trak-ta] From Contracta, which is Latin for to be drawn together. It refers to organs being close together. A good example is Festuca contracta.

Contractile: [kon-trak-tahyl] From Kontraktai, which is Ancient Greek for to have the ability to become shorter. It refers to the roots capability to become shorter; by wrinkling, while at the same time they usually pull the plant portion deeper into the soil.

Contractile Pull: [kon-trak-tahyl, pool] From Kontraktai, which is Ancient Greek for to have the ability to become shorter. It refers to the roots capability to become shorter; by wrinkling, while at the same time they can pull the plant portion deeper into the soil.

Contractum: [kon-trak-tum] From Contarctum, which is Latin for to have the ability to become shorter. It refers to the roots capability of becoming shorter; by wrinkling, while at the same time they can pull the plant portion deeper into the soil. A good example is Comesperma contractum, which is now known as Comesperma virgatum var. contractum.

Contractus: [kon-trak-tus] From Contarctum, which is Latin for to have the ability to become shorter. It refers to the roots capability of becoming shorter; by wrinkling, while at the same time they can pull the plant portion deeper into the soil. A good example is Leucopogon distans subsp. contractus, which is now known as Leucopogon penicillatus.

Contraligule: [kon-trah-li-gyool] From Contarctum, which is Latin for to have the ability to become shorter and Ligule, which is Latin for a thin, membranous growth. It refers to a growth on the culms, near the base of the leaf blade on most grasses. A good example is the ligule on Scleria mackaviensis.

Convallis: [kon-val-lis] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Vallium, which is Latin for a valley. It refers to plants, which grow in valleys. A good example is Clelandia convallis, which is now known as Hybanthus floribundus.

Convallium: [kon-val-li-um] From Com/Conm which is Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Valliumm which is Latin for a valley. It refers to plants, which grow in valleys. A good example is Acacia convallium.

Conveniens: [kon-ven-i-ens] From Convenientiam which is Latin for to be in harmony or suitable to. It refers to a satisfaction which the plants transmit. A good example is Eucalyptus conveniens.

Convergens: [kon-ver-jens/z] From Com/Con, which are Ancient Greek or Con which is Latin for to come together and Vergens, which is Latin for spreading out. It refers to the manner in which leaves and inflorescences spread out from a common point. A good example is Brachyachne convergens.

Convergent Evolution: [kon-ver-gent, e-vo-loo-shon] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and Vergens, which is Latin for Latin for to spread out. It refers to the acquisition of the same biological traits in unrelated lineages where plants or animals are through evolution and because of their environments are displaying similar traits thus converging with similar properties. Because of their occupation of similar environments, the narrowing of their differences evolve so that they become closer together. A good example is noted when comparing the various species in two separate genre like Cassytha with Cuscuta.

Cassytha glabella Cuscuta australis.

Convergent: [kon-ver-gent] From Com/Con, which are Ancient Greek/Latin for to come together and Vergens, which is Latin for spreading out. It refers to plants, which display similar chacteristics within the same genus but through evolution have grown apart and then are re converging again due to environmental conditions. A good example is seen in the Nepenthes genus.

Convex: [kon-veks] From Convexum, which is Latin fora rise. It refers to a surface that bends outwards. (Antonym is concave) A good example is the shape of the pileus on Leotia lubrica.

Convexa: [kon-vek-sa] From Convexa, which is Latin fora rise on a surface. It refers to a surface that bends outwards. (Antonym is concave) It often It refers to lateral petals, which have a distinct outward bend. A good example is Abaxianthus convexa.

Convexula: [kon-veks-yoo-la] From Convexum, which is Latin fora rise. It refers to a surface, which bends outwards. (Antonym is concave) A good example is the shape of the fruits on Sclerolaena convexula.

Convexum: [kon-veks-uh m] From Convexum, which is Latin fora rise on a surface. It refers to a surface, which bends outwards. (Antonym is concave) It often It refers to lateral petals which have a pronounced upward and outward bend. A good example is Dendrobium convexum, which is now known as Abaxianthus convexa.

Convexus: [kon-veks-uh s] From Convexus, which is Latin fora rise on a surface. It refers to a surface that bends outwards. (Antonym is concave) It often It refers to lateral petals which have a pronounced upward and outward bend. A good example is Abaxianthus convexus.

Convolute: [kon-vo/vuh-loo-t-] From Com/Con, which are Latin for coming together and Volutum, which is Latin for rolled longitudinally. It refers to where one margin of a petal, pinnae or leaf overlaps the margin of an adjacent petal, pinnae or leaf in the bud stage. To have a twist along the longitudinal axis. A good example is the leaves on Eragrostis elongata.

Convolvere: [kon-vol-veer] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and volvere, which is Latin for tangled or too complicated to unravel. It refers to vines and creepers which have intertwining stems. A good example is stems on Convolvulus clementii.

Convolvulus: [kon-vol-vyoo-lus] From Com/Con, which are Greek/Latin for to come together or with and volvere which is Latin for tangled or too complicated to unravel. It refers to vines and creepers which have intertwining stems. A good example is stems on Convolvulus erebescens.

Conyza: [kon-ahy-za] From Konops, which is Ancient Greek for a flea. It refers to the powder obtained from the leaves of some fleabanes or Conzya species which were used as natural insecticides. A good example is the exotic Conzya bonariensis.

Conyzoides: [kon-zoi-deez] From Konops, which is Ancient Greek for a flea and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which resemble the fleabanes of Europe in the Conzya genus. A good example is Erigeron conyzoides.

Cookii: [koo-ki-ahy] Is named in honour of James Cook; 1728-1779, who was an English born to a Scottish Labouring father who worked his way up as a stoker to first mate and eventually captain. He is best known for his voyage and mapping part of the east coast of Australia. A good example is Pandanus cookii.

Coolabah: [koo-la-bar] From Gulaba, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the local Kamilaroi/Gamilaroi aborigines for the local gum tree which grows along the rivers and billabongs in their tribal area. They refer to the trees, where their spirits are the ribbons which are seen playing and dancing in the breeze of the ribbon bark gum Eucalyptus microtheca. However a good example of the name in use was applied later to a similar looking tree in Eucalyptus coolabah subsp. coolabah.

Coolaminica: [koo-la-min-i-ka] From Coolaminica, which is Latin for the Coolaminica region in New South Wales. It refers to plants, which grow on the Coolaminica plains. A good example is Craspedia coolaminica.

Coolgardiensis: [kool-gar-di-en-sis] From Coolgardie, which is Latinized from the local aboriginal vernacular for the large Bungarra lizard and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered in the Coolgardie district. A good example is Acacia coolgardiensis.

Cooljarloo: [kool-jar-loo] From Cooljarloo, which is Latinized from the local aboriginal vernacular probably for sand country. It refers to plants, which were first discovered around Cooljarloo and grow in deep sandy soils. A good example is Grevillea sp. cooljarloo.

Cooloomia: [koo-loo-m-a] From Cooloomia, which is Latinized from the local aboriginal vernacular for Cooloomia district. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered in the Cooloomia district slightly east of the Zuytidorp Nature Reserve south of Sharks Bay western Australia. A good example is Verticordia cooloomia.

Coomingalensis: [koo-min-gal-en-sis] From Coominya, which is Latinized from the local aboriginal vernacular for Coomingal that means (A view ) over look water and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered around the hills overlooking the waters of what is now Lake Wivenhow. A good example is Pomaderris coomingalensis.

Coongiensis: [koon-ji-en-sis] From Coongie, which is Latinized from the local aboriginal vernacular for maybe a pristine lake and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered around the Coongie Lakes in north eastern south Australia. A good example iwa Brachyscome coongiensis, which is now known as Brachyscome rara.

Cooperae: [koo-per-ee] Is named in honour of Cooper but which Cooper cannot be substantiated. A good example is Aglaiia cooperae.

Cooperi: [koo-per-ahy] Is named in honour of Cooper but which Cooper cannot be substantiated. A good example is Cyathea cooperi.

Cooperiana: [koo-per-i-ei-nuh] Is named in honour of Cooper but which Cooper cannot be substantiated. A good example is Eucalyptus cooperiana.

Coopernookia: [koo-per-noo-kee-uh] From Coopernook, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the local Aboriginal word meaning elbow. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the Coopernook district in NSW. A good example is Coopernookia chisholmii.

Coorangooloo: [koo-ran-goo-loo] From Coorangooloo, which maybe Latinized from the vernacular for the local Aboriginal word for the tree. A good example is Elaeocarpus coorangooloo.

Copeanus: [koh-pee-nus] Is named in honour of Thomas Aurther Cope; 1949-2.., who was a British botanist specializing in Spermatophytes. A good example is Lepturus copeanus

Copelandii: [kohp-lan-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Edwin Bingham Copeland; 1873-1964, who was an American agriculturalist and botanist who specialized in pteridophytes (ferns). A good example is one of the hallucinatory mushroom Copelandia cyanescens or the shrub Zieria odorifera subsp. copelandii.

Copiosa: [ko-pi-oh-sa] From Copiosus, which is Latin for abundant or plentiful. It refers to the plants, which produced abundantly along the branches and stems. A good example is Ficus copiosa.

Copleyi: [kop-lee-ahy] Is named in honour of Bruce Copley; 1873-1964,who was an Australian farmer with a passion for native flora, namely Acacias, Eucalypts, Eremophilas and Chenopods. He was a Honorary Collector for the State Herbarium of South Australia and collected over 5000 specimen. A good example is Bassia copleyi.

Copper: [ko-per] From Cyprium, which is Latin for the Island of Cyprus and the birthplace of Aphrodite. Symbol Cu    Atomic Number 29

Coppice: [ko-pis] From Copiez, which is Latin for to cut back. It refers to the new growth on old wood which is often seen following fire, lightning, harvesting of hardwoods, on hardwood stumps or following the pruning of trees and some shrubs. The leaves on coppice growth on many plants is often different to that of mature leaves. A good example of coppice or regrowth leaves being very different can be seen on Eucalyptus resinifera.

Coprinellus: [ko-pri-nel-lus] From Koprinos, which is Ancient Greek, for living on faeces or later Karpos which is Modern Latin for faeces and Ella, which is Ancient Greek/Latin for the femine form. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on animal dung and are considered somewhat more dainty than the Coprinus genus thus the use of the suffix. A good example is Coprinellus disseminates.

Coprinopsis: [ko-pri-nop-sis] From kópros, which is Ancient Greek for dung or feces and Opsis which is Ancient Greek for to look the same as. It refers to fungi, which look similar to other species that prefer to grow on the feces of animals. A good example is Coprinopsis cinerea.

Coprinus: [ko-prin-us] Maybe from Koporina, which is Ancient Greek for autumn. It may refer to mushrooms, which are most frequently seen in the autumn months. A good example is Coprinus comatus.

Coprophilous: [ko-pro-fil-los] From kópros, which is Ancient Greek for dung or feces and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to fungi, which prefer to grow on the feces of animals. A good example is Coprinopsis cinerea.

Coprosma: [ko-proz-ma] From Kopros, which is Ancient Greek for excrement and Osme, which is Ancient Greek for a scented smell. It refers to the sweet smell of the sap on most species. A good example is Coprosma hirtella.

Coprosmoides: [ko-proz-moi-deez] From Kopros, which is Ancient Greek for excrement, Osme, which is Ancient Greek for a fragrance and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the fragrance of the sap on most species being similar to that of Coprosma. A good example is Cyclophyllum coprosmoides.

Coprotus: [ko-proh-tus] From Kopros, which is Ancient Greek for excrement. It refers to a group of very small disc shaped fungi, which are usually found growing on dung (excrement) or freshly cut grasses. A good example is Coprotus disculus.

Coptica: [kop-ti-ka] From Copticum, which is Latin for not comparable. It refers to the same species which grows from central and northern Africa and central Australia which first seem or appear to be separate species. A good example is Ipomoea coptica.

Copulans: [ko-pyoo-lanz] From Scopulina, which is Latin for growing on rocks or cliffs. It refers to plants, which prefer growing on rocks especially those associated with cliffs and overhangs. A good example is Eucalyptus copulans.

Cor: [kor] From Kordātum, which is Ancient Greek or Cordātum which is Latin for heart shape. It refers to a prefix to many words often associated with the shape of leaves, petals or sepals.

Coracinum: [ko-ra-si-num] From Coracinum, which is Latin for a crow or raven. It refers to the colour of the soils which are jet black like a crow. A good example is Solanum coracinum.

Coracinus: [ko-ra-si-nus] From Coracinus, which is Latin for a crow or raven. It refers to the colour of the soils which are jet black like a crow. A good example is Homoranthus coracinus.

Corallina: [ko-ral-li-na] From Corallina, which is Latin for coral red. It refers to a structure or organ, which is chalky red or coral red in colour. A good example is Corallina officinalis.

Coralline: [ko-ral-leen] From Corallinum, which is Latin for coral red. It refers to a structure or organ, which is chalky red or coral red in colour. A good example is the rare and popular Chilean vine Berberidopsis corallina.

Coralliocarpa: [ko-ral-li-o-kar-pa] From Corallinum, which is Latin for coral red or coral like and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are various shades of red. A good example is Rhagodia coralliocarpa.

Corallipes: [ko-al-li-peez] From Corallinum, which is Latin for coral red. It refers to a structure or organ, which is chalky red or coral red in colour. A good example was Macrozamia corallipes, which is now known as Macrozamia spiralis.

Corallodéndron: [ko-ral-lo-den-dron] From Corallinum, which is Latin for coral red or coral like and Déndron which is Ancient Greek for a tree. It refers to the common name of the trees as “Coral Trees”. A good example is Corallodéndron vespertilio, which is now known as Erythrina vespertilio.

Corallodesme: [ko-ral-lo-des-me] From Corallinum, which is Latin for coral red or coral like and Desma which is Latin for bundled together. It refers to the red fruits being in together in small bundles or bunches similar to grapes. A good example is Dendrocnide corallodesme.

Corallum: [ko-ral-lum] From Corallum which is Latinized for the vernacular of an Indian (Telinga) word for a plant found there. It refers to the Indian plant and this plant which resemble each other. A good example is Cullen corallum.

Corchorifolia: [kor-kor-i-foh-li-a] From Korchorum, which is Ancient Greek for the ancient name of the blue pimpernel and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves, which resemble the leaves of many of the species in the Corchorus genus. A good example is Melochia corchorifolia.

Corchorus: [kor-kor-us] From Korchorus, which is Ancient Greek for the ancient name of the blue pimpernel. A good example is Cochorus cunninghamii.

Cordata: [kor-dei-ta] From Kordātum, which is Ancient Greek or Cordātum, which is Latin for heart shape. It usually refers to leaves, which are heart shaped. A good example is the leaves on Daviesia cordata.

Cordate: [kor-deit] From Kordātum, which is Ancient Greek or Cordātum, which is Latin for heart shape. It refers to the leaves being heart shape. A good example is Viola hederacea.

Cordatisepala: [kor-da-ti-se-par-la] From Kordātum, which is Ancient Greek or Cordātum, which is Latin for a heart shape and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum, which is Latin for a sepal. It refers to the sepals having a heart shape. A good example is Eremophila cordatisepala.

Cordatum: [kor-dei-tum] From Kordātum, which is Ancient Greek or Cordātum, which is Latin for a heart shape. It refers to leaves, which have a heart shape. A good example is Chorizema cordatum.

Cordatus: [kor-dei-tus] From Kordātum, which is Ancient Greek or Cordātus, which is Latin for a heart shape. It refers to leaves, which have a heart shape. A good example maybe some species of Leucopogon cordatus.

Cordia: [kor-di-a] From Kordātum, which is Ancient Greek or Cordatum, which is Latin for a heart shape. It refers to leaves, which have a heart shape in the type specie. A good example in Australia is Cordia subcordata.

Cordieri: [kor-di-e-ri] Is named in honour of Thomas Corder;   1812-1874, who was a British/Irish agriculturalist and botanist who travelled to Australia from 1839 to 1845. A good example is Eucalyptus cordieri , which is now known as Eucalyptus nortonii.

Cordifolia: [kor-di-foh-li-a] From Kordātum, which is Ancient Greek or Cordātum, which is Latin for a heart shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have a heart shape. A good example is the leaves on Centella cordifolia.

Cordifolium: [kor-di-foh-li-um] From Kordātum, which is Ancient Greek or Cordātum which is Latin for heart shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which are heart shape. A good example is the leaves on Myoporum cordifolium.

Cordifolius: [kor-di-foh-li-us] From Kordātum, which is Ancient Greek or Cordātum which is Latin for heart shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which are heart shape. A good example is the leaves on Leucopogon cordifolius.

Cordiform: [kor-di-form] From Kordātum which is Ancient Greek or Cordatum which is Latin for a heart shape and Forme which is Latin for a to take the shape of or form of. It refers to leaves, which have a heart shape. A good example is the single base leaf on Paracaleana minor.

Cordigera: [kor-di-jeer-a] From Kordātum, which is Ancient Greek or Cordātum, which is Latin for a heart shape and Gera, which is Latin for to have or to bear. It refers to plants, usually the leaves or at times the flowers, which have a heart shape. A good example is the standard petals on Bossiaea cordigera.

Cordyline: [kor-di-lahyn] From Kordyle, which is Ancient Greek for club like in shape. It refers to the base of the slim trunks of some species which are wider like a club. A good example is the base on Cordyline petiolaris.

Corethrostylis: [kor-e-thro-stahy-lis] From Coris, which is Latin for a plant or its seed, Thros, which is unknown and Stízō, which is Ancient Greek for a column or the female reproductive organ between the ovaries and stigmas. It refers to styles, which are rather prominent and beautiful. A good example is Corethrostylis membranacea.

Coriacea: [ko-ri-a–ei-see-a] From Coriceous, which is Latin for like leather or leathery. It refers to leaves, phyllodes and fronds which are thick and leathery to touch. A good example is Acacia coriacea.

Coriaceum: [ko-ri-see-um] From Coriceoum, which is Latin for like leather or leathery. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which are very thick and leathery to touch. A good example is Placospermum coriaceum.

Coriaceus: [ko-ri-a-see-us] From Coriceous, which is Latin for like leather or leathery. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which are rather thick and leathery to touch. A good example is the leaves on Alectryon coriaceus.

Corifolia: [kawr-ri-foh-li-a] From Coriceoum which is Latin for like leather or leathery and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which are rather thick and leathery to touch. A good example is the leaves on Kunzea corifolia.

Corifolium: [kawr-ri-foh-li-um] From Coriceoum, which is Latin for like leather or leathery and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which are rather thick and leathery to touch. A good example is the leaves on Leucopogon corifolium, which is now known as Leucopogon reflexus.

Corifolius: [kawr-dr-foh-li-us] From Coriceoum, which is Latin for like leather or leathery and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which are rather thick and leathery to touch. A good example is the leaves on Leucopogon corifolius, which is now known as Leucopogon reflexus.

Corium: [kawr-ri-um] From Corium, which is Latin for a thickened hide, skin or leathery. It refers to structures or organs, which are thick and leathery to touch. A good example is the pileus on Mycenastrum corium.

Corm: [korm] From Korm, which is Ancient Greek for an enlarged swollen bulblike base. It refers to bulbil like vegetative reproductive organs, which are produced at the base of the parent corm or on the trunk or branches of trees. A good example is the small corms on bulbine bulbosa.

Cormel: [kor-mel] From Kormus, which is Ancient Greek for an enlarged swollen bulblike base. It refers to small bulbil like vegetative reproductive organs which are produced at the base of the parent corm. A good example is the small corms on Thysanotus multifloris.

Cormiflora: [kor-mi-flor-a] From Kormós, which is Ancient Greek for to shear off and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to tree trunks, which are bear of branches and are covered in bulbil like swellings where the flowers appear from. A good example is the flowers, which form on the trunk and branches on Eugenia cormiflora, which is now known as Syzygium cormiflorum.

Cormiflorum: [kor-mi-flor-um] From Kormós, which is Ancient Greek for to shear off and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to tree trunks, which are bear of branches and are covered in bulbil like swellings where the flowers appear from. A good example is the flowers, which form on the trunk and branches on Syzygium cormiflorum.

Corneous: [kor-nee-os] From Kéras, which is Ancient Greek or Cornu, which is Latin for horny or horn like. It usually It refers to the fruits or at times the seeds, which have small horns.

Cornicina: [kor-ni-si-na] From Cornicinis/Cornicinum, which is Latin for a horn, bugle or trumpet. It refers to a structure or organ, which resemble a bugle or trumpet in shape. A good example is the labellum on Thelymitra cornicina which somewhat resembles an inverted bugle.

Corniculata: [kor-ni-kyoo-la-ta] From Kéras, which is Ancient Greek or Cornu, which is Latin for horny or horn like. It refers to seeds or seed cones, which have small horns. A good example is the seeds on Oxalis corniculata or the valves on the cones of Allocasuarina corniculata.

Corniculate: [kor-ni-kyoo-leit] From Kéras, which is Ancient Greek or Cornu, which is Latin for horny or horn like. It refers to a description of an organ or structure, which have horns.

Corniculatum: [kor-ni-kyoo-lei-tum] From Kéras, which is Ancient Greek or Cornu, which is Latin for horny or horn like. It refers to having very prominent horns. A good example is the fruits on Aegiceras corniculatum.

Corniculatus: [kor-ni-kyoo-lei-tus] From Kéras, which is Ancient Greek or Cornu, which is Latin for horny or horn like. It refers to hornsm which are rather small. A good example is the stems on Lotus corniculatus var. corniculatus.

Cornifolia: [kor-ni-foh-li-a] From Kérasm, which is Ancient Greek or Cornum, which is Latin for horny or horn like and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have tiny horn like projections. A good example is the leaves on Personia cornifolia.

Cornifolium: [kor-ni-foh-li-um] From Kérasm, which is Ancient Greek or Cornum, which is Latin for horny or horn like and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have tiny horn like projections. A good example is the leaves on Pittosporum cornifolium.

Cornifolius: [kor-ni-foh-li-us] From Kérasm, which is Ancient Greek or Cornum, which is Latin for horny or horn like and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have tiny horn like projections. A good example is the leaves on Notothixos cornifolius.

Cornigera: [kor-ni-jeer-a] From Kérasm, which is Ancient Greek or Cornum, which is Latin for horny or horn like and Gera, which is Latin for to have. It refers to plants, usually the fruits which have tiny horn like projections. A good example is the leaves on Atriplex cornigera.

Cornigerum: [kor-ni-jeer-um] From Kérasm, which is Ancient Greek or Cornumm, which is Latin for horny or horn like and Gera which is Latin for to have. It refers to plants, usually the fruitsm which have tiny horn like projections. A good example is the leaves on Corticium cornigerum.

Cornigerus: [kor-ni-jeer-us] From Kérasm, which is Ancient Greek or Cornumm, which is Latin for horny or horn like and Gera which is Latin for to have. It refers to plants, usually the fruitsm which have tiny horn like projections. A good example is the leaves on Isopogon cornigerus.

Cornishiana: [kor-ni-shi-a-na] From Cornishm, which is Latinized for the Cornwell district in southern England and Iana, which is Ancient Greek for to originate from. It refers to the copper triangle of Moonta, Kadina and Wallaroo on Yorke Peninsula in southern South Australia, where most of the inhabitants setttled from Cornwell in England. A good example is the leaves on Sclerolaena cornishiana.

Cornucopiae: [kor-nyoo-ko-pi-a] From Cornu, which is Latin for horny or horn like Cōpiae, which is Latin for Copious or plenty. It refers to a horn containing food drink with special reference to the goat Amalthaea which is in an endless supply. A good example is the reference to the copious amounts of nectar and the styles on Banksia cornucopiae.

Cornu-damae: [kor-nyoo-da-mee] From Cornu, which is Latin for horny or horn like and Damae which maybe Latinized for damage. Its reference is unclear but maybe associated with the Japanese Red Horn fungi, Podostroma cornu-damae which is extremely toxic in that it damages internal organs and the production of blood cells. A good example by name is Isopogon cornu-damae which the author cannot associate the two.

Cornuta: [kor-nyoo-ta] From Cornata, which is Latin for horny or horn like. It refers to a structure or organ, which bears horns. A good example is the upper petals on Chilliglottis cornuta.

Cornutum : [kor-nyoo-tum] From Cornatum, which is Latin for horny or horn like. It refers to flowers, or fruits which have a distinct spur. A good example is the fruits on Conchium cornutum, which is now known as Hakea gibbosa.

Cornutus: [kor-nyoo-tus] From Cornatus, which is Latin for a horn/s. It refers to an organ, which bears horns. A good example is Angianthus cornutus.

Corokia: [kor-oh-ki-a] From Corokia, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the Maori word for a genus of native plants. It refers to a genus of plants, which were first discovered in New Zealand. A good example of the genus in Australia is Corokia whiteana.

Corolla: [ko-rol-la] From Coronatus, which is Latin for a crown or small garland. It refers to all the sectors of a flower when speaking generally about an individual flower. A good example of a well formed corolla can be seen on Chloanthes parviflora.

Corolla and corolla lobes on Chloanthes parviflora

Corollata: [ko-rol-la-ta] From Coronatus, which is Latin for a crown or small garland. It refers to all the sectors of a flower when speaking generally about an individual flower being smaller when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is the flowers on Prostanthera ovalifolia.

Corollatus: [ko-rol-la-tus] From Coronatus, which is Latin fora crown or small garland. It refers to all the sectors of a flower when speaking generally about an individual flower. A good example is the flowers on Eucalyptus corollatus.

Coromandelianum: [ko-ro-man-de-li-ei-num] From Coromandel, which is Latinized from the vernacular for the Coromandel Coast in India. It refers to the original plants coming from coastal India. A good example is Malvastrum coromandelianum.

Coromandelina: [ko-ro-man-de-li-na] From Coromandel, which is Latinized from the vernacular for the Coromandel Coast in India. It refers to the original plants coming from coastal India. A good example is Isoetes coromandelina.

Corona: [kor-oh-na] From Corōnātum, which is Latin for a crown or small garland. It usually It refers to the throat of a tubular flower. A good example is the way the flowers form a ring near the apex of the stems on Calothamnus validus.

Coronalis: [kor-o-na-lis] From Corōnātum, which is Latin for a crown or small garland. It refers to flowers, which form a crown over the trees when in flower. A good example was Acacia coronalis, which is now known asAcacia victoriea.

Coronanthera: [ko-o-nan-theer-uh] From Corōnātum, which is Latin for a crown or small garland and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male organs on a flower or the flower. It usually It refers to the sepals standing laterally erect at the base of the flowers like an inverted crown. A good example is Coronanthera pulchra.

Coronaria: [ko-ro-nar-i-a] From Corōnātum, which is Latin for a crown or small garland. It usually It refers to the throat of a tubular flower. A good example is the exotic garden flower Silene coronaria.

Coronarium: [ko-ro-nar-i-um] From Corōnātum, which is Latin for a crown or small garland. It usually It refers to the throat of a tubular flower. A good example is Hedychium coronarium.

Coronata: [ko-ron-a-ta] From Corōnātum, which is Latin fora crown or small garland. It refers to a description of a plant which has the flowers forming a crown around the apex of the stems or being persistent as a ring around the apex of the fruits. A good example is Maireana coronata.

Coronate: [ko-ro-neit] From Corōnātum, which is Latin for a crown or small garland. It refers to a description of a plant which has the flowers forming a crown around the apex of the stems or being persistant as a ring around the apex of the fruits. A good example is the fruits on Ficus coronata.

Coronatum: [ko-ro-nei-tum] From Corōnātum, which is Latin for a crown or small garland. It usually It refers to the the flowersor the leaf structure along the stems appearing like a small crown. A good example is Myriophyllum coronatum.

Coronatus: [ko-ro-nei-tus] From Corōnātus, which is Latin fora crown or small garland. It usually It refers to the throat of a tubular flower. A good example is the flowers on Coronidium elatum, which is now known as Myriophyllum coronatum.

Coronidium: [kor-o-ni-di-um] From Corōnātum, which is Latin for a crown or small garland. It usually refers to the flowers sitting atop of the vertical floral stems. A good example is  the ray florets on Coronidium elatum appearing like a crown around the disc florets.

Coroniform: [ko-ro-ni-form] From Corōnillum, which is Latin for a small crown or small garland and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It usually It refers to the tubular flowers forming a whorl around near the apex of the stem. A good example is the flowers at the apex of the stems on Millotia falcata.

Coroniforme: [kor-o-ni-form] From Corōnillum, which is Latin for a small crown or small garland and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It usually It refers to tubular flowers, which form a whorl around the stems near the apexes. A good example is Stylidium coroniforme.

Coroniformis: [ko-ro-ni-for-mis] From Corōnillum, which is Latin for a small crown or small garland and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It usually It refers to tubular flowers, which form a whorl around the stems near the apexes. A good example is Psora coroniformis.

Coronilla: [ko-ro-nli-la] From Corōnillum, which is Latin for a small crown or small garland. It refers to the flowers being located around the apex of the stems. A good example is the fungus Coronilla vaginalis.

Coronillaefolia: [ko-ro-nil-lee-foh-li-a] From Corōnillum, which is Latin for a small crown or small garland and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves forming a small crown at the top of the shrubs A good example is Swainsona coronillaefolia, which is now known as Swainsona galegifolia.

Coronillifolia: [ko-ro-nil-li-foh-li-a] From Corōnillum, which is Latin for a small crown or small garland and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves forming a small crown at the top of the shrubs A good example is Indigofera coronillifolia.

Coronilloides: [ko-ro-nil-loi-deez] From Corōnillum, which is Latin for a small crown or small garland and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It usually It refers to the flowers forming a whorl around near the apex of the stem. A good example is Senna coronilloides.

Coronopifolia: [ko-ro-no-pi-foh-li-a] From Korōnopum, which is Ancient Greek for a korone or crown and Pous which is Ancient Greek for a foot or feet. It refers to cleft leaves which resemble a crown. A good example is Cotula coronopifolia.

Coronopifolium: [ko-ro-no-pi-foh-li-um] From Corōnopum, which is Ancient Greek for a korone or crown and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble a crown. A good example is Hibiscus coronopifolium, which is now known as Alyogyne hakeifolia.

Coronopifolius: [ko-ro-no-pi-foh-li-us] From Corōnopum, which is Ancient Greek for a korone or crown and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble a crown. A good example is Hibiscus coronopifolius, which is now known as Alyogyne sp. Geraldton.

Coronopus: [ko-ron-o-pus] From Korōnopum, which is Ancient Greek for a korone or crown and Pous which is Ancient Greek or Pedi which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to a leaves, which somewhat resemble an open crown supported by individual pedicels. A good example is Lepidium coronopus.

Coronulata: [ko-ro-nyoo-la-ta] From Korōnopum, which is Ancient Greek for a korone or crown. It refers to fruits, which somewhat resemble a crown. A good example is Ficus coronulata.

Correa: [ko-ree-a] Is named in honour of Correa de Serra; 1750-1823, who was a Portuguese botanist and statesman. A good example is Correa alata.

Correctum: [ko-rek-tum] From Correctōrum, which is Latin for correct, straighten, improved or healed. It refers to spikes which are held erect. A good example is Prasophyllum correctum.

Correifolia: [ko-rei-foh-li-a] From Corrīvālum, which is Latin for a competitor and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the beauty of the leaves which rival any plant in the garden or bush. A good example is Asterolasia correifolia.

Correifolium: [ko-rei-foh-li-um] From Corrīvālum which is Latin for a competitor and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the beauty of the leaves which rival any plant in the garden or bush. A good example is Phebalium correifolium, which is now known as Asterolasia correifolia.

Correifolius: [ko-rei-foh-li-us] From Corrīvālum which is Latin for a competitor and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the beauty of the leaves which rival any plant in the garden or bush. A good example is Eriostemon correifolius, which is now known as Asterolasia correifolia.

Corrickiae: [ko-ri-ki-ee] Is probably named in honour of Mrs. Margaret Georgina Corrick; 1922-20..; who was an Australian herbarium assistant and plant collector but it cannot be 100mm substantiated. A good example is Hovea corrickiae.

Corrigioloides: [ko-ri-ji-o-loi-deez] From Corrigio, which is Spanish for correct and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. Its reference is unclear. A good example is Parakeelya corrigioloides.

Corrugata: [ko-ru-ga-ta] From Corugatum, which is Latin for wrinkled or to be wrinkled. It refers to leaves, which are wrinkled or creased like a corrugated iron roof. A good example is Sida corrugata.

Corrugate: [ko-ru-geit] From Corugatum, which is Latin for wrinkled or to be wrinkled. It refers leaves, which are wrinkled or creased like a corrugated iron roof. A good example is Cryptocarya corrugata.

Corsia: [kor-si-a] From Corugatus, which is Latin for wrinkled or to be wrinkled. It refers leaves, which are wrinkled or creased. A good example is Corsia ornata.

Corticosa: [kor-ti-koh-sa] From Cursārius, which is Latin or Corsaire which is French for a fast ship used in piracy. It refers to flowers, which resemble a fast sailing ship, that is the upper petals spread similar to a large sail and the lower petal is shaped like the keel of a boat. A good example is Eucalyptus corticosa.

Cortinarius: [kor-ti-nar-i-us] From Cortīna, which is Latin for a weblike, often evanescent veil covering the gills or hanging from the cap edge of certain mushrooms. It sometimes refers to the persistent ring or remnant of fibrils around a mushroom stipe. A good example is Cortinarius abnormis.

Cortinifolia: [kor-ti-ni-foh-li-a] From Cotinus, which is Greek for the Oleander tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble the leaves or phyllodes of the Oleander bush. A good example is Planchonella cortinifolia.

Corunastylis: [ko-run-a-stahy-lis] From Koryne, which is Ancient Greek for a club or mace and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a pillar or Column. It refers to styles, which resemble a club in shape. A good example is Corunastylis clivicola.

Corvijuga 1: [kor-vi-joo-ga] From Kórax, which is Ancient Greek or Corvus which is Latin for a harsh sound (A crow or raven) and Jugum which is Latin for a yoke. It refers to opposite leaves, which are very deep green almost black From A, distance and somewhat resembles a yoke. A good example is Banksia corvijuga.

Corvijuga 2: [kor-vi-joo-ga] From Kórax, which is Ancient Greek or Corvus, which is Latin for a harsh sound (A crow or raven) and Jugum which is Latin for a ridge. It refers to seeds, which are black and have a ridge/s that are commonly found on the fruit of umbelliferous plants. A good example is Polyscias sambucifolia.

Coryanthera: [ko-ree-an-theer-a] From Korys, which is Ancient Greek for a helmet. It refers to the caps on the flowers when in bud which resemble a helmet. A good example is Corynanthera flava.

Coryanthum: [ko-ree-an-thum] From Korys, which is Ancient Greek for a helmet ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to the caps on the flowers when in bud, which resemble helmets. A good example is Syzygium corynanthum.

Corybas: [ko-ree-bas] From Korybas which is Ancient Greek or Corybany which is Latin for drunken, dancing Priest. It refers to flowers, sitting atop of short non vertical floral stems dancing in the breeze. A field of orchids leaning in all directions from above resembles a group of priests staggering home from a party or pub. A good example is the flowers on Coroybas barbarae.

Corylifolia: [ko-rahy-li-foh-li-a] From Kórulos which is Ancient Greek or Corylōrum/Corulus which is Latin for the hazel nut and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble the leaves of the hazel nut genus, Corylus avellana. A good example is Commersonia corylifolia.

Corylifolium: [ko-rahy-li-foh-li-um] From Kórulos which is Ancient Greek or Corylōrum/Corulus which is Latin for the hazel nut and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble the leaves of the hazel nut genus, Corylus avellana. A good example is Lasiopetalum corylifolium, which is now known as Commersonia corylifolia.

Corymb: [kor-imb] From Korymbōs, which is Ancient Greek or Corymbōsum which is Latin for a cluster of flowers. It refers to flowers, where the stems branch from different levels on the stalk’s axis but ultimately terminate at the same level.

Corymbia: [kor-im-bi-a] From Korymbōs, which is Ancient Greek or Corymbōsus, which is Latin for a cluster of flowers. It refers to flowers, where the stems branch from different levels on the stalk’s axis but ultimately terminate flowers are all at the same level. A good example is the flowers on Corymbia curtisii.

Corymbifer: [ko-rim-bi-fer] From Korymbōs, which is Ancient Greek or Corymbōsum, which is Latin for a cluster of flowers and Ferra which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which bear their flowers in corymbs. A good example was Elaeocarpus corymbifera, which is now known as Aceratium megalospermum.

Corymbiflora: [ko-rim-bi-flor-a] From Korymbōs, which is Ancient Greek or Corymbōsus, which is Latin for a cluster of flowers and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, where the stems branch from different levels on the stalk’s axis but ultimately terminate at the same level. A good example is Rhodanthe corymbiflora.

Corymbiflorum: [ko-rim-bi-flor-um] From Korymbōs, which is Ancient Greek or Corymbōsum, which is Latin for a cluster of flowers and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, where the stems branch from different levels on the stalk’saxis but ultimately terminate at the same level. A good example isHelipterum corymbiflorum, which is now known as Rhodanthe corymbiflora.

Corymbiform: [ko-rim-bi-form] From Korymbōs, which is Ancient Greek or Corymbōsum, which is Latin for a cluster of flowers and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to flowers, where the stems branch from different levels on the stalk’s axis but ultimately terminate at the same level. A good example is found in the flowers of Alloxylon flammeum.

Corymborkis: [ko-rim-bor-kis] From Korymbōs, which is Ancient Greek or Corymbōsum, which is Latin for a cluster of flowers and Orhkis, which is Ancient Greek for a man’s testicles (an orchid). It refers to a floral cluster of flowers in these orchids forming corymbs. A good example is found in the flowers of Corymborkis veratrifolia.

Corymbosa: [ko-rim-boh-sa] From Korymbōs, which is Ancient Greek or Corymbōsa, which is Latin for a cluster of flowers. It refers to flowers, where the stems branch from different levels on the stalk’s axis but ultimately terminate at the same level. A good example is Poranthera corymbosa.

Corymbosum: [ko-rim-boh-sum] From Korymbōs, which is Ancient Greek or Corymbōsum, which is Latin for a cluster of flowers. It refers to flowers, where the stems branch from different levels on the stalk’s axis but ultimately terminate at the same level. A good example is Haemodorum corymbosum.

Corymbosus: [ko-rim-boh-sus] From Korymbōs, which is Ancient Greek or Corymbōsus, which is Latin for a cluster of flowers. It refers to flowers, where the stems branch from different levels on the stalk’s axis but ultimately terminate at the same level. A good example is Cyperus corymbosus.

Corymbulosa: [ko-rim-byoo-loh-sa] From Korymbōs, which is Ancient Greek or Corymbōsus, which is Latin for a cluster of flowers. It refers to flowers, where the stems branch from different levels on the stalk’s axis but ultimately terminate at the same level. A good example is the flowers on Baeckea corymbulosa.

Coryn: [ko-rahyn] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club. It refers to the club shape flower spikes.

Corynanthera: [ko-rahy-nan-theer-a] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to the club shape flower spikes. A good example is the flower spikes on Corynanthera flava.

Corynanthum: [ko-rahy-nan-thum] From Koryn, which is Greek for a club and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to the shape of the flower buds in some species. A good example is the flower buds on Syzygium corynanthum.

Corynepetala: [ko-rahy-ne-pe-ta-la] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators, the petals which are somewhat shaped like a club. A good example is Caladenia corynepetala, which is now known as Caladenia dilatata.

Corynepetalum: [ko-rahy-ne-pe-ta-lum] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators, the petals which are somewhat shaped like a club. A good example is Calonema corynepetalum, which is now known Caladenia dilatata.

Corynephora: [ko-rahy-ne-for-a] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to the hood over the labellum which has a club shape. A good example is Caladenia corynephora.

Corynephorus: [ko-rahy-ne-for-us] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to the hood over the labellum which has a club shape. A good example is the flower spikes on Corynephorus fasciculatus.

Corynocalyx: [ko-arhy-no-ka-liks] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club and Kalýptra/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for the specialized leaves, which grow behind the flowers. It refers to calyxes which are prominent or to species which have a calyx when other members of the genus the calyx is absent. A good example is the buds on Eucalyptus corynocalyx, which is now known as Eucalyptus cladocalyx.

Corynocarpa: [ko-rahy-no-kar-pa] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which resemble a club in form. A good example is Goodenia corynocarpa.

Corynocarpus: [ko-rahy-no-kar-pus] From Koryn, which is Greek for a club and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which resemble clubs. A good example is the fruits on Corynocarpus cribbianus.

Corynocarya: [ko-ahy-no-kar-ee-a] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club and karya, which is Ancient Greek for a nut. It refers to nuts which resemble clubs. A good example is the nuts on Fimbristylis corynocarya.

Corynoclada: [ko-ahy-no-kla-da] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club and klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stick, stem or branch. It refers to stems which resemble clubs. A good example is the fruits on Euphorbia corynoclada.

Corynodes: [ko-rahy-noh-deez] From Corynodes, which is Latin for to be shaped like a club. It refers to fruits, which resemble a club. A good example is Eucalyptus corynodes.

Corynophora: [ko-rahy-no-for-a] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble a club. A good example is the flower heads on Hydrocotyle corynophora.

Corynophylla: [ko-rahy-no-fahyl-la] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club and Pullen/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which resemble a club. A good example is the leaves on Babingtonia corynophylla.

Corynotheca: [ko-rahy-no-thee-ka] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club and Theka, which is Ancient Greek for a box or case. It refers to the fruits in some species, which somewhat resemble a club in shape. A good example is Corynotheca licrota.

Corynothecoides: [ko-rahy-no-the-koi-deez] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club, Theka, which is Ancient Greek for a box or case and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the Corynotheca genus in that their fruits in some species are somewhat resemble a club in shape. A good example is Tricoryne corynothecoides.

Corynothecus: [ko-rahy-no-thee-ka] From Koryn, which is Ancient Greek for a club and Theka, which is Ancient Greek for a box or case. It refers to the fruits in some species, which somewhat resemble a club in shape. A good example is Dipteracanthus australasicus subsp. corynothecus.

Corypha: [kor-ahy-fa] From Koryphe, which is Ancient Greek for a summit or top. It refers to the leaves, which are right at the apex of the branches. A good example is the leaves on the palm Corypha utan.

Corysanthes: [kor-ahy-san-theez] From Korys, which is Ancient Greek for a helmet and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower which is Ancient Greek for a box or case. It refers to the flowers, which resemble a helmet on the ground. A good example is Corysanthes aconitifloris, which is now known as Corybas aconitiforis.

Cosmelia: [kos-me-li-a] From Kósmos, which is Greek for orderly or an arrangement. It refers to the well arranged flowers. A good example is the flowers on the exotic Cosmelia sinensis, which is now known as Camelia sinensis.

Cosmiza: [kos-mi-za] From Kósmos/kósmic which is Ancient Greek for order and world, particularly in the order of the heavenly bodies. It refers to plants, which have been placed in an order within nature. A good example is found on Cosmiza coccinea, which is now known as Utricularia multifida.

Cosmophylla: [kos-mo-fahyl-la] From Kósmos, which is Ancient Greek for orderly or an arrangement and Pullen/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are arranged in a neat set order. A good example is Eucalyptus cosmophylla.

Cosmos: [koz-mos] From Kósmos, which is Ancient Greek for orderly or an arrangement. It refers to the well arranged flowers. A good example is the flowers on the exotic now unfortunately naturalized Cosmos sulphureus.

Cossinia: [kos-si-ni-a] Is named in honour of Joseph-François Charpentier de Cossigny; 1736-1809, who was French engineer and naturalist? who introduced the Chinese Lychee to the French Islands of Bourbon and Isle de France. A good example is Cossinia agustraliana.

Costa: [kos-ta] From Costālis, which is Latin for a rib or ribbed. A good example can be seen on the fronds/leaves of Livistona decepins.

The black line, surrounded by yellow at the base of the frond of Livistona benthamii is the costa

Costale: [kos-teil] From Costālis, which is Latin for a rib or ribbed. It refers to structures or organs, which have an appendage or other feature near a rib. A good example is Lepidosperma costale.

Costapalmate: [kos-ta-pal-meit] From Costālis, which is Latin for a rib or ribbed and palmatus, which is Latin for a leaf which has 4 or more lobes radiating From A, single position. Costapalmate leaves are usually strongly incurved especially near the base and decurved towards the apex. A good example of these leaves is found on Livistona concinna.

Costata: [kos-ta-ta] From Costālis, which is Latinlis for a rib or ribbed. It refers to a structure or an organ which is obviously coarsely raised. A good example is the fruits on Eucalyptus costata and the leaf veins on Acacia costata.

Costate: [kos-teit] From Costālis, which is Latin for a rib or ribbed. It refers to a description of a structure or an organ usually the leaves which obviously has raised veins. A good example is Angophora costata.

Costatifructum: [Ko-sta-ti-fruk-tum] From Costālis which is Latin for a rib or ribbed and Frū̆ctus which is Latin for to produce fruit. It refers to fruits, which are ribbed. A good example is Helichrysum costatifructum, which is now known as Ozothamnus costatifructus.

Costatifructus: [Ko-stah-ti-fruk-tus] From Costālis ,which is Latin for a rib or ribbed and Frū̆ctus/Frū̆ctūs which is Latin for to produce fruit. It refers to fruits, which are ribbed. A good example is Ozothamnus costatifructus.

Costatum: [kos-tei-tum] From Costātum, which is Latin for a rib or ribbed. It refers to a structure or an organ usually the leaves, which have obviously raised veins. A good example is Sideroxylon costatum, which is now known as Pouteria costata.

Costatus: [Ko-stei-tus] From Costālis, which is Latin for a rib or ribbed. It refers to the thick coriaceus (leathery) leaves being very strongly ribbed. A good example is Elaeocarpus costatus.

Costelloi: [Ko-stel-loi] Is named in honour of M. Costello, who collected the type specimen from near Lake Nash on the border between the Queensland and Northern Territory on the Barley Tableland. A good example is Dicrastylis costelloi.

Costiglumis: [kos-ti-gloo-mis] From Costālis, which is Latin for a rib or ribbed and Glūma, which is Latin for specialized bracts that cover grains. It refers to a description of specialized bracts, which cover grains that have a rib or ribs. A good example is Fimbristylis costiglumis.

Costinervis: [kos-ti-ner-vis] From Kostinos, which is Ancient Greek for the wild Olive and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have veins which resemble the olive tree leaf’s veins. A good example is Acacia costinervis which is now known as Acacia chisholmii.

Costiniana: [kos-tin-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Alec Baillie Costin; 1925-20.., who was an Australia botanist who was a Senior Research Scientist and Chief Research Scientist at the Division of Plant Industry, CSIRO from 1955-1974was an international authority on the ecology of high mountain and high latitude ecosystems. A good example is Poa costiniana.

Costinianum: [kos-tin-i-a-num] Is named in honour of Alec Baillie Costin; 1925-20.., who was an Australia botanist who was a Senior Research Scientist and Chief Research Scientist at the Division of Plant Industry, CSIRO from 1955-1974was an international authority on the ecology of high mountain and high latitude ecosystems. A good example is Racosperma costinianum, which is now known asAcacia costiniana.

Costula: [kos-tyoo-la] From Costulātī/Costulātō, which is Latin for to have ribs, which are not prominent. It usually It refers to a the fruits or seeds, which have a faint ridge. A good example is found on the sori margins of Cyathea woollsiana.

Costularia: [kos-tyoo-lar-i-a] From Costulātī/Costulātō, which is Latin for to have ribs that are not prominent. It usually It refers to a the fruits or seeds which have a faint ridge. A good example is found on the sori margins of Costularia paludosa.

Costulata: [kos-tyoo-la-ta] From Costulātī/Costulātō, which is Latin for to have faint ribs. It usually It refers to a the fruits or seeds which have a faint ridge. A good example is the lateral veins on the leaves of Casearia costulata which start off prominent and fade away as they approach the margins.

Costulatum: [kos-tyoo-la-tum] From Costulātī/Costulātō, which is Latin for to have ribs that are not prominent. It usually It refers to a the fruits or seeds, which have a faint ridge. A good example is found on the sori margins of Gossypium costulatum.

Costulifera: [kos-tyoo-li-fer-uh] From Costulātī/Costulātō, which is Latin for to have ribs which are not prominent and Ferae/Ferārum which are Latin for to bear or bearing. It usually It refers to leaf margins, which have faint ribs on the margins. A good example is Marsilea costulifera.

Costuligera: [kos-tyoo-li-jer-a] From Costulātī/Costulātō, which is Latin for to have ribs which are not prominent and Gera, which is Latin for to have. It usually It refers to leaf margins, which have a thickened edge similar to that found around the lip of many sea shells. A good example is Eucalyptus costuligera.

Costus: [kos-tus] From Costus, which is Latin from the name used by Pliny the Elder who derived it from the Arabic meaning for an aromatic root. It refers to many species having aromatic roots like the edible gingers. A good example is found on Costus potierae.

Cotinifolia: [ko-ti-ni-foh-lee-a] From Kotinum, which is Ancient Greek for the wig tree or Rhus of Europe and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to foliage, which resembles the Rhus tree of Europe. A good example is the leaves on Planchonella cotinifolia.

Cotinifolium: [ko-ti-n-foh-li-um] From Kotinum, which is Ancient Greek for the wig tree or Rhus of Europe and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to foliage, which resembles the Rhus tree of Europe. A good example is the leaves on Sideroxylon cotinifolium, which is now known as Planchonella cotinifolia.

Cotinifolius: [ko-ti-ni-foh-l-us] From Kotinum, which is Ancient Greek for the wig tree or Rhus tree of Europe and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to foliage, which resembles the Rhus tree of Europe. A good example is the leaves on Codonocarpus cotinifolius.

Cotoneaster: [ko-to-nee-as-ter] From Cotoneum, which is Latin for an apple and Quince and Aster, which is Latin for the Aster flowers of Eurasia. It refers to fruits, which have a fragrance similar to that of an apple or quince and or flowers that resemble small Asters. A good example is Pomaderris cotoneaster.

Cottony: [ko-to-nee] From Kutun, which is Latinized from the Arabic word for cotton. It refers to the appearance of a structure or an organ, which appears to be covered in cotton threads. A good example is the seed pods of Cochlospermum gillivraei which are packed with a soft cottony wool.

Cotula: [ko-tyoo-la] From Kotyle, which is Ancient Greek for a small cup. It refers to the involucre, which appear somewhat like a small cup. A good example is found on Cotula australis.

Cotuloides: [ko-tyoo-loi-deez] From Kotyle, which is Ancient Greek for a small cup and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the involucre, which appears somewhat like a small cup. A good example is found on Cotula cotuloides.

Cotyledon: [ko-ti-lee-don] From Kotyle, which is Ancient Greek for a small cup. It refers to the seed leaves, which is like a reserve of food in a cup. The first leaf of a monocotyledon plant or the two leaves of a dicotyledon plant.

Left Dicotyledon Cupaniopsis anacharioides Right Parsonia stramine
Commelina cyanea monocotyledon

Cotylespermous: [kot-i-le-sper-mos] From Kotyle, which is Ancient Greek for a small cup and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the food reserves in cotyledon, derived from zygote.

Coulteri: [kul-ter-ahy] Is named in honour of Coulter. A good example is Acacia coulteri.

Courtii: [kor-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Aurther Bertrum Court; 1927-2012, who was an Australian whose early works included ferns and orchids in the Dandenongs in Victoria but was an authority on the Acacia genus. A good example is Acacia courtii.

Couttsiana: [koot-si-a-na] Is named in honour of Coutts. A good example is Cycas couttsiana.

Covellia: [ko-vel-i-a] Is probably named in honour of John Covel; 1638–1722, who was an English clergyman and botanist. A good example is Covellia oppositifolia, which is now known as Ficus hispida.

Coveniella: [ko-ven-i-el-la] From Coven, which is Latin for unknown meaning and Ella, which is Latin for the female form. A good example is the fern Coveniella poecilophlebia.

Covenyana: [ko-ven-ahy-a-na] Is named in honour of Robert ‘Bob’ George Coveny; 1943–20.., who was an Australian botanist. A good example is Hibbertia covenyana which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to its real or correct classification.

Covenyi: [ko-ven-ahy] Is named in honour of Robert ‘Bob’ George Coveny; 1943–20.., who was an Australian botanist. A good example is Olearia covenyi or Acacia covenyi.

Cowaniana: [kour-an-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Richard S. Cowan; 1921-1997, who was an American born Australian taxonomist and bibliographer. A good example is Acacia cowleana.

Cowiei: [kour-wi-ee] Is named in honour of Cowie. A good example is Digitaria cowiei.

Cowleana: [kour-lee-a-na] Is named in honour of Cowle. A good example is Acacia cowleana.

Cowleanum: [kour-lee-an-um] Is named in honour of Cowley but which Gowley cannot be substantiated. A good example is Racosperma cowleanum, which is now known as Acacia cowleana.

Cowleyana: [kour-lahy-a-na] Is named in honour of Cowley but which Gowley cannot be substantiated. A good example is Aidia cowleyi.

Cowleyi: [kour-lee-ahy] Is named in honour of Cowley but which Cowley cannot be substantiated. A good example is Aidia cowleyi.

Coxii: [kok-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Dr. James Charles Cox; 1834-1912, who was an Australian medical practitioner and conchologist who learnt much about the bush from being raised amongst aboriginal children. A good example is Phabelium coxii.

Cracca: [krah-ka] From Graccum, which is Ancient Greek for a pebble. It refers to plants, which grow amongst half decomposed granitic or rhyolitic pebbles mixed with sand. A good example is Cracca astragalodes, which is now known as Tephrosia astragaloides.

Cracens: [kra-kenz] From Cracēns, which is Latin for slender, neat and graceful. It refers to plants, which have a delicate appearance. A good example is Pimelea cracens.

Cracente: [kra-sen-te] From Cracēns which is Latin for slender, neat and graceful. It refers to plants, which have a delicate appearance. A good example is Racosperma cracente, which is now known as Acacia cracentis.

Cracentis: [kra-sen-tis] From Cracēns, which is Latin for slender, neat and graceful. It refers to plants, which have a delicate appearance. A good example is Acacia cracentis.

Cranei: [krah-ne-ahy] Is named in honour of Crane, but which Crane cannot be substantiated. A good example is Genoplesium cranei.

Crantzia: [krant-zi-a] Is named in honour of Heinrich Johann Nepomuk Crantz;1722-1797, who was a Luxembourger physician and botanist. A good example is Crantzia polyantha, which is now known as Lilaeopsis polyantha.

Craspedia: [kras-pe-di-a] From Craspedia, which is Latin for an edging fringe. It refers to the fruits or seeds having a fringe. A good example is the seeds on Craspedia canens.

Craspedioides: [kras-pe-di-oi-deez] From Craspedium, which is Latin for an edging fringe and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to fruits or seeds which have a distinct fringe and looking similar to that of the Craspedia genus. A good example is Ammobium craspedioides.

Craspedocarpa: [kras-pe-do-kar-pa] From Craspedium, which is Latin for an edging fringe and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits and the pedicels which have a membranous to thick fringe like edge. A good example is Acacia craspedocarpa.

Craspedocarpum: [kras-pe-do-kar-pum] From Craspedium, which is Latin for an edging fringe and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits and the pedicels which have a membranous to thick fringe like edge. A good example is Acacia craspedocarpa, which is now known as Racosperma craspedocarpum.

Craspedodromous: [kras-pe-do-dro-mos] From Crasp, which is Latin for an edge fringe, Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet and Dromous, which is Ancient Greek for moving or running. It refers to a simple leaf venation which has a single primary vein with the lateral (secondary) veins terminating at the margin with them dividing and the divided vein terminating running inside the margin.

Craspedophyllum: [kras-pe-do-fahyl-lum] From Craspedium which is Latin for an edging fringe and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf or frond. It refers to a fronds which have a thin membraneous edge. A good example isthe filmy fern Craspedophyllum marginatum, which is now known as Hymenophyllum marginatum.

Crass: [kras] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump.

Crassa: [krah-sa] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump. It refers to the fruits being thicker than other species in the genus. A good example is Sannantha crassa.

Crassicalyx: [kras-si-ka-liks] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Kályx/Kalýptein which is Ancient Greek for a husk or covering – the calyx. It refers to calyxes, which are much thicker than many other species in the genus. A good example is Hibiscus crassicalyx.

Crassicarpa: [kras-si-kar-pa] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to pods, which are much thicker than many other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia crassicarpa.

Crassicarpum: [kras-si-kar-pum] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to pods, which are much thicker than many other species in the genus. A good example is Racosperma crassicarpum, which is now known as Acacia crassicarpa.

Crassicaudex: [kras-si-kor-deks] From Crassu, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Caudex which is Latin for a trunk or stem. It refers to the base of the culms, which is swollen like the base of many tree trunks. A good example is Poa crassicaudex.

Crassicaulis: [kras-si-kor-lis] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Kaulos, which is Latin for a branch. It refers to the branches, stems or spikes, which are thicker when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is the stems on Cajanus crassicaulis or the spikes on Pterostylis crassicaulis.

Crassiflora: [kras-si-flor-a] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. A good example is Endiandra crassiflora.

Crassiflorus: [kras-si-flor-us] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. A good example is Leucopogon crassiflorus.

Crassifloris: [kras-si-flor-is] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. A good example is Leucopogon crassifloris.

Crassifolia: [kras-si-foh-li-a] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are rather thick and somewhat fleshy. A good example is the leaves on Scaevola crassifolia.

Crassifolium: [kras-si-foh-li-um] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are rather thick. A good example is the leaves on Bulbophyllum crassulifolium.

Crassifolius: [kras-si-foh-li-us] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are rather thick. A good example is the leaves on Niemeyera whiteii.

Crassifrugis: [kras-si-froo-jis] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Frugum, which is Latin for a fruit. It refers to pods on Acacias, which have very thick valves and at times may include the septum where one exists. A good example is Acacia crassifrugis which is now known as Acacia pachycarpa.

Crassilabra: [kras-si-la-bra] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Lābrum/Lavābrum, which are Ancient Greek for a candle stick holder. It refers to the markings on lichens which often resemble candaliers. A good example is Graphis crassilabra.

Crassinerva: [kras-si-ner-va] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick and Neûron, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to plant veins, which are much thicker and more conspicuous than other species in the genus. A good example is Conostylis crassinerva.

Crassinervium: [kras-si-ner-vi-um] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Neûron, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve or vein. It refers to plant veins, which are much thicker and more conspicuous than other species in the genus. A good example is Conospermum crassinervium.

Crassipes: [kras-si-peez] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek for a foot or feet. It refers to pedicels, which are much thicker in this species than other species in the genus. A good example is Crotalaria crassipes.

Crassilabra: [kras-si-la-bra] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Lābrum/Lavābrum, which are Ancient Greek for a candle stick holder. It refers to the markings on lichens which often resemble candaliers. A good example is Graphis crassilabra.

Crassinerva: [kras-si-ner-va] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick and Neûron, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to plant veins, which are much thicker and more conspicuous than other species in the genus. A good example is Conosylis crassinerva.

Crassinervum: [kras-si-ner-vum] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Neûron, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve or vein. It refers to plant veins, which are much thicker and more conspicuous than other species in the genus. A good example is Conospermum crassinervum.

Crassipes: [kras-si-peez] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek for a foot or feet. It refers to pedicels, which are much thicker in this species than other species in the genus. A good example is Crotalaria crassipes.

Crassipetala: [kras-si-pe-ta-la] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to petals, which are much thicker in this species than other species in the genus. A good example is Acronychia crassipetala.

Crassipetalum: [kras-si-pe-ta-lum] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators. It refers to the petals being much thicker in this species when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Melodorum crassipetalum.

Crassirameum: [kras-si-r-mee-um] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Grameum, which is Latin for grass like. It refers to plants, which have an overall appearance of a tuft of grass From A, distance when not in flower. A good example is Sphaerolobium crassirameum, which is now known as Sphaerolobium drummondii.

Crassiramifera: [krah-si-ra-mi-fer-a] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to a structure or organs, which is rather thick. A good example is the leaves on Symplocos crassiramifera.

Crassissimum: [kras-sis-si-mum] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Issimum, which is Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to structures or organs, which are much thicker than the other species in the genus. A good example is Solanum crassissimum, which is now known as Solanum lasiophyllum.

Crassistipula: [kras-si-sti-pyoo-la] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Stipulum, which is Latin for a stalk, stubble or straw. It refers to structures or organs, which are much thicker than the other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia crassistipula.

Crassistipulum: [kras-si-sti-pyoo-lum] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Stipulum, which is Latin for a stalk, stubble or straw. It refers to structures or organs, which are much thicker than the other species in the genus. A good example is Racosperma crassistipulum, which is now known as Acacia crassistipula.

Crassitomentosum: [kras-si-to-men-toh-sum] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick and Tomentosum, which is Latin for soft straight hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in tomentose hairs. A good example is Solanum crassitomentosum.

Crassiuscula: [kras-si-u-skyoo-la] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Uscula, which is Latin for little or smaller. It refers to a structure or organs, which is a little thicker than most other species in the genus. A good example is the flowering culm and flowering head on Isolepis crassiuscula.

Crassiusculum: [kras-si-u-skyoo-lum] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Uscula, which is Latin for little or smaller. It refers to a structure or organs, which is a little thicker than most other species in the genus. A good example is the flowering culm and flowering head on Racosperma crassiusculum, which is now known as Acacia crassiuscula subsp. crassiuscula.

Crassiusculus: [kras-si-u-skyoo-lus] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Uscula, which is Latin for little or smaller. It refers to a structure or organ, which is a little thicker than most other species in the genus. A good example is the flowering culm and flowering head on Scirpus crassiusculus, which is now known as Isolepis crassiuscula.

Crassivalvis: [kras-si-val-vis] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Valva which is Latin for the leaf on a door. It refers to fruits/cones which have thick woody valves. A good example is Callitris crassivalvis.

Crassocephalum: [kras-so-ke/se-fa-lum] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Képhalos, which is Greek for a head. It refers to flowers, which are dense compact heads. A good example is weed thistle Crassocephalum crepidioides.

Crassula: [kras-syoo-la] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump. It refers to the thick, fleshy stems and leaves. A good example is Crassula sieberiana.

Crassulaefolium: [kras-syoo-lee-foh-li-um] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are much thick than many other species in the genus. A good example is Dendrobium crassulaefolium.

Crassulifolium: [kras-si-foh-li-um] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick and fleshy and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are much thicker than other secies in the genus. A good example is the leaves on Bulbophyllum crassulifolium.

Crassuloides: [kras-syoo-loi-deez] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, usually the leaves or phyllodes, which are usually much thicker than other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia crassuloides.

Crassulus: [kras-syoo-lus] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump. It refers to fleshy stems and leaves, which are thicker than other species in the genus. A good example was Ablabus crassulus, which is now known as Isolepis crassiuscula.

Crassum: [krasum] From Crassum, which is Latin for thick, dense or plump. It refers to the fruits, which are thicker than other species in the genus. A good example is Cladium crassum, which is now known as Baumea rubiginosa.

Crassus: [krasus] From Crassus which is Latin for thick, dense or plump. It refers to the fruits, which are thicker than other species in the genus. A good example is Calothamnus crassus.

Crataeva: [kra-tee-va] Is named in honour of Kratevas who was a 1st century Greek herbalist, renowned for his skill in poisoning animals. It is a spelling error for Crateva. A good example is Crateva religiosa.

Craterellus: [kra-ter-el-lus] From Kratero, which is Ancient Greek for strong and sturdy and Elle, which is Latin for to take the female form. It refers to the fruits and leaves, which are somewhat tougher than other species in the genus. A good example is the flowers and fruits on Craterellus australis.

Crateriform: [kra-ter-i-form] From Kratero. which is Ancient Greek for strong and sturdy and Forme which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the fruits and leaves which are very tough. A good example is the flowers and fruits on Garcinia warrenii.

Crateriformis: [kra-ter-i-for-mis] From Kratero, which is Greek for strong and sturdy and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the culms and leaves, which are much tougher than the other species in the genus which are normally very dainty. A good example is Eragrostis crateriformis.

Crateva: [kra-tee-va] Is named in honour of Kratevas, who was a 1st century Greek herbalist, renowned for his skill in poisoning animals. A good example is Crateva religiosa.

Cratista: [kra-tis-ta] From Crātis, which is Latin for wickerwork, a bundle of brush or fascine. It refers to stems, which resemble a bundle of fencing brush or fascine. A good example is Grevillea wickhamii subsp. cratista.

Cratistylis: [kra-ti-stahy-lis] From Kratero, which is Ancient Greek for strong and sturdy and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a part of the female reproductive organ between the ovaries and the stigma. It refers to styles, which are sturdy as well as tough. A good example is Banksia subser. Cratistylis which includes Banksia serrata and Banksia ornata.

Cratystylis: [kra-ti-stahy-lis] From Kratero, which is Ancient Greek for strong and sturdy and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a part of the female reproductive organ between the ovaries and the stigma. It refers to styles, which are sturdy as well as tough. A good example is Cratystylis microphylla.

Craurophylla: [krour-ro-fahy-la] From Kraurosis, which is Ancient Greek for brittle or to have shrinking epidermis and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are crinkled and appear to be shrinking and are somewhat brittle. A good example is Commersonia craurophylla.

Cravenii: [kra-ve-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Lyndley Allen Craven; 1945-2014, who was an Australian botanist, horticulturalist and plant collector. A good example is Hygrochloa cravenii.

Crawfordii: [kror-for-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Alexander Robert Crawford; 1840-1912; who was an Irish born Australian farmer and critical observer of many grasses and Eucalyptus. A good example was Eucalyptus crawfordii which is a defunct name given to what now appears to be a natural hybrid.

Creba: [kree-ba] From Crēberrimum, which is Latin for crowded or pressed together. It refers to the leaves in the crown, which are rather dense or the flowers being very compact. A good example of a dense crown is found on Eucalyptus creba.

Creber: [kree-ber] From Crēberrimum, which is Latin for crowded or pressed together. It refers to the racemes being held close together up to inflorescences. A good example is Erichloa creber.

Creberrima: [kree-ber-ri-ma] From Crēberrimum, which is Latin for crowded or pressed together. It refers to the racemes being held close together up to inflorescences. A good example is Levenhookia creberrima.

Crebriflora: [kre-bri-flor-a] From Crēberrimum, which is Latin for crowded or pressed together and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman Goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are crowded along the stems or spikes. A good example of flowers that are crowded along the spikes is on Gastrodia crebriflora.

Crebriflorum: [kre-bri-flor-um] From Crēberrimum, which is Latin for crowded or pressed together and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman Goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are crowded along the stems or spikes. A good example of flowers that are crowded along the spikes is on Prasophyllum crebriflorum.

Crebriflorus: [kre-bri-flor-um] From Crēberrimum, which is Latin for crowded or pressed together and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman Goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are crowded along the stems or spikes. A good example of flowers that are crowded along the spikes is on the ground orchid Urochilus crebriflorus, which is now known as Pterostylis crebriflora.

Crebrinerve: [kre-bri-ner-ve] From Crēberrimum, which is Latin for crowded or pressed together and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve. It refers to nerves on the leaves, which are rather dense. A good example of crowded nerves is found on Syzygium crebrinerve.

Creethae: [kree-thee] From Kreethia, which is Ancient Greek for a cliff and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which love growing on, above or beneath cliffs. A good example of a plant which grows on and above cliffs is Parakeeya creethae, which is now known as Calandrinia/Candrina creethae.

Cremiflora: [kre-mi-flor-a] From Cremo, which is Latin for a fire or to be destroyed by fire and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman Goddess for spring and flowers. It may refer to flowers, which are the colour of flames. A good example of flowers, which are much deeper in colour than other species in the genus is Acacia cremiflora.

Cremiflorum: [kre-mi-flor-um] From Cremo, which is Latin for a fire or to be destroyed by fire and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman Goddess for spring and flowers. It may refer to flowers, which are the colour of flames. A good example of flowers, which are much deeper in colour than other species in the genus is Racosperma cremiflorum, which is now known as Acacia cremiflora.

Cremnophila: [krem-no-fi-la] From Kremnos, which is Ancient Greek for a cliff and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to plants, which love to grow on the edges of cliffs or cliff faces. A good example is the critically endangered Pimelea cremnophila of which fewer than 100 plants are known.

Cremnothamnus: [kre-no-thahm-nus] From Kremnos, which is Ancient Greek for a cliff and Thamnos, which is Ancient Greek for a shrub. It refers to the shrubs, which grow on the edges of cliffs. A good example is Cremnothamnus thomsonii.

Cremnus: [krem-nos] From Kremnos, which is Ancient Greek for a cliff. It refers to shrubs which grow on the edges of cliffs. A good example was Plectranthus cremnus which is now known as Coleus cremnus.

Crenata: [kre-na-ta] From Crenate, which is Latin for scalloped or obtusely rounded. It usually It refers to leaf margins, which are crenate or at times the petals or sepals. A good example is the leaves on Nympoides crenata.

Crenate: [kre-neit] From Crenate, which is Latin for scalloped or obtusely rounded. It refers to plants, which have crenate leaves or at times the margins of petals, sepals or stipules. A good example is found in the description of the leaves on Eucalyptus crenulata.

Crenatifolia: [kre-na-ti-foh-li-a] From Crenate, which is Latin for scalloped or obtusely rounded. It refers to plants, which have crenate leaves or at times the margins of petals, sepals or stipules. A good example is found in the description of the leaves on Baeckea crenatifolia.

Crenatum: [kre-ne-tum] From Crenate, which is Latin for scalloped or obtusely rounded. It refers to plants, which have very crenate leaves or at times the margins of petals, sepals or stipules. A good example is Tetrastigma crenatum.

Crenidium: [kre-ni-di-um] From Crenate, which is Latin for scalloped or obtusely rounded. It usually It refers to leaf margins, which are obtusely toothed. A good example is  found on the leaves Crenidium spinescens.

Crenifoliola: [kre-ni-foh-li-oh-la] From Crenate, which is Latin for scalloped or obtusely rounded and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It usually It refers to leaf margins, which are obtusely toothed. A good example is Guioa crenifoliola, which is now known as Guioa sarcopterifructa.

Crenulata: [kre-nyoo-la-ta] From Crenate, which is Latin for scalloped or obtusely rounded. It usually It refers to the leaf margins, which are obtusely toothed. A good example is  found on the leaves Boronia crenulata.

Crenulate: [kre-nyoo-leit] From Crenate, which is Latin for scalloped or obtusely rounded. It usually It refers to leaf margins, which are shallowly toothed. A good example is found in the description of Nympoides crenulata.

Crenulatum: [kre-nyoo-lei-tum] From Crenate, which is Latin for scalloped or obtusely rounded. It usually It refers to leaf margins, which are strongly toothed. A good example is  found on the leaves of Racosperma crenulatum, which is now known as Acacia crenulata.

Crenulatus: [kre-nyoo-lei-tus] From Crenate, which is Latin for scalloped or obtusely rounded. It usually It refers to leaf margins which are strongly toothed. A good example is  found on the leaves of Xanthóstemon crenulatus.

Crepidomanes: [kre-pi-do-meinz] From Krepis, which is Ancient Greek for a slipper and Mānis, which is Ancient Greek for a special type of cup. It refers to the shape and form of the invocular bracts, which resemble a cup. A good example is Crepidomanes aphlebioides.

Crepidophyllum: [kre-pi-do-fahyl-lum] From Krepis, which is Ancient Greek for a slipper and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to flowers, fronds or leaves which resemble a slipper. A good example is Crepidophyllum australiense.

Crepidopteris: [kre-pi-do-te-ris] From Krepis, which is Ancient Greek for a slipper and Pteros/Pterón, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to the base of leaves or fronds, which have are attached to the petiole or sten with a wing. A good example is Crepidopteris australiensis.

Crepidotus: [kre-pi-do-tus] From Krepis, which is Ancient Greek for a slipper. It refers to fungi which have a strong symbiotic relationship with a genus or a few species. A good example is the fungus Crepidotus eucalyptorum which grows in Eucalyptus forests.

Crepuscular: [kre-pus-kyoo-lar] From Crepusculum/Krepos, which are Latin for twilight. It refers to animals which are active during sunset and sunrise or the twilight zones of the day. A good example is the Australian nightjar Aegotheles cristatus.

Cressa: [kres-sa] From Kreta, which is Ancient Greek for reference to a woman from Crete. It refers to the halo type which was first described from Crete however the reference to a lady is unclear to the author. A good example is found on the leaves of Cressa cretica var. australis.

Crest: [krest] From Crista, which is Latin or Creste, which is old English for a ridge. It refers to a ridge or distinct keel as seen on many flowers especially those in the Fabaceae family. A good example is found on the leaves of Jacksonia scoparia.

Creta: [kre-ta] From Cretaceum/Creta, which are Latin for to be marked with or covered in chalk. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on chalky, alkaline clays or have a very chalky appearence. A good example is the appearance of Eucalyptus cretata.

Cretacea: [kre-ta-see-a] From Cretacea, which is Latin for chalk. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on cretaceous soils or chalky alkaline soils. A good example is Acacia cretacea.

Cretaceum: [kre-te-see-um] From Cretaceum/Cretum, which is Latin for to be marked with or covered in chalk. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on chalky, alkaline clays or have a very chalky appearance. A good example is the overall appearance of the pileus on Nothocastoreum cretaceum.

Cretaceum: [kre-ta-see-um] From Cretaceum/Cretum, which is Latin for to be marked with or covered in chalk. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on chalky, alkaline clays or have a very chalky appearance. A good example is the overall appearance of the pileus and stipe on Leucocoprinus cretaceus.

Cretata: [kre-ta-ta] From Cretaceum/Cretata, which is Latin for to be marked with or covered in chalk. It refers to stems, buds and fruits which are covered in a chalky white powder. A good example is Eucalyptus cretata.

Cretatum: [kre-ta-tum] From Cretaceum/Cretata, which is Latin for to be marked with or covered in chalk. It refers to stems, buds and fruits which are covered in a chalky white powder. A good example is Racosperma cretatum, which is now known as Acacia cretata.

Cretica: [kre -ti-ka] From Cretaceum/Cretata, which is Latin for to be marked with or covered in chalk. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in a chalky white powder. A good example is the fronds of Pteris cretica.

Cribbiana: [kri-bi-a-na] Is named in honour of the husband and wife team of Doctor Alan Bridson Cribb; 1925-2…, who was an Australian botanist, phycologist who specialized in seaweeds and Joan Winifred Cribb (Nee Herbert); 1930-2…, who was an Australian botanist who specialized in Australian fungi. A good example is Cyanocarpus cribbiana.

Cribbianus: [kri-bi-a-nus] Is named in honour of the husband and wife team of Doctor Alan Bridson Cribb;1925-2…, who was an Australian botanist, phycologist who specialized in seaweeds and Joan Winifred Cribb (Nee Herbert); 1930-2…, who was an Australian botanist who specialized in Australian fungi. A good example is Corynocarpus cribbianus.

Crinifera: [kri-ni-feer-a] From Crīnītum, which is Latin for a hair and Ferae/Ferārum which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants which bear long hairs.

Criniferus: [kri-ni-feer-us] From Crīnītum, which is Latin for a hair and Ferus, which is Latin for bearing. It refers to plants, which have long, silky hairs. A good example is Patersonia sericea.

Criniforme: [kri-ni-form] From Crīnītum, which is Latin for a hair and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which have long silky hairs similar to other plants. A good example is Paspalidium criniforme.

Criniformis: [kri-ni-for-mis] From Crīnītum, which is Latin for a hair and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which have long course hairs. A good example is rachis and seed heads on Setaria criniformis.

Crinipellis: [kri-ni-pel-lis] From Crīnītum, which is Latin for long hair and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to plants, which have long, silky hairs. A good example is Crinipellis australis.

Crinipes: [kri-ni-peez] From Crīnītum, which is Latin for long hair. It refers to plants, which have long, silky hairs. A good example is Ammannia crinipes.

Crinipodus: [kri-ni-po-dus] From Crīnītum, which is Latin for long hair and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to pedicels, which are somewhat covered in long, silky hairs. A good example is Euchilus crinipodus, which is now known as Pultenaea rotundifolia.

Crinisequi: [kri-ni-s-chwe] From Crīnītum, which is Latin for long hair and Quod/Qu, which is Latin for because, which or until. It refers to the stalks on fungi which are very hair or thread like. A good example is Marasmius crinisequi.

Crinita: [kri-ni-ta] From Crīnītum, which is Latin for long hair. It refers to plants, which have long, silky hairs. A good example is Dichelachne cinita.

Crinitum: [kri-ni-tum] From Crīnītum, which is Latin for long hair. It refers to plants, which have very long, silky hairs. A good example is Pogonatherum crinitum.

Crinitus: [kri-ni-tus] From Crīnītum, which is Latin for long hair. It refers to plants, which have a lot of long, silky hairs. A good example is Dilophus crinitus, which is extinct or extremely rare fern from South Australia as it has only been described from the type specimen.

Crinizonatum: [kri-ni-zo-na-tum] From Crīnītum, which is Latin for long hair. It refers to structures or organs, which have very long, silky hairs. A good example is the flower and seed heads on Schizachyrium crinizonatum.

Crinoides: [kri-noi-deez] From Crīnītum, which is Latin for long hair and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have a lot of long, silky hairs. A good example is Dianella crinoides.

Crinum: [krahy-num] From Krinon, which is Ancient Greek for a Lily. It refers to plants, which have typicalcharacteristics of the Lily family. A good example is Crinum pedunculata.

Crispa: [kris-pa] From Crispus, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy. It refers to an organ, which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin. A good example is the wavy petals on Frankenia crispa.

Crispata: [kris-pa-ta] From Crispus, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy. It refers to organs especially the sheaths which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin. A good example is Pollia crispata.

Crispate: [kris-peit] From Crispum, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy. It refers to structures or organs, which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin. A good example is the hairs on the calyx lobes of Elattostachys xylocarpa.

Crispatum: [kris-pa-tum] From Crispum, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy. It refers to structures or organs, which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin. A good example is the leaves on Myriophyllum crispatum.

Crispatus: [kris-pa-tus] From Crispum, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy. It refers to structures or organs, which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin. A good example is the leaves on Ricinocarpos crispatus.

Crisped: [kris-pt] From Crispum, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin. A good example is the leaf margins of Astrotricha latifolia.

Crispiflora: [kris-pi-flor-a] From Crispum, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin.

Crispifolia: [kris-pi-foh-li-a] From Crispum, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy and Folium, which is Latin for a leaf. It refers to structures or organs which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin. A good example is Astrotricha latifolia.

Crispifolium: [kris-pi-foh-li-um] From Crispum, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy and Folium, which is Latin for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin. A good example is Gastrolobium crispifolium, which is now known as Gastrolobium truncatum.

Crispii: [kris-pi-ahy] Is named in honour of Crisp but which Crisp cannot be substantiated. It refers to plants, which have curly, wavy or ruffle organs usually the leaves. A good example is Dillwynia crispii.

Crispiloba: [kris-pi-loh-ba] From Crispum, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy and Lobós, which is Ancient Greek or Lobus which is Latin for an ear lobe. It refers to flower lobes, which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin. A good example is Crispiloba disperma.

Crispula: [kris-pyoo-la] From Crispa, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy. It refers to structures or organs, which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin. A good example is Acacia crispula.

Crispulum: [kris-pyoo-lum] From Crispum, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy. It refers to structures or organs, which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin. A good example is Racosperma crispulum, which is now known as Acacia crispula.

Crispulus: [kris-pyoo-lus] From Crispus, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy. It refers to structures or organs, which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin. A good example is Cyperus crispulus.

Crispus: [kris-pus] From Crispum, which is Latin for a curl, curly or wavy. It refers to structures or organs, which have curly, wavy or ruffled surface or margin. A good example is Potamogeton crispus.

Cristata: [kris-ta-ta] From Cristatus, which is Latin for to have a crest. It refers to a description of structures or organs, which have a crest. A good example is Hakea cristata.

Cristate: [kris-teit] From Cristatum, which is Latin for to have a crest. It refers to a description structures or organs, which have a crest. A good example is Hakea cristata.

Cristatum: [kris-tei-tum] From Cristatum which is Latin for to have a crest. It refers to leaves or other organs, which have a very prominent crest. A good example is on Sphagnum cristatum.

Cristatus: [kris-tei-tus] From Cristatus, which is Latin for to have a crest. It refers to structures or organs, which have a crest. A good example is the little owlet nightjar Aegotheles cristatus.

Cristonia: [kris-to-ni-a] From Cristatum, which is Latin for to have a crest. Its reference is unclear. A good example is extended standard petals on Cristonia biloba.

Cristulata: [kris-tyoo-la-ta] From Cristatum, which is Latin for to have a crest. It refers to flower heads which form a crown or crest at the apex of the stems. A good example is Spermacoce cristulata.

Cristulatus: [kris-tyoo-la-tus] From Cristatus, which is Latin for to have a crest. Its reference is unclear. A good example is the flower heads on Cyperus cristulatus.

Crithmifolia: [krith-mi-foh-li-a] From Krithe, which is Ancient Greek for the sea Samphire and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have foliage which resembles the sea samphire in the Crithmum genus. A good example is Grevillea crithmifolia.

Crithmifolium: [krith-mi-foh-li-um] From Krithe, which is Ancient Greek for the sea Samphire and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have foliage which resembles the sea samphire in the Crithmum genus. A good example is the flower crest on Isopogon crithmifolium.

Crithmifolius: [krith-mi-foh-li-us] From Krithe, which is Ancient Greek for the sea Samphire and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have foliage which resembles the sea samphire in the Crithmum genus. A good example is the flower crest on Isopogon crithmifolius.

Croachiana: [kroa-chi–na] Is named in honour of Maria Croach (nee Telford) , who collected for Ferdiand von Mueller between 1874-1876 in Western Australia. A good example is Oldenlandia crouchiana.

Croajingolensis: [kroh-jin-go-len-sis] From Croajingol, which is Latin from the vernacular for the local aboriginal people and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the original plants, which were first discovered in the Croajingol National Park which is named after the local aboriginal tribe. A good example is Eucalyptus croajingolensis.

Crocata: [kroh-k-ta] From Krókos, which is Latin for the golden yellow Safron. It refers to plants, which resemble golden-yellow Safron in colour. It refers to the colour of the flowers, which are brilliant golden-yellow. A good example is Craspedia crocata.

Crocea: [kro-see-a] From Krókos, which is Latin for Safron. It refers to plants, which resemble Safron crocus. Its reference is unclear in some way. A good example was Cracca crocea, which is now known as Tephrosia crocea.

Croceum: [kro-see-um] From Krókos, which is Latin for Safron. It refers to plants, which resemble Safron crocus in some way. Its reference is unclear. A good example is Stenopetalum croceum, which is now known as Stenopetalum lineare and Stenopetalum robustum.

Crociformis: [kro-ki-for-mis] From Krókos, which is Ancient Greek for Safron and Formis which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to a structure or organ, which resembles the exotic safron, Safron crocus. A good example is the flowers on Nervilia crociformis.

Crociphylla: [kro-si-fahyl-la] From Krókos, which is Ancient Greek for Safron and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to a structure or organ, which resembles the exotic safron, Safron crocus. A good example is the yellow coloured pileus and the yellow exudant squeezed from the mushroom Flammula crociphylla, which is now known as Gymnopilus crociphyllus. (The edibility of this fungi is unknown)

Crociphyllus: [kro-si-fahyl-lus] From Krókos, which is Ancient Greek for Safron and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to a structure or organ, which resembles the exotic safron, Safron crocus. A good example is the yellow coloured pileus and the yellow exudant squeezed from the mushroom Gymnopilus crociphyllus Flammula crociphylla. (The edibility of this fungi is unknown)

Crocodiliensis: [kro-ko-di-li-en-sis] From Krokódeilos, which is Ancient Greek or Crocodīlus, which is Latin for a crocodile and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which grow in areas where crocodiles always frequent. A good example is Planchonella crocodiliensis, which is now known as Planchonella arnhemica.

Croftianus: [krof-ti-a-nus] Is named in honour of Jim R Croft; 1951 -20.., who was an Australian botanist who worked and lived in Papua New Guinee specializing in ferns and later moved to Canberra and was in charge of the Australian Herbarium and Anus which is Latin for pertaining to. A good example is Homoranthus croftianus.

Crombiei: [krom-bi-ahy] Is named in honour of Crombi; 1881-1942, who was a pastoral manager and politician. A good example is Acacia crombiei.

Croninia: [kro-ni-n-a] Is named in honour of Mary Anne Croni; 1871-1974, who was an Australian plant collector for Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Croninia kingiana.

Croniniae: [kro-ni-ni-ee] Is named in honour of Mary Anne Croni; 1871-1974, who was an Australian plant collector for Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Conospermum croniniae.

Croniniana: [kro-ni-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Mary Anne Croni; 1871-1974, who was an Australian plant collector for Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Asteridea croniniana.

Crook: [krook] From Crook, which is Nordic for an appendage that is bent or curved. It often It refers to having a hook at the end like a shepherds crook. A good example is the style on Hakea teretifolia.

Crosslandia: [kros-slan-di-a] Is probably named in honour of Charles Crossland; 1858-1911, who was an explorer in the Kimberley Range in 1905. A good example is Crosslandia setifolia.

Crosslandiana: [kros-slan-di-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Charles Crossland; 1858-1911, who was an explorer in the Kimberley Range in 1905. A good example is Melaleuca crosslandiana, which is now known as Melaleuca nervosa subsp. crosslandiana.

Crosslandii: [kros-slan-di-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Charles Crossland; 1858-1911, who was an explorer in the Kimberley Range in 1905. A good example was Dipteranthemum crosslandii, which is now known as Ptilotus crosslandii.

Crossocephalum: [kros-soh-ke-fa-lum] From Crux, which is Latin for a cross and Kephalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flowers, which form in heads with individual flowers resembling crosses. A good example is Stylidium crossocephalum.

Crossolepis: [kros-so-le-pis] From Crux, which is Latin for a cross and Lepis which is Latin for a scale. It may It refers to the scales which have crosses or are cross shaped. A good example is Crossolepis eriocephala, which is now known as Gnephosis eriocephala.

Crosstriolate: [kros-strahy-oh-leit] From Crux, which is Latin for a cross and Striata, for to be fluted ot striped. It refers to having horizontal striations.

Crotalaria: [kroh-ta-lair-i-a] From Krotalon, which is Ancient Greek for a rattle or to rattle. It refers to the seeds within the pods; of most species, breaking away from their aril when ripe and prior to the dehiscing of the pods. This allows the seeds to make the rattling sound when shaken. A good example is the beautiful Crotalaria novae-hollandiae.

Croton: [kroh-ton] From Croton, which is Ancient Greek for a tick. It refers to the seeds which resemble the shape of a tick (arthropods) in many species. A good example is the seeds of Croton insularis.

Crowded: [kroud-ed] From Crudan, which is Old English, Cruden which is Dutch or Kryda which is Norwegian for people being packed in. It refers to where the individual parts are densely packed together and usually irregularly overlap each other. A good example is the individual fruits of Morinda citrifolia.

Crowea: [kroh-ee-a] Is named in honour of Dr. James Crowe; 1750-1807, who was an English surgeon and expert in mosses and fungi. A good example is the style on Crowea exalta.

Crowei: [kroh-ee-ahy] Is named in honour of Dr. James Crowe; 1750-1807, who was an English surgeon and expert in mosses and fungi. A good example is the style on Eriostemon crowei, which is now known as Crowea saligna.

Crowleyae: [kroh-lei-ee] Is named in honour of Crowley. A good example is the style on Grevillea crowleyae.

Crown 1: [kroun] From Corona, which is Latin for a wreath. It refers to the leaves and branches which are at the apex of trees crown. A good example is Ficus benjamina.

Crown 2: [kroun] From Corona, which is Latin for a wreath. It refers to the circle of appendages on the throat of the corolla.

Crown 3: [kroun] From Corona which is Latin for a wreath. It refers to the point where the root of a seedling joins the stem.

Croxfordiae [kroks-for-di-ee] Is named in honour of Eileen Croxford; 1912-2006, who was an English born Australian died hard enthusiast of Western Australian wildflowers. She started the Albany branch of the West Australian Wildflower Society and was its inaugural treasurer later president and full time collector and amateur researcher. A beautiful lady who fully deserves the honour. A good example is Melaleuca croxfordiae.

Crozier: [kroh-zee-er/a] From Crozier, which is Latinized from the French for the tip of a frond. It refers to the young fronds of ferns, which are still unfurling. A good example is the crosiers on Cyathea australis.

Croziers of Cyathea leichardtiana left and Cyathea australis right.

Cruciata: [kroo-si-a-ta] From Cruciatus/Crux, which is Latin for a cross. It refers to a structure or organ which has a distinct cross. A good example is the flowers on Calothamnus lateralis var. lateralis.

Cruciatum: [kroo-si-a-tum] From Cruciatus/Crux which is Latin for a cross. It refers to a physical property which is marked with a cross. A good example is Gastrolobium cruciatum.

Cruciatus: [kroo-si-a-tus] From Cruciatus/Crux, which is Latin for a cross. It refers to a physical property which is marked with a cross. A good example is the fungi Lysurus genus which have long thick fleshy arms. A good example is Lysurus cruciatus which has arms that appear like a cross.

Crucibulum: [kroo-si-bu-lum] From Crucible, which is Latin for a cup-shaped piece of laboratory equipment and -Bulum, which is a Latin suffix for a vessel. It refers to structure or organ which have a close resemblance to a cup or crucible. A good example is Crucibulum laeve.

Crucifera: [kroo-si-fer-a] From Cruciatus/Crux, which is Latin for a cross and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for bearing or to bear. It refers to a physical property which is marked with a cross. A good example is the flowers on Xanthósia glabrata.

Cruciflora: [kroo-si-flor-a] From Cruciatus/Crux, which is Latin for a cross Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have a very distinct cross compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Prostanthera cruciflora.

Cruciform: [kroo-si-form] From Cruciatus/Crux, which is Latin for a cross and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to a structure or organ, which takes the shape or form of a cross. A good example is the flowers on Xanthósia rotundifolia.

Cruciformis: [kroo-si-for-mis] From Cruciatus/Crux, which is Latin for a cross and Forme which is Latin for to take the shape of or form of. It refers to flowers, which have a distinct crucifix shape. A good example is Arachnorchis cruciformis.

Crucis: [kroo-sis] From Cruciatus/Crux, which is Latin for a cross. It may refer to the original plants, which may have been discovered near the township of Southern Cross in south western Western Australia. A good example is Eucalyptus crucis.

Cruenta: [kroo-en-ta] From Cruenta, which is Latin for gory as in covered in blood or bold in coloured. It usually It refers to flowers, which are deep red to blood-red in colour. A good example is the colour of the flower heads and the base of the culms on Chaetospora cruenta, which is now known as Schoenus cruentus.

Cruentus: [kroo-en-tus] From Cruentus, which is Latin for gory as in covered in blood or bold in colour It refers to flowers, which are deep red to blood-red in colour. A good example is Lotus cruentus.

Crumenatum: [kru-men-a-tum] From Crumenatus, which is Latin for a bag. It refers to flowers, which have a larger spur than other species in the genus. A good example was Dendrobium crumenatum which is now known Ceraia saaronica.

Cruscula: [krus-ku-la] From Cruscula, which is Latin for to have little legs. It refers to organs, which have shorter tepals than other species in the genus. A good example is Caladenia cruscula.

Crus-galli: [krus, gal-li] From Crus-galli, which is Latin for a cock’s spur. It refers to awns which somewhat resemble a cock’s spur. A good example is Echinochloa crus-galli.

Crus-pavonis: [krus, pa-vo-nis] From Crus-pavonicus, which is Latin for a peacock’s spur. It refers to awns which somewhat resemble a peacock’s spur. A good example is Echinochloa crus-pavonis.

Crustacea: [kru-sta-see-a] From Crusta, which is Latin for hard or brittle. It refers to the stems which are rather brittle. A good example is Lindernia crustacea.

Crustaceologist: [kruh-sta-se-o-lo-jist] From Crusta, which is Latin for hard or brittle, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies crustaceans. It includes the family that crabs, prawns and common garden wood slater Porcellio crustacea belong to.

Crustaceology: [kru-sta-se-ol-o-jee] From Crusta, which is Latin for hard or brittle and Ology which is Ancient Greek for to study. It includes the family that crabs, prawns and common garden wood slater Porcellio scaber belong to.

Crustaceous: [kru-sta-see-os] From Crusta which is Latin for hard or brittle. It refers to having a thin, hard, brittle covering. It includes the family that crabs, prawns and common garden wood slater Porcellio scaber belong to.

Crux: [kruks] From Krux which is Ancient Greek for a cross.

Cryphiacanthus: [kri-fi-a-kan-thus] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed or to hide and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers which are well concealed within the flower or are well camouflaged. A good example was Cryphiacanthus australis, which is now known as Brunoniella australis.

Cryphiopetala: [kri-fi-o-pe-ta-la] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed or to hide and Petánnumi which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators. A good example is Sida cryphiopetala.

Crypsinus: [kip-si-nus] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed or to hide. It refers to where an organism’s appearance is used for camouflage. A good example is the seeds on Crypsinus simplicissimus.

Crypsis: [krip-sis] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed or to hide. It refers to where an organism’s appearance is used for camouflage. A good example is the parasitic plants like Amyema miquelii, which has leaves that resemble their hosts leaves.

Crypt: [kript] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed.

Crypta: [krip-ta] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed. It refers to plants, which are generally difficult to see in their environments. A good example is Pterostylis crypta.

Cryptandra: [krip-tan-dra] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Andros which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to the stamens which are well hidden inside the corolla. A good example is the flowers on Cryptandra amara.

Cryptandroides: [krip-tan-droi-deez] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed, Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the genus Cryptandra in that the stamens are well hidden inside the flower. A good example is Prostanthera cryptandroides subsp. cryptandroides.

Cryptantha: [krip-tan-tha] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are often well concealed amongst the foliage or very large sheaths. A good example is Murdannia cryptantha.

Cryptanthemis: [krip-tan-the-mis] Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which live beneath the surface of the ground with only the flowers rising above the surface. A good example is Cryptanthemis slateri.

Cryptantherus: [krip-tan-ther-us] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Antha/Anthos, for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are often well concealed amongst the foliage or very large sheaths. A good example is the flowers on Arthraxon hispidus.

Cryptanthum: [krip-tan-thum] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Antha/Anthos, for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which often lay dormant until good rains are received. A good example is Helipterum cryptanthum, which is now known as Rhodanthe manglesii.

Cryptanthus: [krip-tan-thus] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Antha/Anthos, for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to the stamens which are well concealed within the flower. A good example is Leucopogon cryptanthus.

Cryptica: [krip-ti-ka] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed. It refers to the plants, which remain well hidden amongst other grasses. A good example is Lepyrodia cryptica.

Cryptocarpa: [krip-to-kar-pa] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are well hidden amongst the foliage. A good example is Atriplex cryptocarpa.

Cryptocarpus: [krip-to-kar-pus] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are well hidden amongst the foliage. A good example is Stenocarpus cryptocarpus.

Cryptocarya: [krip-to-kar-i-a] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Karyon, which is Ancient Greek for a nut. It refers to the green fruits being well camouflaged amongst the leaves. A good example is Cryptocarya floydii.

Cryptocotylar: [krip-to-o-tahy-lar] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Kotyledon, a small cup. It refers to the seed leaves, which is the food reserve that remain concealed inside the seed. The seed usually remains beneath the ground. A good example is seeds on Drosera spatulata.

Cryptogamist: [krip-to-ga-mist] Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek for round and Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies non flowering, non vascular flora.

Cryptogamology: [krip-to-ga-mo-lo-jee] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus which is Latin for hidden or concealed, Gýmnos for naked and Ology which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science which studies non flowering, non vascular flora.

Cryptopetalua: [krip-to-pe-tal-yoo-a] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators. It refers to petals which are well concealed or much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example was Sida cryptopetalua, which is now known as Abutilon cryptopetalua.

Cryptophlebium: [krip-to-fle-bi-um] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Plebium which is Latin for a commoner or common person. It refers to plants, which are common but usually not conspicuous in their environments. A good example is Argophyllum cryptophlebium.

Cryptosema: [krip-to-see-ma] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Sema, which is Ancient Greek for a sign or placard. A good example was Cryptosema pimeleoides, which is now known as Jansonia formosa.

Cryptospermum: [krip-to-sper-mum] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the size of the seeds which are very small. A good example was Cryptospermum aspera, which is now known as Opercularia aspera.

Cryptostachys: [krip-to-sta-shus] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Stachys which is Ancient Greek for a spike. It refers to spikes which are normally hidden amongst the foliage. A good example is Carex cryptostachys.

Cryptostemma: [krip-to-stem-ma] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Crypticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Stemma which is Ancient Greek for a crown. A good example is the flowers on the exotic species of Cryptostemma calendula, which is now known as Arctotheca calendula.

Cryptostemon: [krip-to-stei-mon] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek for round and Stemon, which is Ancient Greek or Stemen which is Latin for the male reproductive organs grouped together in the flower. It refers to the stamens being hidden away from sight. A good example is Myrsine subsessilis.

Cryptostylis: [krip-to-stahy-lis] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Cripticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Stylus which is Ancient Greek for a column. It refers to the style being concealed amongst the rest of the flowering organs. A good example is Cryptostylis erecta.

Cryptothrix: [krip-to-thiks] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which are Greek or Cripticus, which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for a hair or to be hairy. It refers to a structure or organ, which is often concealed amongst the hairs. A good example is the flowers on Eremophila cryptothrix.

Crystallina: [kris-tal-li-na] From Kristalinos, which is Ancient Greek or Cristallinum, which is Latin for to be crystal like. It refers to structures or organs, which glisten like crystals in the sun. A good example is Mitrasacme crystallina, which is now known as Mitrasacme prolifera.

Crystallinum: [kris-tal-li-num] From Kristalinos, which is Ancient Greek or Cristallinum, which is Latin for to be crystal like. It refers to structures or organs, which glisten like crystals in the sun. A good example is Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

Crystallinus: [kris-tal-li-nus] From Kristalinos, which is Ancient Greek or Cristalinus which is Latin for crystal clear or transparent. It often It refers to the glossy leaves reflecting light back like a crystal. A good example is Rumex crystallinus.

Crytodonta: [krahy-to-don-ta] From Kryto, which is Ancient Greek for round and Dontos, which is Ancient Greek for a tooth. It refers to leaves, which resemble rounded teeth. A good example is seeds on Beaufortia crytodonta.

Ctenantha: [ten-an-tha] From Kteis/Ekteis, which are Greek for a comb of a loom, a rake, horn, fingers, ribs, scallop, vagina, yoni and Antha/Anthos which is the male reproductive organ on the flower or the flower. It refers to the Kteis, which are circular, concave pedestals, or receptacles, on which the Phallus, or column (obelisk) rests. The union of these two, structures represent the generative and producing principles of nature. Here is found the origin of the point within a circle, a symbol which was first adopted by the old sun worshipers. The Compass arranged above the Square symbolizes the (male) Sun, impregnating the passive (female) Earth accepting its life-producing rays. The true meanings, then are two-fold: the earthly (human) representations are of the man and his phallus (penis), and the woman with her receptive Kteis (vagina).The male-female divinities were commonly symbolized by the generative parts of man and woman. The Phallus and Kteis are the emblems of regeneration reproduction. It refers to the base of the culms being situated in a small circular, concave pedestal at the base. A good example is Digitaria ctenantha.

Ctenanthum: [ten-an-thum] From Kteis/Ekteis, which are Greek for a comb of a loom, a rake, horn, fingers, ribs, scallop, vagina, yoni and Antha/Anthos which is the male reproductive organ on the flower or the flower. It refers to the Kteis, which were circular, concave pedestals, or receptacles, on which the Phallus, or column (obelisk) rested. The union of these two, structures represent the generative and producing principles of nature. Here is found the origin of the point within a circle, a symbol which was first adopted by the old sun worshipers. The Compass arranged above the Square symbolizes the (male) Sun, impregnating the passive (female) Earth accepting its life-producing rays. The true meanings, then are two-fold: the earthly (human) representations are of the man and his phallus (penis), and the woman with her receptive Kteis (vagina).The male-female divinities were commonly symbolized by the generative parts of man and woman. The Phallus and Kteis are the emblems of regeneration reproduction. It refers to the base of the culms being situated in a small circular, concave pedestal at the base. A good example was Panicum ctenanthum, which is now known as Digitaria ctenantha.

Ctenoides: [ten-oi-deez] From Kteis/Ekteis, (Ctenantha above) which are Greek for a comb of a loom or rake and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to structures which resemble a comb. A good example is the finger like comb flowers of Melaleuca ctenoides.

Ctenophylla: [ten-o-fahyl-la] From Kteis/Ekteis, (Ctenantha above) which are Greek for a comb of a loom and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which resemble a comb. A good example is Grevillea ctenophylla, which is now known as Grevillea pectinata.

Ctenopteris: [ten-o-te-ris] From Kteis/Ekteis, (Ctenantha above) which are Greek for a comb of a loom and Pteris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to the fronds which resemble a comb. A good example is Ctenopteris blechnoides.

Ctenosperma: [ten-o-sper-ma] From Kteis/Ekteis, (Ctenantha above) which is Ancient Greek for a comb of a loom and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which have short bristly hairs on one side that resemble a comb. A good example is Ctenosperma alpinum.

Cuboidal: [kyoo-boi-dal] From Kuboidal, which is Ancient Greek for a cube shape. It usually It refers to a description of anthers, which have a cuboidal shape. A good example is the anthers on Angophora costata.

Cucullata: [kuh-kyoo-la-ta] From Cucullatus, which is Latin for having a hood or Cucull which is Latin for to be covered. It refers to flowers, which have a hood. A good example is the upper petal acting like a hood on Pterostylis cucullata or the standard petal draped over the wing and keel petals on Bossiaea cucullata.

Cucullate: [kuh-kyoo-leit] From Cucullatus, which is Latin for having a hood or Cucull which is Latin for to be covered. It refers to a description of a structure or organ, which has a hood.

Cucullatum: [kuh-kyoo-lei-tum] From Cucullatus which is Latin for having a hood or Cucull which is Latin for to be covered. It refers to flowers, which have a hood. A good example is the upper petal acting like a hood on Conospermum cucullatum.

Cucullatus: [kuh-kyoo-lei-tus] From Cucullatus, which is Latin for having a hood or Cucull which is Latin for to be covered. It refers to flowers, which have a cucull like hood or brim. A good example is the upper petal acting like a hood on Eriochillus cucullatus.

Cucumerina: [ker-kyoo-mer-i-na] From Curcuma, which is Latinized from the Arabic vernacular, Kurkum for tumeric. It refers to plants, which have a structure or organ, which resembles the tumeric root or cucumber. A good example is the cucumber like leaves on Dockrillia cucumerina.

Cucumerinum: [kyoo-kyoo-mer-i-num] From Kykyon, which is Ancient Greek for a cucumber. It refers to fruits or at times the leaves which resemble a cucumber. A good example is  the leaves on Dendrobium cucumerinum, which is now known as Dockrilla cucumerinum.

Cucumis: [ku-kyoo-mis] From Kykyon, which is Ancient Greek for a cucumber. It refers to plants, with fruits which resembles cucumbers. A good example is the fruits on Momordica charantica which is now in dispute with many botanists claiming it to be Citrullus lanatus a species which has doubtful origin in Australia. Many botanists believe that it may have been originally introduced to Australia by aboriginals when they first migrated to far north Queensland.

Cudrania: [ku-dra-n-a] From Cudrania, which is Latinized from the Malay word Cudrang. It refers to a plant in which a green dye was derived. The Australian species have all been transferred to the Maclura genus including Maclura cochinchinensis.

Culcita: [kul-si-ta] From Culcita, which is Latin for a pillow. It maybe in reference to the fluffy rhizome material used to stuff pillows in Madeira. A good example is Culcita dubia.

Cullen: [kul-len] Is probably named in honour of William Cullen; 1710–1790, who was a Scottish physician, chemist and agriculturalist but I have been unable to substantiated it 100mm. A good example is Cullen corallum.

Culm: [kulm] From Kálamos, which is Ancient Greek or Culmus, which is Latin for a stalk, hay, straw or thatch. It refers to the stems of grasses, sedges and rushes. A good example is the culms of Digitaria ammophila.

Culminicola: [kul-min-i-koh-la] From Culmini which maybe Latinized from the local indigenous word for lowland swamps,  Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for a dweller or to reside at. It refers to plants, which prefer very wet habitats or areas adjacent to lowland swamps. A good example is Elaeocarpus culminicola.

Cultiformis: [kul-ti-for-mis] From Cultrātus, which is Latin for a knife or dagger and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the leaves, phyllodes or at times spines which resemble a knife’s blade. A good example is Acacia cultiformis.

Cultivar: [kul-ti-var] From Cultivāre/ Cultus which are Latin for to till. It refers to a plant, which varies from the mother plant in the wild and is grown as a horticultural plant. A good example is the prostrate form of Grevillea banksii.

Cultrata: [kul-tra-ta] From Cultrāta, which is Latin for a knife or dagger. It refers to a structure or organ, which is shaped like a knife. A good example is the leaves of Lindsaea cultrata.

Cultratum: [kul-tra-tum] From Cultrātum, which is Latin for a knife or dagger. A good example is the leaves of Lindsaea cultrata.

Cultriforme: [kul-tri-fawrm] From Cultrātum, which is Latin for a knife or dagger and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to leaves which have the shape and form of a knife. A good example is the leaves of Racosperma cultriforme, which is now known as Planchonia Acacia cultriformis.

Cultriformis: [kuhl-tri-for-mis] From Cultrātum, which is Latin for a knife or dagger and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to leaves which have the shape and form of a knife. A good example is the leaves of Acacia cultriformis.

Cumbia: [kum-bi-a] From Cumbia, which maybe Latinized from the Congo vernacular for to roar or yell out. It refers to flowers, which demand attention especially the type specimen. A good example is Cumbia australis, which is now known as Planchonia careya.

Cumingiana: [kum-in-ji-a-na] Is named in honour of Hugh Cuming; 1791-1865, who was an English conchologist and botanist. A good example is Aristida cumingiana.

Cumingii: [ku-min-ji-ahy] Is named in honour of Hugh Cuming; 1791-1865, who was an English conchologist and botanist. A good example is Eragrostis cumingii.

Cummingiana: [kum-min-ji-a-na] Is named in honour of Cumming; 1791-1865, who was an English conchologist and botanist. A good example is Acacia cummingiana.

Cummingianum: [kum-min-ji-an-um] Is named in honour of Cumming; 1791-1865, who was an English conchologist and botanist. A good example is Racosperma cummingianum, which is now known as Acacia cummingiana.

Cunderdin: [kun-der-din] From Cunderdin which is Latinized for the Cunderdin Shire council area in south western, Western Australia. It refers to plants, which were discovered in the Conderdin Shire Council area. A good example is the leaves on Daviesia cunderdin.

Cuneata: [ku-nee-a-ta] From Cuneate, which is Latin for a wedge shape. It refers to the description of the shape of a structure or an organ, usually the leaves, which typically have wedge shaped. A good example is the shape of the leaves on Prostanthera cuneata.

Cuneate: [ku-nee-eit] From Cuneate, which is Latin for a wedge shape. It refers to the description of the shape of a structure or an organ, usually the leaves, which typically have wedge shaped.

Cuneatum: [ku-nee-ei-tum] From Cuneate, which is Latin for a wedge shape. It refers to the description of the shape of a structure or an organ, usually the leaves, which typically have wedge shaped. A good example is the shape of the leaves on Asplenium cuneatum.

Cuneatus: [ku-nee-ei-tus] From Cuneate, which is Latin for a wedge shape. It refers to the description of the shape of a structure or an organ, usually the leaves, which typically have wedge shaped. A good example is the shape of the leaves on Prostanthera cuneata.

Cuneifolia: [ku-nei-foh-li-a] From Cuneatus, which is Latin for a wedge shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which are shaped like a wedge. A good example is the leaves on Hemigenia cuneifolia.

Cuneifolium: [ku-nei-foh-lee-um] From Cuneatus, which is Latin for wedge shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are shaped like a wedge. A good example is the leaves on Astroloma cuneifolium.

Cuneifolius: [ku-nei-foh-li-us] From Cuneatus, which is Latin for wedge shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which are shaped like a wedge. A good example is the leaves on Ozothamnus cuneifolius.

Cuneiforme: [ku-nei-form] From Cuneatus, which is Latin for a wedge shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are shaped like a wedge. Leptospermum cuneiforme is presently an unresolved name awaiting further research to determine which genus, species or sub species or variety it should be allocated to.

Cuneiformis: [ku-nei-for-mis] From Cuneatus, which is Latin for a wedge shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are shaped like a wedge. A good example is the leaves on Acacia cuneiformis.

Cuneilabris: [kuh-nei-la-bris] From Cuneatus, which is Latin for a wedge shape and Labris, which is Latin for a lip or a pair of lips. It refers to the labellums on orchid flowers, which are wedge shaped or take the form of a wedge. A good example is Diuris cuneilabris.

Cunila: [ku-ni-la] Maybe from Cuneate, which is Latin for wedge shape. It may refer to the description of the shape of a structure or organ usually the leaves which have a wedge shaped. A good example is Cunila fruticosa, which is now known as Westringia fruticosa.

Cunninghamiana: [ku-ning-ha-mee-a-na] Is named in honour of Allan Cunningham; 1791-1839, who was an Australian explorer, botanist and collector of plants. A good example is Archontophoenix cunninghamiana.

Cunninghamii: [ku-ning-hei-mi-ahy] Is named in honour of Allan Cunningham; 1791-1839, who was an Australian explorer, botanist and collector of plants. A good example is the prostrate form from Araucaria cunninghamii.

Cunoniaceae: [ku-no-ni-ei-see-e] Is named in honour of J. C. Cunonia’s family. J. C. Cunonia wrote a detailed description of plants he had collected for his garden in Amsterdam Holland.

Cupania: [kyoo-pa-ni-a] Is named in honour of Fransesco Cupania; 1657-1710, who was an Italian botanist and Opsis which is Ancient Greek for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the trees resembling the Cupania genus in North America. A good example was Cupania anarcharioides, which is now known as Cupaniopsis anarcharioides.

Cupanioides: [kyoo-pa-ni-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Fransesco Cupania; 1657-1710, who was an Italian botanist and Opsis which is Ancient Greek for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the trees resembling the Cupania genus in North America. A good example is Bleasdalea cupanioides.

Cupaniopsis: [kyoo-pa-ni-op-sis] Is named in honour of Fransesco Cupania; 1657-1710, who was an Italian botanist and Opsis which is Ancient Greek for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the trees resembling the Cupania genus in North America. A good example is Cupaniopsis anarcharioides.

Cuparilla: [kyoo-pa-ril-la] From Cuparilla, which is unknown. A good example was Cuparilla sophorae, which is now known as Acacia longifolia subsp. sophorae.

Cuphonotus: [kyoo-fon-oh-tus] From Kuphos, which is Ancient Greek for a hump or to be humped and Notos, which is Ancient Greek for the back. It refers to the seed pods having a distinct rounding on the back side. A good example is Cuphonotus andraeanus.

Cuphophyllus: [kyoo-fo-fahyl-lus] From Kuphos, which is Ancient Greek for a hump or to be humped and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble leaves. A good example is the pileus on Cuphophyllus preatensis.

Cupida: [kyoo-pi-da] From Cupīdō, which is the Roman goddess/god of desire, love, or desirous. It refers to the overall beauty of the plants. A good example is Cycas cupida.

Cuprea: [ku-pree-a] From Cuprea, which is Latin for copper coloured. It usually It refers to leaves, which have a distinct copper colour in the new growth or coppice growth. A good example is Eucalyptus cuprea.

Cupresioides: [ku-pre-si-oi-deez] From Cupressus, which is Latin for a Cyress tree and Oides which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants resembling the Cupresus genus of Cypress pines. A good example is Athrotaxis cupresioides.

Cupressiforme: [ku-pres-si-form] From Cupressus, which is Latin for Cypress trees and Forme which is Latin for to take the form of. It refers to ferns, which resemble miniature Cypress pines. A good example is Hymenophyllum cupressiforme.

Cupressiformis: [ku-pres-si-fawr-mis] From Cupressus, which is Latin for Cypress trees and Forme which is Latin for to take the form of. It refers to plants, which resemble the exotic Cypress pines. A good example is Exocarpus cupressiformis.

Cupressina: [ku-pres-si-na] From Cupressus, which is Latin for Cypress trees. It refers to plants, which look similar to the exotic Cypress pines. A good example is Melaleuca cupressina.

Cupressinum: [ku-pres-si-num] From Cupressus, which is Latin for Cypress trees and Forme which is Latin for to take the form of. It refers to the plants looking similar to the exotic Cypress pines. Leptospermum cupressinum is presently an unresolved name awaiting further research to determine which genus, species or sub species or variety it should be allocated to.

Cupressoides: [ku-pre-si-soi-deez] From Cupressus, which is Latin for a Cyress tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which resemble the Cupresus genus of Cypress pines. A good example is Ozothamnus cupressoides.

Cupreus: [ku-pree-us] From Cupreus, which is Latin for coppery. It refers to the plants usually the flowers or leaves, which have a coppery colour or tinge. A good example is the flowers on Calochilus cupreus.

Cupulanthus: [ku-pyoo-lan-thus] From Cupula, which is Latin for a small tub or vat and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which have the shape of vat. A good example was Cupulanthus bilobum, which is now known as Gastrolobium bilobum.

Cupular: [ku-pyoo-la] From Cupulate, which is Latin for a small cup or a small spreading cup. It refers to where the leaf or petals form cup shape, like a cupped hand. A good example is the flower petals of Ryssopterys timoriensis.

Cupularis: [ku-pyoo-lar-is] From Cupular, which is Latin for the most cup shaped. It refers to hypanthium which are distinctly cup shape. A good example is Eucalyptus cupularis.

Cupulate: [ku-pyoo-leit] From Cupulate, which is Latin for a small cup or a small spreading cup. It refers to a description of a physical trait, which is shaped, like a cupped hand. A good example is the cupulate glumes on the American whiskey grass Andropogon virginicus.

Cupule: [ku-pyoo-l] From Cupulate, which is Latin for a small cup or a small spreading cup. It refers to where the leaf or petals form cup shape, like a cupped hand.

Cupulifera: [ku-pyoo-li-fer-a] From Cupulate, which is Latin for a small cup or a small spreading cup and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to flowers, which bear more prominent calyxes or sepals than other species in the genus. A good example is the calyxes on Jacksonia cupulifera.

Cupuliform: [ku-pyoo-li-form] From Cupulate, which is Latin for a small cup or a small spreading cup and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape of. It refers to where the calyx or sepals form cup shape, like a cupped hand. A good example is the calyxes on Hedycaria angustifolia and Hibbertia rufa.

Cupulosa: [ku-pyoo-loh-sa] From Cupulate, which is Latin for a small cup or a small spreading cup. It refers to where the calyx or sepals form cup shape, lsimilar to a cupped hand. A good example is Diospyros cupulosa.

Curasssavica: [ku-ras-sa-vi-ka] From Curassavica, which is Latinized for the Caracoa. It refers to the plants, which were first discovered around Carocoa. A good example is the exotic toxic plant Asclepias curassavica.

Curculigo: [ker-ku-li-goh] From Curvus, which is Latin for a weevil. It refers to the ovary, which resembles a weevil. A good example is Curculigo ensifolia.

Curcuma: [ker-kyoo-ma] From Curcuma, which is Latinized from the Arabic word Kurkum for tumeric. It refers to the plants, which are related to the exotic tumeric. A good example is the native tumeric Curcuma australasica.

Curdieana: [ker-di-e-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Daniel Curdie; 1810-1884, a Scottish born Australian medical doctor, pastoralist and amateur botanist. A good example is Limosella curdieana.

Curranii: [kur-ra-ni-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Curran. A good example is Acacia curranii.

Curta: [kur-ta] From Curta, which is Latin for blunt, mutilated, shortened or incomplete. It refers to flowers, which are either incomplete, appear to be torn or are much shorter than other species in the genus. A good example is the Pterostylis curta.

Curticoma: [kur-ti-koh-ma] From Curtus, which is Latin for blunt, mutilated, shortened or incomplete and Comus which is Latin or Kome which is Ancient Greek for a tuft of hairs. It refers to the apex of the lemmas or other organs, which have a tuft of variable lengths of hair. A good example is Austrostipa curticoma.

Curtifolia: [kur-ti-foh-l-a] From Curtus which is Latin for blunt, mutilated, shortened or incomplete and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have a tuft of hairs usually near the base or at times at the apex. A good example is Diuris curtifolia.

Curtipendulum: [kur-ti-pen-dyoo-lum] From Curtus which is Latin for blunt, mutilated or shortened and Pendulous which is Latin for hanging or swinging. It refers to fruits, which hang singularly from the stems. A good example is Elaeodéndron curtipendulum.

Curtipes: [ker-ti-peez] From Curt which is Latin for incomplete or mutilated. It refers to a structure or organ, which is somewhat incomplete. A good example is Eucalyptus curtipes, which is now known as Corymbia curtipes.

Curtisepala: [kur-ti-se-pa-la] From Curtus which is Latin for blunt, mutilated or shortened and Sképē which is Ancient Greek or much later Sepalum which is Latin for a covering or roof. It refers to the specialized leaves known as sepals which cover and protect the petals and sexual organs in the bud stage separating prior to anthesis. It refers to flowers, which have sepals that are shorter than the petals. A good example is Caladenia curtisepala.

Curtisepalus: [kur-ti-se-pa-lus] From Curtus which is Latin for blunt, mutilated or shortened and Sképē which is Ancient Greek or much later Sepalum which is Latin for a covering or roof. It refers to the specialized leaves known as sepals which cover and protect the petals and sexual organs in the bud stage separating prior to anthesis. It refers to flowers, which have sepals that are shorter than the petals. A good example is Petalochilus curtisepalus.

Curtisiae 1: [ker-ti-si-ee] Is named in honour of Curtis but which Curtis cannot be substantiated but probably Winifred Mary Curtis; 1905-2005, who was an Australian botanist, who dedicated her life to Tasmania’s native flora. A good example is Juncus curtisiae.

Curtisiae 2: [kuh-ti-si-ee] Is named in honour of Dr. Winifred Mary Curtis; 1905-2005, who was an English born Tasmanian who dedicated her life to the flora of Tasmania. A good example is Lepidosperma curtisiae.

Curtisii: [ker-ti-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Denzil Curtis;1892-1873, who was a Queensland farmer and amateur naturalist who first drew attention to this mallee type Corymbia. A good example is Corymbia curtisii.

Curtophylla: [ker-to-fahyl-la] From Curtum, which is Latin for incomplete or mutilated and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to a leaves, which are somewhat to really mutilated. A good example is Calytrix curtophylla.

Curtum: [kur-tum] From Curtum, which is Latin for incomplete or mutilated. It refers to a structure or organ, which really mutilated. A good example is Galium curtum, which is now known as Asperula gunnii.

Curtus: [ker-tus] From Curtum, which is Latin for incomplete or mutilated. It refers to a structure or organ, which is really mutilated. A good example is the fungus Coprinellus curtus, whose fruiting bodies deteriate quickly and are so fragile that they are broken very easily, thus looking as though it has been mutilated.

Curvata: [ker-va-ta] From Curvāta, which is Latin for to bend. It refers to structures or organs which are bent. A good example is the phyllodes and pods which are strongly curved on Acacia curvata.

Curvative: [ker-va-teev] From Curvātum which is Latin for to bend. It usually It refers to leaves or petals which arch or curve like a bow.

Curvatum: [ker-va-tum] From Curvātum, which is Latin for to bend. It refers to structures or organs which are bent. A good example is the phyllodes and pods which are strongly curved on Racosperma curvatum, which is now known as Acacia curvata.

Curvicarpa: [ker-vi-kar-pa] From Curvātum, which is Latin for to bend and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits or seeds, which have a pronounced curve. A good example is Brachyscome curvicapa.

Curvicarpus: [ker-vi-kar-pus] From Curvātum, which is Latin for to bend and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits or seeds, which have a pronounced curve. A good example is Kallstroemia curvicarpus, which is now known as Tribulopis angustifolia.

Curvicaule: [ker-vi-kor-le] From Curvātum, which is Latin for to bend and Caulis which is Latin for a branch or stem. It refers to stems or canes which are profoundly bent. A good example is Dendrobium curvicaule, which is now known as Thelychiton curvicaulis.

Curvicaulis: [ker-vi-kor-lis] From Curvātum, which is Latin for to bend and Caulis, which is Latin for a branch or stem. It refers to stems or canes which are profoundly bent. A good example is Thelychiton curvicaulis.

Curvicuspe: [ker-vi-kus-pe] From Curvātum, which is Latin for to bend and Cuspis, which is Latin for a small projection on the end. It refers to organs, which have a small bent or curved outgrowth like a capping on a tooth. A good example is the short outgrowth surrounding the petals on Solanum curvicuspe.

Curvidentata: [ker-vi-den-ta-ta] From Curvātum, which is Latin for to bend and Odonta, which is Greek or Dentātus which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It refers to leaves, which have curved teet on the margins. A good example is Cupaniopsis curvidentata, which is now known as Cupaniopsis flagelliformis var. flagelliformis.

Curviflora: [ker-vi-flor-a] From Curvātum, which is Latin for to bend and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have different angles and curved corollas in the type speciemen. A good example is Pimelea curviflora var. curviflora.

Curvifolia: [ker-vi-foh-li-a] From Curvātum, which is Latin for to bend and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which distinctly curve upwards from the petioles. A good example is Persoonia curvifolia.

Curvifolium: [ker-vi-foh-li-um] From Curvātum, which is Latin for to bend and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which distinctly curve upwards from the petioles. A good example is Lycopodium curvifolium.

Curvifolius: [ker-vi-foh-li-us] From Curvātum, which is Latin for to bend and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which distinctly curve upwards from the petioles. A good example is Schoenus curvifolius.

Curvihirtum: [ker-vi-her-tum] From Curvātum, which is Latin for to bend and Hirtellus, which is Latin for hairy. It refers to plants, which are covered in dense curved hirsute hairs. A good example is Galium curvihirtum.

Curviloba: [ker-vi-loh-ba] From Curvātum, which is Latin for to bend and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to leaf lobes, which have a degree of curving. A good example is Grevillea curviloba.

Curvinervia: [ker-vi-ner-vi-a] From Curvātum, which is Latin for a curve and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek or Nervus, which is Latin for a nerve. It refers to veins on the leaves or phyllodes which curve. A good example of curved veins is found on the phyllodes of Acacia curvinervia.

Curvipes: [ker-vi-pes] From Curvātum, which is Latin for a curve and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedis, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to pedicels on the leaves or phyllodes which are profoundly curved. A good is found on the long pedicels on Arthropodium curvipes.

Curvula: [ker-vyoo-la] From Curvātum, which is Latin for a curve. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which are curved. A good example is the leaves on the subspecies of Dampiera tenuicaulis var. curvula.

Cusackiana: [ku-sa-ki-a-na] Is named in honour of Cusack but which Cusack cannot be substantiated. A good example is Goodenia cusackiana.

Cuscuta: [kus-ku-ta] From Cuscuta, which is the old Latin name for a dodder vine. It refers to the close resemblance of the new genus of Cuscuta to the Dodder vines. A good example is Cuscuta australis.

Cuscutiflorus: [kus-ku-ti-flor-us] From Cuscuta, which is the old Latin name for a dodder vine and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to the close resemblance of the flowers to those found in the Cuscuta genus. A good example is Phyllanthus cuscutiflorus.

Cusp: [kusp] From Cuspis, which is Latin for a pointed end. It refers to the apex of a leaf or other part ending in an abrupt point.

Cuspidaria: [kus-pi-da-ri-a] From Cuspis, which is Latin for a pointed end. It refers to the apex of a leaf or anther, which ends in an abrupt point. A good example is the possibly invasive exotic garden plant Cuspidaria pulchra.

Cuspidata: [kus-pi-d-ta] From Cuspis, which is Latin for a pointed end. It refers to the apex of a leaf or anther which ends in an abrupt point. A good example is the European Olive tree Olea europaea subsp. cuspidata which becomes invasive once removed from orchard situations.

Cuspidate: [kus-pi-deit] From Cuspis, which is Latin for a pointed end. It refers to the description of the apex of a leaf or other organs ending in an abrupt point.

Cuspidatum: [kus-pi-dei-tum] From Cuspis, which is Latin for a sharp point. It refers to the apex of a leaf or anther, which ends in an abrupt point. A good example is Sphagnum cuspidatum.

Cuspidatus: [kus-pi-dei-tus] From Cuspis, which is Latin for a sharp point. It refers to the apex of a leaf or anther, which ends in an abrupt point. A good example is Leucopogon cuspidatus.

Cuspidifera: [kus-pi-di-fer-a] From Cuspis, which is Latin for a sharp point and Ferae/Ferārum which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to the apex of a leaf or an another organ which ends in an abrupt point. A good example is Persoonia cuspidifera.

Cuspidifolia: [kus-pi-di-foh-li-a] From Cuspis, which is Latin for a sharp point and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the apex of a leaf or phyllode which ends in an abrupt point. A good example is Acacia cuspidifolia.

Cuspidifolium: [kus-pi-di-foh-li-um] From Cuspis, which is Latin for a sharp point and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the apex of a leaf or phyllode, which ends in an abrupt point. A good example was Racosperma cuspidifolia, which is now known as Acacia cuspidifolia.

Cuspidifolius: [kus-pi-di-foh-li-us] From Cuspis, which is Latin for a sharp point and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the apex of a leaf or phyllode, which ends in an abrupt point. A good example is Amaranthus cuspidifolius.

Cussackiana: [kus-sa-ki-a-na] Is named in honour of Cussack but which Cussack is unknown. A good example is Trianthema cussackiana.

Cussonii: [kus-so-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Cusson but who is unknown. A good example was Trachymene cussonii.

Cuthbertsonii: [kuth-bert-so-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Cuthbertson; 1877?-1998?, who was an Australian surveyor and plant collector. A good example is Acacia cuthbertsonii.

Cuticle: [kyoo-ti-kl] From Cuticula/Cutis, which are Latin for a skin. It refers to a very thin film, which covers the surface of plants especially the leaves. It is a waxy substance derived from the outer surface of the epidermal cells. A good thicker example is found on the leaves of Carpobrotus glaucescens.

Cuticular: [ku-ti-kyoo-lar] From Cuticula/Cutis, which are Latin for a skin. It is a protective, hydrophobic, waxy covering produced by the epidermal cells of leaves, young shoots and other aerial organs of a plant. The cuticles minimize water loss and effectively reduce pathogen entry due to their waxy secretion. The main structural components of plant cuticles is the unique polymers cutin or cutan, impregnated with wax. A good example is found on the leaves of the water Lilies including Nelumbo nucifera and Nymphaea violacea.

Cuticulare: [ku-ti-kyoo-lair] From Cuticula/Cutis, which are Latin fora skin. It refers to a rather thicker layer of film, which covers the surface of the leaves. A good example was Myrtoleucodendron cuticulare, which is now known as Melaleuca cuticularis.

Cuticularis: [ku-ti-kyoo-lar-is] From Cuticula/Cutis, which are Latin for a skin. It refers to a rather thicker layer of film covering the surface of the leaves. A good example is Philotheca cuticularis.

Cutiifolia: [Klu-ti-i-foh-li-a] From klúdōn, which is Ancient Greek for to billow and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the prolific number of leaves on the species compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Pultenaea clutiifolia.

Cuttsia: [kut-si-a] Is named in honour of John Cutts who acquired Leichartd’s collection. A good example is Cuttsia viburnea.

Cyanantha: [sahy/kahy-an-ha] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky blue to deep blue. It refers to the colour of the buds, flowers or fruits which are various shades of blue. A good example is Trachymene cyanantha.

Cyanea: [sahy/kahy-an-ee-a] From Kýanos which is Ancient Greek forsky blue to deep blue. It refers to the colour of the buds, flowers or fruits which may vary from sky blue to deep blue. A good example is Halgania cyanea or Commelina cyanea.

Cyanescens: [sahy/kahy-a-ne-senz] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky blue to deep blue. It refers to structures or organs, which are or turn blue. A good example is the pileus on the fungi Copelandia cyanescens.

Cyanescent: [sahy/kahy-a-ne-sent] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky blue to deep blue. It refers to structures or organs, which are or turn blue. A good example is the pileus on the fungi Boletellus emodensis.

Cyanicula: [sahy/kahy-a-ni-kyoo-la] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky blue to deep blue. It refers to the colour of the buds, flowers or fruits being deep blue. A good example is Cyanicula amplexxans.

Cyanide: [sahy/kahy-a-nide] From kyanos, which is Ancient Greek for ‘dark blue’) is a chemical compound that contains a C≡N functional group. This group, known as the cyano group, consists of a carbon atom with a triple-bond to a nitrogen atom. Cyanide is produced in plant tissues as the result of hydrolysis of cyanogenic compounds and is also released as a co-product of ethylene biosynthesis. Most cyanide produced in plants is detoxified primarily by the key enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase, which basically has a hydrogen atom added. The Australian fungi Boletellus species when crushed on the pileus or stipe turn various shades of blue at a specific time, from a few seconds to a minute. This is an indication to the amount of cyanide produced by the specific fungus. Symbol CN.

Cyanitic: [sahy/kahy-a-ni-tik] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky blue to deep blue. It refers to structures or organs, which turn navy blue when damaged or cut. A good example is the pileus and stipe on the fungus Boletellus ananiceps.

Cyano: [sahy/kahy-a-noh] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky blue to deep blue. It refers to the deep blue green colour of the chloroplasts. A good example is the Cyanobacteria like Arthrospira platensis, which are the only bacteria which can produce their own food through photosynthesis and were the building blocks to all modern life on Earth as they changed the Earth’s climate through the production of Oxygen.

Cyanocalyx: [sahy/kahy-a-noh-ka-liks] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky blue to deep blue and Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Greek for a covering. It refers to the outer most layer of specialized petals which have deep blue to deep purple blue colour. A good example is Cyanostegia cyanocalyx.

Cyanocarpa: [sahy/kahy-a-noh-kar-pa] From Kyanos, which is Ancient Greek for deep blue and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits which are deep blue colour. A good example Drymophila cyanocarpa.

Cyanocarpus: [sahy/kahy-a-noh-kar-pus] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky-blue to deep blue and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have a deep blue colour. A good example Cyanocarpus cribbianus

Cyanoclada: [sahy/kahy-a-noh-kla-da] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky-blue to deep blue and klados which is Ancient Greek for a stem branch or trunk. It refers to stems or smaller branches, which are deep blue in colour. A good example Eucalyptus cyanoclada.

Cyanodiscalis: [sahy/kahy-a-noh-dis-ka-lis] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky-blue to deep blue and Discos which is Ancient Greek for a disc. It refers to discs or ray florets which are shaped like a disc and are sky blue to deep blue in colour. A good example is Olearia cyanodiscalis.

Cyanoides: [sahy/kahy-a-noi-deez] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky-blue to deep blue and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the tongue, which turn a deep blue colour after eating the fruits being deep bluish-black. A good example is Melastoma cyanoides.

Cyanopetala: [sahy/kahy-a-noh-pe-ta-la] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky-blue to deep blue and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek fora petal. It refers to flowers, probably from the type species which are somewhat tinged blue or slate-blue in colour. A good example is Trachymene caerulea.

Cyanopetalus: [sahy/kahy-a-no-pe-ta-lus] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky-blue to deep blue and Petalon, which is Greek for a flower. It refers to petals which are blue or grey-blue in colour. A good example is Trachymene cyanopetala.

Cyanophylla: [sahy/kahy-a-no-fahyl-luh] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek forsky blue to deep blue and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek fora leaf. It refers to the colour of the leaves, which are blue or grey-blue in colour. A good example is the leaves on Eucalyptus cyanophylla.

Cyanophyllum: [sahy/kahy-a-no-fahyl-lum] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky-blue to deep blue and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are blue or grey-blue in colour. A good example is Gastrolobium cyanophyllum.

Cyanophyllus: [sahy/kahy-a-no-fahyl-lus] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky-blue to deep blue and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are blue or grey-blue in colour. A good example is the leaves on Coleus cyanophyllus.

Cyanospermum: [sahy/kahy-a-noh-sper-mum] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky-blue to deep blue and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds which are deep blue or mottled deep blue. A good example is Cyanospermum australe, which is now known as Rhynchosia australis.

Cyanostegia: [sahy/kahy-a-no-ste-ji-a] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky-blue to deep blue and Stégē, which is Greek for a covering or a roof. It refers to the waxy like covering over the stems, buds and flowers. A good example is the deep blue almost black flowers on Cyanostegia microphylla.

Cyanothamnus: [sahy/kahy-a-no-tham-nus] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek for sky-blue to deep blue and Thamnus, which is Greek for a shrub. It refers to shrubs, which have deepblue-green foliage. A good example is leaves on Cyanothamnus anethifolius which is now known as  Boronia ramosa.

Cyanotis: [sahy/kahy-a-no-tis] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek forsky blue to deep blue and Otis which is Ancient Greek for an ear. A good example is the deep blue ear shaped flowers on the Asian member of the Commelinaceae family Cyanotis cristata.

Cyanthillium: [sahy/kahy-an-thil-li-um] From Kýanos, which is Ancient Greek forsky blue to deep blue and Otis which is Ancient Greek for an ear. A good example is the deep blue ear shaped flowers on the Asian member of the Commelinaceae family Cyanotis cristata.

Cyathea: [sahy/kahy-a-thee-a] From Kyatheon, which is Greek for a broad lipped cup. It refers to the indusium, which holds the spores that resembles a cup in shaped. A good example is Cyathea cooperii.

Cyathea cooperi spore in their fibrous cups

Cyathifer: [sahy/kahy-a-thi-fer] From Kyatheon, which is Ancient Greek for a broad lipped cup and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the description of a physical property which has the form of an elongated cup or mug. A good example is the Universal veil remnants on Angianthus cyathifer.

Cyathiflora: [sahy/kahy-a-thi-flor-a] From Kyatheon, which is Ancient Greek for a broad lipped cup and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to organs, which have the form of an elongated cup or mug. A good example is the fruits on Tersonia cyathiflora.

Cyathiformis: [sahy/kahy-a-thi-for-mis] From Kyatheon, which is Ancient Greek for a broad lipped cup and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the description of a physical property which has the form of a elongated cup like the Cyathea genus. A good example is the Universal veil remnants on Calvatia cyathiformis.

Cyathium: [sahy/kahy-a-thi-um] From Kyatheon, which is Ancient Greek for a broad lipped cup. It refers to the sporangium which has a lip like those found on a cup. A good example is the sporangia on Cyathea leichadtiana.

Cyathochaeta: [sahy/kahy-a-thoh-chee-ta] From Kyatheon, which is Ancient Greek for a broad lipped cup and Khaite, which is Ancient Greek for a bristle. It refers to the bristles found on the upper fertile glumes of the spikes. A good example is Cyathochaeta diandra.

Cyathodes: [sahy/kahy-a-thoh-deez] From Kyatheon, which is Ancient Greek for a broad lipped cup. It refers to the calyx and sepals. A good example is Cyathodes glauca.

Cyathopappa: [sahy/kahy-a-thoh-pa-pa] From Kyatheon, which is Ancient Greek for a broad lipped cup and Pappos which is Ancient Greek for grandfathers whiskers. It refers to the calyx and sepals which are covered in grey hairs. A good example is Gnephosis cyathopappa, which is now known as Gnephosis arachnoidea.

Cyathopoda: [sahy/kahy-a-tho-poh-da] From Kyatheon, which is Ancient Greek for a broad lipped cup and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to grains which resemble a long cup mounted on a long pedicel. A good example is Chionachne cyathopoda.

Cyathostemma: [sahy/kahy-a-thoh-ste-ma] From Kyatheon, which is Ancient Greek for a broad lipped cup and Stémma, which is Ancient Greek for a crown or garland. It refers to the calyx and sepals which surround the sexual organs, which resemble a broad lipped cup. A good example is Cyathostemma micranthum.

Cyathostemon: [sahy/kahy-a-tho-stei-mon] From Kyatheon, which is Ancient Greek for a broad lipped cup and Stemon, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower. It refers to the filaments and anthers as a single unit. A good example is Cyathostemon tenuifolium.

Cyathula: [sahy/kahy-a-thyoo-la] From Kyatheon, which is Ancient Greek for a broad lipped cup. It refers to a cup like disc that surrounds the ovaries. A good example is Cyathula prostrata.

Cyathus: [sahy/kahy-a-thus] From Kúathos, which is Ancient Greek for a ladel, beaker or an instrument to measure wine. It refers to a cup like disc that surrounds the ovaries or peridium is some fungi. A good example is Cyathus striatus.

Cybele: [sahy/kahy-be-le] From Kybelis, is Ancient Greek for the Anatolian mother goddess of the Earth. Kybelis It refers to partially assimilated to Earth-goddess Gaia and the harvest–mother goddess Demeter. A good example is Cybele saligna, which is now known as Stenocarpus salignus.

Cycad: [sahy/kahy-kad] From Kyad, which is Ancient Greek for any of the old world palms. It refers to ancient world palm like plants, which usually have short, stout trunks. A good example is Lepidozamia peroffskyana.

Cycas: [sahy/kahy-kas] From Kyad, which is Ancient Greek for any of the old world palms. It refers to ancient world palm like plants, which usually have short, stout trunks. A good example is Cycas armstrongii.

Cyclobalanopsis: [sahy/kahy-klo-bal-an-op-sis] From Kyklos, which is Greek for a circle, Balanos, which is Ancient Greek for an acorn and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for similar to. It refers to a simple leaf venation which has a single primary vein with the lateral (secondary) veins terminating at the margin with them dividing and the divided vein also terminating at the margin.

Cyclocampe: [sahy/kahy-klo-kamp] From Kyklos, which is Ancient Greek for a circle and Kampe, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits, which have an almost ram’s horn pattern in the circle. A good example is Cyclocampe arundinacea, which is now known as Costularia arundinacea.

Cyclocarpa: [sahy/kahy-klo-kar-pa] From Kyklos, which is Ancient Greek for a circle and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have an almost ram’s horn pattern in the circle. A good example is Cyclocarpa stellaris or the ram’s horn Hakea, Hakea cyclocarpa.

Cyclogyne: [sahy/kahy-klo-jahyn] From Kyklos, which is Ancient Greek for a circle and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a woman. It refers to stigmas, which have a somewhat circular to oblong shape groove. A good example is Cyclogyne canescens, which is now known as Swainsona canescens.

Cyclophylla: [sahy/kahy-klo-fahyl-la] From Kyklos, which is Ancient Greek for a circle and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek fora leaf. It refers to leaves, which are circular in shape. A good example is the fleshy orbicular leaves on Portulaca cyclophylla.

Cyclophyllum: [sahy/kahy-klo-fahyl-lum] From Kyklos, which is Ancient Greek for a circle and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which have a circular or obovate shape. A good example is Cyclophyllum longipetalum.

Cyclopis: [sahy/kahy-klo-pis] From Syklops, which is Ancient Greek for the mythological one eyed giant. It refers to the seeds which have a thick aril that completely surrounds the seed making it resemble a large eye. A good example is Acacia cyclopis.

Cycloptera: [sahy/kahy-klo-teer-a] From Kyklos, which is Greek for a circle and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to seeds being completely encircled with a papery wing. A good example is Goodenia cycloptera.

Cyclosorus: [sahy/kahy-klo-sor-us] From Kyklosis, which is Ancient Greek for encircling. It refers to the sori, which are encircled with a rim. A good example is Cyclosorus dentatus.

Cyclospermum: [sahy/kahy-klo-sper-mum] From Kyklosis, which is Ancient Greek for encircling and Spermum, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the sori, which are encircled with a rim. Agood example is the exotic garden weed Cyclospermum leptophyllum.

Cyclostoma: [sahy/kahy-klo-stoh-ma] From Kyklosis, which is Ancient Greek for encircling and Stóma, which is Ancient Greek for a mouth. It refers to openings on leaves, which gasses pass oxygen and carbon dioxide during respiration that may have hair or a raised rim surrounding the opening. Agood example is the exotic garden weed Eucalyptus cyclostoma.

Cyclotheca: [sahy/kahy-klo-thee-a] From Kyklosis, which is Ancient Greek for encircling and Theka, which is Ancient Greek for a box or case. It refers to carpels, which are surrounded by a box like wall. Agood example is the exotic garden weed Gyrostemon cyclotheca, which is now known as Gyrostemon sheathii.

Cycnei-sinus: [sahy/kahy-nei-sahy-nus] From Kúanos, which is Ancient Greek and later Cȳaneum, which is Latin for deep blue and Sinus which is Latin for a widening in a canal or duct. Its reference is not clear in that most plants with this name have blueish-green leaves. A good example is Amyema cycnei-sinus.

Cycnocephala: [sahy/kahy-noh-ke-fa-la] From Kyknos, which is Ancient Greek for a swan and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flowers, which somewhat resemble a cignet’s head. A good example is Pterostylis cycnocephala .

Cycnocephalus: [sahy/kahy-noh-ke-fa-lus] From Kyknos, which is Ancient Greek for a swan and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flowers, which somewhat resemble a cignet’s head. A good example was Hymenochilus cycnocephalus, which is now known as Pterostylis ziegeleri.

Cycnogeton: [sahy/kahy-no-ge-ton] From Kyknos, which is Greek for a swan and Geiton, which is Ancient Greek for a neighbour. It refers to being closely related to Triglochin. A good example is Cycnogeton dubia.

Cycnopotamia: [sahy/kahy-no-po-ta-mi-a] From Kyknos, which is Ancient Greek for a swan and Potamós, which is Ancient Greek for water. It refers to plants, which grow in moist soils close to water. A good example is Volvariella cycnopotamia, which is now known as Volvariella hypopithys.

Cycnopotamica 1: [sahy/kahy-no-po-ta-m-ka] From Kyknos, which is Ancient Greek for a swan and Potamós, which is Ancient Greek for water. It refers to plants, which grow in moist soils close to water. A good example is Thomasia cycnopotamica, which is now known as Thomasia grandiflora.

Cycnopotamica 2: [sahy/kahy-no-po-ta-mi-ka] From Kyknos, which is Ancient Greek for a swan and Potamós, which is Ancient Greek for water. It refers to plants, whichwere first discovered or live in or along the Swan river in Western Australia. A good example is Velleia cycnopotamica.

Cycnorum: [sahy/kahy-nor-um] From Cynorum, which is Latin for a young swan. It may have referred to the manner in which the single flower head had a long petiole raised above the foliage. A good example was Acacia cycnorum which is now known as Acacia lasiocarpa var. sedifolia.

Cydonia: [sahy/kahy-do-ni-a] From Kydonium, which is Ancient Greek for a melon fruit or apples. It refers to fruits, which resemble melons or pome. A good example is the Quince, Cydonia oblonga.

Cydoniifolia: [sahy/kahy-do-ni-i-foh-li-a] From Cydōnēa, which is Latin for the quince fruit and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the Quince trees that are in the Cydonia genus. A good example is Olearia cydoniifolia.

Cylindracea: [si-lin-dra-see-a] From Kýlindrós, which is Ancient Greek or Cylindrum, which is Latin for a cylindrical shape. It refers to organs, which have a cylindrical form. A good example is the flower spikes on Uraria cylindracea, which is now known as Uraria lagopodioides.

Cylindric: [si-lin-drik] From kúlindros/kulíndō, which is Ancient Greek for I roll or wallow – intransitive. It usually refers to a stipe, which has cylindrical shaped in that it has the same diameter from apex to base. A good example is Agaricus augustus.

Cylindrica: [si-lin-dri-ka] From Kýlindrós, which is Ancient Greek or Cylindrum, which is Latin for a cylindrical shape. It refers to flowers or fruits, which resemble cylinders. A good example is the fleshy orbicular leaves on Acacia cylindrica.

Cylindriceps: [si-lin-dri-seps] From Kýlindrós, which is Ancient Greek or Cylindrum, which is Latin for a cylindrical shape and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads, which have a cylindrical form. A good example is the buds on Pterigeron cylindriceps, which is now known as Streptoglossa cylindriceps.

Cylindricum: [si-lin-dri-kum] From Kýlindrós, which is Ancient Greek or Cylindrum, which is Latin for a cylindrical shape. It refers to flowers or fruits, which resemble cylinders. A good example is the fleshy orbicular leaves on Racosperma cylindricum, which is now known as Acacia cylindrica.

Cylindrostachya: [si-lin-dro-stah-shee-a] From Kýlindrós which is Ancient Greek or Cylindrum, which is Latin for a cylindrical shape and Stachyum, which is Ancient Greek for a flower spike. It refers to flowering spikes, which have a cylindrical form. A good example is the buds on Banksia cylindrostachya, which is now known as Banksia attenuata.

Cylindrostachyum: [si-lin-dro-stah-shee-um] From Kýlindrós which is Ancient Greek or Cylindrum, which is Latin for a cylindrical shape and Stachyum, which is Ancient Greek for a flower spike. It refers to flowering spikes, which have a cylindrical form. A good example is the buds on Pterocaulon cylindrostachyum, which is now known as Pterocaulon redolens.

Cylindrostachyus: [si-lin-dro-stah-shee-us] From Kýlindrós which is Ancient Greek or Cylindrum, which is Latin for a cylindrical shape and Stachyum, which is Ancient Greek for a flower spike. It refers to flowering spikes, which have a cylindrical form. A good example is the buds on Eleocharis cylindrostachyus.

Cymatoderma: [si-ma-to-der-ma] From kūma, which is Ancient Greek for a wave and Dérma, which Ancient Greek and later Latin for the skin. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble resemble or feel like the skin or leather. A good example is the pileus on the fungi Cymatoderma elegans var. lamellatum.

Cymbalariifolia: [sim-ba-lar-ri-foh-li-a] From Cymbalaria, which is Latin for cymbals and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble cymbals. A good example is the leaf on the orchid Pultenaea cymbifolia, which is now known as Pultenaea elachista.

Cymbalariifolium: [sim-ba-lahr-ri-foh-lee-uh m] From Cymbalaria, which is Latin for cymbals and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble cymbals. A good example is the leaf on the orchid Univiscidiatus cymbalariifolium, which is now known as Acianthus cymbalariifolius.

Cymbalariifolius: [sim-bah-lar-ri-foh-li-us] From Cymbalaria, which is Latin for cymbals and Foliusm which is Latin for . It refers to leaves, which resemble cymbals. A good example is the leaf on the orchid Univiscidiatus cymbalariifolium, which is now known as Acianthus cymbalariifolius.

Cymbaria: [sim-bar-i-a] Maybe from Kúmbalon, which is Ancient Greek or Cymbalum, which is Latin for cymbals. It refers to flower heads which resemble cymbals on the culms. A good example is Lepironia cymbaria, which is now known as Chorizandra cymbaria.

Cymbidium: [sim-bi-di-um] From Kymbe, which is Ancient Greek for a boat. It refers to organs, usually hollow recess in the lip of flowers, which somewhat resemble a boat’s hull. A good example is Taeniophyllum cymbiforme.

Cymbiforme [sim-bi-form] From Cymbalaria, which is Latin for cymbals and Form, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to organs, which resemble cymbals. A good example is Taeniophyllum cymbiforme.

Cymbiformis: [sim-bi-for-mis] From Kymbe, which is Ancient Greek for a boat and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to pods, which resemble a boat in form and shape. A good example is Hovea cymbiformis.

Cymbocarpa: [sim-bo-kar-pa] From Kymbe, which is Greek for a boat and Notos, which is Ancient Greek for a back. It vaguely It refers to the shape of the rear of flowers, which resemble the aft end of a ship. A good example is Cymbonotus lawsonianus.

Cymbonotus: [sim-bo-noh-tus] From Kymbe, which is Greek for a boat and Notos, which is Ancient Greek for a back. It vaguely It refers to the shape of the rear of flowers, which resemble the aft end of a ship. A good example is Cymbonotus lawsonianus.

Cymbopogon: [sim-bo-poh-gon] From Kymbe, which is Greek for a boat and Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to the boat shaped spatheoles subtending the hairy racemes. A good example is Cymbopogon ambiguus.

Cyme: [sahym] From Kyma which is Greek, for a type of inflorescence or Cyma, which is Latin for a type of inflorescence. It refers to the primary axis which bears a single central or terminal flower that blooms first.

Cymiferum: [si-mi-fer-um] From Cymin, and later Cumin which is Latin for the herb, Cumin and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which bear leaves that resemble those of the Cumin genus. A good example is Stylidium cymiferum.

Cymiflora: [si-mi-flor-a] From Cymin and later Cumin, which is Latin for the herb, Cumin. It refers to flowers, and seeds which resemble those of the Cumin genus. A good example is Rhodomyrtus cymiflora.

Cymosa: [sahy-moh-sa] From Kyma, which is Ancient Greek or Cyma, which is Latin for a type of flower cluster. It refers to flowers, which open from the centre first, then in succession outward toward the periphery. A good example is Calcoa cymosa, which is now known as Geitonoplesium cymosum.

Cymose: [sahy-mohs] From Kyma, which is Ancient Greek or Cyma which is Latin for a type of inflorescence. It refers to flowers, which are born on a simple cyme. A good example is the terminal flowers of Oxalis chnoodes.

Cymosum: [sahy-moh-suh m] From Kyma, which is Ancient Greek or Cyma, which is Latin for a type of flower cluster. It refers to flowers, which open from the centre first, then in succession outward toward the periphery. A good example is Geitonoplesium cymosum Thysanotus cymosus.

Cymosus: [sahy-moh-suhs] From Kyma, which is Ancient Greek or Cyma, which is Latin for a type of flower cluster. It refers to flowers, which open from the centre first, then in succession outward toward the periphery. A good example is Thysanotus cymosus.

Cymule: [si-myool] From Kyma, which is Ancient Greek or Cyma which is Latin for a type of inflorescence. It refers to the plants, which have small cymes. A good example is the simple cymes on Atriplex semibaccata.

Cymulosa: [si-myoo-loh-suh] From Kyma, which is Greek or Cyma which is Latin for a type of inflorescence. It refers to flowers, which are born on small compound cymes. A good example is Marsdenia cymulosa.

Cynanchicarpa: [sahy-nahn-chi-kahr-puh] From Kunánkhē, which is Ancient Greek or Cynanchēa, which is Latin for a dog’s collar – a sore throat or throat inflammation and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the corolla tube which is inflamed or swollen similar to a sore throat leading back to the carpels. A good example is Strangea cynanchicarpa.

Cynanchum: [sahy-nahn-chuh m] From Kyon, which is Ancient Greek for a dog and Ancho/Anchos, which is Ancient Greek for to strangle or to choke and Ancho which is Latin for a chilli. It refers to plants, which have the ability to strangle or choke its host or at times the toxic qualities of a plant that can cause a person to gaffe or choke. A good example is Cynanchum brachystelmoides.

Cynaroides: [sahy-nahr-oi-deez] From Kyon, which is Ancient Greek for a dog and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the teeth on the leaves which resemble the canines on a dog. A good example can be found in the fruits of Banksia cynaroides.

Cynarrhodion: [sahy-nahr-roh-di-on] From Kyon, which is Ancient Greek for a dog and Rhodon which is Ancient Greek for a rose. It refers to the thorns, which are like a dog’s canines and also having the delicate pink flowers, which resemble a rose. A good example can be found in the fruits of Rubus parvifolius.

Cynobacteria: [sahy/kahy-noh-bak-teer-i-ah] From Kyanos, which is Ancient Greek for deep blue and Baktḗria, which is Ancient Greek for any ubiquitous one-celled organisms, which appear singularly or in chains as spherical, spiral, or rod-shaped organisms. It refers a group of photosynthetic bacteria in the phylum Cyanobacteria, which contain a blue photosynthetic pigment formally known as blue–green algae but now known to occur in many simple forms of land plants. A good example is the Cyanobacteria found as blue dots on the thalloids of Dendroceros crispatus.

Cynobacteria appear as deep blue specks on many lichens, especially ground lichens and some fungi. photo andi Mellis.

Cynocephala: [sahy-noh-ke/se-far-la] From Kyon, which is Ancient Greek for a dog and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flowers, which have resemble a dog’s head. A good example is Pterostylis cycnocephala.

Cynoctonum: [sahy-nok-toh-num] From Kyon, which is Ancient Greek for a dog and Ancho/Anchos, which is Ancient Greek for to strangle or to choke and Ancho, which is Latin for a chilli. It refers to plants, which have the ability to strangle or choke its host or the toxic qualities of a plant. A good example is Cynoctonum erubescens, which is now known as Cynanchum pedunculatum.

Cynodon: [sahy-no-don] From Kyon, which is Ancient Greek for a dog and Odontos, which is Ancient Greek for a tooth or teeth. It refers to rhizome buds which resemble the canines of a dog. A good example is Cynodon dactylon.

Cynoglossum: [sahy-no-glos-sum] From Kyon, which is Ancient Greek for a dog and Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to fruits or at times flowers, which resemble a dog’s tongue. A good example is Cynoglossum australe.

Cynology: [sahy-nol-o-jee] From Kyon, which is Greek for a dog and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science of studying wild dogs/dingoes.

Cynometra: [sahy-no-me-tra] From Kyon, which is Ancient Greek for a dog and Metra, which is Ancient Greek for the womb or uterus. It refers to fruits, which resemble the form of a dog’s uterus. A good example is Cynometra iripa.

Cyparioides: [sahy-par-i-oi-deez] From Kypárissos, which is Ancient Greek or Cypressus/Cupressus/Cyparissus, which are Latin for Cypress or sedge and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have structures which resemble a sedge. A good example is stems on Frullania cyparioides.

Cyparissias: [sahy-par-is-si-as] From Kypárissos, which is Ancient Greek or Cypressus/Cupressus/Cyparissus, which is Latin for Cypress like or a false Cypress. It refers to plants, which have structures which resemble a sedge. A good example is stems on Euphorbia cyparissias.

Cypellocarpa: [sahy-pel-lo-kar-pa] From Kypellon, which is Greek for a cylindrical shape cup and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are resemble cylindrical cup. A good example is the fruits on Eucalyptus cypellocarpa.

Cyperochloa: [sahy-per-o-kloh-a] From Kyparissos, which is the Ancient Greek name for a sedge and Khlóē, which is Ancient Greek for (young) green shoots – a grass. It refers to grasses which are somewhat sedge like in appearance and habitat. A good example is Cyperochloa hirsuta.

Cyperoides: [sahy-per-oi-deez] From Kyparissos, which is the Ancient Greek name for a sedge and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have typical characteristics of a Cyperus genus or sedges. A good example is Cyperus cyperoides.

Cyperophylla: [sahy-per-o-fahyl-la] From Cyperus, which is Ancient Greek for several species of pine trees and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble the leaves or needles of a pine tree or the Cyperus genus. A good example is Acacia cyperophylla.

Cyperophyllum: [sahy-per-o-fahyl-lum] From Cyperus, which is Ancient Greek for several species of pine trees and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which resemble the leaves or needles of a pine tree or the Cyperus genus. A good example is Racosperma cyperophyllum, which is now known as Acacia cyperophylla.

Cyperus: [sahy-peer-us] From Kúpeiros, which is the Ancient Greek or later Cypērus which is Latin for the name for a sedge. It refers to plants, which are sedges thatthe earliest form of paper was made from the plants along the Nile River in Egypt. A good example is Cyperus difformis.

Cyphanthera: [sahy-fan-theer-a] From Kyphos, which is Greek for a hump or tumor and ántha/ánthos, which are  Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to anthers, which appear to have a tumor. A good example is Cyphanthera albicans.

Cyphochilum: [sahy-fo-chi-lum] From Kyphos, which is Ancient Greek for a hump or tumor and Chilum, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to the labellum or lip of orchids which have small tumor like lumps. A good example is Prasophyllum cyphochilum.

Cypholoba: [sahy-fo-loh-ba] From Kyphos, which is Ancient Greek for a hump or tumor and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to lobe basis which have small lumps. A good example is Banksia cypholoba.

Cyphomandra: [sahy-fo-man-dra] From Kyphos, which is Greek for a hump or tumor and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to anthers, which have many lumps resembling a tumor. A good example is the Tamarilo, Cyphomandra betacea, which is now known as Solanum betacea.

Cypsela: [sahy-se-la] From Kypsele, which is Ancient Greek for a hollow vessel, box or chest. It refers to an achene with an adherent calyx as is found in the Asteraceae family. A good example is the achenes of Coronidium elatum.

Cypseleoides: [sahy-sel-e-oi-deez] From Kypsele, which is Ancient Greek for a hollow vessel or chest and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. A good example is Trianthema cypseleoides.

Cypselocarpus: [sahy-sel-o-kar-pus] From Kypsele, which is Ancient Greek for a hollow vessel or chest and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the hollow apex on the fruits. A good example is the achenes of the genus Cypselocarpus haloragoides.

Cyptotrama: [sahy-to-trar-ma] From Cypto, which is Latin for unknown and Trāma, which is Latin for a woven wrap. It may refer to the pileus, which has many short fibrils resembling a fabric covered in short loose threads. A good example is the beautiful orange fungus Cyptotrama aspratum.

Cyranostigma: [sahy-ra-no-stig-ma] From Cyran, which is unknown and Stígma/Stízein, which is Ancient Greek for the female reproductive organ upon the style which is receptive to receiving pollen. It may refer to the pileus which has many short fibrils resembling a fabric covered in short loose threads. A good example is the beautiful orange fungus Grevillea cyranostigma.

Cyrilwhitea: [si-ril-whahy-t-a] Is named in honour of Cyril Tenison White; 1890-1950, who was a Queensland botanist.

Cyrptonoma: [krip-to-loh-ma] From Krypto/Krypsis/Krypticos, which is Ancient Greek or Crypticus which is Latin for hidden or concealed and Nomós/Némein, which is Ancient Greek for feeding, grazing or consuming. It refers to the calyx lobes being very small. A good example is Baeckea cryptonoma.

Cyrtandra: [kri-tan-dra] From Kyrtos, which is Ancient Greek for a curve and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to the stamens having a curve. A good example is the anthers on Cyrtandra baileyi.

Cyrtococcum: [kri -to-koh-kum] From Kyrtos, which is Ancient Greek for a curve and kokkus, which is Ancient Greek for a kernel or grain. It refers to the seeds being flat on one side while the other side has a distinctly rounded convex shape. A good example is the seeds on Cyrtococcum oxyphyllum.

Cyrtodonta: [kri -to-don-ta] From Kyrtos, which is Ancient Greek for a curve and Donta/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek for a tooth or teeth. It refers to seeds which are flat on one side while the other side has a distinctly rounded convex shape. A good example is the seeds on Melaleuca cyrtodonta.

Cyrtoloba: [kri-to-loh-ba] From Kyrtos, which is Ancient Greek for a curve and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear. It refers to leaflets which have three very distinct lobes. A good example is Glycine cyrtoloba.

Cyrtostylis: [kri-to-stahy-lis] From Kyrtos, which is Ancient Greek for a curve and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column. It refers to styles which are curved or bent. A good example is Cyrtostylis huegelii.

Cystangium: [kri-stan-jee-uh m] From Kystis, which is Ancient Greek for a bladder and Angio, which is Ancient Greek for a vessel. It refers to the pileus on the fungi resembling small bladders prior to maturing and releasing spore. A good example is Cystangium balpineum.

Cystanthe: [kri-stahn-the] From Kystis, which is Ancient Greek for a bladder and Angio, which is Ancient Greek for a vessel. It refers to plants, which have pouches that can store water. A good example is Cystanthe dracophylla, which is now known as Richea dracophylla.

Cystidiiosa: [sahy-sti-di-oh-sa] From Cystidium, which is Latin for one of the large, inflated, sterile cells growing between the basidia and usually projecting beyond them in certain Basidiomycetous fungi. It refers to cystidium which have large spaces. A good example is the fungus Mycena cystidiosa.

Cystidiocatenata: [sahy-sti-di-o-ka-ten-a-ta] From Cystidium, which is Latin for one of the large, inflated, sterile cells growing between the basidia and usually projecting beyond them in certain basidiomycetous fungi and Catēnātus, which is Latin for linked together as in a chain. It refers to the Cystidium which are joined together. A good example is the fungus Inocybe cystidiocatenata.

Cystidiocatenatus: [sahy-sti-di-o-ka-ten-a-tus] From Cystidium, which is Latin for one of the large, inflated, sterile cells growing between the basidia and usually projecting beyond them in certain basidiomycetous fungi and Catēnātus, which is Latin for linked together as in a chain. It refers to the Cystidium which are joined together. A good example is the fungus Cortinarius cystidiocatenatus.

Cystidiorubra: [sahy-sti-di-o-roo-bra] From Cystidium, which is Latin for one of the large, inflated, sterile cells growing between the basidia and usually projecting beyond them in certain basidiomycetous fungi and Rubra, which is Latin for deep red. It refers to cystidium which are red. A good example is the fungus Hygrocybe cystidiorubra.

Cystolith: [sahy/kahy-stoh-lith] From Kústis, which is Ancient Greek or Cystis which is Latin for an anatomical sac. It refers to hair like structures that comprise of mineral concretions usually calcium carbonate. It refers to a botanical term for outgrowths of the epidermal cell wall, usually of calcium carbonate, formed in a cellulose matrix in special cells called lithocysts. They are usually located on the leaves of plants and can but not always inflict a sting, irritation or burns. A good example is the hairs found on the leaves of Brunoniella australis.

Cytoplasm: [sahy-stoh-plazm] From Cyto, which is Latin denoting a cell or the cytoplasm and Plásma, which is Ancient Greek for something being formed. It refers to the central fluid in cells where various new compounds are being formed.

Cystopteris: [sis/kis-sto-ter-is] From Kystis, which is Ancient Greek for a bladder or pouch and Pteris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to ferns, which have bladder like tubers or lumps either on the rachis or rhizomes. A good example is Cystopteris tasmanica.

Cytisifolia: [si/ki-tis-i-foh-li-a] From Kytitos, which is Ancient Greek for an old name for a woody clover and Folium, which is Latin for. It refers to leaves, which resemble those of the clover genus, Trifolia pratense. A good native example with the name is Lysanthe cytisifolia.

Cytisoides: [si/ki-ti-soi-deez] From Kytitos which is Ancient Greek for an old name for a woody clover and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble those of the clover genus, Trifolia pratense. A good example is the foliage on Zieria cytisoides.

Cytisus: [si/ki-ti-sus] From Kytitos, which is Ancient Greek for an old name for a woody clover. A good example is the exotic now declared noxious weed Cytisus scoparia.

Cytogonidium: [sahy/kahy-to-goh-ni-di-um] From Kútos, which is Ancient Greek for a container or a receptacle and Gonidium which is Ancient Greek for an angle in relation to the flowers. It refers to flowers, where the flowers appear at the zig zag angles of the stachus or stem. A good example is Cytogonidium leptocarpoide.

Cytoplasm: [sahy-to-pla-zm] From Kútos, which is Ancient Greek for a container or a receptacle and Plasma/Plassein, which is Ancient Greek for something that can be molded. It refers to the fluid within a cell that contains and supports the cytosol, organelles, cytoskeleton and other particles.

Cytosol: [sahy-to-sol] From Kútos, which is Ancient Greek for a container or a receptacle. It refers to the cell and the semi fluid gel without any of the organelles.

D

Dactile Rocks: [dak-tahy, roks] From Dactile, which is Latin for the greater Romanian land mass. It refers to the Transylvania Mountains which consist of a type of fine grained igneous rock that consist primarily of quartz, plagioclase, and potassium feldspar, and also containing biotite, hornblende, or pyroxene. It is the fine-grained equivalent of granodiorite.

Dacrydioides: [da-krahy-di-oi-deez] From Dakrydion, which is Ancient Greek for a small tear and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to a plants sap, which is exuded in small quantities. A good example is Acacia dacrydioides.

Dacryoides: [da-krahy-oi-deez] From Dakrydion, which is Ancient Greek for a small tear and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to a plants sap which is exuded in small quantities. A good example is Gardenia dacryoides.

Dacryopinax: [da-krahy-oh-pin-aks] From Dakryon, which is Ancient Greek for a tear drop and Pínax, which is Ancient Greek for a (wooden)tablet. It refers to a plants, which resemble a tear drop, which grows in cracks in wood. A good example is Dacryopinax spathularia.

Dactyl: [dahk-tahyl] From Dactylos, which is Ancient Greek for a finger.

Dactylis: [dahk-ti-lis] From Dactylos, which is Ancient Greek for a finger. It refers to the finger like shape of the inflorescens. A good example is exotic pasture grass Dactylis glomerata.

Dactyloctenium: [dak-tahy-lok-t-um] From Dactylos, which is Ancient Greek for a finger and Ktenion, which is Ancient Greek for a little comb. It refers to the finger like shape of the inflorescens radiating from a single point. A good example is exotic pasture grass Dactyloctenium radulans.

Dactylodes: [dahk-tahy loh-deez] From Dactylos, which is Ancient Greek for a finger and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the inflorescenscens, which are similar to those of the Dactylis genus. A good example is Banksia dactylodes.

Dactyloides: [dahk-tahy-loi-deez] From Dactylos, which is Ancient Greek for a finger and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the inflorescenscens being similar to those of the Dactylis genus. A good example is Hakea dactyloides.

Dactylon: [dahk-tahy-lon] From Dactylos, which is Ancient Greek for a finger. It refers to the finger-like spikes of the inflorescence. A good example is the introduced lawn grass Cynodon dactylon.

Dactylotes: [dahk-tahy-loh-teez] From Dactylos, which is Ancient Greek for a finger. It refers to the finger-like spikes of the inflorescence. A good example is the introduced lawn grass Cyperus dactylotes.

Daemeliana: [dee-me-li-a-na] Is named in honour of C.F.Eduard Dämel; 1821-1900, who was a Swiss born American entomologist who collected and sold insects and other animals from Australia, Mexica and South America. A good example is Tetracera daemeliana.

Daemelianum: [dee-me-li-a-num] Is named in honour of C. F. Eduard Dämel; 1821-1900, who was a Swiss born American entomologist who collected and sold insects and other animals from Australia, Mexica and South America. A good example is Toechima daemelianum.

Daintreana: [dahyn-tree-a-na] From Daintree, which is Latin for the Daintree National Park and Ana/Ensis which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Daintree National Park. A good example is Pterostylis daintreana.

Daintreeana: [dahyn-tree-a-na] From Daintree, which is Latin for the Daintree National Park and Eana, which is Latin for originates from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Daintree National Park. A good example is Acacia daintreeana.

Dalbergia: [dal-ber-jee-a] Is named in honour of Nils Dahlberg; 1736-1820, who was a Swedish botanist. A good example is the vine Dalbergia candenatensis.

D’albertisii: [dal-ber-ti-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Is named in honour of Luigi Maria D’Albertis; 1841–1901, who was an Italian naturalist and explorer mainly in New Guinee. A good example is the vine Dendrobium d’albertisii, which is now known as Ceratobium dalbertisii.

Daleana: [da-lee-a-na] Is named in honour of Dale but which Wood cannot be substantiated. A good example is Melaleuca daleana.

Dalhousieanum: [dal-hour-zi-a-num] Is named in Honour of Susan, Marchioness of Dalhousie; 1817-1853 who was the wife of James Andrew Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess of Dalhousie; 1812–1860. A good example wasLycopodium dalhousieanum, which is now known as Phlegmariurus dalhousieanus.

Dalhousieanus: [dal-hour-zi-a-nus] Is named in Honour of Susan, Marchioness of Dalhousie; 1817-1853 who was the wife of James Andrew Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess of Dalhousie; 1812–1860. A good example is Phlegmariurus dalhousieanus.

Dallachiana: [dal-la-chi-a-na] Is named in Honour of Dallach. A good example is Acacia dallachiana.

Dallachii: [dal-la-chi-ahy] Is named in Honour of John Dallachy; 1808?-1871 who was the curator of the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne. A good example is Solanum dallachii.

Dallachya: [dal-la-chahy-a] Is named in Honour of John Dallachy; 1808?-1871, who was the superintendent of the Melbourne Botanic Gardens and later an avid plant collector of plants for Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Dallachya vitiensis

Dallachyana: [dal-la-chahy-a-na] Is named in Honour of John Dallachy; 1808?-1871, who was the superintendent of the Melbourne Botanic Gardens and later an avid plant collector of plants for Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Excoecaria dallachyana.

Dallachyanum: [dal-la-chahy-a-num] Is named in Honour of John Dallachy; 1808-1871, who was the superintendent of the Melbourne Botanic Gardens and later an avid plant collector of plants for Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Antidesma dallachyanum.

Dallachyanus: [dahl-la-chahy-a-nus] Is named in Honour of John Dallachy; 1808?-1871, who was the superintendent of the Melbourne Botanic Gardens and later an avid plant collector of plants for Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Echinus dallachyanus.

Dallachyi: [dal-la-chahy-ee] Is named in Honour of John Dallachy; 1808?-1871, who was the superintendent of the Melbourne Botanic Gardens and later an avid plant collector of plants for Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Amomum dallachyi.

Dalrympleana: [dal-rim-ple-a-na] Is named in Honour of R. Dalrymple Hay; 1861-1943, who was Commissioner for forestry in NSW. A good example is Eucalyptus dalrympleana.

D’altonii: [dal-ton-ni-ahy] Is named in Honour of St. Eloy D’Alton; 1847-1930, who was an Australian naturalist and plant collector mainly in Victoria. A good example is Trymalium d’ altonii and Pultenaea d’ altonii .

Daltonii: [dahl/dol-ton-nee-ahy] Maybe is (an alternative) named in Honour of Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker OM GCSI CB PRS;1817–1911, who was a British botanist and director of the Kew Gardens in England. A good example is Cryptandra daltonii.

Dalyana: [dah-lahy-a-na] Is considered to be named in Honour of Daly however it is probably a spelling error for Daley but which Daley cannot be substantiated. A good example is Eremophila dalyana.

Damasonium: [da-ma-so-ni-um] From Damazo, which is Ancient Greek for to subdue. It refers to some of the species which contain certain subdued poisons and or drugs. A good example is Damasonium minus.

Dameriae: [da-mer-i-ee] Is named in honour of Dameri. A good example is Diplazium dameriae.

Dammannii: [da-ma-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Damman. A good example is Pandanus dammannii.

Dammerianum: [da-mer-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Dammeri. A good example is Diplazium dameriae.

Dampiera: [dam-pi-air-a] Is named in honour of William Dampier; Baptised 1651-1715, who was an early British Sailor and collector of plants from Australia’s north west coast. A good example is Dampiera stricta.

Damposis: [dam-pos-sis] From Dampos which is unknown. A good example is Synaphea damopsis.

Danbulla: [dan-boo-la] From Danbulla, which is Latinized for the area around the Tinaroo dam south west of Cairnes in Queensland. It refers to plants, which were first collected from Danbulla National Park. A good example is Psychotria sp. danbulla.

Danesianum: [dein-zi-a-num] Is named in honour of Doctor Jeri Vaclav Danes; 1880-1928, who was an Australian Geologist and plant enthusiast and plant collector. A good example is Phegopteris danesiana, which is now known as  Coveniella poecilophlebia.

Danesii: [dein-zi-ahy] Is named in honour of Doctor Jeri Vaclav Danes; 1880-1928, who was an Australian Geologist and plant enthusiast and plant collector. A good example is Ectrosia danesii.

Dangarensis: [dan-gar-en-sis] From Dangar, which is Latinized for Mount Dangar and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on Mount Dangar in the Golburn River National Park NSW. A good example is Acacia dangarensis.

Danhatchia: [dan-ha-chi-a] Is named in honour of Edwin Daniel Hatch; 1919–2008, who was a New Zealand botanist and orchidologis. A good example is Danhatchia australis. A good example is Danhatchia australis.

Dansiea: [dan-si-ee-a] Is named in honour of Doctor Jeri Vaclav Danes; 1880-1928, who was an Australian Geologist and plant enthusiast and plant collector. A good example is Dansiea elliptica.

Danthonia: [dan-thon-i-a] Is named in honour of D. Etienne Danthoine; 1739-1794, who was a French Botanist and agrostologist. A good example is the exotic pasture grass Danthonia spicata.

Danthonioides: [dan-thon-i-oi-deez] Is named in honour of D. Etienne Danthoine; 1739-1794, who was a French Botanist and agrostologist. A good example is the exotic pasture grass Triodia danthonioides.

Daohugouthallus: [dour-hyoo-goh-thahl-lus] From Daouhugou, which is unknown and Thallós, which is Ancient Greek for a simple vegetative stage which develops prior to the true leaves, stems, and roots, ranging from an aggregation of filaments to a complex plant like form commonly found in ferns and bryophytes. A good example of a large fully delved plant form is Daohugouthallus ciliiferus.

Daphandra: [da-fan-dra] From Dáphnē, which is Ancient Greek for the name of the nymph who was changed into a laurel to escape Apollo and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower. It refers to anthers, which resemble the exotic Daphne. A good example is Daphandra apatela.

Daphnandra: [daf-nan-dra] From Dáphnē, which is Ancient Greek for the name of the nymph who was changed into a laurel to escape Apollo and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower. It refers to anthers, which resemble the exotic Daphne. A good example is Daphandra apatela.

Daphnifolia: [daf-ni-foh-li-a] From Dáphnē, which is Ancient Greek for the name of the nymph who was changed into a Laurel to escape Apollo and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers the leaves, which resemble the exotic Daphne genus. A good example is Acacia daphnifolia.

Daphnifolium: [dahf-ni-foh-li-um] From Dáphnē, which is Ancient Greek for the name of the nymph who was changed into a Laurel to escape Apollo and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers the leaves, which resemble the exotic Daphne genus. A good example is Trymalium daphnifolium.

Daphnoides: [daf-noi-deez] From Dáphnē, which is Ancient Greek for the name of the nymph who was changed into a Laurel to escape Apollo and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the exotic Daphne genus. A good example is Pultenaea daphnoides.

Dareicarpa: [dar-i-kar-pa] From Dídōmi, which is Ancient Greek or Didō, which is Latin for to yield, surrender or concede and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits or sporangia, which have conceded the lower sections of the limbs or fronds and thus are only found near the apexes. A good example is the sporangia on Monogramma dareicarpa.

Darlingensis: [dar-lin-jen-sis] From Darling, which is Latinized for the Darling River in Queensland and NSW and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. (The river was named after the governor of NSW Sir Richard Darling). It refers to plants, which were first discovered along the Darling River. A good example is Lobelia darlingensis.

Darlingia: [dar-lin-jee-uh] Is named in honour of Sir Richard Darling; 1772-1858, who was a British military officer, governor of New South Wales and a ruthless adversary against slavery. A good example is Darlingia ferruginea.

Darlingiana: [dahr-lin-ji-a-na] Is named in honour of Sir Richard Darling; 1772-1858, who was a British military officer, governor of New South Wales and a ruthless adversary against slavery. A good example is Darlingia darlingiana.

Daronensis: [dar-on-en-sis] From Daron, which is Latinized for the Daron district and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Daron district in India. A good example is Carruthersia daronensis, which is now known as Ichnocarpus frutescens.

Darwinensis: [dar-win-en-sis] From Darwin, which is Latinized for the city of Darwin which is named in honour of Charles Darwin and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered north of Darwin in the Northern Territory. A good example is Pandanus darwinensis.

Darwini: [dawr-wi-ni] Is named in Honour of Dr. Eramus Darwin; 1731-1802 who was Charles Darwin’s grandfather, a botanist and poet. He wrote the poem Botanic Garden. A good example is the beautiful balck and blue butterfly Wallacea darwinii which is now known as Gabaza darwinii which was a great honour for the two men in which it is named.

Darwinia: [dawr-wi-ni-a] Is named in Honour of Dr. Eramus Darwin; 1731-1802 who was Charles Darwin’s grandfather, a botanist and poet. He wrote the poem Botanic Garden. A good example is Darwinia biflora.

Darwinioides: [dahr-win-i-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Charles Robert Darwin; 1809–1882, who was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution, and Oides, which is Ancient Greek for to be alike or similar to. It refers to the plants resembling those in the Darwinia genus. A good example is Homoranthus darwinioides.

Dasyantha: [da-sahy-an-tha] From Dasys, which is Ancient Greek for scruffy, shaggy or not neat and ántha/ánthos, which are  the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to the anthers, which are surrounded by shaggy hairs. A good example is the flowers on Cnesmocarpon dasyantha.

Dasycalyx: [da-sahy-ka-liks] From Dasys, which is Ancient Greek for scruffy, shaggy or not neat and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for specialized leaves which surround the immature bud which are often cupular in shape -the calyx. It refers to the calyxes, which are covered in shaggy hairs. A good example is the flowers on Ichnocarpus dasycalyx, which is now known as Ichnocarpus frutescens.

Dasyclada: [dah-si-kla-duh] From Dasys, which is Ancient Greek for scruffy, shaggy or not neat and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or branch. It refers to bristles on the petals. A good example is the stems on Petrophile dasyclada, which is now known as Petrophile striata.

Dasyphylla: [da-si-fahy-ah] From Dasys, which is Ancient Greek for scruffy, shaggy or not neat and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are covered in loose hairs that grow in all directions. A good example is the flowers of Rulingia dasyphylla.

Dasyphyllum: [da-si-fahyl-lum] From Dasys, which is Ancient Greek for scruffy, shaggy or not neat and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are covered in loose hairs that grow in all directions. A good example is the flowers of Lasiopetalum dasyphyllum, which is now known as Lasiopetalum macrophyllum.

Dasyphyllus: [da-si-fahyl-lus] From Dasys, which is Ancient Greek for scruffy, shaggy or not neat and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are covered in loose hairs that grow in all directions. A good example is the flowers of Urodon dasyphyllus.

Dasypogon: [da-si-poh-gon] From Dasys, which is Ancient Greek for scruffy, shaggy or not neat and Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to petals which are covered in scruffy like brisles. A good example is the flowers of Dasypogon australis.

Dasyrrhache: [da-sahy-rah-che] From Dasys, which is Greek scruffy, shaggy or not neat and Rachis, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf or flower stalk. It refers to the young stems and rachis. A good example is the flowers of Toechima dasyrrhache.

Dasystylis: [dah-si-stahy-lis] From Dasys, which is Greek scruffy, shaggy or not neat and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column or pillar. It refers to the female organ, which lies between the carpels and stigma on a flower that is covered in unruly or scruffy hairs. A good example is Leucopogon dasystylis, which is now known as Leucopogon rufus.

Datura: [da-tyoo-ra] From Datura which is Latinized from the Hindu word Dhatura. It refers to the devil’s trumpet. A good example is the flowers of Datura metel.

Daucus: [da-kus] From Daukus, which is Greek the carrot. Named by, Theophrastus for a carrot therefore it refers to plants, related to the carrot. A good example is the domestic carrot Daucus carota.

Davallia: [da-val-li-a] Is named in Honour of Edmund Davall; 1763-1798, who was a Swiss botanist. A good example is  the fern Davallia solida var. pyxidata.

Davallioides: [da-val-li-oi-deez] Is named in Honour of Edmund Davall; 1763-1798, who was a Swiss botanist and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to ferns which have fronds that resemble the Davallia genus. A good example is the fern Dennstaedtia davallioides.

Davejonesia: [da-ve-joh-ne-si-a] Is named in honour of David Lloyd Jones; 1944-2…, who was an Australian Botanist,  Nurseryman, orchidologist, author with a prostigous knowledge of Australian ferns and orchids. A good example isDavejonesia lichenastra.

Davenportii: [da-ven-por-ti-ahy] Is probably named in honour of A. Davenport who collected plants between the 1870s-1900s. A good example is Lawrencella davenportii.

Davidii: [da-vi-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Armand Pere David; 1826-1900, who was a French Missionary in and a naturalist enthusiast in China. A good example is Westringia davidii.

Davidsonia: [ai-vid-so-ni-a] Is named in Honour of J. E. Davidson a sugar cane farmer who collected the first specimen at Rockingham Bay in Queensland. He wrote the poem Botanic Garden. A good example is Davidsonia pruiens.

Daviesia: [da-vi-si-a] Is named in Honour of Hugh Davies; 1739-1821, who was a Welsh botanist who lived in Angelsea and translated the native plants into Welsh. A good example is Daviesia wyattiana.

Daviesiae: [da-vi-si-ee] Is named in Honour of Hugh Davies; 1739-1821, who was a Welsh botanist who lived in Angelsea and translated the native plants into Welsh. A good example is Thryptomene davisiae, which is now known as Thryptomene mucronulata.

Daviesioides: [dei-vi-si-oi-deez] Is named in Honour of Davies; 1739-1821, who was a Welsh botanist Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the foliage, which resembles that of the Davallia genus. A good example is Stenocarpus davallioides.

Daweana: [dor-wee-na] Maybe named in honour of James Dawson who was an Australian Surveyor and collector of botanical speciemans during the years of 1876-1899 but it cannot be substantiated 100mm. A good example Acacia daweana.

Dawsonia: [dor-so-ni-a] Is probably named in honour of James Dawson who was an Australian Surveyor and collector of botanical speciemans during the years of 1876-1899 but it cannot be substantiated 100mm. A good example Acacia dawsonii.

Dawsonii: [dor-so-ni-ahy] Is probably named in honour of James Dawson who was an Australian Surveyor and collector of botanical speciemans during the years of 1876-1899 but it cannot be substantiated 100mm. A good example Acacia dawsonii.

Dealbata: [deel-ba-ta] From Dealbata, which is Latin for white wash. It refers to the underside of the leaves having the appearance of being whiteish or white washed in lime. A good example is Neolitsea dealbata.

Dealbatum: [deel-ba-tum] From Dealbatum, which is Latin for white wash. It refers to the underside of the leaves having the appearance of being whiteish or white washed in lime. A good example was Xeranthemum dealbatum.

Dealbatus: [deel-ba-tus] From Dealbatum, which is Latin for white wash. It refers to the underside of the leaves, which have the appearance of being whiteish or white washed in lime. A good example is Xeranthemum dealbatum, which is now known as Agaricus dealbatus.

Deanei: [dee-nee-ahy] Is named in Honour of Henry Dean; 1847-1924, who was a railway engineer and noted botanist in the field of Eucalyptus. A good example is Eucalyptus deanei.

Deanianum: [dee-nee-a-num] Is named in Honour of Henry Dean; 1847-1924, who was a railway engineer and noted botanist in the field of Eucalyptus. A good example is Prasophyllum deanianum, which is now known as Genoplesium baueri.

Debeuzevillei: [de-byoo-ze-vil-lee-ahy] Is named in honour of Wilfred Alexander Watt de Beuzeville; 1884-1954, who was an Australian forester, botanist and ecologist. A good example is Eucalyptus debeuzevillei.

Debile: [de-bahyl] From Dedile, which is Latin for weak, feeble or debilitated. It refers to the straggly weak nature of the growth habit. A good example is Stylidium debile.

Debilior: [de-bi-li-or] From Dedile, which is Latin for weak, feeble or debilitated. It refers to the straggly weak nature of the growth habit. A good example is Uncinia debilior.

Debilis: [de-bi-lis] From Dedile, which is Latin for weak, feeble or debilitated. It refers to the straggly weak nature of the growth habit. A good example is Plantago debilis.

Debilissimum: [de-bi-lis-si-mum] From Dedile, which is Latin weak, feeble or debilitated and Issima, which is Latin for the supurlative or the most. It refers to structures, which are the  straggliest and weakest in growth habit of any species in the genus. A good example is Ionidium debilissimum, which is now known as Hybanthus debilissimus.

Debilissimus: [de-bi-lis-si-mus] From Dedile, which is Latin weak, feeble or debilitated and Issima, which is Latin for the supurlative or the most. It refers to structures, which are the  straggliest and weakest in growth habit of any species in the genus. A good example is Hybanthus debilissimus.

Decadens: [De-ka-denz] From De, which is Greek/Latin for down and Cadens, which is Latin for falling down. It refers to plants, which naturally cascade over rocks cliffs or rock overhangs. A good example is Eucalyptus cadens.

Decaisneana: [de-keiz-nee-a-na] Is named in Honour of Joseph Decaisne; 1807-1882, who was a French Botanist. A good example is Casuarina decaisneana.

Decaisnei: [de-keiz-ne-ahy] Is named in Honour of Joseph Decaisne; 1807-1882, who was a French Botanist. A good example is Notoleptopus decaisnei.

Decaisnina: [de-keis-ni-na] Is named in Honour of Joseph Decaisne; 1807-1882, who was a French Botanist. A good example is Allocasuarina decaisnina.

Decalvans: [de-kal-vanz] From (de which is Latin for down) Decalvans, which is Latin for going bald or becoming hairless. It refers to the young stems becoming glabrous sooner than the other species in the genus which may become hairless. A good example is Maireana decalvans.

Decalvatus: [de-kal-va-tuus] From Dēcalvātus, (de which is Latin for down) which is Ancient Greek for becoming bald. It refers to structures or organs, which slowly lose their hairs. A good example is Ptilotus decalvatus.

Decandra: [de-kan-dra] From Deca, which is Ancient Greek for ten and Andros which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to plants, which have ten stamens or anthers. A good example is Scholtzia decandra, which is now known as Thryptomene saxicola.

Decandrum: [de-kan-drum] From Deca, which is Ancient Greek for ten and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to plants, which have ten stamens or anthers. A good example is Dysoxylum decandrum.

Decaptera: [de-kap-teer-a] From Deca, which is Ancient Greek for ten and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to plants, usually the fruits which have ten compartments. A good example is Kochia decaptera, which is now known as Abutilon otocarpum.

Decasetus: [de-ka-se-tus] From Deca, which is Ancient Greek for ten and Seta, which is Latin for a bristle. It may refer to the stamens which resemble 10 short bristles. A good example is Homoranthus decasetus.

Decashistia: [de-ka-shis-ti-a] From Deca, which is Ancient Greek for ten and akhistos, which is Ancient Greek for split. It refers to the capsules which split into 10 sections. A good example is the newly discovered orchid Decashistia cuddapahensis.

Decaspermoides: [de-ka-sper-moi-deez] From Deca, which is Ancient Greek for ten, Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the number of seeds numbering 8 to 10 usually 10 in each fruit and appearing similar to the fruits on the Decaspermum genus. A good example is Austromyrtus decaspermoides.

Decaspermum: [de-ka-sper-mum] From Deca, which is Ancient Greek for ten and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the number of seeds numbering 8 to 10 usually 10 in each fruit. A good example is Decaspermum humile.

Decazesia: [de-ka-ze-si-a] Is named in Honour of Louis Decazes; 1818-1896, who was a French horticulturalist. A good example is Decazesia hecatocephala.

Decazesii: [de-ka-ze-si-ahy] Is named in Honour of Louis Decazes; 1818-1896, who was a French horticulturalist. A good example is Myriocephalus decazesii.

Decemdentata: [de-sem-den-ta-ta] From Deca, which is Latin for ten and Dentatus which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It refers to leaves which have at least ten teeth, usually ten. A good example is Leucas decemdentata.

Decepta: [de-sep-ta] From Dēceptum, which is Latin for to be caught out, to deceive or to cheat. It refers to plants, which resemble another species in the genus. A good example was Eucalyptus decepta, which is now known as Eucalyptus siderophloia.

Deceptivum: [de-sep-ti-vum] From Dēceptum, which is Latin for to be caught out, to deceive or to cheat. It refers to plants, which resemble another species in the genus. A good example is Entoloma deceptivum, which is now known as Entoloma fuscum.

Deceptivus: [de-sep-ti-vus] From Dēceptum, which is Latin for to be caught out, to deceive or to cheat. It refers to plants, which resemble another species in the genus. A good example is Boletellus deceptivus.

Deciduous: [dee-si-dyoo-os] From De, which is Latin for down and Cadere, which is Latin for to fall. It refers to plants, which lose their leaves in the cooler months or which is more normal in Australia to drop their leaves as they near the end of the dry season to conserve water. A good example of an Australian tree that loses its leaves at the end of the dry season is Bracychiton acerifolium.

Deciduus: [dee-si-dyoo-us] From De, which is Latin for down and Cadere which is Latin for to fall. It refers to plants, which lose their leaves in the cooler months or which is more normal in Australia as they near the end of the dry season. A good example of an Australian tree that loses its leaves at the end of the dry season is Melia azedarach or in New Guinea Lepeostegeres deciduus.

Decipiens: [de-si-pi-enz] From Decipiens, which is Latin for to deceive, deceitful or false. It refers to plants, which appear to have a structure or organ of another plant so that it at times looks similar to another plant species. A good example is Livistona decipiens closely resembles Livistona decora.

Decissa: [de-kis-sa] From Dīscissi/Dīscissō, which is Latin for to cut in (Late Latin scissors). It refers to plants, which appear to have had their organs cut into shape. A good example is Graphis descissa.

Declinata: [de-klin-a-ta] From De, which is Latin for down and Clinata, which is Latin for to bend towards. It refers to the structures or organs usually the stems or branches, which arch downwards. A good example is Acacia declinata.

Declinate: [de-klin-eit] From De, which is Latin for down and Clinatum, which is Latin for to bend towards. It refers to a description of branches arching downwards.

Declinatum: [de-klin-ei-tum] From De, which is Latin for down and Clinata, which is Latin for to bend towards. It refers to the branches arching downwards. A good example is Racosperma declinatum, which is now known as Acacia declinata.

Declinatus: [de-klin-ei-tus] From De, which is Latin for down and Clinatus, which is Latin for to bend towards. It refers to a description of branches or stems arching downwards. A good example is Ptilotus declinatus.

Decline: [de-klahyn] From De, which is Latin for down and Clinatum, which is Latin for to bend towards. It refers to where a structure points downwards. A good example is  the dorsal sepals on Lyperanthus suaveolens.

Decolor: [de-ku-lor] From Decoratus, which is Latin for adorn or attractive, Krôma, which is Ancient Greek, Colores, which is Greek or Colōr, which is Latin for a measurement of hue, saturation, and brightness of the reflected lights gauged by the saturation or chroma of. It refers to structures or organs, which have a very attractive colouation. A good example is the pileus on Eucalyptus decolor.

Decoloratus: [dee-ku-lor-ei-tus] From Decoratus, which is Latin for adorn or attractive, Krôma, which is Ancient Greek, Colores, which is Greek or Colōr, which is Latin for a measurement of hue, saturation, and brightness of the reflected lights gauged by the saturation or chroma of. It refers to structures or organs, which have a very attractive colouation. A good example is the pileus on Cortinarius decoloratus.

Decompisitum: [de-kom-pi-si-tum] From De, which is Latin for down and (com which is Latin for to come together) compositus, which is Latin for to divide more than once. It refers to a description of an organ or a physical structure which is repeatedly divided from a common point. Decomposita. A good example is Panicum decompositum.

Decompisitus: [de-kom-pi-si-tus] From De, which is Latin for down and (com which is Latin for to come together) compositum, which is Latin for to divide more than once. It refers to a description of an organ or a physical structure, which is repeatedly divided. A good example is the flowering spikes on Lyperanthus suaveolens.

Decomposita: [dee-kom-po-si-ta] From De, which is Latin for down and (com which is Latin for to come together) composita, which is Latin for to divide more than once. It refers to structures or organs which divide from a common point. A good example is the tripinnate fronds on Lastreopsis decomposita.

Decompositum: [de-com-po-si-tum] From De, which is Latin for down and (com which is Latin for to come together) compositus, which is Latin for to divide more than once. It refers to the inflorescence being extensively branched. A good example is Panicum decompositum.

Decompositus: [de-com-po-si-tus] From De, which is Latin for down and (com which is Latin for to come together) compositus, which is Latin for to divide more than once. It refers to the inflorescence being extensively branched. A good example is Cyperus decompositus.

Decompound: [dee-kom-pour-nd] From De, which is Latin for down, com which is Latin for to come together and Pound, which is Old English for repeatedly, for a second or third time. It refers to where a physical structure; usually the leaves, is divided two, three or more times. It is a general term for leaflets in two or more orders –bi, tri-etc – pinnately, palmately, or ternately compound.

Decora: [de-kor-a] From Decora, which is Latinized from the French word decor to be decorative. It refers to plants, which have an overall decorative appeal. A good example is the decorative trunk on the palm Livistona decora.

Decorans: [de-kor-anz] From Decorans, which is Latinized from the French word decor to be decorative. It refers to plants, which have an overall decorative appeal.

Decorata: [de-kor-a-ta] From Decora, which is Latinized fromthe French word to be decorative. It usually It refers to animals rather than plants. A good example is the beauty in the spider Leucauge decorata.

Decoratum: [de-kor–tum] From Decora which is Latinized fromthe French word to be decorative. It refers to the overall beauty of the plant. A good example is the beautiful exotic fern Elaphoglossum decoratum.

Decoratus: [de-kor- a-tus] From Décor, which is Latinized fromthe French word to be decorative. It refers to the overall beauty of certain insects rather than plants. A good example is the little moth when not chewing on our plants. Endoxyla decoratus when not chewing on our plants.

Decorosa: [de-kor-oh-sa] From Decorosa, which is Latinized from the French word decor to be decorative. It refers to plants, which have an overall decorative appeal especially when in flower. A good example is Derwentia decorosa.

Decorticans: [de-kor-ti-kanz] From Décor, which is Latinized from the French word to be decorative and/or De, which is Latin for down and Corticate, which is Latin for to shed. It refers to the bark in many of the Eucalyptus species which shed their bark annually exposing a beautiful inner bark. A good example is Eucalyptus decorticans which sparingly sheds its bark on the upper limbs while the smooth bark gums like Eucalyptus saligna shed the old bark to reveal beautiful shades of orange.

Decorticate: [de-kor-ti-keit] From Décor, which is Latinized from the French word to be decorative and/or De, which is Latin for down and Corticate, which is Latin for to shed. It refers to the bark in many of the Eucalyptus species, which shed their bark annually exposing a beautiful inner bark. A good example of this extreme colour is found on Eucalyptus deglupta.

Decorum: [de-kor-um] From Décor, which is Latinized fromthe French word to be decorative and Corticate, which is Latin for to shed. It refers to the overall beauty of the plant. A good example is the beautiful exotic fern Racosperma decorum, which is now known as Acacia decora.

Decumbens: [de-kum-benz] From Decumbent, which is Latin for to lie down. It refers to the growth habit of plants whose stems or branches tend to lie or trail across the ground with just the apexes tending to rise a little. A good example is Homoranthus decumbens.

Decumbent: [de-kum-bent] From Decumbent, which is Latin for to lie down. It refers to the growth habit of plants whose stems or branches tend to lie or trail across the ground with just the apexes tending to ascend a little. A good example is Scaevola aemula.

Decurrens: [de-kur-renz] From Decurrent, which is Latin for a deccurrent leaf. It refers to the base of the leaf stalk extending down the stem as two raised lines or wings. A good example is Acacia decurrens.

Decurrent 1: [de-kur-rent] From Decurrent, which is Latin for extending down the stem below the point of attachment. It refers to a description of the base of the leaf petioles which extend down the stem as two raised lines or wings. A good example is the petioles on Viola betonicifolia.

Decurrent 2: [de-kur-rent] From Decurrent, which is Latin of a shrub or the crown of a tree is to have several roughly equal branches bending downwards. It refers to plants, which have branches and stems which arch downwards. A good example is the stems on Austromyrtus dulcis.

Decursiva: [de-ker-si-va] From Decurrent, which is Latin for extending down the stem below the point of attachment. It refers to a description of the base of the leaf petioles which extend down the stem as two raised lines or wings. A good example is Goodenia decursiva.

Decurtatus: [de-ker-ta-tus] From De, which is Latin for down and Curtate which is Latin for to cut. It refers to a description of a physical structure appearing to be cut off.

Decurva: [de-ker-va] From De, which is Latin for down and Curvum, which is Latin for an arch or curve. It refers to barks in many of the Eucalyptus which are shed in curly strips. A good example is Eucalyptus decurva.

Decurve: [de-kerv] From De, which is Latin for down and Curvum, which is Latin for an arch or curve. It refers to the bark in many of the Eucalyptus which shed their bark annually. A good example is the leaf apexes on Syzygium oleosum.

Decussata: [de-kus-sa-ta] From Decussāta, which is Latin for to crossover. It refers to the arrangement of the leaves along the stem where each pair is opposite and at right angles to the pair above and below them. A good example is the arrangement of the leaves along the stem on Melaleuca decussata.

Decussate: [de-ku-seit] From Decussātum, which is Latin for to crossover. It refers to the description of the arrangement of the leaves along the stem where each pair is opposite and at right angles to the pair above and below them. A good example is Melaleuca gibbosa.

Decussatum: [de-kus-sa-tum] From Decussātum, which is Ancient Latin for to be divide and opposite as in the opposite strokes on an “X”. This is presently an unresolved name awaiting further research to determine which genus, species or sub species or variety it should be allocated to. A good example is Myriophyllum decussatum.

Decussatus: [de-kus-sa-tus] From Decussātus, which is Ancient Latin for to be divide and opposite as in the opposite strokes on an “X”. This is presently an unresolved name awaiting further research to determine which genus, species or sub species or variety it should be allocated to. A good example is Leucopogon decussatus.

Dedmanae: [ded-ma-nee] Is probably named in honour of Dedman, John Johnstone; 1896–1973, who was a teacher and ALP federal member during and after the second World War where he held the portfolio of the CSIRO. A good example is Thelymitra dedmanae.

Deeringia: [der-rin-ji-a] Is named in Honour of George Deering; 1695-1749, who was an English botanist. A good example is Deeringia arborescens.

Defensum: [de-fen-sum] From Dēfensum, which is Latin for to defend or guard against. It refers to plants, which have thorns or prickles as a means of defense against predation. A good example is Solanum defensum.

Deficiens: [de-fi-si-enz] From Deficiens, which is Latin for deficient or becoming weak. It refers to plants, which have few leaves and an open spreading habit as though they cannot stand up. A good example is Acacia deficiens.

Deflexa: [de-flek-sa] From De, which is Latin for down and Flexuosum, which is Latin for pliable, sinuous or curved. It usually It refers to the leaves and outer stems which are sharply bent outwards and downwards. A good example is the stems on Platysace deflexa.

Deflexed: [de-fleks-d] From De, which is Latin for down and Flexuosum, which is Latin for pliable, sinuous or curved. It usually It refers to the leaves and outer stems which are sharply bent outwards and downwards. A good example is  the lateral sepals on Diuris punctata.

Deflexifolia: [de-flek-si-foh-li-a] From De, which is Latin for down and Flexuosum, which is Latin for pliable, sinuous or curved and Floilium, which is Latin for . It usually It refers to the leaves and outer stems which are sharply bent outwards and downwards. A good example is  the lateral sepals on Euphrasia deflexifolia, which is now known as Euphrasia collina subsp. deflexifolia.

Deflexum: [de-flek-sum] From De, which is Latin for down and Flexuosum, which is Latin for pliable, sinuous or curved. It usually It refers to the leaves and outer stems which are sharply bent outwards and downwards. A good example is the stems on Racosperma deflexum, which is now known as Acacia deflexa.

Deflexus: [de-flek-sus] From De, which is Latin for down and Flexuosus, which is Latin for pliable, sinuous or curved. It usually It refers to the leaves and outer stems which are sharply bent outwards and downwards. A good example is  the lateral sepals on Amaranthus deflexus.

Defoliata: [de-foh-li-a-ta] From De, which is Latin for down and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which lose their leaves shortly after they appear. A good example is Boronia defoliata.

Defoliatum: [de-foh-li-a-tum] From De, which is Latin for down and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which lose their leaves shortly after they appear. A good example is Comesperma defoliatum.

Deformis: [de-for-mis] From De, which is Latin for down and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of or Disformare, which is Latin for to disfigure. It refers to the stems or branches, which are twisted and appear to be disformed in all different directions. A good example is Leucopogon deformis.

Defungens: [de-fun-jenz] From Dēfungēns which is unknown but may be a spelling error for fulgens which is Latin for bright, shinny or glistening. It refers to the leaves or organs, which have a sheen about them. A good example is Leucopogon deformis.

Deglupta: [de-glup-ta] From Degluptere, which is Latin for to peel or peeling skin. It refers to the bark on many of the Eucalyptus species with smooth bark which sheds annually to expose a beautiful, smooth, fresh inner bark. A good example of this extreme colour is found on Eucalyptus deglupta.

Dehiscens 1: [de-hi-senz] From Dehiscence, which is Latin for the natural splitting of an organ to release its contents. It refers to fruits, which release their seeds by splitting. A good example is Pentachondra dehiscens.

Dehiscens 2: [de-hi-senz] From Dehiscence, which is Latin for the natural splitting of an organ to release its contents. It refers to most anthers as most anthers release their pollen by splitting. A good example is the anthers on Melaleuca viminalis.

Dehiscens 3: [de-hi-senz] From Dehiscence, which is Latin for the natural splitting of an organ to release its contents. It refers to fungi which release their spore through splitting of the pileus. A good example is the pileus on Mycenastrum corium.

Dehiscent 1: [de-hi-sent] From Dehiscence, which is Latin for the natural splitting of an organ to release its contents. It refers to the description of the way the anthers release their pollen.

Dehiscent 2: [de-hi-sent] From Dehiscence which is Latin for the natural splitting of an organ to release its contents. It refers to the way the fruits release their seeds. A good example is Zieria cytisoides.

Delabechei: [del-a-be-che-i] Is probably named in honour of Sir Henry Thomas De la Beche(a);1796–1855, who was an English geologist and paleontologist. A good example was Brachychiton delabechei, which is now known as Brachychiton rupestris.

Delarbrea: [de-lar-bree-a] Is probably named in Honour of Antoine Delarbre; 1724-1807/11?, who was a physician and naturalist. A good example is the fern Delarbrea michieana.

Delegatensis: [de-le-ga-tensis] From Delegate, which is Latinized for the township of Delegate and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to the area where the type specimen originated from just north of the Victorian border in New South Wales. A good example is Eucalyptus delegatensis.

Delestangii: [de-le-stan-ji-ahy] Is named in Honour of Albert de Lestang; 1884–1959, who was an Argentinian born of French parents, was an Australian botanist who worked and dedicated his life to the promotion of fruit trees on his property and genuine conservation at Lawn Hill (North west of Mount Isa) which he donated to the Queensland Government and is now a floral conservation National Park. A good example is the fern Tephrosia delestangii.

Delibrata: [de-li-bra-ta] From Deliberatus, which is Latin for deliberate. It refers to the growth habit which is slow and steady for an Acacia. A good example is Acacia delibrata.

Delibratum: [de-li-bra-tum] From Deliberatum, which is Latin for deliberate. It refers to the growth habit which is slow and steady for an Acacia. A good example is Racosperma delibratum, which is now known as Acacia delibrata.

Delicata 1: [de-li-ka-ta] From Delicatum, which is Latin for charming or refined. It refers to plants, which are more delicate or finer than other species in the genus. A good example is Correa delicata.

Delicata 2: [de-li-ka-ta] From Delicata, which is Latin for delightful or dainty. It refers to plants, which are rather frail or dainty looking especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Goodenia delicate.

Delicate: [de-li-keit] From Delicatum, which is Latin for charming or fine. It refers to plants, which are more delicate or finer than other species in the genus. A good example is Pomaderris delicate.

Delicatula: [de-li-ka-tyoo-la] From Delicatum, which is Latin for charming or refined. It refers to plants, which are more delicate or finer than other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia delicatula.

Delicatum: [de-li-ka-tum] From Delicatum, which is Latin for charming or refined. It refers to plants, which are more delicate or refined than other species in the genus. A good example is Dendrobium delicatum.

Deliquescent: [de-li-chyoo-e-sent] From De, which is Latin for down and Liquesco, which is Latin for to melt away. It refers to deciduous trees when they shed stems and leaves at the same time. A poor example is at time seen with Brachychiton aecrifolium.

Delisseri: [de-lis-ser-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Edmund Alfred Delisser; 1829–1900, who was an Australian surveyor who first named the Nullarbor Plain in 1866 when travelling between Fowler’s Bay and Eucla. I have been unable to substantiated it beyond all doubt as his brother who is also a surveyor was apparently named Alfred as well. There is some A good example is Eremophila delisseri.

Delphina: [del-fi-na] From Delphys, which is Ancient Greek for a womb. It’s reference is unclear. A good example is Racosperma delphinum, which is now known as Acacia delphina.

Delphinum: [del-fi-num] From Delphys, which is Ancient Greek for a womb. It’s reference is unclear. A good example is Acacia delphina.

Delsii: [de-li-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Friedrich Ludwig Emil Diels; 1874-1945, who was a director of the Berlin Botanic Gardens and who travelled and collected widely in Western Australia. A good example is Eragrostis delsii.

Délta: [del-ta] From Délta, which is Ancient Greek for the third letter of the alphabet which is scripted as a triangle. It usually It refers to the leaves or phyllodes which have a distinctly triangular or deltoid shape. A good example is the leaves of Grevillea delta.

Déltantha: [del-tan-tha] From Délta, which is Ancient Greek for the third letter of the alphabet which is scripted as a triangle and Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to floral tube having a distinct triangular shape. A good example is Pararistolochia deltantha.

Deltoid: [del-toid] From Délta, which is Ancient Greek for the third letter of the alphabet which is scripted as a triangle. It usually It refers to the leaves or phyllodes which have a distinctly triangular or deltoid shape. A good example is the leaves of Grevillea Délta.

Deltoidea: [del-toi-dee-a] From Délta, which is Ancient Greek for the third letter of the alphabet which is scripted as a triangle and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the leaves or phyllodes which have a distinctly triangular or deltoid shape. A good example is the leaves of Acacia deltiodea.

Deltoides: [del-toi-deez] From Délta, which is Ancient Greek for the third letter of the alphabet which is scripted as a triangle and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the leaves or phyllodes which have a distinctly triangular or deltoid shape. A good example is the leaves of the exotic horticultural plant Lampranthus deltoides.

Deltoideum: [del-toi-dee-um] From Délta, which is Ancient Greek for the third letter of the alphabet which is scripted as a triangle and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the leaves or phyllodes which have a distinctly triangular or deltoid shape. A good example is the leaves of Racosperma deltiodeum, which is now known as Acacia deltiodea.

Deltophylla: [del-to-fahyl-la] From Délta, which is Ancient Greek for the third letter of the Greek alphabet which is scripted as a triangle and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which have a distinctly triangular or deltoid shape. A good example is the leaves of the Rhagodia deltophylla.

Demersa: [de-mer-sa] From Dēmersum, which is Latin for to be overwhelmed or submerged. It refers to plants, which are usually submerged in fresh stationary slow moving water. A good example of a lichen, which often overwhelms its habitat is Lecanora demersa.

Demersum: [de-mer-sum] From Dēmersum, which is Latin for to be overwhelmed or submerged. It refers to plants, which are usually submerged in fresh stationary slow moving water. A good example of a submerged fresh water plant is Ceratophyllum demersum.

Demidovii: [de-mi-do-vi-ahy] Is named in honour of Prokofi Akinfiyevich Demidov; 1710–1786, who was a Russian industrialist, philanthropist to science and botanist (maybe amateur as he could buy anything) and established the Demidov garden which extraordinarily could grow tropical and subtropical plants in the sub 20 degree temperatures of Moscow outdoors without any input heating based on love and affection for botany. A good example is Astrotricha demidovii.

Deminuta: [de-mi-nyoo-ta] From Diminutivus, which is Latin for very small. It refers to a structure or organ, which is very small. A good example is the very tiny succulent leaves on Osteocarpum acropterum var. deminuta.

Deminutum: [de-mi-nyoo-tum] From Diminutivum, which is Latin for very small. It refers to a structure or organ, which is very small. A good example is the very tiny succulent leaves on Osteocarpum acropterum var. deminutum.

Deminutus: [de-mi-nyoo-tus] From Diminutivus, which is Latin for very small. It refers to astructure or organ, which is very small. A good example is the very tiny succulent leaves on Cortinarius deminutus.

Demissa: [de-mis-sa] From Demissa, which is Latin for hanging down, weak or low growing. It refers to plants, which resembles a weak, bent over old man walking. A good example is the low growing Acacia demsissa.

Demissum: [de-mis-sum] From Demissum, which is Latin for hanging down, weak or low growing. It refers to plants, which are small and weak looking. A good example is the low growing Hyalosperma demissum.

Demissus: [de-mis-sus] From Demissus, which is Latin for hanging down, weak or low growing. It refers to plants, which resembles a weak, bent over old man walking. A good example is the low growing Epitriche demissus.

Dempsteri: [dem-ter-ahy] Is named in honour of Andrew Dempster who was an Australian who discovered the type species. A good example is Acacia dempsteri.

Dempta: [demp-ta] From Dempta, which is Latin for I have removed or subtracted. Its reference is unclear. A good example is Melaleuca dempta.

Dendritic Hairs: [den-dri-tik, hairz] From Dendrī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for pertaining to a tree and Heer, which is Old English or Haarb which is old Danish for a filamentous structure growing from another structure or organ. It refers to hairs which branch out like a tree. A good example is the hairs on Notothixos incanus.

Dendritica: [den-dri-tik-a] From Dendrī́tēs, which is Ancient Greek for pertaining to a tree. It refers to hairs which branch out like a tree. A good example is the hairs on Eremophila dendtritica.

Dendro: [den-droh] From Déndron which is Ancient Greek for a tree.

Dendrobioides: [den-droh-bi-oi-deez] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree, Bios, which is Ancient Greek for life and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers, which somewhat resemble the Dendrobium genus in colour. A good example is Diuris dendrobioides.

Dendrobium: [den-droh-bi-um] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Bios, which is Ancient Greek for life. It refers to plants, which live on trees to survive, not as parasites or saphrophytes. A good example is the orchid Dendrobium falcorostrum.

Dendrocharis: [den-droh-kar-is] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Kháris, which is Ancient Greek for beauty, elegance, charm and grace or Khárites which is ancient Greek for one of the three goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity, and fertility. It refers to plants, which are more upright and have a greater charm, grace and beauty than the other species in the genus. It may also refer to the fruits, which are more beautiful and more bountiful or larger than other species in the genus thus refering to the fertility of the plants. A good example is Rubus moluccanus var. dendrocharis.

Dendrochnide: [den-drok-nahyd] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Knid, which is Ancient Greek for a nettle. It refers to the nettle type hairs, which are capable of yielding a severe stinging or burning sensation. A good example of hairs which burn is found on Dendrochide photinophylla.

Dendroid: [den-droid] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which are tree like. A good example is the short lateral branches of Bambusa arnhemica which give it a somewhat tree like appearance.

Dendroidea: [den-droi-dee-a] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which are tree like. A good example is Eremaea dendroidea.

Dendroideum: [den-droi-dee-um] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which are tree like and similar to most other trees. A good example was Helichrysum dendroideum, which is now known as Ozothamnus ferrugineus that is more tree like than the other shrubs in the genus.

Dendroideus: [den-droi-de-us] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which are tree like and similar to most other trees. A good example was Ozothamnus dendroideus, which is now known as Ozothamnus ferrugineus that is more like a small tree than the other shrubs in the genus.

Dendrolobium: [den-dro-loh-bee-um] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for a pod. It refers to the plants, which are tree like with distinctly tree like seed pods. A good example is Dendrolobium arbuscular.

Dendrologist: [den-dro-lo-jist] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies trees.

Dendrology: [de-dro-lo-jee] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science of studying trees.

Dendromerinx: [den-dro-me-rinks] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Merinx, which is unknown. A good example is Corymbia dendromerinx.

Dendromorpha: [den-dro-mor-fa] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for a shape or form. It refers to the plants having a typical small tree form. A good example is Eucalyptus dendromorpha.

Dendromyza: [den-dro-mahy-za] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Myzo, which is Ancient Greek for to suck in. It refers to hemi parasitic plants sucking some nutrient from its host and producing the remainder from photosynthesis and nutrients from their environment. A good example is Dendromyza reinwardtiana.

Dendrophthoe: [den-drof-thoh-ee] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Phthinein, which is Ancient Greek for to waste away. It refers to many diseases and plant fungi which are parasitic or hemi parasitic and usually lead to the death of its host. A good example is Dendropthoe vitellina on Acacia complanata which is a common Host in the Clarence Valley.

Dendropilosa: [den-dro-pi-loh-sa] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Phthinein, which is Ancient Greek for to waste away. It refers to many diseases and plant fungi, which are parasitic or hemi parasitic but eventually will kill its host. A good example is Lycianthes dendropilosa.

Dendropilosum: [den-dro-pi-loh-sum] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Phthinein, which is Ancient Greek for to waste away. It refers to many diseases and plant fungi, which are parasitic or hemi parasitic but eventually will kill its host. A good example is Solanum dendropilosum, which is now known as Lycianthes dendropilosa.

Dendrothrix: [den-dro-thriks] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for hair. It refers herbs which are more tree like than other species in the genus and are covered in hairs which is unusual for the genus. A good example is Trachymene dendrothrix.

Dendrotrophe: [den-dro-troh-fe] From Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Trophos, which is Ancient Greek for spinning or to turn. It refers to vines habits, which sees them growing clockwise or anti clockwise up the tress even on tall highland rainforest trees. A good example is Dendrotrophe varians.

Deneufvillei: [den-yoo-vil-lahy] Maybe from Dasýs, which is Ancient Greek or Dēnsus, which is Latin for dense or thick and Louis Econches Feuillet; 1660-1732, who was a French explorer and scientist. It refers to plants which have dense foliage. A good example is Acacia deneufvillei.

Denhamia: [den-hei-mi-a] Is named in honour of Dixon Denham; 1786-1828, who was an English explorer in Africa and fought in the Battle of Waterloo. A good example is Denhamia bilocularis.

Denhartogii: [den-har-to-ji-ahy] Is named in honour of Den Hartog. A good example is Posidonia denhartogii.

Denisonia: [den-i-soh-ni-a] Is named in honour of Sir William Denison; 1804-1871, who was a governor of NSW keen gardener and supporter of biology. It refers to a group of semi venomous and venomous snakes in Australia. A good example is Denisonia maculata.

Denisonii: [den-i-so-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Sir William Denison; 1804-1871, who was a governor of NSW keen gardener and supporter of biology. It refers to a group of semi venomous and venomous snakes in Australia. A good example is Encephalartos denisonii, which is now known as Lepidozamia peroffskyana.

Denmarkica: [den-mar-ki-ka] From Denmark, which is Latinized for the Township and district of Denmark. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Denmark district in far south west of Western Australia. A good example is Meeboldina denmarkica.

Dennisii: [den-i-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Jean Dennuis;  1938-20, who was an Australian botanical artist. A good example is Boea dennisii.

Dennstaedtia: [den-stei-ti-] Is named in honour of August Wilhelm Dennstaedt; 1776-1826, who was a German physician, botanist and a remarkable taxonomist. A good example is Dennstaedtia davallioides.

Densa: [den-sa] From Densus, which is Latin for packed close together. It refers to foliage or at times flowers, which bloom in profusion. A good example is Banksia densa var. densa or Deyeuxia densa.

Densevestita: [den-se-ve-sti-ta] From Densus, which is Latin for packed close together and Vestitum, which is Ancient Greek for (well) clothed or (well) dressed. It refers to foliage or at times flowers, which are produced in profusion. A good example is the flowers, which form in dense heads on Parsonsia densivestita.

Densevestitum: [den-se-ve-sti-tum] From Densus, which is Latin for packed close together and Vestitum, which is Ancient Greek for (well) clothed or (well) dressed. It refers to foliage or at times flowers, which are in profusion. A good example is the foliage on Dysoxylum densevestitum.

Densiflora: [den-si-flor-a] From Densus, which is Latin for packed close together and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are densly packed along the spike. A good example is Geodorum densiflora.

Densiflorum: [den-si-flor-um] From Densus, which is Latin for packed close together and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are densly packed along the spike. A good example is Conospermum densiflorum.

Densiflorus: [den-si-flor-us] From Densus, which is Latin for packed close together and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are densly packed along the spike. A good example is Cleistanthus densiflorus, which is now known as Cleistanthus xerophilus.

Densifolia: [den-si-foh-l-a] From Densus, which is Latin for packed close together and Folia, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, that have a copious quantity of leaves. A good example is Erimophila densifolia.

Densifolium: [den-si-foh-li-um] From Densum which is Latin for packed close together and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have a very dense foliage. A good example is Gastrolobium densifolium.

Densifolius: [den-si-foh-li-us] From Densus which is Latin for packed close together and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have a very dense foliage. A good example is the exotic garden succulant Lampranthus densifolium.

Densispicata: [den-si-spi-ka-ta] From Densum, which is Latin for packed close together and Spicatus, which is Latin for spike. It refers to the spikes, which are rather long and densely packed with buds. A good example is Melaleuca densispicata.

Densispicatum: [den-si-spi-ka-tum] From Densum, which is Latin for packed close together and Spicatus, which is Latin for spike. It refers to the spikes, which are rather long and densely packed with buds. A good example is Lepidosperma costale var. densispicatum, which is now known as Lepidosperma pubisquameum.

Densivellosa: [den-si-vel-loh-sa] From Densus, which is Latin for packed close together and Villosa, which is Latin for short thick velvet like hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in villose hairs. A good example is the very short villose hairs throughout Hovea densivellosa.

Densivestita: [den-si-ves-ti-ta] From Densus, which is Latin for packed close together and Vestitus, which is Latin for dressed or clothed. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in hairs. A good example is Parsonsia densivestita.

Densivestitum: [den-si-ves-ti-tum] From Densus, which is Latin for packed close together and Vestitus, which is Latin for dressed or clothed. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in hairs. A good example is Croton densivestitum, which is an incorrect spelling seen in many publications forCroton densivestitus.

Densivestitus: [den-si-ves-ti-tus] From Densus, which is Latin for packed close together and Vestitus, which is Latin for dressed or clothed. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in hairs. A good example is Croton densivestitus.

Densus: [den-sus] From Densus, which is Latin for packed close together. It usually It refers to foliage or at times flowers, which are very copious. A good example is the foliage on Eremophila densifolia which is packed very densly along the stems.

Dentata: [den-ta-ta] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It usually It refers to the margins of the leaves or at times the calyx lobes, which are toothed. A good example is the leaves on Banksia dentata.

Dentate: [den-ta-te] From odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It usually It refers to the margins of the leaves or at times the calyx lobes which are toothed.

Dentatifolia: [den-ta-ti-foh-li-a] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth and Folium which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the margins of the leaves, which are strongly toothed. A good example is Dichromochlamys dentatifolia

Dentatifolius: [den-ta-ti-foh-li-us] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth Folius which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the margins of the leaves, which are strongly toothed. A good example is Pterigeron dentatifolius, which is now known as Dichromochlamys dentatifolia.

Dentatum: [den-tei-tum] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It usually refers to the margins of the leaves or at times the calyx lobes, which are toothed. A good example is Leionema dentatum.

Dentatus: [den-teir-tus] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It usually refers to the margins of the leaves or at times the calyx lobes, being toothed. A good example is Melicytus dentatus.

Dentella: [den-tel-la] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth and Ella which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It usually  refers to an organ, which has a few small or dainty like teeth. A good example is the lobes on the fruiting capsules of Dentella minutissima.

Dentex: [den-teks] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It usually refers to the margins of the leaves or at times the calyx lobes or stems, which are toothed. A good example is the leaves on Pluchea dentex.

Denticidal Capsule: [den-ti-sahy-dal, kap-syool] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It refers to a capsule, that dehisces apically, leaving a ring of teeth. A good example is the dehiscing capsules on Calothamnus tuberosus.

Denticulata: [den-ti-kyoo-la-ta] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth and Ocalātum which is Latin for with an eye. It refers to leaf margins which have very fine teeth that need a keen eye to see them. A good example is the leaves on Prostanthera denticulata.

Denticulate: [den-ti-kyoo-leit] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth and Ocalātum, which is Latin for with an eye. It refers to leaf margins which have very fine teeth that need a keen eye to see them. A good example is the leaves on Eremophila denticulata subsp. trisulcata

Denticulatum: [den-ti-kyoo-la-tum] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth and Ocalātum, which is Latin for with an eye. It refers to leaf margins which have very fine teeth that need a keen eye to see them. A good example is the leaves on Astroloma denticulatum, which is now known as Astroloma humifusum.

Denticulatus: [den-ti-kyoo-la-tus] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth and Ocalātum, which is Latin for with an eye. It refers to leaf margins which have very fine teeth that need a keen eye to see them. A good example is the leaf apex’s on Leucopogon denticulatus.

Denticuliferum: [den-ti-kyoo-li-fer-um] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for very fine teeth and Ferum, which is Latin for with an eye. It refers to leaf margins which have very fine teeth that need a keen eye to see them. A good example is the leaf apex’s on Spyridium denticuliferum.

Denticulosa: [den-ti-kyoo-loh-sa] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It refers to margins which have teeth. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia denticulosa.

Denticulosum: [den-ti-kyoo-loh-sum] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It refers to margins which have teeth. A good example is the phyllodes on Racosperma denticulosum, which is now known as Acacia denticulosa.

Dentifera: [den-ti-fer-a] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth and Ferae/Ferārum which is Ancient Greek for to bear. It refers to a structure or organ, which have teeth. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia dentifera.

Dentiferum: [den-ti-fer-um] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth and Ferae/Ferārum which is Ancient Greek for to bear. It refers to a structure or organ, which have teeth. A good example is the phyllodes on Racosperma dentiferum, which is now known as Acacia dentifera.

Dentigera: [den-ti-geer-a] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth and Gera which is Latin for to bear. It refers to a structure or organs, which have teeth. A good example is the phyllodes on Boronia anemonifolia subsp. Anemonifolia.

Dentigeroides: [den-ti-ger-oi-deez] From Odoús/Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Dēns, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth, Gera which is Latin for to bear and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to a structure or organs, which have two teeth similar to the subspecies dentigera. A good example is the phyllodes on Boronia anemonifolia subsp. variabilis.

Denudata: [den-yoo-da-ta] From Dēnūdāre, which is Latin for without leaves. It refers to plants, which have no true leaves. A good example is the phyllodes on Fimbristylis denudata.

Denudatum: [den-yoo-da-tum] From Dēnūdāre, which is Latin for without leaves. It refers to plants, which have no true leaves. A good example is Pentacraspedon denudatum, which is now known as Amphipogon turbinatus.

Denudatus: [den-yoo-da-tus] From Dēnūdāre, which is Latin for without leaves. It refers to plants, which have no true leaves. A good example was Leucopogon denudatus, which is now known as Leucopogon microphyllus.

Deparia: [de-pahr-i-a] From Deparos which is Ancient Greek for a goblet or beaker. It refers to indusium cover, which surround the spores on most species of ferns and fern allies. A good example is Deparia petersenii.

Depauperata: [de-por-per-a-ta] From Depauperata, which is Latin for poorly or imperfectly developed. It refers to plants, which have a poorer flowering habit than other species in the genus. A good example is Scaevola depauperata.

Depauperate: [de-por-per-eit] From Depauperatum, which is Latin for poorly or imperfectly developed. It refers to a description of plants, which have a poorer flowering habit than other species in the genus. A good example is the flowers on Frankenia pauciflora.

Depauperatum: [de-por-per-a-tum] From Depauperatum, which is Latin for poorly or imperfectly developed. It refers to plants, which have a poorer flowering habit than other species in the genus. A good example is the flowers on Myrtoleucodendron depauperatum, which is now known as Melaleuca depauperata.

Depauperatus: [de-por-per-a-tus] From Depauperatus, which is Latin for poorly or imperfectly developed. It refers to plants, which have a poorer flowering habit than other species in the genus. A good example is the flowers on Scirpus depauperatus.

Dependens: [de-pen-denz] From Dependum, which is Latin for hanging down. It refers to flowering spikes or branches which hang down. A good example is the flowering spikes and leading stems on Maesa dependens var. dependens which hang down from the crowns of rainforest trees.

Deplanata: [de-plan-a-ta] From Deplanata, which is Latin for flattened or expanded. It refers to a structure or organ, which is very flat or much expanded when compared to other species in the genus. A good example was Atriplex deplanata, which is now known as Atriplex codonocarpa.

Deplanchea: [de-plan-che-a] Is named in honour of Emile Deplanche; 1824-1874, who was a French naval surgeon, botanist and entomologist. A good example is Deplanchea tetraphyla.

Deplanchei: [de-plan-che-ahy] Is named in honour of Emile Deplanche; 1824-1874, who was a French naval surgeon, botanist and entomologist. A good example is Alstonia deplanchei.

Deplexa: [de-plek-sa] From Deplexa ,which is Latin for to clasp or to grasp. It refers to plants, which may prefer to grow close to the ground. A good example is Lepidobolus deserti.

Depremesnilia: [de-pre-mes-ni-li-a] From Dēpressum, which is Latin for depressed, suppressed or sunken and Mesnilia, which is unknown. It refers to a structure or more often an organ, which has a feature that is derpressed or sunken. A good example is the depreesed seeds on the pods of Pityrodia depremesnilia, which is now known as Pityrodia chrysocalyx.

Depressa: [dee-pres-sa] From Dēpressa, which is Latin for depressed, suppressed or sunken. It refers to a structure or more often an organ, which has a feature that is depressed or sunken. A good example is the depressed seeds on the pods of Acacia depressa.

Depressed: [de-presd] From Dēpressum, which is Latin for depressed, suppressed or sunken. It refers to a description of a structure or more often an organ, which has a feature that is depressed or sunken.

Depressum: [dee-pres-sum] From Dēpressum, which is Latin for depressed, suppressed or sunken. It refers to a structure or more often an organ, which has a feature that is depressed or sunken. A good example is the flower spikes on Eriocaulon depressum.

Depressus: [dee-pres-us]From Dēpressus, which is Latin for depressed, suppressed or sunken. It refers to a structure or more often an organ, which has a feature that is derpressed or sunken. A good example is the sunken valves on the capsules of Lophostemon depressus, which is now known as Lophostemon suaveolens.

Derbyensis: [der-bee-en-sis] From Derby, which is Latinized for the district of Derby and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the district surrounding Derby in south western Western Australia. A good example is Drosera derbyensis.

Dermatophylla: [der-ma-to-fahyl-la] From Dérma, which is Ancient Greek for the skin and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are rather thick and leathery. A good example is Acacia dermatophylla.

Dermatophyllum: [der-ma-to-fahyl-lum] From Dérma, which is Ancient Greek for the skin and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which are rather thick and leathery. A good example was Racosperma dermatophyllum, which is now known as Acacia dermatophylla.

Derris: [de-ris] From Dérrhis, which is Ancient Greek for a tough leather like skin. It refers to structures usually the leaves, which are thick and leathery. A good example is the thick leathery leaves on Derris involuta.

Derris Dust: [de-ris, dust] From Derris, which is Ancient Greek for an East Indian woody, climbing legume that yields the compound rotenone a valuable insecticide. It usually It refers to Derris elliptica. A good Australian example is Derris trifoliata.

Derwentia: [der-wen-ti-a] From Derwent, which is Latinized for the Derwent River in Tasmania. It refers to the type species which was first discovered along the river. A good example Veronica derwentiana subsp. derwentiana.

Derwentiana: [der-wen-ti-a-na] From Derwent, which is Latinized for the Derwent River in Tasmania. It refers to the type species which was first discovered along the river. A good example Veronica derwentiana subsp. derwentiana.

Descending: [dee-sen-ding] From Decendere, which is Latin for going down. It refers to the structures or organs which grow or are directed downward with an angle of divergence of 136 degrees to 165 degrees.

Deschampsioides: [des-champ-sei-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Louis Deshamps; 1765-1842, who was a French surgeon and naturalist who studied the life forms in Java and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants resembling the Deschampsia genus. A good example is Arthragrostis deschampsioides.

Descurainia: [des-ku-rahy-ni-a] A good example is Descurainia sophia

Deserti: [dee-zer-tahy] From Desertum, which is Latin for a desert or an arid location. It refers to plants, which prefer very dry, sandy locations such as deserts. A good example is Lepidobolus deserti.

Deserticola: [dee-ser-ti-koh-la] From Desertum, which is Latin for a desert or an arid location and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for a dweller or to reside at. It refers to plants, which grow in desert regions. A good example is Sclerolaena deserticola.

Desertorum: [dee-ser-tor-um] From Desertum, which is Latin for a desert or an arid location. It refers to plants, which prefer very dry, sandy locations such as deserts. A good example is Eragrostis desertorum.

Deshampsia: [des-hamp-si-a] Is named in honour of Louis Deshamps; 1765-1842, who was a French surgeon, naturalist who studied the life forms in Java. A good example is Deshampsia cespitosa.

Desmodium: [dez-moh-dee-um] From Desmodion, which is Ancient Greek for small chains. It refers to the flowers and fruits, which appear like small chains. A good example is Desmodium macanthocladum.

Desmondii: [des-mon-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Robert Desmond Meikle; 1923-20.., who was a British botanist and taxonomist who worked on the classification of the Cyperus genus. A good example is Acacia desmondii.

Desmophylla: [dez-mo-fahyl-la] From Desmodion, which is Ancient Greek for small chains and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaves which appear like a smsll chain links joined together. A good example is Hibbertia desmophylla however the reference to the leaves is unclear.

Desolata: [des-o-leit] From Dēsōlāta/Dēsōlāre, which are Latin for saken or Dē-, which is Latin for down and Sōlāre, which is Latin for to make lonely. It refers to plants, which prefer isolated habitats away from humanisation. A good example is Cycas desolata.

Despectans: [de-spec-tanz] From Despecto, which is Latin for to despise or look down upon. It refers to the insignificance of the leaves, spike and flower on this small green orchid. A good example is Genoplesium despectans.

Despectum: [de-spek-tum] From Despecto which is Latin for to despise or look down upon. It refers to thethe insignificance of the leaves, spike and flower on this small green orchid. A good example is Stylidium despectum.

Destruens: [de-stroo-enz] From Destruens, which is Ancient Greek for a negative or opposite argumentation of views. It refers to a structure or organ, which has directly opposing characteristics. A good example is the lower and upper laminas of the leaves on Ficus destruens.

Desvauxii: [de-vo-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Desvaux. A good example is the lower and upper laminas of the leaves on Lepidium desvauxii.

Determinate: [dee-ter-min-eit] From Determinatum, which is Latin for having the primary and or secondary axis ending in flower buds. It refers to the inflorescences terminating any further growth thus preventing any further elongation of the stems. A good example is Ceropetalum gummiferum.

Detestans: [dee-tes-tanz] From Detestari, which is Latin for to call God as a witness against. It refers to the foul smell or detestable smell. A good example is Chenopodium detestans.

Detmoldii: [det-mol-di-ahy] It Is named in honour of William Detmol; 1828-1884, who was a German born Australian book binder and stationer and good friend of Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Adenanthos detmoldii.

Detritivor: [di-tri-ti-vor] From De, which is Latin for down and Vorous which is Latin to eat. It refers to any organism which eats or consumes decomposing plant matter and animal parts as well as faeces and or fungi involved in the process of decomposition of dead organic matter. A good example is the earth worm Neodiplotrema altanmoui. (There are over 6000 species of earth worms in Australia.)

Detritivorous: [de-tri-tir-vor-os] From De, which is Latin for down and Vorous which is Latin to eat. It refers to any organism which eats or consumes decomposing plant matter and animal parts as well as faeces and or fungi involved in the process of decomposition of dead organic matter. A good example is the earth worm Diplotrema rigida. (There are over 6000 species of earth worms in Australia.)

Deuaensis: [dyoo-en-sis] From Deua, which is Latinized for the Deau River and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to the type species which was discovered along the Deau River. A good example is Eucalyptus deuaensis.

Deusta: [dyoo-sta] From Deusta, which is Latin for to be burned. It refers to the burnt sienna colour on flower heads, which are contrast the grass-green spikes. A good example is Ptilothrix deusta.

Deustum: [dyoo-stum] From Deusta, which is Latin for to be burned. It refers to the burnt sienna colour flower heads, which are contrast the grass-green spikes. A good example is Eriocaulon deustum.

Deuterodensa: [dyoo-ter-o-den-sa] From Deuta, which is Ancient Greek for second or secondary and Densa, which is Latin for dense. It refers to the stems, which are somewhat denser or more crowded and yet still not second to any other species in the genus or only second to one other specie in the genus.. A good example was found on the green stems of Huperzia deuterodensa, which is now known as Lycopodium deuterodensum.

Deuterodensum: [dyoo-ter-o-den-sum] From Deuta, which is Ancient Greek for second or secondary and Densum which is Latin for dense. It refers to the stems, which are somewhat denser or more crowded and yet still not second to any other species in the genus or only second to one other specie in the genus. A good example is Lycopodium deuterodensum.

Deuteroneura: [dyoo-ter-o-nyoo-ra] From Deuta, which is Ancient Greek for second or secondary and Neuron which is Ancient Greek for a vein or nerve. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have a secondary or lateral veins. A good example is the seconday veins on Acacia deuteroneura which runs for 2/3 of the phyllode and parallel to it.

Deuteroneurum: [dyoo-ter-o-nyoo-rum] From Deuta, which is Ancient Greek for second or secondary and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek for a vein or nerve. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which have a secondary main vein. A good example is Racosperma deuteroneurum, which is now known as Acacia deuteroneura, which has a secondary vein that runs for 2/3 of the phyllode and parallel to it.

Devexa: [de-vek-sa] From Devexus, which is Latin for downhill or steep country. It refers to plants, which grow on cliff faces or very steep grades. A good is Tectaria devexa which grows on cliff faces.

Dewrangia: [dyoo-ran-ji-a] From Derang, which is Latinized from the local Aboriginal vernacular for tall or lofty. It refers to the fungi which are much taller than other species in the genus. A good example is Inocybe dewrangia.

Dewy: [dyoo-ee] From Dewy, which is old British for moisten, to glisten when covered in minute water droplets. It refers to a covering, of waxy platelets which appear like minute water droplets. A good example of plants glistening in the sunlight like dew is Drosera burmanni.

Dextrinoid: [deks-trI-noid] From Dextrine, which is French for a chemical staining reaction in which the tissue, spore wall ornamentation, etc. stains reddish to reddish brown upon exposure to iodine or Melzer’s reagent. A good example of staining is on the fungi Hygrophoropsis aurantiac.

Dextrorse: [deks-trors] From Dextrorsum, which is Latin for twinning in a clockwise direction. It refers to creepers rise helically in a clockwise direction in the northern hemisphere. The antonym is sinistrorse where creepers rise helically in an anticlockwise clockwise direction in the southern hemisphere.

Deyeuxia: [dei-our-shi-a] Is named in honour of Nicolas Deyeux; 1753-1837, who was a French professor of pharmacy. A good example is Deyeuxia decipiens.

Di: [dahy/di] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two. It refers to any structure or organ, which has two parts. A good example is the Dicotyledon seed leaves on Dischidia nummularia.

Diabolica: [dahy-a-bo-li-ka] From Diabolikos, which is Ancient Greek or Diabolicus, which is Latin for having qualities of the devil or being evil. It refers to the leaves being fiendishly unequal. A good example is Mucuna diabolica subsp. kenneallyi.

Diacantha: [dahy-a-kan tha] From Di/Dis which are Ancient Greek for two and ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for a thorn. It refers to an organ, which has two thorns. A good example is the seeds of Sclerolaena diacantha.

Diacheiron: [dahy-a-chei-ron] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Cheiron/Kheiron, which are Ancient Greek for the hand which was held to be the superlative centaur amongst his brethren as the “wisest and most just of all the centaurs. It refers to the prominent bracteoles which clasp and partially enclose the flowers as if protecting and guiding them. A good example is Bergia diacheiron.

Diacolpicus: [dahy-a-kol-pi-kus] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for through or between and Kólp/Kólpos, which are Ancient Greek for a bay or gulf. It refers to plants, which are found both sides of the gulf or bay. A good example is Desmocladus diacolpicus which was found both sides of the Great Australian Bite but is considered extinct in Western Australia due to excessive clearing and salinity problems associated with its environment.

Diadelphous: [dahy-del-fos] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Delphous, which is Ancient Greek for to be united. It refers to flowers which have their stamens fused together at least part of the way by the filaments so that they form two separate bundles one having a bundle of stamens and usually one that is solitary or at times two or rarely three in a separate bundle. A good example is Daviesia genisitfolia. Commonly found in legumes.

Diadena: [dahy-a-de-na] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Adena, which is Ancient Greek for a gland or glandular. It refers to plants, which have two very distinct glands. A good example is Linkia diadena, which is now known as Persoonia saundersiana.

Diallaga: [dahy-al-la-ga] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Delphous, which is Ancient Greek for to be united. It refers to having its stamens fused together at least part of the way by the filaments so that they form two separate bundles one having a bundle of stamens and usually one where it is solitary. A good example is Daviesia genisitfolia.

Diamantinensis:[dahy-man-ti-nen-sis] From Diamantina, which is Latinized for the Diamantina River and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were first recognized as new species, originated from along the Diamantina River. A good example is Gnaphalium diamantinensis and Ipomea diamantinensis despite its main occurrences that are to the west and north of the river

Diamesogenos: [dahy-mes-o-jee-nos] From Diameso, which is unknown and Genos, which is Ancient Greek for a single family of descendants. A good example is Hibbertia diamesogenos.

Diametrically 1: [dahy-me-tri-kah-lee] From Diametric, which is Ancient Greek for being related to a diameter or along the diameter.

Diametrically 2: [dahy-me-tri-kah-lee] From Diametric, which is Ancient Greek for being in direct opposition to or being diametrically different.

Diander: [dahy-an-der] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to having two very prominent stamens. A good example is Scleranthus diander.

Diandra: [dahy-an-dra] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Andros, which is Ancient Greek fora man. It refers to flowers, which produce two stamens. A good example is Boerhavia diandra.

Diandrochloa: [dahy-an-droh-kloh-a] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two, Andros, which is Ancient Greek fora man and Khlóē, which is Ancient Greek for (young) green shoots – a grass. It refers to a grass that has just two anthers instead of the normal three. The Diandrochloa genus was the old name for some of the grasses of which the Australian species are now known as Eragostis and include Eragrostis alveiformis.

Diandroides: [dahy-an-droi-deez] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two, Andros, which is Ancient Greek fora man and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants being similar to the Diandrum genus. A good example is Spergularia diandroides.

Diandrum: [dahy-an-drum] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Andros, which is Ancient Greek fora man. It refers to flowers, which produce two stamens. A good example is Glossostigma diandrum.

Diandrus: [dahy-an-drus] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to flowers, which produce two stamens. A good example is the highly invasive noxious weed Bromus diandrus.

Dianella: [dahy-an-el-la] From Diāna, which is Latin for the virginal goddess of the hunt, moon and protector of small wildlife. A good example is Dianella caerulea, which feeds many small pollinators then small birds with its fruits. Dianella also is the habitat of many small creatures within its foliage.

Dianella caerulea Arthropodium milleflorum

Diantha: [dahy-an-tha] From Diantha, which is Ancient Greek for divine. It refers to structures or organs, which have a divine characteristic. A good example is the health characteristics of Hydrocotyle diantha.

Dianthifolia: [dahy-an-thi-foh-li-a] From Diantha, which is Ancient Greek for divine and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the leaves of the divine flower, the Dianthus genus. A good example is Jasminum dianthifolia, which is now known as Jasminum suavissimum.

Dianthifolium: [dahy-an-thi-foh-li-um] From Diantha, which is Ancient Greek for divine and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble the leaves of the divine flower, the Dianthus genus. A good example is Jasminum dianthifolium.

Dianthophorum: [dahy-an-tho-for-um] From Dantha, which is Ancient Greek for divine and Phorum, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to the overall beauty of the plants. A good example is the flowers on Solanum dianthophorum.

Diaphana: [dahy-a-fa-na] From Diaphanus, which is Latin for filmy or transparent. It refers to leaves and phyllodes which are very thin and transparent. A good example is Acacia diaphana.

Diaphanophleba: [dahy-a-fan-o-fle-ba] From Diaphanus, which is Latin for filmy or transparent. It refers to leaves and phyllodes, which are very thin and transparent. A good example was Lyonsia diaphanophleba, which is now known as Parsonsia diaphanophleba.

Diaphanum: [dahy-ah-fahn-uh m] From Diaphanes, which is Ancient Greek for Translucent or filmy. It refers to the fronds, which are somewhat dainty and fragile or almost transparent. A good example is Adiantum diaphanum.

Diaphanus: [dahy-a-fan-us]From Diaphanes, which is Ancient Greek for Translucent or filmy. It refers to the bud scales,which are transparent. A good example is the exotic water weed Cyperus diaphanus.

Diaphragm: [dahy-a-fram] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two or Dia, which is Ancient Greek for across and Phragma, which is Ancient Greek for a fence. It refers to a dividing fence or an article which seperates two sides or across from.

Diaphyllodinea: [dahy-a-fahyl-lo-di-nee-a] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to nodes which have two leaves or phyllodes. A good example is Acacia diaphyllodinea.

Diaphyllodineum: [dahy-a-fahyl-lo-di-nee-um] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to nodes which have two leaves or phyllodes. A good example is Racosperma diaphyllodineum, which is now known as Acacia diaphyllodinea.

Diaschides: [dahy-as-chi-deez] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Schidius, which is Latin for a cleft or to split. It refers to leaves, which have great variation in the size and number of the lobes. A good example is Senecio diaschides.

Diaspasis: [dahy-a-spa-sis] From Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and probably Spasis, which is Ancient Greek for a wide space or to scatter. It refers to the petal lobes being widely separated. A good example is Diaspasis filifolia.

Diaspore: [dahy-a-spor-a] From Di/Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Spora, which is Ancient Greek for the seeds of ferns or at times flowering plants. It refers to a seed or spore plus any additional tissues which assist in the dispersal. A good example is seen surrounding the tumbleweeds of central Australia’s Salsola tragus.

Dicarpa: [dahy-kar-pa] From Di/Dis which are Ancient Greek for two  and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to plants, which have two fruits per axis. A good example is the two sporangia on each pinnae of Gleichenia dicarpa.

Dicarpidium: [dahy-kar-pi-di-um] From Di/Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two, Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit and Podium, which is Ancient Greek for a little foot. It refers to the two short petioles and two fruits produced from the leaf axis. A good example is Dicarpidium monoicum.

Diceratum: [dahy-ser-tum] From Di/Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and maybe from Cernere, which is Latin for a to separate from or distinguish from. It refers to a visual separation of characteristics which is rather difficult or where uncertainty exists. A good example is Stylidium diceratum.

Dicerna: [dahy-ser-na] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Cernere which is Latin for to separate from or distinguish from. It refers to a visual separation of characteristics which is rather difficult or where uncertainty exists.

Dichanthioides: [dahy-kahn-thi-oi-deez] From Di/Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two, ákantha, which is Ancient Greek for a thorn and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar two. It refers to an organ, which resembles those of many Acacia species in that they have organs, which have two thorns. A good example is the seeds of Austrochloris dichanthioides.

Dichanthium: [dahy-kan-thee-um] From Dikha, which is Ancient Greek for splitting in two and Antha/Anthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have two barren spikelets. A good example is the barren spikes on Dichanthium sericeum subsp. sericeum.

Dichanthoides: [dahy-kan-thoi-deez] From Di/Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two, ákantha which is Ancient Greek for a thorn and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar two. It refers to an organ, which resembles those of other Acacia species in that they have organs, which have two thorns. A good example is the seeds of Chloris dichanthoides, which is now known as Austrochloris dichanthioides.

Dichapetalum: [dahy-cha-pe-ta-lum] From Dikha, which is Ancient Greek for splitting in two and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators. It refers to each petal being further split down the center. A good example is Dichapetalum timorense.

Dichasia: [dahy- ka-si-a] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Khasia, which is Ancient Greek for to divide. It refers to flowers, where the peduncle splits into 2 or multiples of 2. A good example is the fruits of Tristaniopsis laurina.

Dichasiale: [dahy-kas-si-al] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Khasia, which is Ancient Greek for to divide. It refers to flower heads, where the peduncle splits twice and are of equal length. A good example Cynanchum dichasiale.

Dichasium: [dahy-ka-si-um] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Khasia, which is Ancient Greek for to divide. It refers to flower heads, where the peduncle splits twice and are of equal length.

Dichelachne: [dahy-chel-ak-nee] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two, Khelos, which is Ancient Greek for split and Achne which is Ancient Greek for chaff. It refers to glumes which split into two. A good example is the glumes on Dichelachne crinita.

Dichlamydeous: [dahy-klah-mahy-dee-us] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Khlamydous, which is Ancient Greek for a calyx and corolla as separate identities. It refers to where the perianth is composed of a distinctly separated calyx and corolla. A good example is Ajuga australis.

Dichogamous: [dahy-ko-gam-os] From Di/Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Gamos, which is Ancient Greek for marriage. It refers to where the anthers dehisc and the stigma mature at two different stages to prevent self fertilization. A good example is Hibiscus splendens.

Dichogamy: [dahy-ko-ga-mee] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Gamos, which is Ancient Greek for marriage. It refers to where the anthers dehisc and the stigma mature at two different stages to prevent self fertilization. A good example is Hibiscus splendens.

Dichondra: [dahy-kon-dra] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Khondros, which is Ancient Greek for a grain. It refers to the two fruitlets appearing similar to two united grains. A good example is Dichondra repens.

Dichopetala: [dahy-ko-pe-ta-la] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to petals which have two distinctly different colours or forms. A good example was Azorella dichopetala, which is now known as Dichosciadium ranunculaceum var. ranunculaceum.

Dichopetalum: [dahy-ko-pe-ta-lum] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double and Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to petals which have two distinctly different colours or forms. A good example is Dichopetalum ranunculaceum.

Dichopogon: [dahy-ko-poh-gon] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double and Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to appendages on anthers, which number two and are covered in bristly hairs. A good example is Dichopogon capillipes.

Dichoptera: [dahy-ko-teer-a] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to seeds which have two distinct wings. A good example is Maireana dichoptera.

Dichopus: [dahy-ko-poos] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to pedicels which are twice as long as many other species in the genus. A good example is Dichopus insignis.

Dichorisandra: [dahy-kor-i-san-dra] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double, Khorizo, which is Ancient Greek for a part and Antheros which is Ancient Greek for an anther. It refers to the two anthers looking like another part disimilar to a real anther. A good example Dichorisandra thyrsiflora.

Dichosciadium: [dahy-ko-ski-ei-a-di-um] From Dikos, which is Greek for double and Skiadeion, which is Ancient Greek for shade giving like an umbrella. It refers to the flowers being in the shape of an umbel (umbrella). A good example is Dichosciadium ranunculaceumvar. ranunculaceum.

Dichotoma: [dahy-ko-toh-ma] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double and Khotomos which is Ancient Greek or Chotomos which is Latin for to fork. It refers branches, leaves, fronds or at times other organs, which divide like the prongs on a fork, equally two at a time. A good example is Persicaria dichotoma.

Dichotomizans: [dahy-ko-to-mis-ans] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for two, Khotomos, which is Ancient Greek or Chotoma which is Latin for a fork and Mizans which is Latin for to balance or scales. It refers to branches which divide like the prongs on a fork, equally two at a time and appear to be perfectly balanced. A good example is Caesia dichotomizans, which is now known as Caesia parviflora.

Dichotomous: [dahy-ko-to-mos] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double and Khotomos, which is Ancient Greek or Chotomos which is Latin for to fork. It refers branches which divide like the prongs on a fork, equally two at a time. A good example is Polyscias murrayii and Eryngium expansum.

Dichotomum: [dahy-ko-to-mum] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double and Khotomos, which is Ancient Greek or Chotomos which is Latin for to fork. It refers branches whih divide like the prongs on a fork, equally two at a time. A good example is Baloskion dichotomum.

Dichotomus: [dahy-ko-to-mus] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double and Khotomos, which is Ancient Greek or Chotomos which is Latin for to fork. It refers to flower spikes which divide like the prongs on a fork, equally two at a time. A good example is Thysanotus dichotomus.

Dichpogon: [dahy-poh-gon] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for to double and Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to the anthers having two distinctly different coloured hairy beards near the base. A good example is Dichopogon Fimbriātum.

Dichroantha: [dahy-kro-an-tha] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double, Kroa, which is Ancient Greek or Chrome which is Latin for colour and Antha/Anthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have two distinct colours. A good example is Dichopogon capillipes.

Dichrocephala: [dahy-kro-ke/se-fa-la] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double, Kroa, which is Ancient Greek or Chrome which is Latin for colour and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek or Cephalus, which is Latin for a head. It refers to flower heads, which have two distinctly different colours. A good example Dichrocephala integrifolia.

Dichromophloia: [dahy-kro-mo-floi-a] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double, Kroa, which is Ancient Greek or Chrome which is Latin for colour and Phloia which is Ancient Greek for bark. It refers to barks which have two very distinct colours especilly on those trees which have a decorticating bark. A good example was Eucalyptus dichromophloia, which is now known as Corymbia dichromophloia.

Dichromophylla: [dahy-kro-mo-fahyl-la] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double, Kroa, which is Ancient Greek or Chrome which is Latin for colour and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are bi colour or have two distinct colours. A good example is Endiandra dichrophylla.

Dichromosomatica: [dahy-kro-mo-so-ma-ti-ka] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double, Kroa which is Ancient Greek or Chrome, which is Latin for colour and Soma which is Ancient Greek for a body. It refers to the to the involucre, in which the dark coloured backs of the phyllaries contrast strongly with the white scarious margins. A good example is Brachyscome dichromosomatica.

Dichrosepala: [dahy-kro-se-pa-la] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for double and which is Ancient Greek or Chrome which is Latin for colour and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or later Sepalum, which is Latin for a sepal. It refers to sepals which number twice as many as normally seen in the genus or sepals which are twice as large as normaly seen in the genus. A good example is Drosera dichrosepala.

Dichrostachys:[dahy-kro-sta-shus] From Dikos, which is Ancient Greek for in two ways, Khroa, which is Ancient Greek for colours and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek or later Stachys which is Latin  for a spike. It refers to flowers, which have different coloured staminodes along the spike. A good example is the Chinese garden plant Dichrostachys cinerea.

Dicksonia: [dik-soh-ni-a] Is named in honour of James Dickson; 1738-1822, who was an English nurseryman who specialized in Crypytogams. A good example is Dicksonia antarctica.

Dicksonioides: [dik-soh-ni-oi-deez] Is named in honour of James Dickson; 1738-1822, who was an English nurseryman who specialized in Crypytogams and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to fronds which closely resemble the fronds of the Dicksonia genus. A good example is Cheilanthes dicksonioides.

Dicladanthera: [dahy-kla-dan-ther-a] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two, Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a shoot or small branch and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for an anther. It refers to the four anthers being connected from two filaments and spreading at near right angles. A good example is Dicladanthera glabra.

Diclesium Calyx: [dahy-kle-si-um, ka-liks] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and probably Klesium, which is Greek for persistent and Kalyx, which is Ancient Greek for a cup. It refers to an achene or nut which have a persisent calyx or perianth. A good example is Pimelea axiflora.

Diclina: [dahy-kli-na] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Kline, which is Ancient Greek for a bed. It refers to imperfect flowers where the stamens and pistils are born in separate flowers. They can be on either monoecious or dioecious plants. A good example is Muehlenbeckia diclina.

Diclinous: [dahy-kli-nos] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Kline, which is Ancient Greek for a bed. It refers to imperfect flowers where the stamens and pistils are born in separate flowers. They can be on either monoecious or dioecious plants. A good example is Clematis microphylla.

Dicliptera:[dahy-klip-ter-a] From Diklis, which is Ancient Greek for folded and Ptera, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to the wings of a capsule’s valves being folded back. A good example is Dicliptera armata.

Dicotyledon: [dahy-ko-tahy-lee-don] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Kotyledon, which is Ancient Greek for the seed leaves. It refers to plants, that have two seed leaves on germination. A good example is the seedling leaves of Eucalyptus resinifera.

Dicranopteris: [dahy-kra-no-teer-is] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two, Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or small branch and Ptera which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to ferns, which have fronds that spread out and upwards similar to a birds’ wings. A good example is Dicranopteris linearis var. linearis.

Dicrastylis: [dahy-kra-sti-lis] From Dikroos, which is Ancient Greek for forked and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a part of the female organ or style in a flower. It refers to the style being forked. A good example is Dicrastylis lewellianii.

Dictiocarpa: [dik-ti-oh-kar-pa] From Diktyo, which is Ancient Greek for netted or a net and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits, which have a visible network of raised lines. A good example is Zornia dyctiocarpa.

Dictiosperma: [dik-ti-oh-sper-ma] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek for a net and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the seeds, which form a raised network on the surfaces. A good example is Rorippa dictyosperma.

Dictymia: [dik-ti-mi-a] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek for a network. It refers to the mid vein, which is strongly raised on the lower lamina and has a prominent or faint network of lateral veins. A good example is the network of veins on the fronds of Dictymia brownii.

Dictyocolea: [dik-ti-oh-ko-lee-la] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek for a net and maybe from Coleá, which is Latinized from the Portuguese vernacular for to wriggle. It refers to a network of veins, which are not straight. A good example is Fimbristylis dictyocolea.

Dictyon: [dik-ti-on] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek for a net. It refers to the description of the pattern of veins which have a strong net like appearance.

Dictyoneura: [dik-ti-oh-nyoo-ra] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek for a network and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve. It refers to the pattern of veins, which are prominently raised. A good example is Acacia dictyoneura.

Dictyoneurum: [dik-ti-oh-nyoo-rum] From Diktyon, which is Latin for a net and Neuron, which is Ancient Greek for a nerve. It usually It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have a network of veins. A good example is Racosperma dictyoneura, which is now known as Acacia dictyoneura.

Dictyophleba: [dik-ti-oh-fle-ba] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek fora network and Phleps, which is Ancient Greek for a vein. It refers to leaves, which have a strong netlike of veins in appearance. A good example is the network of veins on the fronds of Amylotheca dictyophleba.

Dictyophlebium: [dik-tee-oh-flee-bi-um] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek for a net and Phleps, which is Ancient Greek for a vein. It refers to the veins on a structure or organ which forms a distinct network veins. A good example is Syzygium dictyophlebium, which is now known as Syzygium sayeri.

Dictyophlebus: [dik-ti-oh-flee-bus] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek for a net and Phleps, which is Ancient Greek for a vein. It refers to the veins on a structure or organ which forms a distinct network veins. A good example is Loranthus dictyophlebus, which is now known as Amylotheca dictyophleba.

Dictyopora: [dik-ti-oh-por-a] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek fora network and Porōsum, which is Ancient Greek or Porosus, which is Latin for an opening. It refers to a structure or organ, which has large openings or pores. A good example is the large pores on the underside of the pileus on Macrohyporia dictyopora.

Dictyopteris: [dik-ti-oh-teer-is] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek fora network and Pteris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to ferns, which have a strong netlike of veins on the fronds. A good example is Dictyopteris australis.

Dictyosperma: [dik-ti-oh-sper- ma] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek for a network and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which have a network pattern of vein like markings on the surface. A good example is Rorippa dictyosperma.

Dictyospermum: [dik-ti-oh-sper-mum] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek for a network and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which have a network pattern of vein like markings on the surface. A good example is Nasturtium dictyospermum, which is now known as Rorippa dictyosperma.

Dictyostele: [dik-ti-oh-steel] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek for a network and Stele, which is Ancient Greek for the central part of a root or stem containing the tissues derived from the procambium. It refers to the multiple gaps in the vascular cylinder which exist in any one transverse section. The numerous leaf gaps and leaf traces give a dictyostele the appearance of many isolated islands of xylem surrounded by phloem. Each of the apparently isolated units of a dictyostele can be called a meristele. They are only found in the rhizomes and petioles of ferns.

Dictyum: [dik-tum] From Diktyon, which is Ancient Greek for a network of veins. It refers to veins which have a strong net like appearance.

Dicupha: [dahy-ku-fa] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and kŷpha/kŷphos which is Ancient Greek for a hump. It refers to a bulging protuberance near the base of the calyx tube which is around twice that of other species in the genus. A good example is Vappodes dicupha.

Dicuphum: [dahy-ku-fum] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and kŷpha/kŷphos, which is Ancient Greek for a hump. It refers to a bulging protuberance near the base of the calyx tube which is around twice that of other species in the genus. A good example is Dendrobium dicuphum, which is now known as Vappodes dicupha.

Dicyclic: [dahy-sahy-klik] From Di/Dis, which is Ancient Greek for two and Kyklikos, which is Greek or Cyclicos, which is Latin for a circular. It refers to where the petals and sepals form two separate whorls. A good example is the sepals and floral tube of Blandfordia grandiflora.

Didactyla: [di-da-tahy-la] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and dactylus which is Latin for a toe or finger. It refers to flower spikes, which only have two arms or spikelets. A good example is Acacia didyma.

Didiscoides: [di-dis-koi-deez] From difficilis, which is Latin for difficult or being difficult and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Didiscus genus and are very difficult to distinguish between. A good example is the umbel once it has finished flowering and prior to the seeds maturing on Trachymene didiscoides.

Didyma: [di-di-um] From Didaymos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or in pairs. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are born in pairs. A good example is Acacia didyma.

Didymanthus: [di-di-man-thus] From Didymos, which is Ancient Greek for pairs or twins and Antha/Anthos which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are found in identical pairs from the leaf axis. A good example is Didymanthus roei.

Didymobotrya: [di-di-mo-bo-trahy-a] From Didymos, which is Ancient Greek for pairs or twins and Botrya, which is Ancient Greek for a bunch of grapes. It refers to fruits, which are produced in great quantities like grapes. A good example is Grevillea didymobotrya.

Didymocarpos: [di-di-mo-kar-pos] From Didymos, which is Ancient Greek for pairs or twins and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits which are found in identical pairs. A good example is Psychotria didymocarpos.

Didymochiton: [di-di-mo-kahy-ton] From Didymos, which is Ancient Greek for a twin and Khiton, which is Ancient Greek for a tunic. It refers to the flowers appearing more segregated on each side of the rachis thus looking like a mirror image. A good example is Grevillea irrasa subsp. didymochiton.

Didymochryseus: [di-di-mo-kray-see-us] From Didymos, which is Ancient Greek for pairs or twins and Khrysos, which is Ancient Greek for golden-yellow. It refers to the flowers or fruits, which are developed in pairs and are golden-yellow in colour. A good example is Mallotus didymochryseus, which is now known as Mallotus dispersus.

Didymoglossum: [di-di-mo-glos-sum] From Didymos, which is Ancient Greek for pairs or twins and Glossum, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to fronds, which somewhat resemble a poked out spilt or forked tongue. A good example is the little, white ground orchid Didymoglossum baileyanum, which is now known as Didymoplexis micradenia.

Didymoplexis: [di-di-mo-plek-sis] From Didymos, which is Ancient Greek for pairs or twins and Plexum, which is Ancient Greek for plaited, braided ot twisted. It refers to flowers, which twist around the spike. A good example is Didymoplexis micradenia.

Didymorplexis: [di-di-mor-plek-sis] From Didymos, which is Ancient Greek for pairs or twins and Plexis, which is Ancient Greek for plaiting. The reference is unclear though there is some references made to the interlocking papillae along the center line of the labellum on Didymorplexis pallens.

Didymum: [di-di-mum] From Didaymos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or in pairs. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which are born in pairs, that is unusual for the species when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Racosperma didymum, which is now known as Acacia didyma.

Didynamous: [di-di-na-mos] From Di/Dis which are Ancient Greek for pairs or twins and Dynam, which is Ancient Greek for powerful. It refers to having two groups of stamens of which two are long (more powerful) and two are much shorter. A good example is Plectranthus graveolens.

Dieffenbachii: [dif-en-ba-kee-ahy]  Is named in honour of Dr. Johannan Karl Ernst Dieffenbach; 1811-1855, who was a German naturalist who lived and studied in New Zealand. A good example is Kelleria dieffenbachii.

Dielsia: [di-el-si-a] Is named in honour of Friedrich Ludwig Emil Diels; 1874- 1945, who was a German who had an extraordinary knowledge of Australian flora and was director of the Berlin Botanic Gardens. A good example is Dielsia stenostachya.

Dielsiana: [di-eli-si-a-na] Is named in honour of Friedrich Ludwig Emil Diels; 1874-1945, who was a director of the Berlin Botanic Gardens and who travelled and collected widely in Western Australia. A good example is Grevillea dielsiana.

Dielsianum: [di-el-si-a-num] Is named in honour of Friedrich Ludwig Emil Diels; 1874-1945, who was a German who had an extraordinary knowledge of Australian flora and was director of the Berlin Botanic Gardens. A good example is Stylidium dielsianum.

Dielsianus: [di-el-si-a-nus] Is named in honour of Friedrich Ludwig Emil Diels; 1874-1945, who was a German who had an extraordinary knowledge of Australian flora and was director of the Berlin Botanic Gardens. A good example is Leucopogon dielsianus.

Dielsii: [di-el-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Friedrich Ludwig Emil Diels; 1874- 1945, who was a German who had an extraordinary knowledge of Australian flora and was director of the Berlin Botanic Gardens. A good example is Eragrostis dielsia.

Diemenica: [di-e -men-i-ka] From Diemen, which is Latinized from Van Diemen’s Land. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from Tasmania that was originally named Van Diemen’s Land. A good example is the herb Mentha diemenica or the grass Agrostis diemenica.

Diemenicum: [di-e-men-i-kum] From Diemen, which is Latinized for Van Diemen’s Land. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from Tasmania that was originally known as Van Diemen’s Land. A good example is the grass Rytidosperma diemenicum.

Diemenicus: [di-e-men-i-kus] From Diemen, which is Latinized for Van Diemen’s Land. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from Tasmania that was originally known as Van Diemen’s Land. A good example is the little ground orchid Corybas diemenicus.

Diemensis: [di-e-men-sis] From Diemen, which is Latinized from Van Diemen’s Land and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in Tasmania that was originally named Van Diemen’s Land. A good example is the herb Chionogentias diemensis.

Dienema: [di-e-ne-ma] From Diemen, which is Latinized from Van Diemen’s Land. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from Tasmania that was originally named Van Diemen’s Land. A good example is Arachnorchis dienema.

Dienia: [di-e-ni-a] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Enos, which is Ancient Greek for a season. It refers to the fleshy stems which last for two years or two growing seasons. A good example is Dienia montana.

Diesingii: [di-e-sin-ji-ahy] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Enos, which is Ancient Greek for a season. It refers to the fleshy stems, which last for two years or two growing seasons. A good example is Patersonia diesingii, which is now known as Patersonia occidentalis var. occidentalis.

Dietes: [di/dahy-ee-teez] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Etes, which is Ancient Greek for a family. It refers to plants, which may have two families as there has been confusion to which family the plants should be assigned to. A good example is Dietes robertsoniana.

Dietrich: [di-e-trik] Is named in honour of Konkordia Amalie Dietrich (Nee Nelle); 1821-1891, who was a German physician, geologist and naturalist. A good example is Leucophyta dietrich, which is now known as Leucophyta brownii.

Dietrichiae: [di-e-trahy-ki-ee] Is named in honour of Konkordia Amalie Dietrich (Nee Nelle); 1821-1891, who was a German physician, geologist and naturalist. A good example is Stackhousia dietrichiae.

Dietrichiana: [di-e-trahy-ki-a-na] Is named in honour of Konkordia Amalie Dietrich (Nee Nelle); 1821-1891, who was a German physician, geologist and naturalist. A good example is Eleocharis dietrichiana.

Dietrichianum: [dahy-trahy-ki-a-num] Is named in honour of Konkordia Amalie Dietrich (Nee Nelle); 1821-1891, who was a German physician, geologist and naturalist. A good example is Diplazium dietrichianum.

Difficile: [dif-fi-sahyl] From difficilis, which is Latin for difficult or being difficult. It refers to plants, which have some close relatives and are difficult to determine the differences. A good example is Racosperma difficile, which is now known as Acacia difficilis.

Difficilis: [dif-fi-si-lis] From Difficilis, which is Latin for difficult or being difficult. It refers to plants, which have some close relatives and are difficult to determine the differences. A good example is Acacia difficilis.

Difforme: [dif-form] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which have two distinctly different forms. A good example is Asplenium difforme.

Difformis: [di-for-mis] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which have two distintly different forms. A good example is Hygrophila difformis.

Diffusa: [di/dahy-fyoo-sa] From Difusa, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out thinly, as in a scattered manner or profusely. It refers to the plants, which spread spread out over large areas. A good example is Threlkeldia diffusa.

Diffuse: [di/dahy-fyooz] From Difusum, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out thinly, as in a scattered manner or profusely. It refers to the description given to the growth habits of plants that spread out.

Diffusum: [di/dahy-fyoo-sum] From Difusum, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out thinly, as in a scattered manner or profusely. It refers to the leaves, which spread out and are less profuse than other species in the genus. A good example is Stylidium diffusum.

Diffusus: [di/dahy-fyoo-sus] From Difusus, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out thinly, as in a scattered manner or profusely. It refers to the flowers, which are spread out along the spikes compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Gonocarpus diffusus.

Digestive Glands: [dahy-jes-tiv, glahnz] From Digestus, which is Latin for having the function to dissolve food particles into the circulatory system and Glans, which is Latin for a group of cells which produce secretions. It refers to enzyme secreting glands which are usually found on leaves of insectivorous plants for entrapping then aiding in the digestion of insect. A good example is Drosera binata.

Digitaria: [di-ji-tar-i-a] From Digitatus, which is Latin for a finger. It refers to flower spikes which spreadout like fingers on a hand. A good example is Digitaria breviglumis.

Digitata: [di-ji-ta-ta] From Digitatus, which is Latin for a finger. It refers to the flower spikes or leaves spreading out like fingers on a hand. A good example is Schizaea digitata.

Digitate: [di-ji-teit] From Digitatus, which is Latin fora finger. It refers to the description of flower spikes which spread out like fingers on a hand. A good example is the leaf on Livistona australis.

Digitatum: [di-ji-tei-tum] From Digitatus, which is Latin for a finger. It refers to flower spikes which spread out like fingers on a hand. A good example is Hymenophyllum digitatum.

Digitatus: [di-ji-tei-tus] From Digitatus, which is Latin fora finger. It refers to flower spikes which spread out like fingers on a hand. A good example is Cyperus digitatus.

Diglinus: [dahy-glin-us] From Di, which is Ancient Greek for two and Kline, which is Ancient Greek for a bed. It refers to imperfect flowers where the stamens and pistils are born on separate flowers. They can be on either monoecious or dioecious plants. A good example of a diglinis plant is Clematis aristata.

Digyna: [dahy-jahy-na] From Di, which is Ancient Greek for two and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a woman. It refers to polygynous flowers, which have two Pistils that is two ovaries, two styles and two stigmas. The flowers can be found on either monoecious or dioecious plants. A good example is the flowers on Haloragis digyna.

Digynous: [dahy-jahy-nos] From Di, which is Ancient Greek for two and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a woman. It refers to polygynous flowers, which have two Pistils that is two ovaries, two styles and two stigmas. The flowers can be found on either monoecious or dioecious plants. A good example is  the flowers on Haloragis heterophylla.

Dilatata: [dahy-lei-ta-ta] From Dilatare, which is Ancient Greek for to widen or dilate. It refers to the leaves or phyllodes, which are spread widely or are half closed on the same plant. A good example is the phyllodes on Arachnorchis dilatata.

Dilatatum: [dahy-lei-tum] From Dilatare, which is Ancient Greek for to widen or dilate. It refers to the stomata on the leaves, which can open very wide on temperature changes. A good example is Gastrolobium dilatatum.

Dilatatus: [dahy-lei-tus] From Dilatare, which is Ancient Greek for to widen or dilate. It refers to the stomata on the leaves, which can open and close on temperature changes. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia dilatatus.

Dilated: [dahy-lei ted] From Dilatare, which is Ancient Greek for to widen or dilate. It refers to an organ usually the stomata which open slightly or remain closed for long periods.

Dillenia: [di-len-ni-a] Is named in honour of John Dillenius; 1684-1747, who was a German Botanical professor working in England. A good example is Dillenia alata.

Dillenia alata

Dilleniifolia: [di-len-ni-foh-li-a] Is named in honour of John Dillenius; 1684-1747, who was a German Botanical professor working in England and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the foliage and leaves which are similar to the leaves on the Dillenia genus. A good example is Banksia dilleniifolia.

Dillwynia: [dil-win-ni-a] Is named in honour of L. W. Dillwyn; 1788- 1855, who was a Welsh Botanist. A good example is  Dillwynia retorta.

Dillwyniifolia: [dil-win-ni-foh-li-a] Is named in honour of L. W. Dillwyn; 1788- 1855, who was a Welsh Botanist and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which resemble those of the Dilwynia genus. A good example is Acacia dillwyniifolia.

Dillwynioides: [dil-win-ni-oi-deez] Is named in honour of L. W. Dillwyn; 1788- 1855, who was a Welsh Botanist and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which resemble those of the Dilwynia genus. A good example is Dillwynia dillwynioides.

Dimeria: [di-mer-i-a] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Merous, which is a Greek suffix for how many segments are within a flower’s whorl. It refers to grasses which have spikes with flowers appearing on two distinct pedicels. A good example is Dimeria acinaciformis.

Dimerostigma: [di-mer-o-stig-ma] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two, Merous which is a Greek suffix for how many segments are within a flower’s whorl and Stígma/Stízein which is Ancient Greek for to tattoo. It refers to plants, which have two stigmas. A good example is Bertya dimerostigma.

Dimerous: [di-mer-us] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Merous, which is a Latin suffix for how many segments are within a flower’s whorl. It refers to flowers, for example which have 2 sepals, 2 petals and 2/4 stamens.

Dimidiata: [di-mi-di-a-ta] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Midius, which is Latin for to be divided into parts. It refers to an organ, which has one or at times all the sides that have unequal measurements. A good example is the phyllodes Acacia dimidiata where all the nerves are on one side.

Dimidiate: [di-mi-di-eit] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Midius, which is Latin for to be divided into parts. It refers to a description of an organ, which has one or at times all the sides that have unequal measurements.

Dimidiatum: [di-mi-di-ei-tum] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Midius, which is Latin for to be divided into parts. It refers to an organ, which has one or at times all the sides that have unequal measurements. A good example is the florets where most of them appear on one side of the rachises on Rytidosperma dimidiatum.

Dimidiatus: [di-mi-di-ei-tus] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Midius, which is Latin for to be divided into parts. It refers to a structure or organ, which has one or at times two sides, that are unequal. A good example is the fleshy leaves on the introduced Carpobrotus dimidiatus from Africa that has been extensively planted along the foreshores by sand mining companies and is also used as a garden plant by gardeners in mistake for the local Carpobrotus edulis.

Diminuta: [di-mi-nyoo-ta] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Minūtum, which is Latin for small, little or pretty. It refers to organs, which are rather small compared to other species in the genus. A good example is the flowers on Acacia diminuta.

Diminutum: [dahy-mi-nyoo-tum] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Minūtum, which is Latin for small, little or pretty. It refers to organs, which are rather small compared to other species in the genus. A good example is the flowers on Racosperma diminutum, which is now known as Acacia diminuta.

Dimorpha: [dahy-mor-fa] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for a form or structure. It refers to plant structures or organs, which have two distinct forms. A good example is Rinzi dimorphandra.

Dimorphandra: [dahy-mor-fan-dra] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two, Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for a form or structure and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to stamens, filaments and or anthers, which have two distinct forms. A good example is Rinzi dimorphandra.

Dimorphantha: [dahy-mor-fahn-tha] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two, Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for a form or structure and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have two distinct forms. A good example is Stawellia dimorphantha.

Dimorphic: [dahy-mor-fik] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for a form or structure. It refers to flowers or especially fern fronds, which have two distinct forms. A good example is the flowers on Stawellia dimorphantha and the fronds on Blechnum nudum.

Dimorphic fronds of Blechnum nudum
Left sterile frond Right fertile frond.

Dimorphispinum: [dahy-mor-fi-spi-num] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two, Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for a form or structure and Spīnus/Spīnī, which is Latin for the Hawthorn or Blackthorn bush. It refers to plants, which resemble either Hawthorn or Blackthorn bushes in that they have two distinct forms. A good example is Solanum dimorphispinum.

Dimorphocalyx: [dahy-mor-fo-ka-liks] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two, Morphos, which is Ancient Greek for a form or structure and Kálux, which is Greek for a calyx or Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for to cover up. It refers to flowers, which have two distinct forms of calyxes. A good example is Dimorphocalyx australiensis.

Dindygulensis: [din-dahy-gu-lensis] From Dindygul, which is Latinized for the district in southern India and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first described from the Dindygul district in far southern India. A good example was Peperomia dindygulensis, which is now known as Peperomia blanda.

Dinosperma: [dahy-no-sper-ma] From Deinós, which is Ancient Greek or later Dinos, which is Latin for horrible terrible, fearful or awesome and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to fruits usually the seeds, which are very toxic in some species but in others give a peculiar tingling or numbing sensation in the tongue inner cheeks and lips. A good example is Dinosperma erythrococcum.

Dioicea: [dahy-oi-see-a] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Oîkos, which is Latin for a house. It refers to a structure or organ, which covers another structure or organ. A good example is the florets where most of them appear on one side of the rachise like on Wurmbea dioicea.

Dioscorea: [dahy-o-skor-ee-a] From Dioskourídēs, which is Latinized for Dioscorides who was a was a stoic philosopher and the father of pharmacognosy. – Studied medicinal drugs, which could be obtained from plants. A good example is Dioscorea transversa. Photo from: https://www.sciencephoto.com/media/813698/view/pedanius-dioscorides-greek-physician

Pedanius Dioscorides

Diosmeum: [dahy-os-mee-um] From Dîos, which is Ancient Greek for divine and Osmḗrēs, which is Ancient Greek for an aroma. It refers to plants which have a divine fragrance. A good example is the flowers Phebalium diosmeum.

Diosmifolia: [dahy-os-mi-foh-li-a] From Dîos, which is Ancient Greek for divine and Folium, which is Latin for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which have a divine fragrance similar to the European Diosma genus. A good example is the flowers Baeckea diosmifolia

Diosmifolium: [dahy-os-mi-foh-li-um] From Dîos, which is Ancient Greek for divine and Folium, which is Latin for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which have a divine fragrance similar to the European Diosma genus. A good example is the flowers Helichrysum diosmifolium.

Diosmifolius: [dahy-os-mi-foh-li-us] From Dîos, which is Ancient Greek for divine and Folium, which is Latin for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which have a divine fragrance similar to the European Diosma genus. A good example is the flowers Ozothamnus diosmifolius.

Diospyros: [dahy-o-spahy-ros] From Diós, which is Ancient Greek for Zeus and Purós, which is Ancient Greek for wheat. It literally refers to the wheat of Zeus. A good example is Diospyros australis.

Dioxin: [dahy-ok-sin] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two, Oxus, which is Ancient Greek for acid. It refers to a general name for a family of double molecule chlorinated hydrocarbons, C12 H4 Cl4 O2 of which there are two oxygen molecules. Dioxin — is a member of the class of persistent organic pollutants that is produced through combustion, in the bleaching of paper/pulp or in the chemical manufacturing process. In regards to Agent Orange dioxin was a by-product of the deliberately accelerated production of the herbicide 2,4,5-T, one of the components of Agent Orange. Specifically the dioxin contaminating Agent Orange was 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD)which is the most toxic of all the dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. The US National Toxicology Program (NTP) and the International Agency for the Research on Cancer list TCDD as a known human carcinogen. Dioxin has been found to be an endocrine disrupter, it can cause chloracne, certain cancers, and reproductive and developmental effects (at least in animals- of which humans are by way of the animal kingdom).

Dipetala: [dahy-pe-ta-la] From Di/Dis which is Ancient Greek for twice and Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for a thin plate, a colourful leaf or to spread out. It refers to plants, which have two petals that surround reproductive organs. A good example was Drimys dipetal, which is now known as Tasmannia insipida.

Diphylla 1: [dahy-fahyl-la] From Di/Dis which are Ancient Greek for twice and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves which are twice divided. It refers to having two leaves at each node. A good example is Opercularia diphylla.

Diphylla 2: [dahy-fahly-la] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are twice as broad as the other subspecies. A good example is the leaves on Acacia blakei subsp. diphylla.

Diphyllum: [dahy-fahyl-lum] From Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two and Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to having two leaves at each node. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are twice as broad as the other subspecies. A good example is the leaves on Polycarpon diphyllum, which is now known as Polycarpon tetraphyllum.

Diphyllostegia: [di-fahyl-lo-ste-ji-a] From Di/Dis which are Ancient Greek for two, Phullon/Phýllon, which is Ancient Greek for a leaf and Stégos, which is Ancient Greek for a roof. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are twice as broad as the other subspecies or varieties. A good example is the leaves on Diploglottis cunninghamii var. diphyllostegia.

Dipla: [di-pla] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled. It refers to the leaves being twice.

Diplachne: [di-plak-ne] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Akhne, which is Ancient Greek for a lemma or chaff. It refers to lemmas, which have two lobes. A good example is the lemmas and glumes on Diplachne fusca.

Diplacrum: [di-plak-ru-im] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or doubled and Akron, which is Ancient Greek for the highest point or apex. It refers to the calyxes having two apexes. A good example is Diplacrum caricinum.

Diplanthera: [di-plan-ther-a] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or doubled and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to plants, which have two flowers from each leaf axis. A good example is Hemigenia diplanthera.

Diplarrena: [di-plar-ree-na] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or doubled and Arrhen, which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to plants, which have two fertile stamens. A good example is Diplarena morraea.

Diplaspis: [dahy-plas-pis] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Aspis, which is Ancient Greek for a shield. It refers to leaves, which are shield shape and twice as thick as most leaves bordering on being succulent. A good example is the leaves on Diplaspis nivis.

Diplatia: [di-plahi-ti-a] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled. It refers to the plants having two leaf like bracts surrounding the flowers and fruits. A good example is the leaves on Diplatia grandibractea.

Diplax: [di/dahy-plaks] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Laxa, which is Ancient Greek for slack or loose and open in habit. It refers to grasses, which have a rather open slack habit of growth. A good example is the leaves on Ehrharta diplax.

Diplazium: [dahy-pla-zi-um] From Diplazium, which is Greek for to double or be doubled. It refers to ferns, which have a double covering over the spores. A good example is the sporangium on the fronds of Diplazium assimili.

Diplectroglossum: [dahy-plek-tro-glos-sum] Maybe from Di/Dis, which are Ancient Greek for two, Plectros which is Ancient Greek for a spur and Glossum, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to flowers, which appear to have two trigger like spurs that resemble tongues. A good example is Stylidium diplectroglossum.

Diplocaulobium: [di-plo-kor-loh-bi-um] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and kaulos, which is Ancient Greek for a trunk or stem. It refers to the pseudo bulbs, which give the appearance of a stem or dwarf trunk. A good example is Diplocaulobium stelliferum.

Diplocyclos: [di-plo-sahy-klos] From Diploos which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and kyklos, which is Ancient Greek or Cyclos, which is Latin for a circle. It refers to axis, which have two round fruit. A good example is the fruits on Diplocyclos palmatus.

Diploglottis: [di-plo-glo-tis] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or doubled and Glottis, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue or throat. It refers to petals, which have two glands at their base. A good example is the flowers on Diploglottis australis.

Diploglottoides: [di-plo-glo-toi-deez] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or doubled, Glottis which is Ancient Greek for a tongue or throat and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the Diplglottis genus. A good example is the flowers on Cupaniopsis diploglottoides.

Diploid: [dahy-ploid] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Glottis, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue or throat. It refers to where the offspring possess a full set of genes from both parents in sexual reproduction.

Diplolaena: [di/dahy-plo-lee-na] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Laina, which is Ancient Greek for a cloak. It refers to flowers, which have a double row of bract like calyxes around the flower. A good example is the flowers on Diploaena andrewsii.

Diplomera: [di-plo-mee-a] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Merus, which is Ancient Greek for a member. It refers to a structure which is divided into two equal parts. A good example is the leaves on Macrozamia diplomera.

Diplopeltis: [di-plo-pel-tis] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Pelte, which is Ancient Greek for a small, rounded shield. It refers to the shape of the disc. A good example is the disc on the flowers on Diplopeltis petiolaris.

Diplopogon: [dahy-plo-poh-gon] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a bristly beard. It refers to the awns on the glumes, which have bistles. A good example is the flowers on Diplopeltis setaceus.

Diplospora: [di-plo-spor-a] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Spora, which is Ancient Greek for a ferns spore, a seed or germ cell. It refers to fruits or sporangia, which contain two seeds in each cell. A good example is the flowers on Diplospora ixoriodes.

Diplosporum: [di-plo-spor-um] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Spora, which is Ancient Greek for a ferns spore, a seed or germ cell. It refers to fruits or sporangia, which contain two seeds in each cell. A good example is the two united cells on the algae Actinotaenium diplosporum.

Diplostemonous: [di-plo-stei-mon-os] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Stemon, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on the flower or the flower. It refers to the stamens, which are in two whorls with the outer whorl opposite the sepals and the inner whorl opposite petals. A good example is the flowers on Diplostemonous chersideana.

Diplotaxis: [di-plo-tak-sis] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Taxis, which is Ancient Greek for to be properly arrange. It refers to the seeds or sporangia, which are double rows within the pods. A good example is the exotic weed on Diplotaxis tenuifolia.

Diplotricha: [di-plo-trahy-kuh] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Tricha, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to a structure or organ, which has double the amount of hairs as other species in the genus. A good example is Blumea diplotricha.

Dipodium: [di-poh-di-uh m] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Podium, which is Ancient Greek for a platform. It refers to orchids, which have labellum which are much larger than other species in the genus. A good example is the exotic weed on Dipodium atropurpureum.

Dipogon: [dahy-poh-gon] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a bristly beard. It refers to legumes, which have bristly hairs along the stems and on the leaves. A good example is the exotic garden cultivar and potential weed species Dipogon lignosus.

Dipsacus: [dip-sa-kus] From Dipsa, which is Ancient Greek for to have a thirst. It refers to the attached leaf bases of some species, which can hold water. A good example is the exotic garden cultivar Dipsacus fillonum.

Diptera: [dip-ter-a] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to stems, which have a wing running down each side. A good example is Eucalyptus diptera.

Dipteracanthus: [dip-ter-a-kan-thus] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled, Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing and ἀκακία, which is Ancient Greek for a spine. It refers to bracts which have two spines on some species which have a wing. A good example is Dipteracanthus australasicus.

Dipterocarpa: [dip-ter-o-kar-pa] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled, Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits/seeds which have a wing. A good example is Babbagia dipterocarpa, which is now known as Osteocarpum dipterocarpum.

Dipterocarpum: [dip-ter-oh-kar-pum] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled, Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits/seeds, which have a wing. A good example is Osteocarpum dipterocarpum.

Dipterous: [dip-ter-us] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Pteron, which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It usually It refers to plant stems which have two wings but can refer to the fruits. A good example is the fruits on Ludwigia octovalvis, has four longitudinal wings.

Disa: [dahy-sa] From Disa, which is Latinized for the mythical Queen Disa of Sweden, who appeared in a fish-net before King of the Seas. It refers to seeds, which have a netted appearance. A good example is Disa bracteata.

Disarticulata: [dahy-sar-ti-kyoo-la-ta] From Di, which is Latin for apart or away from and Articulare which is Latin for to divide into distinct parts. It refers to plant nodes or stems which have become disjointed. A good example is  Tecticornia disarticulate.

Disarticulate: [dis-ar-ti-kyoo-leit] From Di, which is a Latin suffix for apart or away from and Articulare, which is Latin for to divide into distinct parts. It refers to plant nodes or stems, which have become disjointed. A good example is the stems/culms on Triodia pungens.

Disc 1: [disk] From Diskos, which is Ancient Greek for any usually round, raised physical structure. It refers to the apex of the round receptacle at the base of the petals of a compound or composite flower. A good example is the flower disc on Helychrysum bracteata.

Disc Floret on Senecio linearifolius
Disc Floret on Senecio linearifolius

Disc 2: [disk] From Diskos, which is Ancient Greek for any usually round, raised physical structure. It refers to the upper surface of flat round central section of a solid ovary. A good example is capsule apex on Leptospermum polygalifolia.

Discs on Leptospermum polygalifolia.

Discaria: [dis-kar-i-a] From Diskos, which is Ancient Greek for any usually round, raised physical structure. It refers to a large floral disc which is circular. A good example is the exotic weed Discaria nitida.

Dischidia: [di-shi-di-a] From Diploos, which is Ancient Greek for to double or be doubled and Schidius, which is Latin for a cleft or split. It refers to flowers, which open in pairs. A good example is the corolla tubes Dischidia nummularia.

Dischorense