“Ea-Ey”

E: [e] From E – Ex which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary, out side or external.

Eachamensis: [ee-cham-en-sis] From Eacham which is Latininized for the Lake Eacham district in far north eastern Queensland and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered around lake Eacham. A good example is Aneura eachamensis.

Eadesia: [ee-de-si-a] Is named in honour of Lucy Eades Nee Coyne; 1859-1927 who was a Western Australian collector of plants for Ferdinand Von Mueller. A good example was  Eadesia anthocercidea, which is now known as Cyphanthera anthocercidea.

Eadesii: [ee-des-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Lucy Eades Nee Coyne; 1859-1927 who was a Western Australian collector of plants for Ferdinand Von Mueller. A good example was Anthocercis eadesii, which is now known as Cyphanthera anthocercidea.

Eardleyae: [ear-lahy ee] Is named in honour of Constance Margaret Eardley; 1910-1978 who was a South Australian botanist and taxonomist. A good example is Atriplex eardleyae.

Earlia: [ee-li-a] From Erol, which is Latinized from the Germanic word for a noble man. It refers to plants, which are really very beautiful. A good example was Earlia excelsa, which is now known as Graptophyllum excelsum.

Earlii: [er-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Earl but which earl cannot be substantiated. A good example was Graptophyllum earlii, which is now known as Graptophyllum ilicifolium.

Eastonii: [ee-ston-i-ahy] Is named in honour of Walter Robert Easton; 1893-1987, who was an Australian born explorer of the Kimberley region of Western Australia. A good example is Livistona eastonii.

Eatoniae: [ee-ton-i-ee] From Eaton, which is Latinized for a district in Western Australia and Iana, which is Latin for coming from. It refers to the type specimen which were believed to be found around Eaton at one stage. A good example is Conospermum eatoniae.

Eatoniana: [ee-ton-i-a-na] From Eaton, which is Latinized for a district in Western Australia and Iana, which is Latin for coming from. It refers to the synonym which was believed to be found around Eaton at one stage. A good example is Scholtzia eatoniana.

Ebbanoensis: [eb-ban-o-en-sis] From Ebban, which is Latinized for a localised place name in Western Australia probably north of Kalgoorlie and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were discovered near Ebban. A good example is Eucalyptus ebbanoensis.

Ebermiera: [e-ber-mi-er-a] Is named in honour of Johann Ebermaer; 1767-1825, who was an apothecaryist and physician who studied medicinal plants.

Eboracense: [ee-bor-a-sens] From Eborac, which is Latinized for Eborac Island and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on Eborac Island north of the tip of Cape York Peninsular in far north eastern Queensland. A good example is Hymenophyllum eboracense.

Eboracensis: [ee-bor-a-sen-sis] From Eborac, which is Latinized for Eborac Island and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on Eborac Island north of the tip of Cape York Peninsular in far north eastern Queensland. A good example was Phyllanthus eboracensis, which is now known as Phyllanthus virgatus.

Ebracteata: [ee-brak-tee-a-ta] From A, or at times ē, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Bracteātus/Bracteā which are Latin for a specialized leaves usually behind a flower. It refers to flowers, which do not have bracts. A good example is Eremaea ebracteata.

Ebracteatus: [ee-bra-tee-a-tus] From A, or at times ē, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Bracteātus/Bracteā which is Latin for a specialized leaves usually behind a flower. It refers to flowers, which do not have bracts. A good example was Eriostemon ebracteatus, which is now known as Philotheca spicata.

Ebracteolatum: [ee-bra-tee-o-la-tum] From A, or at times ē, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Bracteātus/Bracteā which is Latin for a specialized leaves usually behind a flower. It refers to flowers, which do not have bracts. A good example is Gastrolobium ebracteolatum.

Eburna: [e-ber-na] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for without or out of the ordinary and Bracteata which is Ancient Greek for bracts. It refers to the flowers not having bracts like most flowers. A good example is Amyema eburna.

Eburnea: [e-ber-ne-a] From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary and Bracteata, which is Ancient Greek for bracts. It refers to the flowers not having bracts like most flowers. A good example is Correa eburnea.

Eburneum: [e-ber-ne-um] From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary and Bracteata, which is Ancient Greek for bracts. It refers to the flowers not having bracts like most flowers. A good example is Solanum eburneum.

Ecallosa: [e-kal-loh-suh] From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary and Callōsus, which is Latin for thickened. It refers to structures or organs, which are very thick. A good example is Swainsona ecallosa.

Ecalycata: [e-ka-lahy-ka-ta] From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for a husk, veil or cover. It refers to the specialized leaves which surround the bud and protect the developing sexual organs and ovaries. It refers to Calyxes, which are extremely small even when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Calytrix ecalycata.

Ecarinata: [e-ka-ri-na-ta] From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary and Carinatus which is Latin for a keel. It refers to the keels on the lemmas and glumes, which are prominent. A good example is Eragrostis ecarinata.

Ecarinatum 1: [e-kar-i-na-tum] From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary and Carinatum, which is Ancient Greek for a keel or ridge. It refers to seeds, which have a ridge or keel running longitudinally. A good example is Sorghum ecarinatum.

Ecarinatum 2: [e-kar-i-na-tum] From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary and Carinatum, which is Ancient Greek for a keel or ridge. It refers to leguminous flowers, which have more prominent keel petals than other species in the genus. A good example is Swainsona galegifolia.

Ecarinatum 3: [e-kar-i-na-tu m] From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary and Carinatum, which is Ancient Greek for a keel or ridge. It refers to leaves, which a very prominent mid vein. A good example is Erythroxylum ecarinatum.

Ecarinatum 4: [e-kar-i-nei-tuh m] From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary, Carinatum, which is Latin fora keel and Um, which is Greek/Latin for a degree. It refers to keels on the lemmas and glumes which are very prominent. A good example is Erythroxylum ecarinatum.

Ecbolium: [ek-bo-li-um] From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary or outside and Bolḗ, which is Ancient Greek for to throw away or throw outwards. It refers to plants, which have rapid movements or drugs which induce labour to help induce contractions and thus display rapid movements to expel or throw out the seeds or baby. A good example was Ecbolium cavernarum, which is now known as Rhaphidospora cavernarum.

Eccentric: [ek-sen-trik] From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary and Center which is Latin for in the middle. It refers to styles which are off set from the center.

Ecdeiocolea: [ek-dei-o-koh-le-a] From Ekdeia, which is Ancient Greek for falling short and Koleos, which is Ancient Greek for a sheath. It refers to scale leaves which fall off leaving the stems appearing leafless. A good example is Ecdeiocolea monostachya.

Echidnachila: [e-kid-na-chi-la] From Echinus, which is Latin for a prickle or bristly and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to labellum margins which have a row of rather long spine like appendages. A good example is Arachnorchis echidnachila.

Echiifolia: [e-ki-i-foh-li-a] From Echinus, which is Latin for a prickle or bristly and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which are somewhat bristly or prickly. A good example is Hibbertia echiifolia which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to its real or correct classification.

Echinata: [e-kin-a-ta] From Echinus, which is Latin for a prickle or bristly. It refers to being covered in spines or bristle like the hairs on an echidna. A good example is Lambertia echinata.

Echinatum: [e-kin-a-tum] From Echinus, which is Latin for prickle or bristly. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in spines or bristle like the hairs on an echidna. A good example is Solanum echinatum.

Echinoblastus: [e-ki-no-bla-stus] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Blastos, which is Ancient Greek for a germ cell. It refers to young buds, which are covered in spines and/or bristle like hairs thus they resemble a sea urchin. A good example is Drosera echinoblastus.

Echinocarpa: [e-ki-no-kar-pa] From Ekhinos which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are covered in spines and/or bristle like hairs. A good example is the small orchid Cadetia echinocarpa.

Echinocarpum: [e-ki-no-kar-pum] From Ekhinos which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are covered in spines and/or bristle like hairs. A good example is one of the damp off fungi, which affects seedlings Pythium echinocarpum.

Echinocarpus: [e-ki-no-kar-pus] From Ekhinos which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are covered in spines and/or bristle like hairs. A good example is Sloanea australis.

Echinocephala: [e-ki-no-ke/se-fa-la] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads, which resemble an echidna or sea urchin. A good example is the flower heads on Andersonia echinocephala.

Echinocephalum: [e-ki-noh-ke/se-fa-lum] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads which resemble an echidna or sea urchin. A good example is the flower heads on Sphincterostoma echinocephalum, which is now known as Andersonia echinocephala.

Echinochloa: [e-ki-no-kloh-a] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Khloa, which is Ancient Greek for a grass. It refers to grasses’ glumes which are covered in spine like awns. A good example is the fruits on Echinochloa telmatophila.

Echinocroton: [e-ki-no-kroh-ton] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Kroton, which is Ancient Greek for a tick. It refers to seeds, which resemble a tick in shape and are covered entirely in spine like projections. A good example is the flower heads on Echinocroton claoxyloides, which is now known as Mallotus claoxyloides.

Echinology: [e-ki-nol-o-jee] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the branch of zoology that studies echinoderms.

Echinophorus: [e-ki-no-flor-us] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Phoros, which is a Greek suffix or Phorus, which is a Latin suffix for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in spines. A good example is the fruits on Monococcus echinophorus.

Echinopogon: [e-ki-no-poh-gon] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to glumes which are covered in spines and/or havie a bristly beard. A good example is the glumes on Echinopogon ovatus.

Echinops: [e-ki-nops] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin. It refers to flowers, which resemble a purple echidna in a ball. A good example is the leaf margins on Echinops sphaerocepephalus.

Echinopsila: [e-ki-no-si-la] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Psilḗ which is Greek/Latin for a shaggy mat or rug. It refers to fruits, which resemble a small sea urchin with shaggy type spines. A good example is the leaf margins on Bassia echinopsila, which is now known as Sclerolaena anisacanthoides.

Echinopsilon: [e-ki-no-si-lon] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Psilḗ which is Greek/Latin for a shaggy mat or rug. It refers to fruits, which resemble a small sea urchin. A good example was Echinopsilon anisacanthoides, which is now known as Sclerolaena anisacanthoides.

Echinosperma: [e-ki-no-sper-ma] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which are sparsely to moderately covered in short, strong prickles. A good example is Blyxa echinosperma.

Echinostephia: [e-ki-no-ste-fi-a] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Stephium, which is Ancient Greek for a crown, garland or wreath. It refers to structures or organs usually the flowers or fruits, which appear like a spiny crown. A good example is Echinostephia aculeata.

Echinula: [e-ki-nyoo-la] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin. It refers to stems which bear short, stiff hairs like the spines on a sea urchin. A good example is Pultenaea echinula.

Echinulata: [e-ki-nyoo-la-ta] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a small hedgehog or sea urchin. It refers to a structure or organ, which are prickly. A good example is the leaf apexes on Pterostylis echinulata.

Echinulatus: [e-ki-nyoo-la-tus] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a small hedgehog or sea urchin. It refers to a structure or organ, which are prickly. A good example is the leaf apexes on Homalocalyx echinulatus.

Echinuliflora: [e-ki-nyoo-li-flor-a] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which bear short, stiff hairs. A good example is Acacia echinuliflora.

Echinuliflorum: [e-ki-nyoo-li-flor-um] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to stems which bear short, stiff hairs. A good example was Racosperma echinuliflorum, which is now known as Acacia echinuliflora.

Echinus: [e-ki-nus] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin. It refers to stems, which bear a short, stiff hairs. A good example is Echinus claoxyloides.

Echites: [e-chi-teez] From Ekhinos, which is Greek/Latin for a hedgehog or sea urchin. It refers to stems which bear a short, stiff hairs. A good example was Echites frutescens, which is now known as Ichnocarpus frutescens.

Echium: [e-chi-um] From Ekhis which is Ancient Greek or Echion, which is Latin for a viper. It refers to the nutlets which resemble a vipers head in some species. A good example is Echium plantagnineum.

Echma: [ek-ma] From Ekhme, which is Ancient Greek for the point on a spear. It refers to spines which have a small pointed hook like funiculus on the fruits. Good examples are found in the Acanthaceae family including the Australian plant Thunbergia arnhemica.

Eciliata: [e-si-li-a-ta] From From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary or out side and Ciliatus which is Latin for hairs which are on a margin. A good example is Hibbertia eciliata.

Eciliate: [e-si-li-eit] From From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary or out side and Ciliatus which is Latin for hairs which are on a margin. A good example is Ecklonea radiata.

Eciliatum: [e-si-li-a-tum] From From Eks, which is Ancient Greek or Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary or out side and Ciliatus which is Latin for hairs which are on a margin. A good example is Parmotrema eciliatum.

Eckersleyana: [e-ker-slei-a-na] Is named in honour of Eckersley. A good example is Ecklonea radiata.

Ecklonea: [ek-lo-ne-a] Is named in honour of Christian Friedrich Ecklon; 1795–1868, who was a German/Danish botanical collector and apothecary. A good example is Ecklonea radiata.

Eclipta: [e-klip-ta] From Ekleipo/Ekliptain, which are Greek for lacking or to omit. It refers to the absence of the pappus on the seeds. A good example is Eclipta prostrata.

Ecliptoides: [e-klip-toi-deez] From Ekleipo/Ekliptain, which are Greek for lacking or to omit. It refers to the absence of the pappus on the seeds. A good example is Pentalepis ecliptoides.

Eco: [e-koh] From Oîkos, which is Ancient Greek for a house. It refers to the ecosystem where all living things are born, live, die and decompose returning to form new life in a perpetual balance until disturbed.

Ecorne: [e-korn] From écorné, which is Latinized from the French for without horns as in having dehorned an animal. It refers to structures or organs which do not pocess horns as other species or subspecies do in the genus or species. A good example is Stylidium ecorne.

Ecorniculata: [e-kor-ni-kyoo-la-ta] From écorné, which is Latinized from the French for without horns as in having dehorned an animal and Culata which is Latinized from a French for a head. It refers to structures or organs which do not possess horns as other species or subspecies do in the genus or species. A good example is Grevillea buxifolia subsp. ecorniculata.

Ecorollata: [e-kor-ol-la-ta] From E, which is Ancient Greek for not to have and Korollatta, which is Ancient Greek for a corolla. It refers to flowers, which do not have a corrolla where as most flowers in the genus have a distinct corolla. A good example is Berchemia ecorollata.

Ecostatum: [e-kor-sta-tum] From Echos, which is Latin for the environment and Statum, which is Latin for to stand or put in place. It refers to the ecosystem where all living things are born, live, die and decompose returning to form new life in a perpetual balance until disturbed. It refers to plants, which seem happy set in their position in the environment. A good example is Gompholobium ecostatum.

Ectadioclada: [ek-ta-di-o-kla-da] From Ektos, which is Ancient Greek for outside and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or branch. It refers to stems, which extend outwards from the base of the shrubs. A good example is Eremaea ectadioclada.

Ectocarp: [ek-to-karp] From Ektos, which is Ancient Greek for outside and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to descriptions of the outermost layer of the pericarp.

Ectopum: [ek-to-pum] From Ektos, which is Ancient Greek for outside, out of, free from or exempt. It refers to the fact that the column is not surrounded by the lateral tepals or upper sepals. A good example is Genoplesium ectopum.

Ectrosia: [ek-tro-si-a] From Ectrosia, which is Ancient Greek for a miscarriage. It refers to the spikelets bearing only one or two fertile flowers. A good example is Ectrosia leporina.

Edentata: [ee-den-ta-ta] From E/Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary or out side, external and Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Denta, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It refers to the leaves, calyxes or petals, which do not having teeth. A good example is Auranticarpa edentata in which the type species were unusual in that the leaf margins were entire.

Edentatum: [ee-den-ta-tum] From E/Ex which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary or out side, external and Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Denta, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It refers to the leaves, calyxes or petals, which do not having teeth. A good example is Stylidium edentatum.

Edentatus: [ee-den-ta-tus] From E/Ex which is Greek/Latin forout of the ordinary or out side, external and Odonta, which is Ancient Greek or Denta, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It refers to the leaves, calyxes or petals, which do not having teeth. A good example is the New Zealand native Eleaocarpus edentatus.

Edged: [edj] It refers to when one colour is surrounded by a very narrow rim of another colour.

Ediothea: [ed-di-oh-thee-a] From Eidothea/Ideothea, a sea goddess, daughter of Proteus, the Old Man of the Sea who was able to change shape. A good example is Eidothea hardeniana.

Ednaeana: [ed-nee-a-na] Is named in honour of Edna. A good example was Eucalyptus ednaeana but it is now a defunct name as the trees have been found to be a natural hybrid between Eucalyptus intertexta and Eucalyptus sideroxylon.

Ednieana: [ed-ni-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Beverly Ednie; 1931-20.., who was an Australian botanical illustrator. A good example is Hakea ednieana.

Educta: [e-duk-ta] From Eēductus, which is Latin for to draw forth or bring out something potential or latent or to elicit and develop. It refers to plants, one feels has more to offer but you cannot put finger on or it is difficult to exploit that potential. A good example is Eucalyptus educta.

Edule: [e-dyool] From edūle, which is Latin for to be edible. It refers to plants, which have a structure or organ that is edible. A good example is Haemodorum edule.

Edwardsii: [ed-wawrd-zi-ahy] Is named in honour of Edwards, who collected the type specimen around Mount Barker. A good example is Boronia edwardsii.

Eerwah: [ee-r-wa] From Eewah, which is Latinized from the vernacular from the local Gabbi Gabbi aboriginal tribal word for an eagle. It is named after the area in where the first plant was discovered near Mount Eerwah in south east Queensland. A good example is Planchonella eerwah.

Effusa: [e-foo-sa] From Effuse, which is Latin for spreading out in a loose manner. It refers to the growth habit of the leaves spreading out without a pattern. A good example is Lomandra effusa.

Effuse: [e-foos/z] From Effuse, which is Latin for spreading out in a loose manner. It refers to the growth habit of the culms and leaves spreading out without a pattern. A good example is Deyeuxia reflexa.

Effusiflora: [e-foo-si-flor-a] From Effuse, which is Latin for spreading out in a loose manner and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to the growth habit of the culms and leaves spreading out without a pattern. A good example is the open spreading habit of Chionanthus effusiflora.

Effusifolia: [e-foo-si-foh-li-a] From Effuse, which is Latin for spreading out in a loose manner and Folium which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the growth habit of the culms and leaves spreading out without a pattern. A good example is the open spreading habit of Acacia effusifolia.

Effusifolium: [e-foo-si-foh-li-um] From Effuse, which is Latin for spreading out in a loose manner and Folium which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the growth habit of the culms and leaves spreading out without a pattern. A good example is the open spreading habit of Racosperma effusifolium, which is now known as Acacia effusifolia.

Effusum: [e-foo-sum] From Effuse, which is Latin for spreading out in a loose manner. It refers to the growth habit of the culms and leaves spreading out without a pattern. A good example is the open spreading habit of Panicum effusum.

Effusus: [e-foo-sus] From Effuse, which is Latin for spreading out in a loose manner. It refers to the growth habit of the culms and leaves spreading out without a pattern. A good example is the culms on Juncus effusus.

Efoliata: [e-foh-li-a-ta] From A/E, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which discard their leaves early so that they always look bare. A good example is Indigofera efoliata.

Efoliatum: [e-foh-li-a-tum] From A/E, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which discard their leaves early so that they always look bare. A good example is Acacia insolita subsp. efoliatum, which is now known as Acacia adjutrices.

Efoliatus: [ee-foh-li-a-tus] From A/E, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which discard their leaves early so that they always look bare. A good example is Schoenus efoliatus.

Egena: [e-jee-na] From Genys, which is Ancient Greek for a jaw or Gena which is Latin for a cheek. It refers to the flowers growing laterally from the stems and the wing petals spreading more like a chin or jaw than in other legumes. A good example is Templetonia egena.

Egeria: [e-jer-i-a] Is named after the Roman nymph who advised Numa Pompilius. A good example is the now problemsome water exotic weed Egeria densa.

Egg Diapause: [eg, dahy-a-porz] From Aeg, which is Old English for an egg and Diapausis, which is Ancient Greek for suspended development. It usually It refers to the ability of some organisms (Frogs and Mites) to suspend the development of the egg, so that it does not develop further when conditions are unsuitable like when it is very hot or dry, then at a later time continue the process of development when conditions are again more favourable.

Eglandular: [e-glan-dyoo-lar] From Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out side or out of the ordinary and Glandula, which is Latin for glands. It refers to a description of a plant that does not have any glands.

Eglandulosa: [e-glan-dyoo-loh-sa] From Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary or out side and Glandula, which is Latin for glands. It refers to a description of a plant that does not have any glands. A good example is Goodenia heterophylla subsp. eglandulosa.

Eglandulosum: [e-glan-dyoo-loh-sum] From Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary or out side and Glandula, which is Latin for glands. It refers to a description of a plant that does not have any glands. A good example is Phebalium glandulosum subsp. eglandulosum.

Eglandulosus: [e-glan-dyoo-loh-sus] From Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary or out side and Glandula, which is Latin for glands. It refers to a description of a plant that does not have any glands. A good example is Senecio vagus subsp. eglandulosus.

Eglobosus: [e-glo-boh-sus] From Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary or out side and Globosus, which is Latin for spherical. It refers to seeds which are spherical especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Cyperus eglobosus.

Ehretia: [er-e-ti-a] Is named in honour of George Ehret; 1708-1770, who was a German botanical illustrator. A good example is Ehretia acuminata var. Acuminata.

Ehretioides: [er-e-ti-oi-deez] Is named in honour of George Ehret; 1708-1770, who was a German botanical illustrator and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have a similarity to the Ehretia genus. A good example is Ficus ehretioides, which is now known as Ficus variegata.

Ehrharta: [er-har-ta] Is named in honour of Jakob Friedrich Ehrhart; 1742-1795, who was a Swiss botanist and student of Carl Linnaeus and who was the first person to rank plants in botanical literature as a subspecies. A good example is Ehrharta diplax.

Eichhornia: [ei-kor-ni-a] Is named in honour of Johann Albrecht Freidrich Eichhorn, who was 19th century Prussian politician and the education minister for King Friedrick Wilhelm the 4th who actively seppressed dissent amongst young leftist students. A good example is Eichhornia crassipes which is one of the most aggressive water weeds in Australia along with Elodea canadensis.

Eichlerago: [ei-kler-a-goh] Is named in honour of H. Eichler, who was an Australian director of the South Australian Herbarium. A good example of the genus is Eichlerago tysoniana, which is now known as Prostanthera tysoniana.

Eichleri: [ahy-kler-ahy] Is named in honour of August Wilhelm Eichler; 1839-1887, who was a German professor in botany, a plant collector who is atributed to discovering the Tulip in China. A good example is Picris eichleri.

Eichlerianus: [ei-kler-i-a-nus] Is named in honour of August Wilhelm Eichler; 1839-1887, who was a German professor in botany and a plant collector and attributed to discovering the Tulip in China. A good example is Tribulus eichlerianus.

Eidothea: [ei-do-theer-a] From Eidothea, which is Ancient Greek for a God of the sea. It refers to plants, which live on mountains facing the sea. A good example is Eidothea hardeniana.

Eildonensis: [ei-do-nen-sis] From Eildon, which is Latin for Lake Eildon in Victoria. It refers to plants, which were first discovered around Lake Eildon. A good example is Gymnomyces eildonensis.

Einadia: [ei-na-di-a] From Ein, which is Ancient Greek for one or alone and Ándros which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower. It refers to flowers, which have a single usually prominent stamen. A good example is Einadia trigonus.

Elachantha: [el-a-kan-tha] From Elachys, which is Ancient Greek for short or small and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are less prolific than many other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia elachantha.

Elachanthum: [el-a-kan-thum] From Elachys, which is Ancient Greek for short or small and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are less prolific than many other species in the genus. A good example was Racosperma elachanthum, which is now known as Acacia elachantha.

Elachanthus: [el-a-kan-thus] From Elachys, which is Greek for short or small and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are less prolific than many other species in the genus. A good example is Elachanthus pusillus.

Elachista: [el-a-kis-ta] From Elachys, which is Ancient Greek for short or small. It refers to shrubs, which are generally shorter than other species in the genus. A good example is Pultenaea elachista.

Elachistum: [el-a-kis-tum] From Elachys, which is Ancient Greek for short or small. It refers to shrubs, which are generally shorter than other species in the genus. A good example is Gastrolobium elachistum, which is now known as Pultenaea elachista.

Elachocarpa: [el-a-ko-kar-pa] From Elachys, which is Ancient Greek for short or small and Karpós, which Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are generally smaller than other species in the genus. A good example is Trachymene elachocarpa.

Elachocarpus: [el-a-ko-kar-pus] From Elachys, which is Ancient Greek for short or small and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are rather small especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Corchorus elachocarpus.

Elachocroton [el-a-ko-kroh-ton] From Elachys, which is Ancient Greek for short or small and Kroton, which is Ancient Greek for a tick. It refers to seeds, which resemble small ticks. A good example was Elachocroton asperococcum, which is now known as Microstachys chamaelea.

Elacholoma: [el-a-ko-loh-ma] From Elachys, which is Ancient Greek for short or small and Loma, which is Ancient Greek for a fringe. It refers to the short, course hairs on the sepals. A good example is Elacholoma prostrata.

Elachopappus: [el-a-ko-pa-pus] From Elachys, which is Ancient Greek for short or small and Páppos, which is Ancient Greek for a tuft of hair or a grandfather. It refers to an organ, which has tuft/s of greyish-white hairs which resembles a grandfathers beard. A good example was Elachopappus rudallii, which is now known as Myriocephalus rudallii.

Elachophylla: [el-a-ko-fahyl-la] From Elachys, which is Ancient Greek for short or small and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaves, which are rather small especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Pomaderris elachophylla.

Elachophyllum: [el-a-ko-fahyl-lum] From Elachys, which is Ancient Greek for short or small and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaves which are rather small especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Myrtoleucodendron elachophyllum, which is now known as Melaleuca depauperata.

Elachophyllus: [el-a-ko-fahyl-lus] From Elachys, which is Ancient Greek for short or small and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaves, which are rather small especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example was Phyllanthus elachophyllus, which is now known as Sauropus elachophyllus.

Elachothamnos: [el-a-ko-tham-nos] From Elachys, which is Ancient Greek for short or small and Thamnos, which is Ancient Greek for a Shrub. It refers to the shrubs, which are rather small especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example was Elachothamnos cunninghamii, which is now known as Duma florulenta and has had several name changes in the past which have included Muehlenbeckia cunninghamii and Muehlenbeckia florulenta.

Elaeagnifolium [el-ee-ag-ni-foh-li-um] From Elaia, which is Ancient Greek for an olive, Agnos, which is Latin for pure and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which very closely resemble the leaves of the olive trees. A good example was Eriostemon elaeagnifolium, which is now known as Phebalium squamulosum.

Elaeagnoidea: [el-a-ee-noi-dee-a] From Elaia, which is Greek for an olive and Arachnoides, which is Latin for a spider’s web. It refers to fruits and or stems which have a dull silky web like covering. A good example is Aglaia elaeagnoidea.

Eleocarpa: [el-o-kar-pa] From Elaia, which is Ancient Greek for an olive, and Karpós, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to rust spots first found on the leaves of the eotic olive tee. A good example is Gnomonia elaeocarpa, which is a rust spot found on native tropical figs.

Eleocarpus: [el-e-oh-kar-pus] From Elaia, which is Ancient Greek for an olive, and Karpós, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to fruits, which superficially resemble olives. A good example is Elaeocarpus reticulatus.

Eleodendron: [el-e-o-den-dron] From Elaia, which is Ancient Greek for an olive and Dendron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree. It refers to tall trees, which superficially resemble European, olive tree. A good example is Elaeodendron australe.

Eleophila: [el-e-o-fi-la] From Elaia, which is Ancient Greek for an olive, Agnos which is Latin for pure and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which very closely resemble the leaves of the olive trees. A good example is Olearia elaeophila.

Eleophloia: [el-e-o-floi-a] From Elaia, which is Ancient Greek for an olive and phlóos, which is Ancient Greek for bark. It refers to barks, which very closely resemble the bark of the European Olive trees. A good example is Olearia elaeophila.

Elaisoma: [el-lahy-so-ma] From ELatine, which is Ancient Greek for the ancient Greek name for a European genus of water a plant. It refers to a group of small aquatic plants, which resemble the European plants. A good example was ELatine gratioloides, which is now known as Goodenia elaiosoma.

Elata: [el-la-ta] From ELatine, which is Ancient Greek for the Ancient Greek name for a European genus of water a plant. It refers to a group of small plants, which resemble the European plants. A good example is the phyllodes Acacia elata.

ELatine: [el-la-teen] From ELatine, which is Ancient Greek for the ancient Greek name for a European genus of a water plant. It refers to a group of small aquatic plants, which resemble the European plants in the genus. A good example was ELatine gratioloides, which is now known as Goodenia elaiosoma.

ELatinoides: [el-la-ti-noi-deez] From ELatine, which is Ancient Greek for the ancient Greek name for a European genus of a water plants and Oides which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to a group of small aquatic plants, which resemble the European plants. A good example was Hedyotis eLatinoides which is now known as Glossostigma eLatinoides.

Elatior: [el-la-ti-or] From ēlātius, which is Latin for taller. It refers to plants, which are taller than other species in the genus. A good example is Boronia elatior.

Elatius: [el-lei-ti-us] From ēlātius, which is Latin for very tall. It refers to plants, which are much taller than other species in the genus. A good example is Lepidosperma elatius.

Elatostema: [el-la-to ste-ma] From Elatos, which is Greek for to drive or to strike and Stemon, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in the flower. It refers to a forceful explosion of pollen from the dehiscing anthers. A good example is Elatostema reticulatum.

Elattostachys: [e-la-to-sta-shis] From Elatton, which is Greek for small and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek or later Stachys which is Latin for a flowering spike. It refers to plants, which have a short flowering spike. A good example is Elattostachys nervosa.

Elatum: [el-la-tum] From Elatus, which is Latin for tall. It refers to the plants, which are upright and much taller than other species in the genus. A good example is Prasophyllum elatum.

Elatus: [el-la-tus] From Elatus, which is Latin for tall. It refers to the plants, being very tall and taller much than other species in the genus. A good example is Podocarpus elatus.

Elderi: [el-der-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Sir Thomas Elder; 1818-1897, who was a Scottish-Australian pastoralist, highly successful businessman, philanthropist for many Australian expeditions, politician, race-horse owner and breeder, and public figure. Amongst many other things, he is notable for introducing camels to Australia. 

Elderiana: [el-der-i-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Sir Thomas Elder; 1818-1897, who was an Australian pastoralist, explorer and sponsor of science. A good example is Baecke aelderiana.

Electrospermum: [el-ek-tro-sper-mum] From Elektron, which is Ancient Greek for a negatively charged ion and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. Its reference to the seeds is unclear. A good example is Eriocaulon electrospermum.

Elegans: [el-e-ganz] From ēlegāns, which is Latin for fine, elegant, handsome and tasteful. It refers to the overall appearance of plants, which are neat and good looking. A good example is Polyscias elegans.

Elegantissima: [el-e-gan-tis-si-ma] From ēlegāns, which is Latin for fine, elegant, handsome and tasteful and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or the most. It refers to plants which are the most elegant in the genus. A good example is the grass Austrostipa elegantissima.

Elegantulum: [el-e-gan-tyoo-lum] From ēlegāns, which is Latin for fine, elegant, handsome and tasteful and Um, which is Latin for a degree. It refers to species which are very elegant. A good example is Dipodium elegantulum.

Elagantulus: [el-e-gahn-tyoo-lus] From ēlegāns, which is Latin for fine, elegant, handsome and tasteful and Um, which is Latin for a degree. It refers to species which are very elegant. A good example is the beautiful and fortunately not overly problemsome fern aphid, Felisacus elegantulus.

Photos by Tim Holms at Martin NA.2015, revised 2017. Fern mirid – Felisacus elegantulus. Interesting Insects and other Invertebrates. New Zealand Arthropod Factsheet Series Number 23. https://nzacfactsheets.landcareresearch.co.nz/

Elengi: [el-en-ji] From Elengi, which is Latinized from the vernacular of the Sankrist word for a local tree found there. A good example is Mimusops elengi.

Eleocharis: [el-e-oh ka-ris] From Elios, which is Ancient Greek for marshy and Kharis, which is Ancient Greek for elegantly beautiful or graceful. It refers to the overall appearance of wallum plants, which are delightfully beautiful. A good example is Eleocharis elegans.

Elephantopus: [el-e-fan-to-pus] From Eléphās, which is Ancient Greek for an elephant and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to pedicels, which are thick, fleshy and do not taper. A good example is Elephantopus spicatus.

Elettaria: [el-e-ta-ri-a] From Elettaria, which is Latinized for the Hindu word for this plant growing there. It refers to plants, which resemble the plants in India. A good example is Elettaria scottiana.

Eleusine: [el-oo-seen] From Eleusis, which is Ancient Greek for a city in Greece and Ceres, which is Ancient Greek for cereal. It refers to grasses, which were once stored in the temple of cereals. A good example is Eleusine caracana.

Eleusinoides: [e-loo-si-noi-deez] From Eleusis, which is Ancient Greek for the earthly home of Demeter, the god of eternal life and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the stem and grain, which were shown or sold to those hopeful of being initiated with eternal life. A good example is  the exotic weed Cyperus eleusinoides, which is now known as Cyperus nutans subsp. eleusinoides.

Eleuterostachya: [el-oo-ter-o-stah-sha] From Eleutherine which is Ancient Greek for to free from bondage and Stachyus, which is Ancient Greek for flower stalk. It refers to the lobes and upper part of the corolla, which look as though they have just broken away from the bracts and are still not yet completely free. A good example is Melaleuca eleuterostachya.

Eleutheranthera: [el-oo-ther-an-ther-a] From Eleutherine, which is Ancient Greek for to free from bondage and Antha/Anthos which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. It refers to the lobes and upper part of the corolla, which look as though they have just broken away from the bracts and are still not yet completely free. A good example is Eleutheranthera ruderalis.

Eleutheroglossum: [el-oo-ther-o-glos-sum] From Eleutheros, which is Ancient Greek for to liberate or to free from bondage and Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to the orchid’s labellum, which are much longer and break free of the lateral petals at an earlier stage. A good example is Eleutheroglossum fellowsii.

Eleuthranthes: [el-ooth-ran-thes] From Eleutheros, which is Ancient Greek for to liberate or to free from bondage and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, or anthers, which are free from the rest of the flower organs. A good example is Eleuthranthes opercularina, which is now known as Opercularia liberiflora.

Elevated: [el-e-vei-ted] From Elevatus, which is Latin for to lighten or to lift up. It refers to a structure or organ, which is raised well above the others. A good example of flowers being elevated well above the water are found in some water lilies which include Nymphaea gigantea.

Elionurus: [el-i-o-nyoo-rus] From Elionurus, which is Ancient Greek for doormouse. It refers to the mature flower spikes, which resemble a doormouse’s tail. A good example of the genus in Australia is Elionurus citreus.

Eliosurum: [el-i-o-syoo-rum] From Elionurus, which is Ancient Greek for doormouse. It refers to the mature flower spikes, which resemble a doormouse’s tail. A good example of the genus in Australia is Typhonium eliosurum

Elisabethae: [e-liz-a-beth-ee] Is probably named in honour of Queen Elizabeth; 1926-20… A good example is Prostanthera elisabethae.

Elisae: [e-li-see] It may be named in honour of Elisa Kern sister of the American Edward Meyer Kern who was a topographer, and explorer but it can not be 100% substantiated. There is also some thoughts as to it being derived from the Ancient Greek word for for the oath of God. A good example is Adelopetalum elisae.

Elixiana: [e-liks-si-a-na] Is named in honour of Dr. John (Jack) Alan Elix; 1941-2…, who was an Botanist, lichenologist and chemist at the Australian National University Canberra. A good example is Graphis elixiana.

Elixii: [e-liks-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Dr. John (Jack) Alan Elix; 1941-2…, who was an Botanist, lichenologist and chemist at the Australian National University Canberra. A good example is Fissurina elixii.

Elizabethae: [e-liz-a-beth-ee] Is probably named in honour of Queen Elizabeth; 1926-20… A good example was Thelymitra elizabethae, which is now known as Thelymitra carnea.

Elleryana: [el-leer-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Ellerya. A good example is Melicope elleryana.

Elliffii: [el-lif-fi-ahy] Is named in honour of Elliff. A good example is Elaeocarpus elliffii.

Elliottii: [el-li-ot-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Elliott but which Elliotte cannot be substantiated. A good example was Hibiscus elliottii, which is now known as Hibiscus drummondii.

Ellipsoidal: [el-lip-soi dal] From Elleiptikós, which is Ancient Greek for an elliptical or ovate shape. It usually refers to spores, which have a solid elliptical shape. A good example is the spores on the fungus Trichoglossum walteri.

Ellipsoidea: [e-lip-soi-dee-a] From Elleiptikós, which is Ancient Greek for an elliptical or ovate shape. It refers to organs, which have a solid ovate shape. A good example is the elongated leaves on Corymbia ellipsoidea.

Elliptica: [e-lip-ti-ka] From Elleiptikós, which is Ancient Greek for an elliptical or ovate shape. It refers to organs usually the leaves which have an elliptical shape. A good example is Melaleuca elliptica.

Elliptical: [e-lip-ti-kal] From Elleiptikós, which is Ancient Greek for an elliptical or ovate shape. It refers to organs usually the leaves which have an elliptical shape. A good example is the shape of the leaves on Hymenosporum flavum.

Elliptical leaf of Hymenosporum flavum

Elliptice: [e-lip-tahys] From Elleiptikós, which is Ancient Greek for an elliptical or ovate shape. It refers to organs other than leaves which have an elliptical shape. A good example is the outer pileus layer which folds back to allow the spore carrying sector to release its spore on Geastrum elliptice.

Ellipticum: [e-lip-ti-kum] From Elleiptikós, which is Ancient Greek for an elliptical or ovate shape. It refers to organs usually the leaves, which have a precise elliptical shape. A good example is the elliptical shape of the leaves on Oxylobium ellipticum.

Elliptifolia: [e-lip-ti-foh-li-a] From Elleiptikós, which is Ancient Greek for an elliptical or ovate shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves, which have an elliptical shape. A good example is Pimelea latifolia subsp. elliptifolia

Ellytes: [e-lahy-tes] From Ellytes, which is unknown but me be a bastardised for of mellitus, which is Ancient Greek for to pass through or later the Greek/Latin for honey. It may refer to honey scented flowers or sugar passing through fruits giving them a somewhat acrid taste. A good example is Leptomeria ellytes.

Elmae: [el-mee] From Elmae which is unknown. A good example was Prasophyllum elmae, which is now known as Corunastylis pumila.

Elobata: [el-o-ba-ta] From Lobós, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to the corolla tube, which has very distinct lobes. A good example is Micromyrtus elobata

Elobatum: [el-o-ba-tum] From Lobós, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to an organ, which has many lobes. A good example is the labellum on Dendrobium elobatum.

Endocarp: [en-do-karp] From éndon which is Ancient Greek prefix for within and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the inner most part of a fruit that surrounds the seed.

Endoplasmic Reticulum: [en-do-plaz-mik, re-ti-kyoo-lum] From éndon which is an Ancient Greek prefix for within, Plásma, which is Ancient Greek for something being formed or later Plasma, which is Latin for a mold, Rēte, which is Latin for a snare or network and -culum, which is Latin for a diminutive suffix. It refers to a network of membranes within the cytoplasm of cells, where proteins and lipids are synthesized.

Endosperm: [en-do-sperm] From éndon which is an Ancient Greek prefix for within and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the tissue surrounding the embryo of flowering plant seeds, which provides nutrition to the developing embryo.

Epetiolulate: [ee-pe-ti-o-leit] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary and Petiole, which is Latin for a petiole. It refers to the leaves, which have a minute petiole which means the leaves are almost sessile. A good example is Hibbertia scandens.

Ephedroides: [e-fe-droi-deez] From From Ephi, which is Ancient Greek for a horses tail and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to trunks which resemble a typical minni-ritchi peeling bark. A good example is Acacia ephedroides.

Ephemera: [ef-fe-mer-a] From Ephḗmer/Ephḗmeros, which is Ancient Greek for temporary, short-lived, lasting but a day. It refers to plants, usually flowers or fungi, which are seen for a day or so before discarding their seeds or spore. A good example is Sphaeromorphaea ephemera.

Ephemeral 1: [ef-fe-meer-al] From Ephḗmer/Ephḗmeros, which is Ancient Greek for temporary, short-lived, lasting but a day. It refers to flowers, which last for less than one day. A good example is Pattersonia sericea or Hibiscus diversifolium.

Ephemeral 2: [ef-fe-me-ral] From Ephḗmer/Ephḗmeros, which is Ancient Greek for temporary, short-lived, lasting but a day. It refers to temporary streams, creeks, wallums or rills associated with forests and woodlands that dry up in the dry season or shortly after the rain ceases falling.

Ephemeral Pools: [ef-fe-me-ral, poolz] From Ephḗmer/Ephḗmeros, which is Ancient Greek for temporary, short-lived, lasting but a day. And Pol which is Old English or Poel which is Dutch for a standing body of water. It refers to temporary pools associated with forests and woodlands that dry up in the dry season or shortly after the rain ceases falling.

Ephemerantha: [ef-fe-mer-an-tha] From Ephi, which is Ancient Greek for a horses tail and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in the flower or the flower. It refers to the apex of the flowers labellum which are covered in long twisted hair like appendages. A good example is the New Caledonian orchid Ephemerantha comata.

Ephemerus: [ef-fe-mer-us] From Ephḗmer/Ephḗmeros, which is Ancient Greek for temporary, short-lived, lasting but a day. It refers to plants, usually flowers or fungi, which are seen for a day or so before discarding their spore. A good example is Coprinus ephemerus.

Ephippium: [e-fi-pi-um] From Ephíos, which is Ancient Greek for putting on or mounting and Híppos, which is Ancient Greek for a horse. It refers to the lateral petals on an orchid, which resemble a person’s legs that has mounted a horse. A good example is Ephippium masdevalliaceum.

Epi: [e-pi] From Epi which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or upon.

Epiblema: [e-pi-ble-ma] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Blema, which is Ancient Greek for a coverlet. It refers to appendages at the base of the column. A good example is the coverings on the column of the orchid Epiblema grandiflora.

Epica: [e-pi-ka] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Kalyx, which is Ancient Greek for a cup. It refers to the plants environment, which is upon cliff top dunes. A good example is Banksia epica.

Epicalyx: [e-pi-ka-liks] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Kályx/Kalýptein, which are Ancient Greek or Calycina, which is Latin for a husk, veil or cover. It refers to the specialized leaves, which surround the bud and protect the developing sexual organs and ovaries in that the involucre resemble the calyx but consist of a whorl of bracts that is exterior to the calyx or results from the union of the sepal appendages. A good example is Hibiscus splendens.

Epicarpurus: [e-pi-kar-pu-rus] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which appear to sit upright upon the pedicel. A good example is Epicarpurus orientalis, which is now known as Streblus orientalis.

Epicharis: [e-pi-kar-is] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Kharis, which is Ancient Greek for charming beauty or pleasantly beautiful. It refers to the overall beauty of the trees. A good example is Epicharis densevestita which use to be known as Dysoxylyum parasiticum.

Epicormic: [e-pi-kor-mik] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Korm, which is Ancient Greek for a corm. It refers to the dormant buds beneath the bark, which regenerate when the crown of the tree or shrub has been destroyed. A good example is the epicormic growth on Eucalyptus planchoniana.

Epicormic Shoots on Eucalyptus planchoniana – andi Mellis

Epicortical Runners: [e-pi-kor-ti-kal, run-nerz] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Kortical, which is Ancient Greek for a bark. It refers to the roots or haustorium of parasitic plants that run both externally on the bark and just below the bark of the host plant. A good example is Dendrophthoe vitellina.

Epicotyl: [e-pi-ko-til] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Kotyle, which is Ancient Greek for a seed leaf. It is the apical end of an embryo’s axis, which gives rise to a new shoot.

Epicroca: [e-pi-kroh-ka] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Krocos, which is Ancient Greek for transparent or fine. It refers to fine looking flowers, which are held at the apexes of the stems. A good example is Grevillea epicroca.

Epidendroides: [e-pi-den-droi-deez] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over, Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which prefer trees to grow upon similar to those of the orchids in the Epidéndron genus. A good example is the naturalized crucifix orchid Epidendroides tetrandra, which is now known as Myrmecodia beccarii.

Epidéndron: [e-pi-den-dron] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree. It refers to the orchids, which prefer trees to grow upon. A good example is the naturalized crucifix orchid Epidéndron radicans.

Epidermis: [e-pi-der-mis] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Dermis, which is Ancient Greek for skin. It refers to the dead Layer of cells on the outer surface of an animal or leaf.

Epigaea: [e-pi-jee-a] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Geios, which is Ancient Greek for earth or soil. It refers to where the cotyledon leaves are raised vertical above the soil surface. A good example is Mitrasacme epigaea.

Epigeal: [e-pi-jeel] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Geios, which is Ancient Greek for earth or soil. It refers to where the cotyledon leaves are raised vertical above the soil surface. A good example is Persoonia stradbrokensis.

Epigeaum: [e-pi-jee-um] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Geios, which is Ancient Greek for earth or soil. It refers to where the cotyledon leaves are raised vertical above the soil surface. A good example is Syzygium wilsonii sub specie epigeaum.

Epigeous: [e-pi-jee-os] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Geios, which is Ancient Greek for earth or soil. It refers to fungi which have their fruiting bodies above the ground. A good example is Lactarius eucalypti.

Epiglottis: [e-pi-glo-tis] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Glottis, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to an organ, which resembles a tongue outside of the mouth. A good example is Conchium epiglottis.

Epigynous: [e-pi-jahy-nos] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek for the female. (The reproductive organs of a plant.) It refers to a flower where the petals and sepals are above the fruit. The flower is known as inferior. A good example is Momordica charantia.

Epigyny: [e-pee-jahyn] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek for the female. (The reproductive organs of the plant.) It refers to where the sepals, petals, stamens are attached to the floral tube above the ovary with the ovary adnate to the tube or hypanthium.– Inferior ovary.

Epihyperigyny: [e-pi-hahy-per-i-jahyn] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek for the female. (The reproductive organs of the plant.) It refers to where the sepals, petals, stamens are attached to the floral tube or hypanthium surrounding the ovary. It is a combination of a perigyny or superior ovary and an inferior ovary.

Epihypogyny: [e-pi-hahy-po-jahyn] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek for the female. (The reproductive organs of the plant.) It refers to where the sepals, petals, stamens are attached about half-way from the base of the ovary to the partly adnate hypanthium tube.- Half inferior ovary.

Epileia: [e-pi-lee-a] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Pillos, which is Latin for long, soft, erect or appressed wavy hairs. It refers to new stems, which are covered in pilose hairs. A good example is the parasitic plant, Shawia epileia, which is now known as Olearia ramulosa.

Epilinum: [e-pi-li-num] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Pillos, which is Latin for long, soft, erect or appressed wavy hairs. It refers to new stems, which are covered in pilose hairs. A good example is the parasitic plant, Cuscuta epilinum which is an excluded name.

Epilith: [e-pi-lith] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Lithos, which is Ancient Greek for a stone. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on rocks. A good example of an epiphyte come epiphytic plant in the small orchid Bulbophyllum minutissimum.

Epilobioides: [e-pi-lo-bi-oi-deez] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over, Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for a pod or capsule and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Epilobium genus. A good example is Tetratheca epilobioides, which is now known as Tetratheca hirsuta.

Epilobium: [e-pi-lo-bi-um] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for a pod or capsule. It refers to fruits, which appear above the ovary similar to where the flower was positioned. A good example is Epilobium pallidiflorum.

Epilosa: [e-pi-loh-sa] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over, pilose, which is Latin for short, soft wavy hairs and Losa, which is Latin for somewhat. It refers to the stems, which are sparsely or somewhat covered in short, soft wavy hairs. A good example is the stems on Philotheca epilosa.

Epimatium: [e-pi-ma-ti-um] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Matium, which is Ancient Greek for a degree of good. It refers to the covering of the seeds, which are more or less fused with the petiole and rise from the chalazal end of the ovule like an additional integument. A good example is the fruit and pedicel on Podocarpus elatus.

Epimelaeana: [e-pi-mel-ee-a-na] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Malon, which is Ancient Greek for black and Ana, which is Ancient Greek for every. It refers to lichens, which appear to be scribbled upon rocks or at times trunks. A good example is Graphis epimelaeana.

Epimeredi: [e-pi-mer-e-dahy] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Meredi, which maybe Latin for to have a pair which are arranged around. It refers to a spike or secund, which has the flowers in a very loose formation. A good example is the flowers on Epimeredi salviifolium, which is now known as Anisomeles malabarica.

Epimicta: [e-pi-mik-ta] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and maybe Micta, which is Latin for to mix or make a mixture. It refers to stems, which look totally in disarray. A good example is Banksia epimicta.

Epimorphicologist: [e-pi-mor-fi-kol-o-jist] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for before, Morphic, which is Ancient Greek for to change, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies the science of the development of life in which a body can regrow after being severed. A good example is the tail on a lizard.

Epimorphicology: [e-pi-mor-fi-kol-o-jee] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for before, Morphic, which is Ancient Greek for to change and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science of the development of life in which a body can regrow after being severed. A good example is the tail on a lizard.

Epimorphosis: [e-pi-mor-fo-sis] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Morphos, is which is Ancient Greek for to change or have the ability to change. It refers to an organism or a form of an animal like a larvae to a butterfly.

Epipactis: [e-pi-pak-tis] From Epipaktís/Epipegnuo, which are Greek for a group of orchids that were believed to have milk curdling properties. A good example is the filaments on Epipactis fornicata.

Epipactoides: [e-pi-pak-toi-deez] From Epipaktís/Epipegnuo, which are Greek for a group of orchids that were believed to have milk curdling properties and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to orchids, which resemble the Epactis genus. A good example is the filaments on Thelymitra epipactoides.

Epiperigyny: [e-pi-peri-jahyn] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over, Peri, which is Ancient Greek for the wall or skin of the fruit and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is the female reproductive organs of the flower. It refers to where the sepals, petals, stamens are attached to the floral tube or hypanthium cup above the ovary with the lower part of the hypanthium completely adnate to the ovaryon an inferior ovary.

Epipetalous: [e-pi-pe-tal-os] From Epi which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Petalon which is Ancient Greek for a petal or Petalum, which is Latin for a petal. It refers to filaments, which are attached to the corolla tube or corolla lobes. A good example is the filaments on Westringea fruiticosa.

Epipetiolar: [e-pi-pe-to-lar] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a petiole It refers to branches which develop from buds on the petiole.

Epipetric: [e-pi-pe-trik] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Petric, which is Ancient Greek for a stone. It refers to those plants that prefer to grow on rocks as opposed to lithophytes, which grow on or in the soil. A good example is Dendrobium kingianum.

Epiphragm: [e-pi-phram] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Phrágma, which is Ancient Greek for a barrier. It refers to a dilated apex of the columella in mosses or a covering, which protects the immature peridium. A good example is the lid that protects the  peridium on Cyathus striatus.

Epiphylloidea:[e-pi-fahyl-loi-dee-a] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which resemble those of the Epiphyllum genus. A good example was Dampiera epiphylloidea, which is now known as Dampiera alata.

Epiphyllous: [e-pi-fahyl-los] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to some lichens which prefer to grow on the leaves of trees.

Epiphyllum: [e-pi-fahyl-lum] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which somewhat resemble the exotic epiphytic cacti. A good example is Daviesia epiphyllum.

Epiphyllus: [e-pi-fahyl-lus] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which somewhat resemble the exotic epiphytic cacti. A good example is the dainty little fungus Marasmius epiphyllus.

Epiphyte: [e-pi-fahyt] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Phyton, which is Ancient Greek fora plant. It refers to plants, which grow on the trunk or branches of another tree but are not a parasite. A good example is Asplenium simpliflorans.

Epiphytologist: [e-pi-fahy-to-lo-gist] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over, Phyton, which is Ancient Greek fora plant, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies epiphytes.

Epiphytology: [e-pi-fahy-to-lo-jee] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over, Phyton, which is Ancient Greek fora plant and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the scientific study of epiphytes.

Epipogium: [e-pi-po-ji-um] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to the turned up labellum appearing like a beard. A good example is the Labellum on the saphrophytic orchid Epipogium roseum.

Epipremnum: [e-pi-prem-num] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Premnum, which is Latin for a tree stump. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on stumps and trunks. A good example is Epipremnum amplissimum.

Epirhizous: [e-pi-rahy-zos] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Rhizomous, which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to a having its roots grow on another plant but not as a parasite. A good example is Vappodes phalaenopsis.

Episepalous: [e-pi-se-pa-los] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Thḗkion/Thḗkē, which is Ancient Greek for a hymen or sheath. It refers to the surface of the fructifying discs in Lichens or on the upper surface of the disc in some groups of fungi. A good example is the Discomycetes genus.

Epitriche: [e-pi-trahy-ke] From Epi, which is Ancient Greek for upon, above or over and Tríchion, which is Greek a hair. It refers to hairs which grow on the upper or outer surfaces. A good example is Epitriche demissus.

Epruinata: [e-pryoo-na-ta] From E, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Pruinose, which is Latin for frosty. It refers to leaf surfaces, which do not have a frosty appearance. A good example was Eucalyptus epruinata, which is now known as Eucalyptus distans.

Equestre: [e-kwes-tre] From Equestre, which is Latin for belonging to the cavalry or to a horsemen. It refers to a leaves, which resembles a rider’s legs straddled over the saddle. A good example is Leionema equestre.

Equilateral: [e-kwee-la-ter-al] From Aequalis, which is Latin for equal and Lateralis, which is Latin for a side or sides. It refers to where a segment can be divided into two equal halves or sides which are equal in shape and size.

Equinoctial: [e-kwee-nok-ti-al] From Aequalis, which is Latin for equal and Nocturnalis, which is Latin for nocturnal or night time. It pertains to an equinox where the day and night have the same hours, minutes and seconds.

Equinox: [e-kwee-noks] From Aequalis, which is Latin for equal and Nocturnalis, which is Latin for nocturnal or night time. Pertains to an equinox where the day and night have the same hours, minutes and seconds.

Equisetifolia: [e-kwi-se-ti-foh-li-a] From Equus, which is Latin for a horse and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves and branchlets looking like a horse’s tail. A good example is the branchlets on Casuarina equisitifolia.

Equisetina: [e-kwis-se-ti-na] From Equus, which is Latin for a horse and Setum, which is Latin for a bristle. It refers to the flower’s anthers, which appear like the tail of a white horse along the smooth culms. A good example is Eleocharis equisetina.

Equitans: [e-kwee-tanz] From Equitans, which is Latin for to ride horseback. It refers to a leaves, which appear to like a rider riding a horse. A good example is found on Cyathochaeta equitans.

Equitant: [e-kwee-tant] From Equitans, which is Latin for to ride horseback. It refers to a leaves, which resembles a rider’s legs straddled over the saddle. A good example is found on Carpobrotus glaucescens.

Eragrostiella: [e-rah-gro-sti-el-la From Eros, which is Ancient Greek for love or erotic, Agrostis, which is Ancient Greek for a fine grass and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to this grass appearing somewhat similar to the genus Egrostis but a little more feminine like a young girl. A good example is Eragrostiella bifaria.

Eragrostis: [e-rah-gros-tis] From Eros, which is Ancient Greek for love or erotic and Agrostis, which is Ancient Greek for a fine grass. It refers to the appearance of the elegant flower heads and fine foliage of this grass. A good example is Eragrostis leptostachya.

Eragrostoides: [e-rah-gros-toi-deez] From Eros, which is Ancient Greek for love or erotic, Agrostis, which is Ancient Greek for a fine grass and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to grasses which somewhat resemble the Eragrostis genus in that they are elegant with fine foliage. A good example is Ectrosia eragrostoides.

Eramous: [e-ra-mos] From Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary or outside and from Ramous, which is Latin for pertaining to the branches. It refers to a plant which is without branches or stems. Good examples are the palm trees including Archontophoenix cunninghamiana.

Eranthemoides: [e-ran-the-moi-deez] From Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary or outside, ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which very closely resemble the Anthemis genus or Chamomile without flowers. Good example is Isoglossa eranthemoides.

Erebescens: [er-e-bes-enz] From Erebescent, which is Latin for becoming reddish or blushing. It refers to the colour of the flowers having a reddish tinge. A good example is Melaleuca erubescens.

Erechtites: [e-rek-ti-teez] From Erekhtites, which is Ancient Greek for one of the kings possibly Attic or maybe Neptune. Rafinesque separated it from the genus Senecio. A good example is the introduced weed Erechtites valerianifolium var. valerianifolium.

Erect: [e-rek-t] From Erectus, which is Latin for upright in posture. It refers to plants, structures or organs, which are very erect. A good example is the stigma and pollen presenter on Grevillea incrassatta.

Erecta: [e-rek-ta] From Erectus, which is Latin for upright in posture. It refers to plants, structures or organs very erect. A good example is Plectorrhiza erecta.

Erectifolia: [e-rek-ti-foh-li-a] From Erectus, which is Latin for upright in posture and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are often erect along the stems. A good example is Eucalyptus erectifolia.

Erectifolium: [e-rek-ti-foh-li-um] From Erectus, which is Latin for upright in posture and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are often erect along the stems. A good example was Lasiopetalum erectifolium, which is presently listed as an unresolved name as Lasiopetalum sp. watheroo while waiting further investigation as to which species name it should be allocated.

Erectifolius: [e-rek-ti-foh-li-us] From Erectus, which is Latin for upright in posture and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are often erect along the stems. A good example is Chiloscyphus erectifolius.

Erectiloba: [e-rek-ti-loh-ba] From Erectus, which is Latin for upright in posture and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to leaf lobes which are stand erect along the rachis. A good example is Grevillea erectiloba.

Erecto-patent: [e-rek-toh, pei-tent] From Erectus, which is Latin for upright in posture and Petánnumi which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or to spread wide. It refers to plants, structures, or organs, which are not erect or horizontal but spreading at an angle between but are more spreading than erect. Agood example is Rorippa laciniata.

Erecto-plano: [e-rek-toh, plei-noh] From Erectus, which is Latin for upright in posture and Plānum which is Latin for a plain or flat. It refers to plants, structures, or organs, which are not erect or horizontal but spreading at an angle between but more erect than horizontal. Agood example is Rorippa laciniata.

Erectum: [e-rek-tum] From Erectus, which is Latin for upright in posture. It refers to plants, structures, or organs, which are very erect. Agood example is the sporophyll pedicels on the moss Leptostomum erectum.

Erectus: [e-rek-tus] From Erectus, which is Latin for upright in posture. It refers to plants, structures, or organs, which are very erect. Agood example is the sporophyll pedicels on the moss Walteranthus erectus.

Eremaea: [er-em-ee-a] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland. It refers to plants, which produce a single terminal flower on a shoot. A good example is Crotalaria eramea.

Eremaeum: [er-em-ee-um] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland. It refers to plants, which produce a single flower at the end of each lateral stem. A good example is Zygophyllum eremaeum.

Eremicola: [er-e-mi-koh-la] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland, Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which prefer dry open desert plains growing in solitude. A good example is Phyllanthus eremicus.

Eremicus: [er-e-mi-kus] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland. It refers to plants, which prefer dry open desert plains growing in solitude. A good example is Phyllanthus eremicus.

Eremigena: [er-em-i-je-na] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland and Genia, which is Ancient Greek for to be born. It refers to the plants, which grow solitarily in arid habitats. A good example is Arabidella eremigena.

Eremigenum: [er-em-i-je-num] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland and Genia, which is Ancient Greek for to be born. It refers to the plants, which prefer to grow solitarily in desert habitats. A good example is Sisymbrium eremigenum, which is now known as Arabidella eremigenaa.

Eremita: [er-e-mi-ta] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or waste and Genia, which is Ancient Greek for to be born. It refers to the plants, which are solitarily in desert habitats. A good example is Ptilotus gaudichaudii subsp. eremita.

Eremocarpus: [er-e-mo-kar-pus] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland and from Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to plants, which prefer habitats that are in dry open desert like plains where the fruits are produced in the dry season. A good example is the exotic weed Eremocarpus setigerus.

Eremochloa: [er-e-mo-kloh-a] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland and Khloa, which is Ancient Greek for a grass. It refers to the plants, which prefer habitats that are drier open desert plains. A good example is Eremochloa bimaculata.

Eremocitrus: [er-e-mo-si-trus] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland and from Kitron, which is Ancient Greek for a lemon or lime tree or Citron, which is Latin for lemon-yellow or the citrus tree. It refers to plants, which have habitats that are drier and rather poor. A good example is Eremocitrus glauca, which is now known as Citrus glauca.

Eremodéndron: [er-e-mo-den-dron] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland and Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree. It refers to trees, which have a preference for dry, poor environments. A good example is Jacksonia eremodéndron.

Eremophea: [er-e-mo-fee-a] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland. It refers to shrubs which prefer dry isolated environments. A good example is Eremophea aggregata.

Eremophila: [er-e-mo-fil-a] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland and from Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to the shrubs, which have a love of dry, open desert plains. A good example is Eremophila biggoniflora.

Eremophiloides: [er-e-mo-fil-oi-deez] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland and from Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for to be loved or loving and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the Eremophila genus. A good example is Acacia eremophiloides.

Eremophilum: [e-re-mo-fi-lum] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to the plants, which prefer to grow in environmental habitats that are dry open desert plains. A good example is Solanum eremophilum.

Eremophilus: [e-re-mo-fi-lus] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland and from Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to the plants, which prefer to grow in habitats that are dry open desert plains. A good example is Enneapogon eremophilus.

Eremopyxis: [e-re-mo-pahy-kis] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland and Pyxis, which is Ancient Greek for to open with a lid. It refers to sepals which resemble a lid opening in the bud stage. A good example is Eremopyxis camphorata which is now known as Triplarina camphorata.

Eremorum: [e-re-mor-um] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland and Morum which is Latin for a blackberry fruit. It refers to plants, which produce a single fruit or short spike from each leaf axis. A good example is Acalapha eremorum.

Eremosyne: [e-re-mo-sayn] From Erêmos/Eremaeios, which is Ancient Greek for a desert, arid or wasteland and Mosyne, which is Ancient Greek for solitude. It refers to the single seed in each cell. A good example is the monotypic species of Eremosyne pectinata.

Eria: [er-i-a] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for wool. It refers to perianths or labellum which are very woolly. A good example is the much sought after orchid Eria biflora.

Eriacantha: [er-i-a-kan-tha] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for wool and Ãkantha, which is Ancient Greek for a thorn. It refers to plants, which have thorns that are very woolly. A good example is Sclerolaena eriacantha.

Eriachne: [e-ri-ak-nee] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for wool and Akhne, which is Ancient Greek for chaff. It refers to the glumes which are covered in woolly like hairs. A good example is Eriachne glabrata.

Eriaeoides: [er-ee-a-oi-deez] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for wool and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Eria genus. A good example is the much sought after orchid Bryobium eriaeoides.

Erianacea: [e-rin-a-see-a] From Erinacea/Echīnātus, which is Latin for a hedgehog or very prickly. It refers to a leaves, which are often divided and have pungent apexes.

Eriantha: [e-ri-an-tha] From Erion which is Ancient Greek for wool and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are covered in a soft woolly down. A good example is Maireana eriantha.

Erianthoides: [e-ri-an-thoi-deez] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for wool, ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to grass florets which are covered in long soft woolly type hairs similar to the Eriantha genus. A good example is Bothriochloa erianthoides.

Erianthum: [e-ri-an-thum] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for wool and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flower spikes or other organs, which are covered in long soft woolly hairs. A good example is Rytidosperma erianthum.

Erianthus: [e-ri-an-thus] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for wool and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flower spikes or other organs, which are covered in long soft woolly hairs. A good example is Erianthus fulvus.

Erica: [e-ri-ka] From Erica, which is Latin for heath. It refers to plants, which grow in heaths or wallums. A good example is  the exotic garden plant Erica arborea.

Ericaea: [e-ri-see-a] From Erica, which is for a heath. It refers to plants, which grow in heath like environments. A good example is Baeckea ericaea.

Ericacea: [e-ri-ka-see-a] From Erica, which is for a heath and Acea, which is Latin for a family. It refers to plants, which grow in heath like environments and belong to the Family known as Ericacea. A good example is Leucopogon virgatus.

Ericaefolia: [e-ri-see-foh-li-a] From Erica, which is Latin for a heath and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble the European heaths in the Erica genus. A good example was Melaleuca ericaefolia that appears as a spelling error in some earlier editions and should be spelt as Melaleuca ericifolia.

Ericaefolium: [e-ri-see-foh-li-um] From Erica, which is Latin for a heath and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble the European Erica genus. A good example is Gompholobium ericaefolium.

Ericaefolius: [e-ri-see-foh-li-us] From Erica, which is Latin for a heath and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble the European heaths in the Erica genus. A good example is Ozothamnus ericaefolius.

Ericaeus: [e-ri-see-us] From Erica, which is Latin for a heath. It refers to plants, which grow in heath like environments. A good example is Homalocalyx ericaeus.

Ericeteum: [e-ri-se-te-um] From Ericetorum, which is Latin for of warmer, drier heathlands or moorlands or wallums. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow around warmer, drier or seasonal, swampy marshlands or in native wallums. A good example is Helichrysum ericeteum, which is now known as Ozothamnus ericifolium.

Ericeteus: [e-ri-se-te-us] From Ericetorum, which is Latin for of the heathlands or moorlands. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow around warmer, drier or seasonal, swampy marshlands or in native wallums. A good example is Ozothamnus ericeteus, which is now known as Ozothamnus ericifolium.

Ericetorum: [e-ri-se-tor-um] From Ericetorum, which is Latin for of the heathlands or moorlands. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow around warmer, drier or seasonal, swampy marshlands or in native wallums. A good example is Schoenus ericetorum.

Erichsenia: [e-rik-se-ni-a] Is named in honour of F. Ericsen an engineer of the Goldfields water scheme in Western Australia. A good example is Erichsenia uncinata.

Erichsenii: [e-rik-se-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of F. Ericsen an engineer of the Goldfields water scheme in Western Australia. A good example is Micromyrtus erichsenii.

Ericifolia: [e-ri-si-foh-li-a] From Erica, which is Latin for heath and Folia, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have foliage similar to the exotic Erica genus. A good example is Banksia ericifolia.

Ericifolium: [e-ri-si-foh-li-um] From Erica, which is Latin for heath and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have foliage similar to the exotic Erica genus. A good example is Gonocarpus ericifolium.

Ericifolius: [e-ri-si-foh-li-us] From Erica which is Latin for heath and Folius, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have foliage similar to the exotic Erica genus. A good example is Eriostemon ericifolius, which is now known as Philotheca ericifolia.

Ericina: [e-ri-si-na] From Erica, which is Latin for heath. It refers to plants, which prefer heathy habitats. A good example is Bredemeyera ericina, which is now known as Comesperma ericinum.

Ericinum: [e-ri-si-num] From Erica, which is Latin for heath. It refers to plants, which prefer heathy habitats or resemble the European heaths. A good example is Comesperma ericinum.

Ericiocarpa: [e-ri-si-o-kar-pa] From Erica, which is Latin for heath and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which resemble the fruits of the exotic Erica genus. A good example is Gnephosis eriocarpa.

Ericksonae: [e-rik-so-nee] Is named in honour of Frederika Lucy (Rica) Erickson; 1908-2009, who was an Australian amateur botanist, botanical artist and illustrator of her own work. A good example is Acacia ericksoniae.

Ericksoniae: [e-rik-so-ni-a] Is named in honour of Frederika Lucy (Rica) Erickson; 1908-2009, who was an Australian amateur botanist, botanical artist and illustrator of her own work. A good example is Acacia ericksoniae.

Ericoides: [e-ri-koi-deez] From Erica, which is Latin for heath and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have foliage similar to the exotic Erica genus. A good example is Platysace ericoides.

Ericomyrtus: [e-ri-ko-mer-tus] From Erica, which is Latin for heath and Mýrtos, which is Ancient Greek or much later Myrtillus which is Latin for the European Myrtle genus. It refers to plants, usually the leaves which resemble the exotic Myrtle genus. A good example is Ericomyrtus serpyllifolia.

Ericopsis: [eri-kop-sis] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for to look similar to. It refers to plants, which somewhat resemble the Erica heaths of Europe. A good example is Ericopsis formosa, which is now known as Lechenaultia tubiflora.

Erigeron: [e-ri-jer-on] From Eri, which is Ancient Greek for early and Geron, which is Ancient Greek for an old man. It refers to the pink flowers, which appear first thing in the early morning then later turn white and finally grey like an old man. A good example is Erigeron bellidioides.

Erimocola: [e-ri-mo-koh-la] From Erimos, which is Ancient Greek for a, Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or inhabit. It refers to plants, which grow in arid locations. A good example is Eucalyptus erimocola.

Erinacea: [e-rin-ei-see-uh] From Erinacea which is Latin for a hedgehog. It refers to plants, which have very rigid, pungent spines. A good example is Acacia erinacea.

Erinaceum: [e-rin-ei-see-uh m] From Erinacea, which is Latin for a hedgehog. It refers to plants, which have very rigid, pungent spines. A good example was Racosperma erinaceum, which is now known as Acacia erinacea.

Erinus: [e-ri-nuh s] From Erinus, which is Ancient Greek for a similar plant in Greece. It refers to a plants, which resembles the Erinus genus a name given by Dioscorides for a plant which resembled Basil. A good example is Lobelia erinus.

Erio: [e-ri-oh] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly.

Eriobotrya: [e-ri-oh-bo-trahy-a] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Botrys, which is Ancient Greek for a bunch of grapes. It refers to fruits which hang down like small bunches of grapes. A good example is the exotic horticultural Pipa tree (枇杷树) known locally as the Loquat, Eriobotyra japonica or the native Lachnostachys eriobotrya.

Eriocalia: [e-ri-oh-ka-li-a] From Erios, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for a covering or to cover up. It refers to flowers especially the buds, which are covered by rather large calyxes. A good example is Eriocalia leucocephala.

Eriocalyx: [e-ri-oh-ka-liks] From Erios, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Kályx/Kalýptein, which is Ancient Greek for specialized leaves which surround the immature bud which are often cupular in shape – calyx. It refers to calyxes which are covered in floccose hairs. A good example is Kunzea eriocalyx.

Eriocarpa: [e-ri-oh-kar-pa] From Erios, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are covered in long, soft, silky hairs. A good example is Tephrosia eriocarpa.

Eriocarpus: [e-ri-oh-kar-pus] From Erios, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are covered in long, soft, silky hairs. A good example is Convolvulus eriocarpus, which is now known as Ipomoea eriocarpa.

Eriocaulon: [e-ri-oh-kor-lon] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Kaulon, which is Ancient Greek or later Caulon, which is Latin for a stick, stem or branch. It refers to the stems or culms which are covered in long, soft, silky hairs. A good example is Eriocaulon australe.

Eriocephala: [e-ri-oh-ke/se-fa-la] From Erios, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to peduncles, pedicels, calyxes and sepals, which are covered in long, soft, silky, floccose hairs. A good example is Pomaderris eriocephala.

Eriocephalum: [e-ri-oh-ke/se-fahr-luh m] From Erios, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to peduncles, pedicels, calyxes and sepals, which are covered in long, soft, silky, floccose hairs. A good example is Helichrysum eriocephalum , which is now known as Ozothamnus eriocephalus.

Eriocephalus: [e-ri-oh-ke/se-fah-lus] From Erios, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to peduncles, pedicels, calyxes and sepals, which are covered in long, soft, silky, floccose hairs. A good example is Ozothamnus eriocephalus.

Eriochasma: [e-ri-oh-chaz/kahz-ma] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Chasma, which is Greek/Latin for a deep cleft or opening. It refers to leaves or at times other organs, which have deep clefts like a chasm. A good example was Eriochasma distans, which is now known as Cheilanthes distans.

Eriochila: [e-ri-oh-chi-lah] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to an orchid’s labellum being covered in long, silky, hairs. A good example is Corunastylis eriochila.

Eriochilum: [e-ri-oh-chi-lum] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to an orchid’s labellum being covered in long, silky, hairs. A good example is Genoplesium eriochilum.

Eriochilus: [eri-oh-chi-lus] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Cheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to an orchids’s labellum, which is covered in long, silky, almost floccose hairs. A good example is Eriochilus cucullatis.

Eriochiton: [eri-oh-kahy-ton] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Chiton, which is Ancient Greek for an ancient Greek dress. It refers to the buds and flowers, which appear to be wearing a floccose tunic. A good example is Eriochiton sclerolaenoides.

Eriochlamys: [e-ri-oh-klah-mis] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for a woolly and Khlamys, which is Ancient Greek for a cloak. It refers to the flower heads, which are entirely smothered in long, floccose, hairs until the individual flowers actually bloom. A good example is Eriochlamys behrii.

Eriochloa: [e-ri-oh-kloh-a] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Khloa, which is Ancient Greek for a grass. It refers to flowering spikes and glumes, which are covered in long, silky, hairs. A good example is Eriochloa villosa.

Erioclada: [eri-oh-kla-da] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or branch. It refers to stems which are covered in hairs or more often floccose type hairs. A good example is Acacia erioclada.

Eriocladium: [eri-oh-kla-di-um] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or branch. It refers to stems which are covered in hairs or more often floccose type hairs. A good example is Eriocladium pyramidatum.

Eriocladum: [eri-oh-kla-dum] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or branch. It refers to stems which are covered in hairs or more often floccose type hairs. A good example is Racosperma eriocladum, which is now known as Acacia erioclada.

Eriocladus: [eri-oh-kla-dus] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or branch. It refers to stems which are covered in hairs or more often floccose type hairs. A good example is Isopogon eriocladus.

Eriocmyrtus: [eri-mer-tus] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Myrtus, which is Latin for the Myrtle genus from European. It refers to plants, which resemble a wooly myrtle tree. A good example is Ericomyrtus drummondii.

Eriodiophyllum: [eri-oh-di-o-fahyl-lum] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are covered in short, silky, floccose hairs. A good example is Eriodiophyllum elderi.

Eriodium: [eri-oh-di-um] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly. It refers to the leaves or other structures, which are covered in short, silky, floccose hairs. A good example is Eriodium crinitum.

Eriogona: [eri-o-goh-na] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Goúna, which is Ancient Greek or Gunna, which is Latin for a leather strap or thong. It refers to stems, which are covered in short, silky, hairs. A good example is Brachyscome eriogona.

Eriogonum: [eri-o-goh-num] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Goúna, which is Ancient Greek or Gunna, which is Latin for a leather strap or thong. It refers to stems, which are covered in short, silky, hairs. A good example is Eriogonum cinereum.

Erioloma: [e-ri-o-loh-ma] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Loma, which is Ancient Greek for a fringe or edge. It refers to a structure or organ, which is sparsely to moderately covered in long, silky, hairs. A good example is the new growth, petioles and sepals of Pittosporum erioloma which are moderately covered in very long silky, floccose hairs.

Eriophora: [eri-o-for-a] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Phóros/Phérein, which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to a structure or organ, which is covered in short, silky, floccose hairs. A good example is Pultenaea eriophora.

Eriophorus: [eri-o-for-us] From Erion which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Phóros/Phérein which is Ancient Greek for to bear or bearing. It refers to a structure or organ, which is covered in short, silky, floccose hairs. A good example is Isopogon eriophorus.

Eriopoda: [eri-o-poh-da] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to the base of the tuft grasses, which resemble a woolly ball or club foot. A good example is Eragrostis eriopoda.

Eriopodum: [eri-o-poh-dum] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to the base of the tuft grasses, which resemble a woolly ball or club foot. A good example is Stylidium eriopodum.

Eriorhizum: [eri-o-rahy-zum] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Rhizum, which is Latin for a root. It refers to the base of the tufts around the roots, which are covered in woolly type hairs. A good example is Stylidium eriorhizum.

Eriosema: [e-ri-o-se-ma] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Sema, which is Ancient Greek for a standard, a sign or spur. It refers to an organ on a flower namely the standard petals, which is covered in long, silky, hairs and standing out like an advertising sign. A good example is Eriocema chinense.

Eriosphaera: [e-ri-oh-s-feer-a] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Sphaîra, which is Ancient Greek or Sphaera, which is Latin for a shere, global shape, globe or orb. It refers to fruits, which are distinctly orb shaped. A good example is Maireana eriosphaera.

Eriostachya: [e-ri-o-sta-sha] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek or later Stachys which is Latin  for a flower spike. It refers to the flower spikes which are covered in short, silky, hairs. A good example is Grevillea eriostachya.

Eriostemon: [e-ri-o-ste-mon] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Stemon, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower which includes both the filaments and anthers as a single unit. It refers to the flower’s stamens which are covered in short, silky, hairs. A good example is Eriostemon australasius.

Eriostemun: [e-ri-o-ste-mun] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Stemon, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower, which includes both the filaments and anthers as a single unit. It refers to the flower’s stamens, which are covered in short, silky, hairs. A good example is Myoporum eriostomum.

Eriotrichum: [e-ri-o-trahy-kum] From Erion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Trichos, which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to the structures and or organs, which are covered in long, soft, woolly hairs. A good example was Trichinium eriotrichum, which is now known as Ptilotus eriotrichus.

Erodium: [e-ri-o-di-mum] From Erodios, which is Ancient Greek for a heron. It refers to seed capsules, which have a long beak similar a heron’s beak. A good example is Erodium angustilobum.

Erosa: [e-roh-sa] From Erosus, which is Latin for gnawed. It refers to leaves or at times other organs, which appear as though the margins have been irregularly notched, toothed or chewed by insects. A good example is the ligules on Thelymitra erosa.

Erose: [e-rohs] From Erosus, which is Latin for gnawed. It refers to leaves or at times other organs, which appear as though the margins have been irregularly notched, toothed or chewed by insects. A good example is the ligules on Austrostipa ramosissima.

Erosema: [e-ro-se-ma] From Erosus, which is Latin for gnawed. It refers to leaves or at times other organs, which appear as though the margins have been irregularly notched, toothed or chewed by insects. A good example is the sepals on Eriosema chinensis.

Erosipetala: [e-ro-si-pe-ta-la] From Erosus, which is Latin for gnawed and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators. It refers to petals which appear as though the margins have been irregularly notched, toothed or chewed by insects. A good example is Calytrix erosipetala.

Erostre: [e-ros-tre] From Eros, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to red and black fruits, which are very beautiful that one could fall in love with them. A good example is Antidesma erostre.

Erostris: [e-ros-tris] From Eros, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to rushes which have a lot of appeal. A good example was Caustis erostris which is now known as Calorophus erostris.

Erosum: [e-ri-oh-sum] From Erosus, which is Latin for gnawed. It refers to leaves or at times another organ, which appear as though the margins have been irregularly notched, toothed or chewed by insects. A good example was Helichrysum erosum, which is now known as Helichrysum rosum var. rosum and which is also presently an unresolved name awaiting further classification.

Erosus: [e-ri-oh-sus] From Erosus, which is Latin for gnawed. It refers to leaves or at times another organ, which appear as though the margins have been irregularly notched, toothed or chewed by insects. A good example is Pachyrhizus erosus.

Erpetion: [er-pe-ti-on] From Erepetion, which is Latin for suddenly snatched and run away. It refers to the runners and the way they run across the ground surface. A good example was Erpetion hederaceum, which is now known as Viola hederacea.

Errabunda: [er-ra-bun-da] From Errō, which is Latin for wandering, roving or going astray and Bundus which is Latin for abundant. It may refer to plants which are found in larger numbers over variable types of arid habitats. A good example is Acacia errabunda.

Errabundum: [er-ra-bun-dum] Maybe from Err which is Latin for differing or variable and Bundus which is Latin for abundant. It refers to plants, which have an abundance of stems spreading irregularly outwards. A good example was Racosperma errabundum, which is now known as Acacia errabunda.

Errabundus: [er-ra-bun-dus] From Errō, which is Latin for wandering, roving or going astray and Bundus which is Latin for abundant. It refers to plants, which have an abundance of stems spreading irregularly outwards. A good example is Austrodolichos errabundus.

Errerana: [er-re-ra-na] From Errō, which is Latin for wandering, roving or going astray and maybe Rāna which is Latin for croaking. It may refer to fruits which appear like a frog throwing out it’s throat to croak or the croaking one may display on eating the very sour lemon fruits that actually make lemons taste sweet. A good example was Errerana wilcoxiana, which is now known as Acronychia wilcoxiana.

Errurraga: [er-ru-ra-ga] From Errō, which is Latin, for wandering, roving or going astray and maybe from raga which is for breaking rocks. It may refer to fungi which have the ability to grow on very poor rocky surfaces that break the normal rings associated with fungi and or the vents on the pileus to release the spore similar to volcanoes. A good example is Disciseda errurraga.

Erthrophleum: [er-thro-flee-um] From Eryth, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Phloema, which is Ancient Greek for the conductive tissues below the bark. It refers to the phloem, which turns scarlet-red when damaged. A good example is Erythrophleum chlorostachys.

Erubescens: [e-ru-be-senz] From Erubescentia, which is Ancient Greek for blushing. It is further derived from rubescere to turn red. It refers to plants, which have a reddish or pink flush in the flowers. A good example is Melaleuca erebescens.

Eruciformis: [er-u-si-for-mis] Maybe from Eruca, which is Latin for a leafy vegetable and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which are found in larger numbers over variable type of arid habitats. A good example is Brachiaria eruciformis.

Ervatamia: [er-va-ta-mi-a] From nadi-ervatum, which is Latinized from the Malay word for a local plant that is known by this name. A good local example is Ervatamia pandacaqui which is now known as Tabernaemontana pandacaqui.

Ervoides: [er-voi-deez] From órobos, which is Ancient Greek for a  vetch. It refers to plants, which resemble the modern day Vetch genus. A good example is the leaves on Indigofera ervoides.

Erycibe: [er-ahy-si-be] From Eryo, which is Ancient Greek for to drag and Kybe, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to vines often seen crawling across the rainforest floor to a support tree where it drags itself up the tree and the flowers appear in small loose heads. A good example is Erycibe coccinea.

Erymnocladum: [er-ahym-no-kla-dum] From Erymo, which is Latin for dry or a dry habitat and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stick, stem or small branch. It refers to stems or small branches, which have a very dry texture. A good example is Spyridium erymnocladum.

Erymophyllum: [er-ahy-mo-fahyl-lum] From Erymo, which is Latin for dry or a dry habitat and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves which have a very dry texture. A good example is Erymophyllum glossanthus.

Eryngioides: [e-ri-ji-noi-deez] From Errygion, which is Ancient Greek for holly sea and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the deep blue-purplish to blue or bluish-purple flowers, which resemble the Erygium genus in colour. A good example of the mystic deep blue flowers of Grevillea eryngioides.

Eryngium: [e-ri-ji-um] From Errygion which is Ancient Greek for holly sea and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus which is Latin for a woman. It refers to the deep blue-purplish to sea-blue or bluish-purple flowers including the female reproductive organs in some species. A good example of the mystic deep blue flowers of Eryngium ovinum.

Eryth: [e-rahyth] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red.

Erythraeu: [e-ri-three-a] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red or deep orange-red. It refers to structures or organs, which are scarlet-red. A good example is Centaurium erythraea, which has been moved to and fro with several names for over a century. Latest research indicates strongly that the Australian species could not be the same as the European species as they were tetraploid whereas the European species were diploid so they were again moved to the new/old genus from the original genus and species to Schenkia australis in 2004.

Erythraeum: [e-ri-three-um] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red or deep orange-red. It refers to structures or organs, which are scarlet-red. A good example is the pileus on Dendrobium erythraeum.

Erythraeus: [e-ri-three-us] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red or deep orange-red. It refers to structures or organs, which are scarlet-red. A good example is the pileus on Cortinarius erythraeus.

Erythrandra: [e-ri-thran -dra] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to stemens, filaments and or anthers, which are scarlet-red. A good example is Eucalyptus erythrandra.

Erythranthera: [e-ri-thran-ther-a] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers flowers, stamens, filaments and or anthers, which are scarlet-red. A good example was Erythranthera pallidum, which is now known as Rytidosperma pallidum.

Erythranthra: [e-ri-thran-thra] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to the flowers, stamens, filaments and or anthers, which are scarlet-red. A good example was Euphorbia erythrantha.

Erythrina: [e-ri-thrahy-na] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red. It refers to flowers, which are scarlet-red. A good example is the flowers on Erythrina vespertilio.

Erythrocala: [e-ri-thro-ka-la] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Cālae, which is Latin for a log to burn. It refers to scarlet-red fungi, which can grow quite profusely on logs giving a burning log appearance. A good example is Hygrocybe erythrocala.

Erythrocalyx: [e-ri-thro-ka-liks] From Erythros which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Kalyx, which is Ancient Greek for a cup. It refers to calyxes, which are scarlet-red. A good example is Syzygium erthrocalyx.

Erythrocarpa: [e-ri-thro-kar-pa] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the fruits, which are scarlet-red. A good example is Gahnia erythrocarpa.

Erythrocarpum: [e-ri-thro-kahr-puh m] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are scarlet-red when ripe. A good example is the orange-red fruits on Toechima erythrocarpum.

Erythrocarpus: [e-ree-thro-kar-pus] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are scarlet-red when ripe. A good example is the orange-red fruits on Psittacoschoenus erythrocarpus, which is now known as Gahnia sieberiana.

Erythrocephala: [e-ri-thro-ke/se-fa-la] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to pods, which are scarlet-red when ripe. A good example is Acacia erythrocephala.

Erythroclada: [e-ri-thro-kla-da] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a stick, stem or small branch. It refers to new growth stems, which are bright scarlet red. A good example is the orange-red fruits on Grevillea erythroclada.

Erythrococca: [e-ri-thro-koh-ka] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Kokos, which is Ancient Greek for a dry berry. It refers to dry berries, ripe fruits or seeds, which are scarlet-red when ripe. A good example is Melicope erythrococca, which is now known as Dinosperma erythrococcum.

Erythrococcum: [e-ri-thro-koh-kum] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Kokos, which is Ancient Greek for a dry berry. It refers to dry berries, ripe fruits or seeds, which are scarlet-red when ripe. A good example is Acacia erythrocephala.

Erythroconcha: [e-ri-thro-ko-cha] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and , which is Ancient Greek or Concha which is Latin for a coiled sea shell. It refers to an organ, which has the shape of a snail’s shell and is red. A good example is the lateral sepals on Pterostylis erythroconcha.

Erythrocorys: [e-ri-thro-kor-is] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Korys, which is Ancient Greek for a small helmet. It refers to flower buds especially the calyptras, which are scarlet red. A good example is Eucalyptus erythrocorys.

Erythrodoxum: [e-ri-thro-dok-sum] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Doxum, which is Ancient Greek for contrary to what is expected. It refers to flowers, which are red to scarlet-red along with the sepals whereas most species in the genus have white or cream flowers. A good example is Syzygium erythrodoxum.

Erythrogyne: [e-ri-thro-jahy-ne] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus which is Latin for a woman. It refers to the ovaries or carpels, which are scarlet red in the centre and green on the outside with the center resembling a woman’s vagina. A good example is the tall growing Western Australian sundew Drosera erythrogyne.

Erythronema: [e-ri-thro-nee-ma] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to the filaments on the stamens which are scarlet-red. A good example is Eucalyptus erythronema.

Erythrophleum: [e-ri-throh-flee-um] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Phloia, which is Ancient Greek for bark. It refers to the scarlet-red sap, which exudes from beneath the bark when damaged. A good example is Erythrophleum chlorostachys.

Erythrophloia: [e-ri-throh-floia] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Phloia, which is Ancient Greek for bark. It refers to the scarlet-red sap, which exudes from beneath the bark when damaged. A good example is Corymbia erythrophloia.

Erythrorchis: [e-ri-thror-kis] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Orchis, which is Ancient Greek for a man’s testicles. It refers to the orchids, (testicles) which have a reddish tinge through the yellow-ochre sepals. A good example is Erythrorchis cassythoides.

Erythrorhiza: [e-ri-thro-rahy-za] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and rhiza, which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to roots, which have a reddish colour. A good example is the sundew Drosera erythrorhiza.

Erythroxylon 1: [e-ri-throk-sahy-lon] From Eryth, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Xylon, which is Ancient Greek for wood. It refers to the inner live bark, layer turning red after being damaged or cut. A good example is Erythroxylon australe.

Erythroxylon 2: [e-ri-thro-sahy-lon] From Erythros, which is Ancient Greek for scarlet-red and Xylon, which is Ancient Greek for wood. It refers to timber which are scarlet-red. A good example is Cryptocarya erythroxylon.

Esculenta: [es-kyoo-len-ta] From ēsculentum, which is Latin for edible, to nourish or delicious. It refers to plants, which have good eating qualities. A good example is Colocasia esculenta.

Esculentum: [es-kyoo-len-tum] From ēsculentum, which is Latin for edible, to nourish or delicious. It refers to plants, which have good eating qualities. A good example is the common bracken fern Pteridium esculentum in which the new shoots use to be roasted and eaten.

Esculentus: [es-kyoo-len-tus] From ēsculentum, which is Latin for edible, to nourish or delicious. It refers to plants, which have good eating qualities. A good example is Cyperus esculentus.

Esenbeckii: [es-en-be-ki-ahy] Is named in honour of Esenbeck. A good example was Hypolaena esenbeckii, which is now known as Hypolaena exsulca.

Esiangkara: [e-si-ang-kar-a] From Esiang, which has an unknown derivation and Kara, which is Latin for precious or dearly loved. It refers to the beauty of the flowers. A good example is Tinospora esiangkara.

Esmerelda: [ez-mer-el-da] From Smáragdos, which is Ancient Greek and later Emeraelda, which was Spanish then Old French for emerald green. A good example was Ficus esmeralda which is now known as Ficus virgata var. virgata.

Espalier: [es-pa-li-er] From Spallier, which is Latin for a trellis. It refers to usually trees or at times larger shrubs that are trained to grow in two dimensions, usually along or against a fence, as opposed to topiary. A good example can be the growing and training of Syzygium smithii.

Esquamata: [es-kwu-ma-ta] From A/E, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Squamae, which is Latin for scaly. It refers to species, which do not have scales when compared to other species in the genus. A good example was Styphelia esquamata, which is now known as Leucopogon esquamatus.

Esquamatum: [es-kwu-ma-tum] From A/E, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Squamae, which is Latin for scaly. It refers to species, which do not have scales when compared to other species in the genus. A good example was Trichinium esquamatum, which is now known as Ptilotus esquamatus.

Esquamatus: [es-kwu-ma-tus] From A/E, which is Greek/Latin for without or not having and Squamae, which is Latin for scaly. It refers to species, which do not have scales when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Leucopogon esquamatus.

Essential Organs: [e-sen-shal, or-ganz] From Essencial, is which is Latin for an essence of a plant and Organon, which is Ancient Greek or Organum which is Latin for a group of tissues. It refers to the androecium and gynoecium – the male and female reproductive organs of a plant.

Estivation: [es-ti-va-shon] From aestivalis, which is Latin for an organism which only appears during the summer months. It refers to those organisms which sleep or remain dormant throughout the winter. A good example is found amongst many of our lady beetles including Apolinus lividigaster. Alternative spelling Aestivation.

Estrophiolata: [es-tro-fi-o-la-ta] From Oîstros, which is Ancient Greek for the Gadfly or Horse Fly and Pilos which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to the flies love of certain flowers. A good example of a flower that attracts the Gadfly is Acacia estrophiolata.

Estrophiolatum: [es-tro-fi-o-la-tum] From Oîstros, which is Ancient Greek for the Gadfly or Horse Fly and Pilos which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to the flies love of certain flowers. A good example of a flower that attracts the Gadfly was Racosperma estrophiolatum, which is now known as Acacia estrophiolata.

Esulifolia: [e-syoo-li-foh-li-a] From Esula, which is Latin from the Celtic word for sharp and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. Its reference is unclear however the foliage is similar to that of Euphorbia esula. A good example is Pimelea esulifolia.

Esulifolium: [e-syoo-li-foh-li-um] From Esula, which is Latin from the Celtic word for sharp and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. Its reference is unclear however the foliage is similar to that of Euphorbia esula. A good example is Comesperma esulifolium.

Esuriale: [e-syoo-ri-a-le] From ēsuriōnum which is Latin for to eat or hungry. It refers to some aboriginal vernacular for fruits or at times other organs, which are edible. A good example is Solanum esuriale.

Etaeria: [e-tee-ri-a] From Eetaireia/Hetaireia, which is Ancient Greek for an aggregate fruit. It refers to fruits, which comprise of many small drupes joined together as a single fruit. A good example was Etaeria polygonoides, which is now known as Rhomboda polygonoides.

Etheliana: [e-the-li-a-na] Is named in honour of Ethel Gray Blackall Nee Eldrid the wife of William Edward Blackall; 1876-1941, who were English born Australians. He was a medical practitioner and botanist in Western Australia. A good example is Verticordia etheliana.

Ethereal Oil Producing Glands: [e-ther-el, oil, pro-dyoo-sing, glandz] It usually It refers to the aromatic compound producing glands found on various parts of the plant. The function of most of the oils at this stage is still generally unknown to botanists however is known in some cases to act as insect attractants or deterrents. A good example of an insect detterant is Prostanthera ovalifolia.

Ethnobotanist: [eth-no-bo-tan-ist] From Ethnos, which is Ancient Greek for a race of people, Botany which is Ancient Greek for the science of plants and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies the “flora lore” amongst primitive Tribes.

Ethuliopsis: [e-thyoo-li-op-sis] From Ethulios, which is Ancient Greek for an and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for appears. It refers to a plant which appears to be another plant. A good example is the present confusion with Ethuliopsis dioica that at the time of writing is again in limbo land.

Etlingera: [et-lin-jer-a] From Etlingera, which maybe Latinized from the Borneo vernacular for the genus of Lilies originally discovered there. A good example is Etlingera australasica.

Etliolate: [et-li-o-leit] From étioler, which is Latinized from old French for to blanch or to become straw like. It refers to structures or organs, which have paled through a lack of sunlight. A good example is Etlingera australasica.

Etymology: [e-ti-mo-lo-jee] From étumon which is Ancient Greek for the true sense, Logía which is Ancient Greek for an in depth study and Lógos which is Ancient Greek for a word. It refers to a the study of the origin and true meaning of the words with the explanations of what the words meaning and how they sounded when originally used in the text.

Eu: [yoo-] From Eu, which is Greek a prefix for wrapped up or well covered.

Eucalptoides: [yoo-kal-toi-deez] From Eû, which is a Greek prefix for good or well and Kalúptō, which is Ancient Greek for to cover up and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the similarity of the leaves to those of the Eucalyptus genus. A good example is Xanthóstemon eucalyptoides which is now classified as being restricted to New Guinee.

Eucalypticum: [yoo-ka-lip-ti-kum] From Eû, which is a Greek prefix for good or well and Kalúptō, which is Ancient Greek for to cover up. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in the mulch made from Eucalyptus leaves and bark. A good example is Tricholoma eucalypticum.

Eucalypticus: [yoo-ka-lip-ti-kus] From Eû, which is a Greek prefix for good or well and Kalúptō, which is Ancient Greek for to cover up. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in the mulch made from Eucalyptus leaves and bark. A good example is the white scale insect Pseudococcus eucalypticus, which is found on many Eucalyptus species.

Eucalyptifolia: [yoo-ka-lip-ti-foh-li-ah] From Eû, which is a Greek prefix for good or well and Kalúptō, which is Ancient Greek for to cover up and Folius, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble those of the Eucalyptus genus. A good example was the parasitic plant Muellerina eucalyptifolia, which is now known as Muellerina eucalyptoides and is found on mainly Eucalyptus species.

Eucalyptifolius: [yoo-ka-lip-ti-foh-li-us] From Eû, which is a Greek prefix for good or well and Kalúptō, which is Ancient Greek for to cover up and Folius, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble those of the Eucalyptus genus. A good example was Elaeocarpus eucalyptifolius, which is now known as Elaeocarpus obovatus.

Eucalyptiformis: [yoo-kah-lip-ti-for-mis] From Eû, which is a Greek prefix for good or well and Kalúptō, which is Ancient Greek for to cover up and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to leaves which resemble those of the Eucalyptus genus. A good example was Hakea eucalyptiformis, which is now known as Hakea eriantha.

Eucalyptoides: [yoo-ka-lip-toi-deez] From Eû, which is a Greek prefix for good or well and Kalúptō, which is Ancient Greek for to cover up and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the similarity of the leaves to those of the Eucalyptus genus. A good example is Xanthóstemon eucalyptoides.

Eucalyptophylla: [yoo-kah-lip-to-fahyl-la] From Eû, which is a Greek prefix for good or well and Kalúptō, which is Ancient Greek for to cover up and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or leaves. It refers to leaves, which resemble typical leaves that are found in the Eucalyptus genus. A good example is Parsonsia eucalyptophylla.

Eucalyptorum: [yoo-kah-lip-tor-um] From Eû, which is a Greek prefix for good or well and Kalúptō, which is Ancient Greek for to cover up. It refers to the Pileus, which bends down at the margins thus it covers the stalk and gills well from the weather. A good example is Gymnopilus eucalyptorum.

Eucalyptus: [yoo-ka-lip-tus] From Eû, which is a Greek prefix for good or well and Kalúptō, which is Ancient Greek for to cover up. It refers to the stamens, which have a lid or cover over them in the bud stage prior to opening. A good example is Eucalyptus resinifera.

Eucamptodromous: [yoo-kam-to-dro-mos] From Eû, which is a Greek prefix for good or well, Akamptos, which is Ancient Greek for rigid or stiff and Dromos, which is Ancient Greek for running. It refers to a single primary vein, which runs through to the apex of the leaf, while the secondary veins curve towards the apex and gradually diminish distally within the margin. A good example is the Asian and Northern Australian Dioscorea bulbifera, which is establishing a name as a noxious weed in many countries overseas and is starting to infiltrate forests in southern Queensland and has recently been discovered near Grafton growing wild.

Dioscorea bulbifera, which is showing sings of a weed in southern Qld. and northern NSW.

Eucarya: [yoo-kar-ee-a] From Eu, which is a Greek prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Karyon, which is Ancient Greek for a walnut. It refers to fruits, which have a large stone. A good example is Eucarya acuminata.

Eucentrica: [yoo-sen-tri-ka] From Eu, which is a Greek prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Centric, which is Latin for to have a central point. It refers to calyptras which are placed central perfect on the hypanthium. A good example was Eucalyptus eucentrica, which is now known as Eucalyptus socialis subsp. eucentrica.

Euchila: [yoo-chil-a] From Eu, which is Greek for wrapped up or well covered and Kheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to the wing petals, which entirely cover the keel petals. A good example is Pultenaea euchila.

Euchilus: [yoo-chil-us] From Eu, which is a Greek prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Kheilos, which is Ancient Greek for a lip. It refers to the wing petals which are well spread over the keel petals. A good example is Pultenaea euchila.

Euchiton: [yoo-kahy-ton] From Eu, which is a Greek prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Khiton, which is Ancient Greek for a tunic. It refers to flowers, which are surrounded by bracteoles that resemble a tunic. A good example is Euchiton sphaericus.

Euclea: [yoo-klee-a] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for a prefix to be wrapped up or well covered and Kleos, which is Ancient Greek for glory. It refers to the beautiful timber. A good example is the garden plant from Africa known as Euclea natalensis.

Eucryphia: [yoo-krahy-fi-a] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for a prefix to be wrapped up or well covered and Kryphios, which is Ancient Greek for to cover up. It refers to sepals which wrap almost completely around the petals. A good example is Eucryphia jinksii.

Eucyperus: [yoo-sahy-per-us] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for a prefix for to be wrapped up or well covered and Kyperus, which is Ancient Greek for a sedge. It refers to the lemmas on grass, which almost wrap completely around the flowers. A good example was Eucyperus tenellus, which is now known as Carex goodenowii.

Eudesmia: [yoo-des-mi-a] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for a prefix to be wrapped up or well covered and Desmós, which is Ancient Greek for a band, chain or bundle. It refers to the way the flowers are bundled closely together. A good example was Eudesmia eucalyptoides, which is now known as Eucalyptus eucalyptiodes.

Eudesmioides: [yoo-des-mi-oi-deez] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for a prefix to be wrapped up or well covered and Desmós, which is Ancient Greek for a band, chain or bundle. It refers to a leaves, which resemble the old Eudesmia genus. A good example is Eucalyptus eudesmioides.

Eugenea: [yoo-jee-ni-a] Is named in honour of Prince Francois Eugene de Savoi-Carigan; 1663-1736, who developed a Botanical Garden near Venice and was a patron of biology. The correct spelling is actually Eugenia. A good example is the fresh water algae Audouinella eugenea.

Eugeneiodes: [yoo-jee-ni-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Prince Francois Eugene de Savoi-Carigan; 1663-1736, who developed a Botanical Garden near Venice and was a patron of biology and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the leaves being similar to those of the Eugenea genus. A good example is Eucalyptus eugeneiodes.

Eugenia: [yoo-jee-ni-a] Is named in honour of Prince Francois Eugene de Savoi-Carigan; 1663-1736, who developed a Botanical Garden near Venice and was a patron of biology. A good example is Eugenia reinwardtiana.

Eugeniae: [yoo-jee-ni-ee] Is named in honour of Prince Eugene of Savoy; 1663-1736, who was a French Born Austrian military tactition with an immaculate reputation. A good example is Josephinia eugeniae.

Eukaryotic: [yoo-ka-rahy-o-tik] From Eu, which is Greek a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Káruon, which is Ancient Greek for a nut or kernel. It refers to any softer, usually, edible part of a nut, seed, or fruit stone contained within a much harder shell. The kernel of a walnut is taken as the edible portion or at times it includes the shell and inner edible core.

Eulalia: [yoo-la-li-a] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for a prefix to be wrapped up or well covered and Lalo, which is Ancient Greek for spoken. It refers to plants, which are from the genus being well spoken about. A good example is the grass Eulalia aurea.

Eulobata: [yoo-lo-ba-ta] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for wrapped up or well covered and Lobata, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to organs, which have lobes. A good example is Melaleuca eulobata.

Eulophia: [yoo-lo-fi-a] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for a prefix to be wrapped up or well covered and Lophos, which is Ancient Greek for a plume or crest. It refers to the crest like callus on the labellum of orchids. A good example is orchid Eulophia pelorica.

Eumundi: [yoo-mun-di] From Eumundi, which is Latinized from the local area near Nambour in south east Queensland. It refers to the plants, which were first discovered around the Eumundi district. A good example is Alaeocarpus eumundi.

Eungellensis: [yoon-jel-len-sis] From Eungella, which is Latinized from Eungella National Park and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Eungella National Park. A good example is Acronychia eungellensis.

Eunomia: [yoo-no-mi-a] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for well covered or good and Nomia, order as in a court of law. It refers to the order of flowers along the spike. A good example is Eunomia cochlearina, which is now known as Phlegmatospermum cochlearinum.

Euodia: [yoo-o/oh-di-a] From Euodia, which is Ancient Greek for a sweet smell. It refers to leaves or fruits, which have a sweet aroma. A good example is Euodia elleryana which was known as Melicope elleryana.

Euodiiformis: [yoo-o-di-for-mis] From Euodia, which is Ancient Greek for a sweet smell and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to leaves or fruits, which have the shape or form of the Euvodia genus. A good example is Acradenia euodiiformis.

Euonymus: [yoo-o-nahy-mus] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Onymous, which is Ancient Greek for a name. It refers to the flowers, which are well covered by the sepals and being well spoken about by botanists. A good example is Euonymous australiana.

Eupatorioides: [yoo-pa-tor-i-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Mithridates VI from Old Persian the “gift of Mithra”; 135–63 BC who supposedly discovered an antidote to a poison found in one of the species and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Eupatorea genus. A good example is Trymalium eupatorioides, which is now known as Spyridium parvifolium

Euphemiae: [yoo-fe-mi-ee] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for wrapped up or well covered and Phēmí, which is Ancient Greek for to speak. It refers to the wrinkled seeds, which somewhat resemble lips and are well covered in the bell shaped fruits. A good example was Rhadinothamnus euphemiae, which is now known as Codonocarpus cotinifolius.

Euphleba: [yoo-fle-ba] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Phleps, which is Ancient Greek for a vein. It is usually used as a prefix which indicates the type of vein pattern or strength of the veins that cover the organs surface.

Euphlebia: [yoo-fle-bi-a] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Phleps, which is Ancient Greek for a vein. It refers to structures or organs, which have a feint, irregular reticulated vein network. A good example is Pouteria euphlebia.

Euphorbia: [yoo-for-bi-a] Is named in honour of Euphorbus; 52BC-23AD,who was King Juba’s physician and married the daughter of Anthony and Cleopatra. His work included the strong Laxative powers of Euphorbia obtusifolia which King Juba named in his honour. A good Australian example is Euphorbia tannensis.

Euphorbiaceae: [yoo-for-bi-a-see-e] Is named in honour of Euphorbus; 52BC-23AD, who was King Juba’s physician and married the daughter of Anthony and Cleopatra. His work included the strong Laxative powers of Euphorbia obtusifolia which King Juba named in his honour and Aceae which is Latin for a family. It refers to any plant which is in the Euphorbiaceae family. A good example is Croton verreauxii.

Euphorbioides: [yoo-for-bi-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Euphorbus; 52BC-23AD, who was King Juba’s physician and married the daughter of Anthony and Cleopatra. His work included the strong Laxative powers of Euphorbia obtusifolia which King Juba named in his honour and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the Euphobia genus in appetence. A good example is Daviesia euphorbioides.

Euphrasia: [yoo-fra-si-a] From Euphrosyne, which is Ancient Greek for the Goddess for happiness and to delight. It refers to the type specimens having the power to deliver a person into a Euphorbic state of happiness. A good example is Euphrasia collina.

Euphrasioides: [yoo-fra-si-oi-deez] From Euphrosyne, which is Ancient Greek for the Goddess for happiness and to delight and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Euphrasia genus. A good example is Prostanthera cryptandroides subsp. euphrasioides.

Euroensis: [yoo-roh-en-sis] From Euroa, which is Latinized for the township of Euroa and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants which were first discovered near the township of Euroa in central Victoria. A good example is Philotheca euroensis.

Eupomatia: [yoo-po-ma-ti-a] From Eu, which is Greek a prefix for good or well and Pomation, which is Ancient Greek for a small cap. It refers to the flower buds having a small cap. A good example is Eupomatia laurina.

Europaea: [yoo-roh-pee-ah] From Eurys, which is Ancient Greek for broad and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble closely related plants that grow in Europe. A good example is the commercial Olive tree of Europe, Olea europaea and the south Australasian olive Olea paniculata.

Euroschinus: [yoo-roh-shi-nus] From Euros, which is Ancient Greek for south eastern and Schinus, which is Ancient Greek for the Pistachio nut. It refers to trees, which resemble the Pistachio trees. A good example is Euroschinus falcatus var. falcatus.

Eurotioides: [yoo-roh-ti-oi-deez] From Euros, which is Ancient Greek for south eastern and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble. A good example is Sclerolaena eurotioides.

Euryanthera: [yoo-rahy-an-ther-a] From Eurys, which is Ancient Greek for broad and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which are broader than longer. A good example is Aglaia euryanthera.

Eurybia: [yoo-rahy-bi-a] From Eurybia, which is Ancient Greek for a daughter of Pontus, and Gaea, who was a sea goddess. It refers to plants, which were first discovered grow along the coast and on the shores of the salt lakes. A good example is Eurybia aculeata, which is now known as Olearia ramulosa.

Eurybioides: [yoo-rahy-bi-oi-deez] From Eurybia, which is Ancient Greek for a daughter of Pontus and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have a close resemblance to the Eurybia genus. A good example is Prostanthera eurybioides.

Eurybiopsis: [yoo-rahy-bi-op-sis] From Eurybia, which is Ancient Greek for a daughter of Pontus, and Gaea, who was a sea goddess and Opsis, which is a Greek suffix for to have a similarity to the prefix. It refers to plants, which were first discovered grow along the coast in New Zealand. A good example is Eurybiopsis hookeri, which is now known as Vittadinia australis.

Eurycarpa: [yoo-rahy-kar-pa] From Eurys, which is Ancient Greek for broad and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are broader than other species in the genus. A good example is Wahlenbergia eurycarpa.

Eurychorda: [yoo-rahy-kor-da] From Eurys, which is Ancient Greek for broad and Khord, which is Ancient Greek for a cord. It refers to seeds, which hang by a broad or thickened thread when ripe and ready for dispersal. A good example is Eurychorda complanata.

Eurycles: [yoo-rahy-kles] From Eurys, which is Ancient Greek for broad and Kleia, which is Ancient Greek for to close. It refers to flowers, which opening one at a time over a long period. A good example is Eurycles amboinensis, which is now known as Proiphys amboinensis.

Euryloba: [yoo-rahy-loh-ba] From Eurys, which is Ancient Greek for broad and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to lobes, which are much broader especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Daviesia euryloba.

Eurynema: [yoo-rahy-ne-ma] From Eurys, which is Ancient Greek for broad and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to structures or organs, which have fine flattened threads. A good example is Cayratia eurynema.

Euryomyrtus: [yoo-rahy-oh-mer-tus] From Eurys, which is Ancient Greek for broad and Myrtos, which is Ancient Greek for the myrtle trees of Europe. It refers to a leaves, which resemble the European myrtles. A good example is Euryomyrtus ramosissima subsp. ramosissima.

Euryphylla: [yoo-rahy-fahyl-la] From Eurys, which is Ancient Greek for broad and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which are much broader when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Angophora euryphylla.

Euryphyllum: [yoo-rahy-fahyl-lum] From Eurys, which is Ancient Greek for broad and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which are much broader when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is the leaves on Gastrolobium euryphyllum.

Euryphyllus: [yoo-rahy-fahyl-lus] From Eurys, which is Ancient Greek for broad and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds, which are much broader when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is the leaves on Corchorus tridens var. euryphyllus.

Euryspermus: [yoo-rahy-sper-mus] From Eurys, which is Ancient Greek for broad and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to seeds, which are much broader especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Aponogeton euryspermus.

Eurystoma: [yoo-rahy-stoh-ma] From Eurys, which is Ancient Greek for broad and Stóma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to plants, which have broad mouth like openings on the surface usually on the leaves. A good example is Habenaria eurystoma.

Eusocial: [yoo-soh-shal] From Eu, which is Greek a prefix for wrapped up or well covered, Soci, which is Latin for us as in partners and Alis, which is Latin for comrade. It refers to social insects or Crustaceans, which live and work socially for the benefit of all the members of their community caring for the brood of off spring from other individuals with a division of labour into reproductive and non reproductive groups. Good examples are the Tetragonula species of native bees and Amitermes meridionalis the termites of which is just one of the 295 odd species of termites which mainly consumes grass and do not enter homes.

Eusporangiate: [yoo-spor-an-ji-eit] From Eu, which is Greek a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and sporangia which is Latin for the spores as a group in ferns or bryophytes. It refers to a plants, which have the sporangium develop from a lot of leaf tissue as opposed to only one or a few cells.

Sporangium develops from group of superficial cells. These cells divide periclinally into primary wall layers and inner primary sporogenous cells (Fig.2A, B).The outer wall layers form the wall of the sporangium while inner sporogenous cells divide meiotically and form spores.

http: //www.biologydiscussion.com/pteridophytes

Eustachii: [yoo-stah-chi-ahy] Is named in honour of Woloszczak, Eustach; 1835-1918, who was a Polish botanist and author. A good example is Bulbostylis eustachiis.

Eustele: [yoo-stee l] From Eu, which is Greek a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Histanai, which is Ancient Greek and later Stele, which is Greek for a column or a group of columns or Stare which is Latin for a column or a group of columns. It refers to an arrangement of xylem and phloem cells into discrete strands separated by parenchymatous tissue.

Eusteles

Eustrephus: [yoo-stre-fus] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Strepho, which is Ancient Greek for to twist. It refers to plants, which have a strong climbing habit twisting around everything. A good example is Eustrephus latifolius.

Eustylis: [yoo-stahy-lis] From Eu, which is Ancient Greek for a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column. It refers to styles, which cover the apex of the fruits even as they enlarge to maturity. A good example is Rorippa eustylis.

Eutacta: [yoo-tak-ta] From Eu, which is Greek a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Tactica, which is Ancient Greek for not comparable or Taxia, which is Ancient Greek for to be properly arranged in order. It refers to describing the leaves and or branches which are well arranged along the stems. A good example was Eutacta cunninghamii, which is now known as Araucaria cunninghamii.

Eutassa: [yoo-tas-sa] From Eu, which is Greek a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Tactica, which is Ancient Greek for not comparable or Taxia, which is Ancient Greek for to be properly arranged in order. It refers to describing the leaves and or branches which are well arranged along the stems. A good example was Eutassa cunninghamii, which is now known as Araucaria cunninghamii.

Eutaxia: [yoo-tak-si-a] From Eu, which is Greek a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Taxia, which is Ancient Greek for to be properly arranged in order. It refers to describing the leaves which are well arranged along the stems. A good example is Eutaxia obovata.

Eutaxioides: [yoo-tak-si-oi-deez] From Eu, which is Greek a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Taxia, which is Ancient Greek for to be properly arranged in order. It refers to describing the leaves which are well arranged along the stems. A good example is Hemigenia eutaxioides, which is now known as Hemigenia teretiuscula.

Euthales: [yoo-tha-les] From Eu, which is Greek a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and is named in honour of Thales; 624?–546? BC, who was a Greek Phílosopher, mathematician, and astronomer, born in Miletus. He held the view that water was the origin of all things and also predicted the solar eclipse of May 28, 585BC. A good example is Euthales filiformis, which is now known as Velleia trinervis.

Euthycarpa: [yoo-thahy-kar-pa] From Euthy, which is Greek appears to be for vulgar or self (maybe self-vulgarism in wit. The meaning is not really clear.) and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which on investigation have the following characteristics in that they are coriaceous or at times crustaceous or glabrous all on the same tree. (Vulgar – lack of good breeding or taste) A good example is Acacia euthycarpa.

Euthycarpum: [yoo-thahy-kar-pum] From Euthy, which is Ancient Greek appears to be for vulgar or self (maybe self-vulgarism in wit. The meaning is not really clear.) and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which on investigation have the following characteristics in that they are coriaceous or at times crustaceous or glabrous all on the same tree. (Vulgar – lack of good breeding or taste) A good example is Racosperma euthycarpum, which is now known as Acacia euthycarpa.

Euthyphyla: [yoo-thahy-fahyl-lua From Euthy which is Ancient Greek appears to be for vulgar or self (maybe self-vulgarism in wit. The meaning is not really clear.) and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or Phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which on investigation have the following characteristics in that they are coriaceous or at times crustaceous or glabrous all on the same tree. (Vulgar – lack of good breeding or taste) A good example is Acacia euthyphylla.

Euthyphyllum: [yoo-thahy-fahyl-lum] From Euthy, which is Ancient Greek appears to be for vulgar or self (maybe self-vulgarism in wit. The meaning is not really clear.) and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf or phyllode. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which on investigation have the following characteristics in that they are coriaceous or at times crustaceous or glabrous all on the same tree. (Vulgar – lack of good breeding or taste) A good example is Racosperma euthyphyllum, which is now known as Acacia euthyphylla.

Eutrophication: [yoo-tro-fi-kei-shon] From Eu, which is Greek a prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Trephein, which is Ancient Greek for sound nutrition. It refers to soils or water which is rich in minerals and organic nutrients that consequently promote the; abnormal, ultimate growth in vegetable matter. It is usually seen in algal blooms which deprives shallow, still or slow moving water or surface water of oxygen.

Eutrophication of dam Sha Ping Ba showing Lemna minutum in full bloom.

Euzeylanicum: [yoo-zahy-la-ni-kum] From Eû which is Ancient Greek for well, Zeylanca, which is Latin for Sri Lanca. It refers to the halotype specimens originating from Sri Lanca formally known as Ceylon. A good example is Trichodesma zeylanicum subsp. euzeylanicum.

Evae: [e-vee] The etymology escapes me here unless it has been taken from the Spanish abbreviation and Latinized. “El verdadero amor espera” which translates as True love waits. It could refer to the plants being attractive but not pretty enough for anyone to fall in love with it and want to grow it. It may also refer to children who use to pick the mature flower heads with ripe seeds and blow on them repeating She/he loves me she/he doesn’t love me until all the seeds had been blown off. Or pick the flowers and repeat while discarding one petal at a time. A good example is Picris evae.

Evandra: [e-van-dra] From Evandra, which is a Greek prefix for wrapped up or well covered and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to the anthers, which are a very prominently displayed feature during flowering. A good example is Evandra pauciflora.

Evanescens: [e-van-es-enz] From ēvānēscēns, which is latin for to vanish or disappear. It refers to flowers , which fade a way prematurly early as opposed to Cadūcum, which drop immediately or before without shrivelling. A good example is Grevillea evanescens.

Evanescent: [e-va-ne-sent] From ēvānēscēns, which is latin for to vanish or disappear. It refers to flowers , which fade a way prematurly early as opposed to Cadūcum, which drop immediately or before without shrivelling. A good example is the flowers on Caladenia evanescens.

Evanidium: [e-va-ni-dium] From ēvānēscēns, which is Latin for to vanish or disappear. It refers to flowers, which fade a way prematurly early as opposed to Cadūcum, which drop immediately or before without shrivelling.

Evanulosa: [ee-van-yoo-loh-sa] From Ex, which is Latin for out of the ordinary or out of and Vēnōsum, which is Latin for veins. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which appear not to have veins. A good example is Acacia evenulosa.

Evanulosum: [ee-van-yoo-loh-sum] From Ex, which is Latin for out of the ordinary or out of and Vēnōsum, which is Latin for veins. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which appear not to have veins. A good example is Racosperma evenulosum, which is now known as Acacia evenulosa.

Evansiana: [e-van-si-a-na] Is named in honour of Thomas Evans Chapman; 1788-1864, who was a British landscape artist who later collected and studied plants from Malaysia. A good example is Grevillea evansiana.

Evansianas: [e-van-si-a-nas] Maybe named in honour of Thomas Evans Chapman; 1788-1864, who was a British landscape artist who later collected and studied plants from Malaysia. A good example is Grevillea evansianas.

Evansianum: [e-van-si-a-num] Maybe named in honour of Thomas Evans Chapman; 1788-1864, who was a British landscape artist who later collected and studied plants from Malaysia. A good example is Lepidosperma evansianum.

Evansianus: [e-van-si-ea-nus] Maybe named in honour of Thomas Evans Chapman; 1788-1864, who was a British landscape artist who later collected and studied plants from Malaysia. A good example is the Norfolk Island grounsel, Senecio evansianus.

Evasa: [ee-vei-sa] From Eēvāsum, which is Latin to evade or be evasive. It refers to plants, which are often neglected or are difficult to locate in their natural habitat/environment. A good example was Karorchis evasa, which is now known as Bulbophyllum evasum.

Evasum: [ee-vei-sum] From ēvāsum, which is Latin to evade or be evasive. It refers to plants, which are often neglected or are difficult to locate in their natural habitat or environment. A good example is the small orchid Bulbophyllum evasum.

Evecta: [ee-vek-ta] Possibly from Ex which is Ancient Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary and ēvectum, which is Latin to carry out or carry away. It refers to plants, which have structures or organs, which are carried aloft or away from the main structure. A good example is the spores capsules on Angiopteris evecta.

Eveltria: [ee-vel-tri-a] From eveltria which is unknown. A good example of the name was Eveltria multiflora, which is now known as Orthrosanthus multifloris.

Even Binate: [ee-ven- Bi-neit] From Bi/Bis, which are Greek/Latin for two. It refers to leaves or fronds, which are placed opposite along the stem or rachis, with the apical pair being opposite. A good example is the pinnae on Nephrolepsis cordata.

Evenulosa: [e-van-yoo-loh-sa] From Venosus, which is Latin for with veins. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have a conspicuous; though at times faint, anastomosis venation. A good example is Acacia evenulosa.

Evenulosum: [e-van-yoo-loh-sum] From Venosus, which is Latin for with veins. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have a conspicuous; though at times faint, anastomosis venation. A good example is Racosperma evenulosum, which is now known as Acacia evenulosa.

Evergreen: [e-ver-green] It refers to staying fresh and green all year. It refers to plants, that do not lose all their foliage all at once, when the weather turns cold or at the end of the dry season. A good example of an evergreen tree is Syzygium australe.

Everistia: [e-ver-is-ti-a] Is named in honour of Dr. L. Selwyn Everist; 1913-1981, who was a Director of the Queensland Herbarium from 1954-1976. A good example is Everistia vacciniifolia var. nervosa.

Everistiana: [e-ver-is-ti-a-na] Is named in honour of Dr Selwyn L. Everist; 1913-1981, who was a Director of the Queensland Herbarium from 1954-1976. A good example is Sclerolaena everistiana.

Everistii: [e-ver-is-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Dr. L. Selwyn Everist; 1913-1981, who was a Director of the Queensland Herbarium from 1954-1976. A good example is Acacia everistii.

Eversa: [ee-ver-sa] From ēversā, which is Latin for swept up or cleaned out. It may refer to plants, which have a very restricted distribution or disjunct distribution thus have been cleaned out of other locations or swept into one area. A good example is Everistia vacciniifolia.

Evident: [e-vi-dent] From evidens, which is Latin in clear sight or clearly understood. It refers to be clearly visible macroscopically. A good example is the ray florets on Brachyscome sturtii.

Evodia: [e-voh-di-a] From Euodia, which is Ancient Greek for a sweet smell. It refers to the misspelling of Euodia, in which the flowers and fruits have a sweet scent or herbal like scent. A good example was Evodia elleryana, which is now known as Melicope elleryana.

Evodiella: [e-voh-di-e-la] From Euodia, which is Ancient Greek for a sweet smell and Ella which is Latin for the feminine form. It refers to plants , which resemble the Euodia genus in many aspects but smaller, like a little sister. A good example was Evodiella muelleri, which is now known as Meliocarpa rubra.

Evolution: [e-vo-loo-shon] From ēvolūtiō, ēvolūtiōnis which are Latin for unfolding, to unroll or opening a book. It refers to the unfolding of one species into a variety, subspecies and with further changes usually because of environmental or predatory conditions eventually becoming a new species, genus etc. A good example is

Evolvulus: [e-vol-vyoo-lus] From Evolvus, which is a Latin prefix for not twinning. It refers to creepers or vines which do not have the characteristic twining habit. A good example is Evolvulus alsinoides var. decumbens.

Ewartia[e-wor-ti-a] Is named in honour of Dr. Alfred James Ewart; 1872-1934, who was a professor of Botany and wrote the Flora of Victoria. A good example is Ewartia nubigena.

Ewartiana [e-wor-ti-a-na] Is named in honour of Dr. Alfred James Ewart; 1872-1934, who was a professor of Botany and wrote the Flora of Victoria. A good example is Bothriochloa ewartiana.

Ex: [eks] From Ex which is Latin for out of the ordinary or outside.

Exallage: [ek-sal-laj/lag] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Enallátte, which is Ancient Greek for to interchange or exchange. It may refer to plants, which have very few variations in characteristics. A good example was Exallage radicans, which is now known as Hedyotis radicans.

Exalata: [ek-sal-la-ta] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Alatus, which is Latin for lofty or tall. It refers to the shrubs which are much taller than other species in the genus. A good example is Crowea exalata.

Exaltatum: [ek-sal-ta-um] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary or outside or external and Alatus, which is Latin for lofty or tall. It refers to shrubs, which are much taller than all the other species in the genus. A good example is Liparophyllum exaltatum.

Exaltatus: [ek-sal-ta-tus] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary or outside or external and Alatus, which is Latin for lofty or tall. It refers to shrubs which are much taller than all the other species in the genus. A good example is Ptilotus exaltatus var. exaltatus.

Exangulata: [ek-san-gyoo-la-ta] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary or outside or external and Angulatus, which is Latin for having angles. It refers to stems which, have four very distinct sides or angles. A good example is Ratonia exangulata, which is now known as Mischocarpus exangulatus.

Exangulatus: [ek-san-gyoo-la-tus] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary or outside or external and Angulatus which is Latin for having angles. It refers to stems which have four very distinct sides or angles. A good example is Mischocarpus exangulatus.

Exarata: [ek-sar-a-ta] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary or outside or external and Arata, which is Latin for to plough up. It refers to the speed in which an organism can break free of its enclosure. A good example is the speed in which the spores germinate and become little ferns with Marsilea exarata.

Exarillate: [ek-sa-ril-leit] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Arillus, which is Latin for a connecting tube. It refers to having no aril. A good example is the seeds on Acacia echinula.

Exaristata: [ek-sar-i-sta-ta] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Aristātus, which is Ancient Greek for a bristle, an awn or a bristle. It refers to the calyx lobes, which taper to an awn like apex. A good example is Bruguiera exaristata.

Exarmata: [ek-sar-ma-ta] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Armātum/Armātī, which is Ancient Greek for well-armed. It refers to plants, which have many spines or thorns or have the spines, prickles and thorns well positioned. A good example is Ximenia exarmata, which is now known as Ximenia americana.

Exarmatus: [ek-sar-ma-tus] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Armātum/Armātī, which is Ancient Greek for well-armed. It refers to plants, which have many spines or thorns or have the spines, prickles and thorns well positioned. A good example is Pandanus exarmatus, which is now known as Pandanus cookii.

Exarrhena: [ek-sar-ree-na] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Arren, which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to the stamens, which  protrude out of the corolla tube compared to all or most other species in the genus that are either level with or inside the corolla tube. A good example is Myosotis exarrhena.

Exarrhenus: [ek-sar-re-nus] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Arren, which is Latin for a male. It refers to the stamens, which are prominently displayed especially when compared to the pistols. This is presently an unresolved name awaiting further research to determine which genus, species or sub species or variety it should be allocated to. A good example is Leucopogon exarrhenus.

Exasperata: [ek-sas-per-ei-ta] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Asperātus, which is Latin for to be rough. It refers to structures or organs usually the leaves, which have an extremely rough texture. A good example is Hibbertia exasperata.

Exastia: [ek-sas-ti-a] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, outside or external and maybe from Astia, which is Latinized from the Finnish word for a dish, bin or receptacle. It may refer to the fruits , whicg somewhat resemble a fancy bowl. A good example is Keraudrenia exastia.

Excarya: [eks-kar-ree-a] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, out side or external and Karyum, which is Ancient Greek for the Greek King of Laconia’s daughter who was turned into a walnut tree. A good example is the commercial white walnut Carya ovata.

Excavata: [eks-ka-va/vei-ta] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, out side or external and Cavitas, which is Latin for a hole. It refers to flowers, which are wide spreading similar to an excavation. A good example is Maireana excavata.

Excavatia: [eks-ka-va/vei-ti-a] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, out side or external and Cavitas, which is Latin for a hole. It refers to flowers, which are wide spreading similar to an excavation. A good example is Excavatia coccinea, which is now known as Ochrosia coccinea.

Excelsa: [ek-sel-sa] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, out side or external and Celsa, which is Latin for high. It refers to plants, which are taller than other species in the genus. A good example is the height on Alphitonia excelsa.

Excelsior: [ek-sel-si-or] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, out side or external and Celsum, which is Latin for high. It refers to plants, which have exceptionally beautiful flowers. A good example is Grevillea excelsior.

Excelsum: [eks-sel-sum] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, out side or external and Celsum, which is Latin for high. It refers to plants, which are the tallest when compared to other species in the genus or exhibit exceptional beauty in their flowers or foliage. A good example is the exceptional beauty of the flowers on Graptophyllum excelsum.

Excelsus: [eks-sel-sus] From Ex which is Latin forout of the    ordinary, out side or external and Celsus which is Latin for high. It refers to trees, which are much taller than other species in the genus. A good example is Orites excelsus.

Excentric: [ek-sen-trik] From Ekkentros, which is Ancient Greek or Eccentricus, which is Latin for away from the center. It refers to a physical organ, which is noticeably off center.

Excentrica: [ek-sen-tri-ka] From Ekkentros, which is Ancient  Greek or Eccentricus which is Latin, for away from the center. It refers to a physical organ, which is noticeably off center. A good example is Acacia excentrica.

Excentricum: [ek-sen-tri-kum] From Ekkentros, which is Ancient Greek or Eccentricus, which is Latin for away from the center. It refers to a physical organ, which is noticeably off center. A good example is Racosperma excentricum, which is now known as Acacia excentrica.

Exceocaria: [ek-see-oh-kar-i-a] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for of the ordinary, out side or external and Koenus, which Ancient Greek for blindness. A good example is the superficial appearance to the walnut tree to Exceocaria agallocha.

Excisum: [ek-si-sum] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek forout of the ordinary, out side or external and Excise, which is Latin for to cut away. It refers to leaves or fronds, which have a margin that appears as though it has been torn or raggidly cut off. A good example is Asplenium excisum.

Excorticatus: [eks-kor-ti-ka-tus] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek forout of the ordinary, out side or external and Corticaticus, which is Latin for to decorticate, hulled or pull off. It refers to the bark being loose and subject to being easily pulled off. A good example is Eucalyptus melliodora.

Excrescences: [eks-kre-sen-ses] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek forout of the ordinary, out side or external and Crescencent, which is Latin for an out growth. It refers to leaves and pitchers, which have small wart like projections on the surfaces. A good example is the leaves of Nepenthes mirabilis.

Excurrent 1: [eks-kur-rent] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, out side or external and Current, which is Latin for an out growth. It refers to having the axis prolonged further so as to form an undivided trunk. A good example is the trunk on Callitris columellaris.

Excurrent 2: [eks-kur-rent] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, out side or external and Current, which is Latin for an out growth. It refers to the midrib and vein projecting beyond the apex of the leaf. A good example is  the fronds on Macrothelypteris torresiana.

Excurved: [eks-kervd] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, out side or external and Current, which is Latin for an out growth. It refers to having the axis prolonged further so as to form an undivided trunk. A good example is the trunk on Callitris columellaris.

Exfolians: [eks-foh-li-anz] From Exfōliāns, which is Latin for to remove from and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have been stripped of their leaves. A good example is Melia azedarach which is stripped annually in Autumn by the white Cedar moth Leptocneria reducta.

Exfoliant: [eks-foh-li-ant] From Ex or Eks, which are Ancient Greek for out, to remove from or leave and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have been stripped of their leaves. A good example is Perga affinis which strip many Eucalyptus species including Eucalyptus melliodora periodically.

http://www.westgatepark.org/2011/07/seen-the-sawfly-lavae/
Melia azedarach with Ochrogaster lunifera, which strip the trees annually.

Exfoliata: [eks-foh-li-eit] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary or outside, external and Foliata, which is Latin for to strip off. It refers to the shedding of hair, scales or other parts in small pieces. A good example is the tessellated bark on Cryptocarya exfoliata.

Exfoliating: [eks-foh-li-ei-ting] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary or outside, external and Foliatum, which is Latin for to strip off. It refers to the shedding of hair, scales or other parts in small pieces. A good example is the tessellated bark on Eucalyptus tessellaris.

Exigua: [ek-si-gyoo-a] From Exigua, which is Latin for slender, scanty meager or petty. It refers to an organ, which is very scanty, slender or meager. A good example is the very slender flower spikes and small flowers on Eragrostis exigua.

Exiguifolia: [eks-i-gwee-foh-li-a] From Exigua, which is Latin for slender, scanty meager or petty and Folia, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which are impoverished in the number of leaves they exhibit. A good example is Olearia exiguifolia.

Exiguifolius: [eks-i-gwee-foh-li-uhs] From Exigua, which is Latin for slender, scanty meager or petty and Folia, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which are impoverished in the number of leaves they exhibit. A good example is Aster exiguifolius, which is now known as Olearia exiguifolia.

Exigua: [exks-i-gyoo-a] From Exigua, which is Latin for slender, scanty meager or petty. It refers to flower spikes, pedicels and tepals, which are all very slender or scanty. A good example is Velleia exigua.

Exiguum: [ek-si-gyoo-um] From Exigua, which is Latin for slender, scanty meager or petty. It refers to flower spikes, pedicels and tepals, which are all very slender or scanty. A good example is Adelopetalum exiguum.

Exiguus: [eks-i-gyoo-us] From Exigua, which is Latin for slender, scanty meager or petty. It refers to the flower spikes, pedicels and tepals, which are all very slender or scanty. A good example is Acianthus exiguus.

Exiliflora: [ek-sil-li-flor-a] From Exilis, which is Latin for slender and feeble and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to the flowering capsules being slimmer than the other species in the genus. A good example is Tristaniopsis exiliflora.

Exiliflorum: [ek-si-li-flor-um] From Exilis, which is Latin for slender and feeble and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowering capsules, which are slimmer than the other species in the genus. A good example was Limnanthemum exiliflorum which is an unresolved name and maybe known as Villarsia geminata which is currently also known under the names of Nymphoides exiliflorum and Nymphoides exiliflora at the present time.

Exilifloris: [ek-sil-li-flor-us] From Exilis, which is Latin for slender and feeble and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowering capsules, which are slimmer than the other species in the genus. A good example is Thysanotus exilifloris.

Exiliflorus: [ek-si-li-flor-us] From Exilis, which is Latin for slender and feeble and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to the flowering capsules being slimmer than the other species in the genus. A good example is Thysanotus exiliflorus.

Exilifolia: [ek-si-li-foh-li-a] From Exilis, which is Latin for slender and Folia, which is Latin for a leaf. It refers to a leaves, which are slimmer than the other species in the genus. A good example is Atriplex exilifolia.

Exilifolium: [ek-si-li-foh-li-um] From Exilis, which is Latin for slender and Folia, which is Latin for a leaf. It refers to a leaves, which are slimmer than the other species in the genus. A good example is Atriplex exilifolium, which is now known as Atriplex exilifolia.

Exilifolius: [ek-si-li-foh-li-us] From Exilis, which is Latin for slender and Folia, which is Latin for a leaf. It refers to a leaves, which are slimmer than the other species in the genus. A good example is Aster exilifolius, which is now known as Olearia brachyphylla.

Exilipes: [ek-si-li-pes] From Exsiliō, which is Latin for to leap out or spring out. It refers to the overall beauty of the trees which stand out in a harsh environment. A good example is Eucalyptus exilipes.

Exilis: [ek-sil-is] From Exilis, which is Latin for slender and feeble. It refers to the tepals, which are slimmer than those of the other species in the genus. A good example is Hypoxis exilis.

Eximia: [ek-zi-mi-a] From Eximius, which is Latin for distinguished or excellent. It refers to the plants, which have a rather distinguishable appearance amongst its peers. A good example is Corymbia eximia.

Exine 1: [ek-zahyn] From Exine, which is Ancient Greek for a sticky polymer. It refers to a very durable, natural polymer exuded by a receptive stigma which assists the pollen grains adhering to the stigma and commences pollination with the pollen sperm.

Exine being exuded on the stigmas of Alloxylon flammeum

Exine 2: [ek-zahyn] From Exine, which is Ancient Greek for a sticky polymer. It refers to a natural polymer exuded by sporangia, which allows, keeps the unripen spore adhering to the sporangia until the spore is ripe and conditions are conducive for is release.

Exitela: [ek-si-te-la] From Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary and Tela, which is Latin for any delicate tissue or web like structure. It may refer to plants, which are rather elicate or delicate looking. A good example is Diuris exitela.

Exocarp: [ek-soh-karp] From Exo, which is a Greek prefix for out of the ordinary, or external and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the outer most layer of the pericarp or the fruit.

Exoecaria: [ek-soh-kar-i-a] From Exoecaria, which is Latin for to make blind. It refers to the milky sap, which causes excruciating pain and blindness if it comes into contact with the eyes. A good example is Excoecaria agallocha.

Exocarpi: [ek-soh-kar-pi] From Exo, which is a Greek prefix for out of the ordinary, or external and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the outer most layer of the fruit or fruiting bodies, which are glossy and highly visible. A good example is found on the fruits of the parasitic plant Lysiana exocarpi.

Exocarpi

Exocarpoides: [ek-soh-kar-poi-deez] From Exo, which is a Greek prefix for out of the ordinary, or external, Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the outer most layer of the fruit, which is thinly coriaceous and slightly glossy. A good example is found on the fruits of the parasitic plant Lysiana exocarpi.

Exocarpos: [ek-soh-kar-pos] From Exo, which is a Greek prefix for out of the ordinary, or external and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the seeds, which have a fleshy petiole, which gives the appearance of the seed being outside the fruit. A good example is the seed and petiole of Exocarpos cupressiformis.

Fruit of Exocarpos cupressiformis.

Exocarya: [ek-so-kar-ee-a] From Exo which is a Greek prefix for out of the ordinary, or external and Karyon which is Ancient Greek for a nut. It refers to the fruits which have a small nutlet. A good example is the seed and petiole of Exocarya scleriodes.

Exoglossum: [ek-so-glos-sum] From Exo, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, or external and Glossum, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to the flowers, which have tongue like appendage. A good example is the seed and petiole of Stylidium exoglossum, which is now known as Stylidium pygmaeum.

Exolasia: [ek-so-la-si-a] From Exo, which is a Greek prefix for out of the ordinary, or external and Lasios, which is Latin for wool. It refers to flowers, which appear to be densly covered in white wool. A good example is the corolla lobes on Styphelia exolasia which is now known as Leucopogon exolasius.

Exolasius: [ek-so-la-si-uh s] From Exo, which is a Greek prefix for out of the ordinary, or external and Larius, which is a Latin suffix pertaining to the similarity of. It refers to flowers, while different in being prominent bearded they still are very similar to other members of the genus. A good example is Leucopogon exolasius.

Exoleta: [ek-so-le-ta] From Exolētus/Exolēta/Exolētum, which is Ancient Greek for worn out or mature. It refers to structures or organs, which appear to be very old. A good example is the persistant number of old or mature bladders on Utricularia exoleta.

Exolus: [ek-so-lus] From Exo, which is a Greek prefix for out of the ordinary, or external and maybe Olus/ kholḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a green vegetable. It refers to plants, which have been used as a green vegetable in Australia and taste similar to (salty) Kale. A good example is Euxolus enervis, which is now known as Scleroblitum atriplicinum.

Exoperidium: [ek-so-per-i-di-um] From Exo, which is a Greek prefix for out of the ordinary or external and Peridiolum, which is Latin for a membrane wall. It refers to the thick outer membranous wall of certain fungi. A good example is found on Cyathus striatus.

Exospore: [ek-so-spor] From Exo, which is a Greek prefix for out of the ordinary or external and Sporous, which is Ancient Greek for a spore or seed. It refers to spores, which are not held in a sporangia or not to have an indusium. A good example is Belvisia mucronata.

Exostemonea: [ek-soh-ste-mon-ee] From Exo, which is a Greek prefix for out of the ordinary or external and Stemon, which is Ancient Greek for a spore the male reproductive organs on a flower. It refers to stamens, which are held outside the other floral parts. A good example was Arytera exostemonea, which is now known as Arytera divaricata and Endiandra exostemonea.

Exotrachys: [ek-so-trahy-kis] From Exo, which is a Greek prefix for out of the ordinary or external and Trachys, which is Ancient Greek for rough. It probably It refers to seeds which have a very rough texture. A good example is Eremophila platythamnos subsp. exotrachys.

Expanded Inflorescence: [ek-span-ded, in-flor-es-ens-ez] It refers to where the inflorescences, sepals or calyxes, which continue to grow and expand even after the sexual organs have matured. A good example of the apexes growing out during flowering is seen on Melaleuca viminalis.

Expandens: [ek-span-denzn] From Expositī/Expositō, which is Latin for to exposed or spreadout. It refers to ray bracts which are large and spreading. A good example was Ixora expandens, which is now known as Tarenna dallachiana subsp. expandens.

Expansa: [ek-span-sa] From Expositī/Expositō, which is Latin for to exposed or spreadout. It refers to the bracts on the flowers, which are large and spreading. A good example is Corybas expansus Eryngium expansum.

Expansifolium: [ek-span-si-foh-li-um] From Expositī/Expositō, which is Latin for exposed or spreadout and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are longer than other species in the genus and more spreading. A good example is Helichrysum expansifolium, which is now known as Ozothamnus expansifolium.

Expansifolius: [ek-span-si-foh-li-us] From Expositī/Expositō, which is Latin for exposed or spreadout and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are longer than other species in the genus and more spreading. A good example is Ozothamnus expansifolius.

Expansum: [ek-span-sum] From Expositī/Expositō, which is Latin for to exposed or spreadout. It refers to the bracts on the flowers, which are large and spreading. A good example is Eryngium expansum.

Expansus: [ek-span-sus] From Expositī/Expositō, which is Latin for to exposed or spreadout. It refers to the bracts on the flowers, which are large and spreading. A good example is Exocarpos expansus.

Expeditionis: [ek-spe-di-sho-nis] From Expositī/Expositō, which is Latin for an expedition, march or a campaign. It refers to plants, which are difficult to locate in the field so a long march, campaign ot expedition may be required to locate them. A good example is Stylidium expeditionis.

Explanata: [ek-splan-a-ta] From Explanata, which is Latin for to be flattened or spread out. It refers to a group of beetles found in the garden including both destructive and friendly with large flat feet.

Explanate: [ek-spla-neit] From Explanatum, which is Latin for to be flattened or spread out.

Explanatum: [ek-spla-na-tum] From Explanatus which is Latin for to be flattened or spread out. A good example is the orchid Taeniophyllum explanatum, which lies flat on the branches and twigs.

Explanatus: [ek-spla-na-tus] From Explanatus which is Latin for to be flattened or spread out. A good example is the sap sucking bug Cephaloplatus explanatus which we would rather entertain just a few in our gardens.

Exposita: [eks-po-si-ta] From Expositī/Expositō, which is Latin for to exposed or spreadout. It refers to plants, and their stems, which are well spread out. A good example is Grevillea exposita.

Exserta: [eks-ser-ta] From Exsertus, which is Latin for to be held outside or protruding. It refers to an organ, which protrudes beyond the other organs or structure. A good example is the stamens and style on Styphelia exserta.

Exserted: [eks-ser-ted] From Exsertus, which is Latin for to be held outside or protruding. It refers to an organ, which protrudes beyond the other parts. A good example is Correa reflexa which has exerted stamens. The antonym is inserted or enclosed.

Exsertum: [eks-ser-tum] From Exsertus, which is Latin for to be held outside or protruding. It refers to an organ, which protrudes beyond the other parts. A good example is the sepals on Leptospermum exsertum which are longer than many other species in the genus.

Exsertus: [eks-ser-tus] From Exsertus which is Latin for to be held outside or protruding. It refers to an organ, which protrudes beyond the other parts. A good example is the lower petals on Acianthus exsertus, which are extremely long and extend well beyond the other tepals.

Exsiccate: [eks-si-keit] From Ex, which is Latin for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Siccātum, which is Latin for to dry, dried up or desiccated. It often refers to plants in collections or series of dried herbarium specimens deliberately dried for preservation, reference and study.

Exsiccatum: [eks-si-kei-tum] From Ex, which is Latin for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Siccātum, which is Latin for to dry, dried up or desiccated. It refers to the ability of a plant to completely desiccate in the dry season before rejuvenating when rain again falls.

Exsquarrosa: [eks-skwar-roh-sa] From Ex, which is Greek/Latin for out of the ordinary and Squarrōsa, which is Latin for scale or rough. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in scales. A good example is Polygala exsquarrosa.

Exstans: [eks-stahnz] From Exstāns, which is Latin to stand out or to be exposed to prominence. It refers to plants, usually the flowers, which are stand out from surrounding plants in their environment and other species in their genus. A good example is Caladenia exstans.

Exstipulata: [ek-sti-pyoo-la-ta] From Ex, which is Latin for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Stipulus, which is Latin for stipules. It refers to not having stipules as is the norm within the genus. A good example is found on Calytrix exstipulata.

Exstipulate: [eks-sti-pyoo-leit] From Ex, which is Latin for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Stipulus, which is Latin for stipules. It refers to a description of a flower which does not having.

Exstipulatus: [eks-sti-pyoo-la-tus] From Ex, which is Latin for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Stipulus, which is Latin for stipules. It refers to a description of a flower which does not having stipules Lotus australis var. exstipulatus.

Exsuccosa: [eks-su-koh-sa] From Ex, which is Latin for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Surculosa, which is Latin for to sucker. It refers to plants, which have the ability to sucker from the roots or rhizomes. A good example is Dicrastylis exsuccosa.

Exsudans: [ek-soo-danz] From Ex, which is Latin for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Oûthar, which is Greek or ūber, which is Latin for to secrete through pores. It refers to any organ, which gradually oozes drops of a fluid or semi fluid. A good example was Acacia exsudans , which is now known as a Acacia verniciflua subsp. exudans.

Exsul: [eks-sul] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Exsul, which is Latin for a person who has been placed in exile. It refers to plants or subspecies of a plant, which have a very restricted distribution and are often well away from other species in the genre or other subspecies. A good example is Allocasuarina rigida subsp. exsul.

Exsulca: [eks-sul-ka] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Sulcātus, which is Latin for to plough a field or make furrows. It refers to a structure or organ, which has distinct longitudinal furrows. A good example is Hypolaena exsulca.

Exsulcus: [eks-sul-kus] From Ex, which is Ancient Greek for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Sulcātus, which is Latin for to plough a field or make furrows. It refers to a structure or organ, which has distinct longitudinal furrows. A good example was Calorophus exsulcus, which is now known as Hypolaena exsulca.

Extensa: [ek-sten-sa] From Extensa, which is Latin for being extended. It refers to one organ or structure, which extends well beyond the others on the plant especially common amongst the leaves or phyllodes which extend well beyond the stems. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia extensa which extend well beyond the stems.

Extenuata: [ek-sten-yoo-a-ta] From Extensa, which is Latin for being extended. It refers to one organ or structure, which extends well beyond the other son the plant especially common amongst the leaves or phyllodes which extend well beyond the stems. A good example is the moss Wijkia extenuata.

Extenuatum: [ek-sten-yoo-ei-tum] From Extensa, which is Latin for being extended. It refers to one organ or structure, which extends well beyond the other son the plant especially common amongst the leaves or phyllodes which extend well beyond the stems. A good example was the moss Sematophyllum extenuatum, which is now known as Wijkia extenuata.

Extenuatus: [ek-sten-yoo–tus] From Extensa, which is Latin for being extended. It refers to one organ or structure, which extends well beyond the other son the plant especially common amongst the leaves or phyllodes which extend well beyond the stems. A good example is the flowers on Ptilotus extenuatus which extend well above the foliage.

Extorris: [ek-str-ris] From Extortum, which is Latin for being extorted. It may refer to plants, which have extorted the beauty of all the surrounding plants. A good example is Grevillea extorris.

Extrajacens: [ek-stra-ja-senz] From Extra, which is Latin for beyond or more than expected and maybe from Jacēns, which is Latin for being sick, lying down or dying. It refers to plants, which grow in extremely low rainfall areas of Australia that other plants yield and die under. A good example is Swainsona extrajacens.

Extralittoralis: [ek-stra-li-tor-a-lis] From Extra, which is Latin for beyond or more than expected and Littorālis/Litorālis, which is Latin for by the sea shore. It refers to plants, which grow the seaward side of the litorale zone along the foreshores. A good example was Pandanus extralittoralis, which is now known as Pandanus tectorius.

Extravaginal: [ek-stra-va-jahy-nal] From Extra, which is Latin for beyond or more than expected and Vagina, which is Latin for the vaginal sheath. It refers to a perennial grasses or lilies, which have stoloniferous and rhizomiferous stems bearing ordinary erect leafy branches, and the branches emerge by piercing through a leaf sheath similar to a vaginal opening in shape and form. A good example is Dianella caerulea subsp. caerulea.

Extrica: [eks-tri-ka] From Ex, which is Latin for out or external and Trīcō, which is Latin for impediments or tangled. It refers to stems and branches, which are free, disentangled or extricated. A good example is Eucalyptus extrica.

Extrorsa: [ek-stror-sa] From Ex, which is Latin for out or external and Trorsus, which is Latin for to bend away. It refers to anthers, which dehisce longitudinally away from the central axis or central perianth of the flower. A good example is Hibbertia extrorsa.

Extrorse: [ek-strors] From Ex, which is Latin for out or external and Trorsus, which is Latin for to bend away. It refers to anthers, which dehisce longitudinally away from the central axis or central perianth of the flower. A good example is Cryptocarya triplinervis.

Exudans: [ek-soo-danz] From Ex, which is Latin for out of the ordinary, outside or external and Oûthar, which is Greek or ūber, which is Latin for to secrete through pores. It refers to any organ, which gradually oozes drops of a fluid or semi fluid. A good example is Acacia verniciflua subsp. exudans.

Exudate: [ek-soo-deit] From Ex, which is Latin for out or external and Exdatus, which is Latin for to discharge certain elements to the outside. It refers to plants, which exude a liquid from its circulatory system to the outside because of an injury that aid in its protection. A good example is the resins on Lepidozamia hopei and Eucalyptus resinifera.

Exudativores: [ek-soo-da-ti-vors] From Ex, which is Latin for out or external and Exdatus, which is Latin for to discharge certain elements to the outside and vorus which is Latin for to eat. It refers to animals, which deliberately damage or make incisions to the bark or other parts of a plant to extract the sap. The sugar glider, Petaurus breviceps is a good example of an animal which is an exudativore.

Exul: [ex-ul] From Ex, which is Latin for out or external and Exile, which is Latin for to banish. It refers to the trees, which are banished from its long standing cousins and left in isolated pockets. A good example is Angophora exul.

Exutiacies: [ex-u-ti-a-si-es] From Ex, which is Latin for out or external and Utiace, which is Hebrew but the meaning is unknown. A good example is Hibbertia exutiacies.

Eyrea: [air-a] Is named in honour of Edward John Eyre; 1815-1901, who was an English explorer in Australia and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered around Lake Eyre in South Australia. A good example is Eyrea rubelliflora, which is now known as Pluchea rubelliflora.

Eyreana: [air-a-na] Is named in honour of Edward John Eyre; 1815-1901, who was an English explorer in Australia. A good example is Harperia eyreana.

Eyreanus: [air-ree-ei-nuh s] Is named in honour of Edward John Eyre; 1815-1901, who was an English explorer in Australia. A good example is Convolvulus eyreanus.

Eyrei: air-ahy] Is named in honour of Edward John Eyre; 1815-1901, who was an English explorer in Australia and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered around Lake Eyre in South Australia. A good example is Banksia eyrei.

Eyrensis: [air-ri-en-sis] Is named in honour of Edward John Eyre; 1815-1901, who was an English explorer in Australia. A good example is Brachyscome eyrensis, which is now known as Brachyscome multifida.

“Fa – Fu”

Faba: [fa-ba] From Faba, which is Latin for a bean. It refers to the plants, which are members of the Fabaceae family. A good example is the exotic bean Vicia faba.

Fabagifolia: [fa-ba-ji-foh-li-a] From Faba, which is Latin for a bean and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble those from the Vicia faba beans. A good example is Roepera fabagifolia.

Fabagifolium: [fa-ba-ji-foh-li-um] From Faba, which is Latin for a bean and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble those from the Vicia faba beans. A good example was Zygophyllum fruticulosum, which is now known as Roepera fabagifolia.

Fabianoides: [fa-bi-an-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Francisco Fabián y Fuero; 1719–1801, who was a Spanish Priest and a strong advocate of botany and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. A good example is Boronia fabianoides.

Fabri: [fa-bri] From Fabri/Fabree, which is Latin for a craftsman. It refers to plants, which bear an uncanny resemblance to anther species as though they have been crafted together. A good example is Melaleuca fabri.

Fabricia: [fah-bri-ki-uh] From Fabrica, which is Latin for a smithy or forger. It refers to plants, which bear an uncanny resemblance to anther species as though they have been crafted together. A good example is Leptospermum fabricia, which is now known as Neofabricia myrtifolia.

Fabrorum: [fa-bror-um] From Facilis, which is Latin for that which can or is able to be made easily. Its reference is not clear. A good example was Eucalyptus fabrorum, which is now known as Eucalyptus obliqua.

Facelis: [fa-se-lis] From Facilis, which is Latin for that which can or is able to be made easily. Its reference is not clear. A good example is Facelis retusa.

Facultative: [fa-kyoo-lai-tiv] From faculty ,which is French for not to be obligated to. It refers to a plant that is able to perform a particular life function, or to live generally, in more than one way. A good example is the perennial or annual existence of Ammobia alatum.

Faeces: [fe/fahy-seez] From Faex (singular) Faecēs (plural), which are Latin for excreted animal bile. It refers to the waste matter remaining after food has been digested and discharged from the bowel. It was Theophrastus who realized and espoused the use of faeces in healthy plant growth.

Fagara: [fa-jar-a] From Fagara, which is Latin for fragrance. It refers the Chinese name is 四川辣椒 (Sichuan hot spice) which is pronounced花椒 (huajiao- flower spicy) in Sichuan, Chongqing and Yunan China compared to black pepper that is known as 胡椒 (hujiao). The word lajiao (辣椒 – hot spice) relates to chilli. It is in fact the seed pods which are eaten as the spice. A good example was Fagara brachyacanthum, which is now known as Zanthoxylum brachyacanthum that should be considered as a viable crop in drier parts of Australia.

Fagifolia: [fa-ji-foh-li-a] From Fagus, which is Greek for the beech tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the plants, which have leaves like the Beech trees. A good example is Banksia fagifolia.

Fagifolium: [fa-ji-foh-li-um] From Fagus, which is Greek for the beech tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the plants having leaves like the Beech trees. A good example is the exotic bramble Rubus fragifolium.

Fagonioides: [fa-go-ni-oi-deez] From Fagus which is Greek for the beech tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Fagus genus. A good example is Acacia fagonioides.

Fagopyrum: [fa-go-pahy-rum] From Fagus, which is Greek or the beech tree and Pyros which is Ancient Greek for buckwheat. It refers to grasses which have seeds which resemble the beech trees of Europe. A good example is Fagopyrum esculentum.

Fagraea: [fa-gree-a] Is named in honour of Doctor Jonas Theodor Fragraus; 1729-1796/97, who was a Swedish botanist. A good example is Fagraea cambagei.

Fagraeacea: [fa-gree-a-see-a] Is named in honour of Doctor Jonas Theodor Fragraus; 1729-1796/97, who was a Swedish botanist and Aceae which is Latin for a family. It refers to plants, which have typical characteristics and belonging to the family Fragraeacea. A good example is Fagraea fagraeacea.

Fagus: [fa-gus] From Fagus, which is Greek for the beech tree. It refers to the trees which closely resemble the European Beech trees. A good example was Fagus carronii, which is now known as Nothofagus moorei.

Fairallii: [fair-a-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Arthur Robert   Fairall; 1920-1970, who was an Australian Gardens superintendent. A good example is Lambertia fairallii.

Fairfaxii: [fair-fak-si-ahy] Is named in honour of John Fairfax; 1804-1877, who was a british born Australian newspaper proprietor. A good example is Dockrillia fairfaxii.

Falcata: [fal-ka-ta] From Falcata, which is Latin for a scythe or sickle shape. It refers to leaves, which have a shape somewhat like a scythe or sickle shape. A good example is Acacia falcata.

Falcate: [fal-keit] From Falcatum, which is Latin for a scythe or sickle shape. It refers to the description of leaves which are falcate or sickle shape. Ah, brings back memories of cutting grass in the table drains and under the fruit trees with a short and a long handle sythes then cutting the lawn with the old push mower. Yes, every home had one of each. A good example is the falcate phylodes on Acacia pycnantha.

A falcate shape.

Falcatula: [fal-ka-ta] From Falcatum, which is Latin for a scythe or sickle shape. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have a slight or minor falcate shape. A good example is one of the Pistachio nuts Pistacia lentiscus var. falcatula.

Falcatum: [fal-ka-tum] From Falcatum, which is Latin for a scythe or sickle shape. It refers to the leaves or phyllodes, which have a falcate shape. A good example is the pinnae on Asplenium falcatum.

Falcatus: [fal-ka-tus] From Falcatus, which is Latin for a scythe or sickle shape. It refers to leaves, which have a distinct falcate shape like a sythe. A good example is Sarcochilus falcatus.

Falcifolia: [fal-ki-foh-li-a] From Falcata, which is Latin for a scythe or sickle shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which have a falcate shape. A good example is Acacia falcifolia.

Falcifolium: [fal-ki-foh-li-um] From Falcata, which is Latin for a scythe or sickle shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which have a falcate shape. A good example was Conospermum falcifolium, which is now known as Conospermum taxifolium.

Falciforme: [fal-ki-form] From Falcatum, which is Latin for a scythe or sickle shape and Forme, which is Latin for to take the form or shape of. It refers to the leaves, which have the shape or form of a sythe. A good example is Racesperma falciforme.

Falciformis: [fal-ki-for-mis] From Falcatum, which is Latin for a scythe or sickle shape and Forme, which is Latin for to take the form or shape of. It refers to the leaves, which have the shape or form of a sythe. A good example is Acacia falciformis.

Falcinella: [fal-ki-nel-la] From Falcatum, which is Latin for a scythe or sickle shape and Ella, which is Latin for the feminine form. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which have a slight falcate shape. A good example was Acacia falcinella, which is now known as Acacia pycantha.

Falconeri: [fal-ko-ner-ahy] Is named in honour of Falconer. A good example is the sundew Drosera falconeri.

Falcorostra: [fal-kor-os-tra] From Falcatum, which is Latin for a scythe or sickle shape and Rostrate/Rostrum, which is Latin for a beak, to bear a beak or to have a beak like appendage. It refers to organs usually the fruits, which have a falcate appendage. A good example is the appendage on the apex of the labellum on Tropilis falcorostra, which is now known as Dendrobium falcorostrum.

Falcorostrum: [fal-kor-os-trum] From Falcatum, which is Latin for a scythe or sickle shape and Rostrate/Rostrum, which is Latin for a beak, to bear a beak or to have a beak like appendage. It refers to organs usually the fruits, which have a falcate appendage. A good example is the appendage on the apex of the labellum on Thelychiton falcorostrum.

Falcorostrus: [fal-koir-os-trus] From Falcatum, which is Latin for a scythe or sickle shape and Rostrate/Rostrum which is Latin for a beak, to bear a beak or to have a beak like appendage. It refers to organs, which have a falcate appendage. A good example is the appendage on the apex of the labellum on Thelychiton falcorostrus, which is now known as Thelychiton falcorostrum.

Falklandicum: [forl-klan-di-kum] Probably from Falkland, which is Latinized for the Falkland Islands off the South American coast of Argentina and Anum/Ensis which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first found on the Falkland Islands. A good example is Hymenophyllum falklandicum which is found on Macquarrie Island.

Fallacina: [fal-la-si-na] From Fallācia/Fallāx. which are Latin for to deceive or to be misleading. It refers to the plants, displaying characteristics of other species which misleads botanists. A good example was Lomatia fallacina, which is now known as Lomatia myricoides.

Fallax: [fa-laks] From Fallācia/Fallāx, which are Latin for to deceive or to be misleading. It refers to the plants, which display characteristics of other species which misleads botanists. A good example is Chrysopogon fallax.

False Veins: [fols, veinz] From Fallere, which is Latin for to deceive or be misleading and Vena, which is Latin for a vein. It refers to where small veins like areas of thickened walled cells appear in the leaves. It is usually found in some of the lower class vascular plants. A good example is found on the leaves of Eremophila mitchelli.

Famelica: [fa-me-li-ka] From Famélica, which is Latin for hungry, starved or famished. It refers to plants, which display characteristics of being malnutrition or grow on very poor soils. A good example is the poor sands that are often semi brackish to brackish habitats which are preferred by Eucalyptus famelica.

Familiaris: [fa-mil-i-ar-is] From Familiāris, which is for to be well acquainted with. It refers to plants, which are frequently encountered or have very familiar traits for the genus. A good example is Microtis familiaris.

Family: [fah-mi-lee] From Familia, which is Latin for the usual major subdivision in the order of plants or animals below the rank of an Order and above the Genus rank.

Faradaya: [fa-ra-dei-a] Is named in honour of Michael Faraday; 1791/4?-1867, who was an electromagnetic engineer. A good example is Faradaya splendida.

Farragei: [fa-rajee-ahy] Maybe from Farrago, which is Latin for mixed fodder. It may refer tothe mixture of characteristics and shapes of the seeds and to some extent the leaves. A good example is Radyera farragei.

Fareana: [fa-ree-na] From Farean, which is unknown. A good example is Medicosma fareana.

Farinacea: [fa-rin-a-see-a] From Farinaceous, which is Latin for mealy or floury in appearance. It refers to structures or organs which have a mealy or slightly scaly like mealy texture. A good example is the leaves and smaller stems on Amanita farinacea.

Farinaceous: [fa-rin-ei-see-os] From Farinaceous, which is Latin for mealy or floury in appearance. It refers to being mealy or to have a slightly scaly like mealy texture. A good example is the leaves and smaller stems on Eucalyptus pulverulenta.

Farinosa: [fa-rin-oh-sa] From Farinosus, which is Latin for to be covered in a mealy or floury powder. It refers to being mealy or to have a slightly scaly like mealy texture. A good example is the leaves and smaller stems on Acacia farinosa.

Farinosum: [fa-ri-noh-sum] From Farinosus, which is Latin for to be covered in a mealy or floury powder. It refers to being mealy or to have a slightly scaly like mealy texture. A good example is the phylodes and smaller stems on Racosperma farinosum, which is now known as Acacia farinosa.

Farinose: [fa-ri-nohs] From Farinosus, which is Latin for to be covered in a mealy or floury powder. It refers to a description of the leaves or stems of the new growth being described as having a mealy or floury appearance.

Farnesiana: [far-ne-si-a-na] From Farnesiana, which is Latinized from the Farnese Palace in Rome where the original plants came from America and were grown for the perfume trade. A good example is Vachellia farnesiana which was probably an introduced species to Australia from Africa.

Fasciated: [fas-si-ei-ted] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for abnormally compressed or flattened stems growing together. It refers to a relatively rare condition of abnormal growth in vascular plants in which the apical meristem; or growing tip, becomes elongated or perpendicularly flattened and grows together compared to the normal growth. A good example is at times seen on the smaller stems of Acacia oshanesii, Acacia baileyana or Acacia Cyclops as can be seen below.

Fasciated stems on Acacia complanata

Fasciation: [fas-si-ei-shon] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for abnormally compressed or flattened stems growing together. It refers to a relatively rare condition of abnormal growth in vascular plants in which the apical meristem; or growing tip, becomes elongated or perpendicularly flattened and grows together compared to the normal growth. A good example is at times seen on the apical growth of many herbaceous plants like Pratia purpurescens.

Fasciatus: [fas-si-a-tus] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for abnormally compressed or flattened stems growing together. It refers to fungi which develop abnormal growth where the pileus can form folds. A good example is the spectacular looking folds on Lentinus fasciatus.

Fascicle: [fas-si kl] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a close cluster or to be bundled together. It refers to the description of leaves or flowers, which are closely imbricated together as in a fascicle like a horse’s tail.

Fascicle Sheath: [fas-si-kl, sheeth] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together. It refers to the leaves or flowers, which are closely imbricated together. A good example can be seen on Cassuarina nana.

Fasciculare: [fas-si-kyoo-lair/lahr] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together. It refers to plants, which are closely clustered together. A good example is the fungi Hypholoma fasciculare.

Fascicularis: [fas-si-kyoo-lar-is] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together. It refers to flowers, which are closely imbricated together as in a fascicle like a small horse’s tail. A good example is the flower heads of Acacia fasciculiaris.

Fasciculata: [fas-si-kyoo-la-ta] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a close cluster or to be bundled together. It refers to flattened stems, which are bundled together along the branches. A good example is Pultenaea fasciculata.

Fasciculate: [fas-si-kyoo-leit] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a close cluster or to be bundled together. It refers to leaves or flowers, which are closely imbricated together as in a fascicle like a horse’s tail. A good example is Ardisia fasciculate.

Fasciculatum: [fas-si-kyoo-lei-tum] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a close cluster or to be bundled together. It refers to leaves or flowers, which are closely imbricated together as in a fascicle like a horse’s tail. A good example is the flowers on Lepidium fasciculatum

Fasciculatus: [fas-si-kyoo-lei-tus] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a close cluster or to be bundled together. It refers to leaves or flowers, which are closely imbricated together as in a fascicle like a horse’s tail. A good example is Scleranthus fasciculatus.

Fasciculifera: [fas-si-kyoo-li-fer-a] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together and Ferae/Ferārum which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to the description of flowers being closely imbricated together. A good example is the flower heads of Acacia fasciculifera.

Fasciculiferum: [fas-si-kyoo-li-fer-um] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to the description of flowers, which are closely imbricated together. A good example is the flower heads of Racosperma fasciculiferum, which is now known as Acacia fasciculifera.

Fasciculiflora: [fas-si-kyoo-li-flor-a] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together and Ferae/Ferārum which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to the description of flowers being closely imbricated together. A good example is the flower heads of Styphelia fasciculiflora.

Fasciulosa: [fas-si-kyoo-loh-sa] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together. It refers to the description of leaves which are somewhat closely imbricated together. A good example is the flower heads of Dyospyros fasciculosa.

Fasiculiflora: [fas-si-kyoo-li-flor-a] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is The Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are closely imbricated close together. A good example is Maytenus fasciculiflora.

Fasiculiflorum: [fahs-si-kyoo-li-flor-um] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is The Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are closely imbricated close together. A good example is Myrtoleucodendron fasciculiflorum, which is now known as Melaleuca brevifolia.

Fasiculifolia: [fas-si-kyoo-li-foh-li-a] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have smaller leaves than other species in the genus. A good example is Maytenus fasciculiflora.

Fasiculigerus: [fahs-si-kyoo-li-jeer-us] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together and Gerus, which is Greek/Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which have smaller flowers bundled together than other species in the genus. A good example was Cyperus fasciculigerus, which is now known as Cyperus umbellatus var. fasciculigerus.

Fastidiosa: [fa-sti-di-oh-sa] From Fastu, which is Latin for pride, and Tīdium which is Latin for conceit. It refers to plants, which display their beauty off with pride and contentment. A good example is the flowers on Diuris fastidiosa.

Fastigiata: [fa-sti-ji-a-ta] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together. It refers to organs, which are closely imbricated together. A good example is the flower heads of Eucalyptus fastigiata.

Fastigiate: [fa-sti-jee-eit] From Fasiculus, which Latin for a small, closely clustered together. It refers to branches, which have a small angle away from the trunk. A good example is Callitris endelicheri.

Fastigiatum: [fa-sti-ji-a-tum] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together. It refers to the description of flowers or leaves, which are very closely imbricated together. A good example is Lycopodium fastigiatum.

Fastigiatus: [fa-sti-ji-a-tus] From Fasiculus, which is Latin for a small, close cluster or to be bundled together. It refers to a description of flowers or leaves, which are very closely imbricated together. A good example is Restio fastiagtus.

Fastuosa: [fas-tyoo-oh-sa] From Fastuōsus, which is Latin for proud or arrogant. It refers to fruits, which are extremely beautiful but are somewhat toxic to consume. A good example is Geunsia fastuosa, which is now known as Callicarpa accuminata.

Fatmensis: [fat-men-sis] From Fatm, which is Latin for bad, simple and or insipid and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which originate from poor or bad soils and environments. A good example is Eriochloa fatmensis.

Fatua: [fah-tyoo-a] From Fatua, which is Latin for insipid or tasteless. It refers to structures or organs, which have no taste. A good example is the common rice Oryza fatua which is now known as Oryza rufipogon.

Fatuus: [fah-tyoo-us] From Fatuus, which is Latin for insipid or tasteless. It refers to structures or organs, which have no taste. A good example is the fungus Agaricus stipatus var. fatuus which is now known as Psathyrella fatua.

Faucicola: [for-si-koh-la] From Faucēs, which is Latin for a mouth or the narrow section or back section of a corolla or is Ancient Latin for a vestibule at the entrance of an upper class ancient Roman house and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which are often found at the entrance of small valleys, gorges, chasms and canyons. A good example is Gardenia faucicola.

Faucium 1: [for-si-um] From Faucēs, which is Latin for a mouth or the narrow section or back section of a corolla or is Ancient Latin for a vestibule at the entrance of an upper class ancient Roman house. Its reference is unclear however it may refer to the flowers, which have a deeper corolla than other species in the genus as they are also are broader than most. A good example is Acacia faucium that has a few spreading hyaline hairs towards base of the tube giving the appearance that a secondary chamber is located beyond the hairs.

Faucium 2: [for-si-um] From Faucēs, which is Latin for a mouth or the narrow section or back section of a corolla. It refers to plants, which have a large or longer corolla than other species in the genus. A good example is Goodenia faucium.

Fauntleroyi: [forn-le-roi-ahy] Is named in honour of Fauntleroy but which Fauntleroy cannot be substantiated. A good example is Acacia fauntleroyi.

Faveolata: [fa-ve-oh-la-ta] From Faveolātum, which is Latin for pitted, honeycombed or hexagonal paving bricks. It refers to lichens, which have pitted margins or somewhat honeycombed surfaces. A good example is Pseudocyphellaria faveolata.

Favonium: [fa-vo-ni-um] From Favōnius/Favōniōrum, which is Latin for the west wind. It may refer to plants, which grow on the west coast or western side of ranges or hills and are exposed to westerly winds. A good example is Prasophyllum favonium which grows on the west coast of Tasmania.

Favosa: [fa-vo-sa] From Favus, which is Latin for honeycomb or hexagonal paving bricks. Its reference is unclear however it may refer to the flowers, which resemble honeycomb in its colour. A good example is Synaphea favosa.

Fawcettia: [for-se-ti-a] Is named in honour of Hugh Charles Fawcett; 1812-1890, who was an Australian policeman who collected specimens for Ferdinand Von Mueller in the Richmond River District in northern New South Wales. A good example is the synonym to Tinospora tinosporoides which was originally known as Fawcettia tinosporoides.

Fawcettiae: [for-se-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Hugh Charles Fawcett; 1812-1890, who was an Australian policeman who collected specimens for Ferdinand Von Mueller in the Richmond River District in northern New South Wales. A good example is Poa fawcettiae.

Fawcettiana: [for-se-ti-a-na] Is named in honour of Hugh Charles Fawcett; 1812-1890, who was an Australian policeman who collected specimens for Ferdinand Von Mueller in the Richmond River District in northern New South Wales. A good example is Litsea fawcettiana.

Fawcettianum: [for-se-ti-a-num] Is named in honour of Hugh Charles Fawcett; 1812-1890, who was an Australian policeman who collected specimens for Ferdinand Von Mueller in the Richmond River District in northern New South Wales. A good example is Ripogonum fawcettianum.

Fawcettii: [for-se-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Hugh Charles Fawcett; 1812-1890, who was an Australian policeman who collected specimens for Ferdinand Von Mueller in the Richmond River District in northern New South Wales. A good example is the synonym to Macrozamia fawcettii.

Fawkneri: [faok-ner-ahy] Is named in honour of Fawkner. A good example is Quintinia fawkneri.

Fax: [fahks] From Fax, which is Latin for a torch or a flame of love. It refers to the flower spikes, which resemble pale green torches above the deep green leaves. A good example is Poa fax.

Fearnsidei: [fern-si-dei] Is named in honour of Honouring grazier Geoff Fearnside, of “Wallaroo” station, where the type specimen was first collected. A good example is Macrozamia fearnsidei.

Fecunda: [fe-kun-da] From Fecunda, which is Latin for fruitful or a fetus. It refers to the plants, which produce copious quantities of seed. A good example is Acacia fecunda.

Fecundum: [fe-kun-dum] From Fecundus, which is Latin for fruitful or a fetus. It refers to the plants, which produce copious quantities of seed. A good example is Dichanthium fecundum.

Feldstonia: [fel-sto-ni-a] Is named in honour of Feldston. A good example is Feldstonia niten.

Fellea: [fel-lee] From Fellea, which is Latin for the gallbladder. It refers to the fruiting capsules, which collectively resemble a messy bile as they break down. A good example is Armillaria fellea.

Felliana: [fel-li-a-na] Is named in honour of Leonard Armstrong Fell; 1899-19??, who was an Australian nurseryman and seed collector. A good example is Dallwatsonia fellian..

Fellii: [fel-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Leonard Armstrong Fell; 1899-19.., who was an Australian nurseryman and seed collector. A good example is Melicope fellii.

Female: [fee-meil] From femella which is Latin for a woman or female. It refers to a plant which has pistillate flowers.

Fen: [fen] From Fen, which is old English, Venn which is Dutch or Fanni which is Gothic for a marsh or wetland. It refers to a wetland, which contains varies amounts of calcareous matter and which is usually very alkaline opposed to a bog which is very acidic.

Fenestrate: [fen-es-treit] From Fenestratus, which is Latin for to be furnished with windows. It refers to where window like holes appear through, usually, the leaves or rarely other structures. A good example is the leaves on Epipremnum pinnatum.

Fenshamii: [fen-sha-mi-ahy] Is named in honour of professor Roderick Fensham; 19..-20.., who was a research botanist at the Queensland University and specialized in the Artesian basin lakes and streams. A good example is Eragrostis fenshamii.

Fenzlia: [fenz-li-a] Is named in honour of Dr. E. Fenzl; 1808-1879, who was the curator of the botanical museum in Vienna. A good example is the synonym to Lithomyrtus obtusa which was originally known as Fenzlia obtusa.

Ferae: [fer-ee] From Ferae/Ferārum, which is Ancient Greek for to bear. It refers to many aspects of a plant’s characteristics which are born on that plant. A good example is the stems bearing rings like a necklace on Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera.

ferdinandi: [fer-di-nan-dahy] Is named in honour of Ferdinand von Mueller; 1825-1896, who was a German born Australian physician and botanist who was founded the Victorian herbarium. A good example is Glochidion ferndinandi.

Feresetacea: [fer-e-se-ta-see] From Fere, which is Latin for bearing and Setacea which is Latin for bristly. It refers to structures or organs, which are densely covered in hairy bristles like the Setaria genus. A good example is the seeds on Austrostipa feresetacea.

Fergusonii: [fer-gu-son-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Ferguson but which Ferguson cannot be substantiated. A good example is Eucalyptus fergusonii.

Fern: [fern] An order of cryptogamous plants, the Filices, which have their fructification on the back of the fronds or leaves. They are usually found in humid areas with moist soil or at times grow as epiphytes on trees or lithophytes on rocks. Ferns start with a complex asexual reproduction system bearing clusters of sporangia, which contain the minute spores. The spores germinate, carrying one half of the meiosis and grow into the prothalli, which require the other half to continue growing and form the true sexual organs of reproduction. A good example is the beautiful maiden hair fern, Adiantum aethiopicum.

Ferocior: [fer-oh-si-awr] From Feroc/Ferox, which is Latin for fierce, dangerous or vipungent spines or prickles. A good example is Acacia ferocior.

Ferocissimum: [fer-o-sis-si-mum] From Ferūs, which is Latin for ferocious or fierce and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to plants which have numerous spines or thorns that have great potency. A good example is Solanum ferocissimum.

Ferocius: [fer-o-si-us] From Feroc/Ferox, which is Latin for fierce, dangerous or vicious. It refers to any structure or organ, which is covered in very pungent spines or prickles. A good example was Acacia ferocior Acacia ferocius which is now known as Acacia ferocius.

Ferox: [fer-oks] From Feroc/Ferox, which is Latin for fierce, dangerous or vicious. It refers to several structures or organs, which include fruits, leaves and flowers, which are potentially toxic. A good example is the deadly seeds on Abrus precatorius.

Ferraria: [fer-rar-i-a] Is named in honour of Giovanni Baptista (also Battista) Ferrari; 1584–1655, who was an Italian Jesuit and professor in Rome, a botanist, and an author of illustrated botanical books. A good example is Senna ferraria.

Ferrea: [fer-ree-a] From Ferrugineus, which is Latin for rusty iron coloured. It refers to the soils, which contain a lot of iron so are deep rusty red in colour. A good example is Diospyros ferrea.

Ferresii: [fer-re-si-ahy] Is probably named in honour of James Henry Ferriss; 1849-1926, who was an American politician and amateur conchologist who collected the largest collection of land mollusk shells ever. A good example is Olearia ferresii.

Ferricola: [fer-i-koh-la] From Ferrugineus, which is Latin for rusty iron coloured From Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to reside at or dwell at. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on or in soils that contain a lot of iron so consequently they are deep rusty red in colour. A good example is Darwinia ferricola.

Ferrimontanus: [fer-ri-mon-ta-nus] From Ferrugineus, which is Latin for rusty iron coloured and Montanum, which is Latin for of or in the mountains. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on mountains. A good example iwas Pandanus ferrimontanus, which is now known as Pandanus cookii.

Ferriticola: [fer-i-ti-koh-la] From Ferrugineus, which is Latin for rusty iron coloured From Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to reside at or dwell at. It refers to the soils which contain a lot of iron so are deep rusty red in colour. A good example is Corymbia ferriticola.

Ferruginea 1: [fer-u-jin-ee] From Ferrugineus, which is Latin for rusty iron coloured. It refers to the colour of the leaves, hairs or other physical properties of a plant, which have a rusty iron colour. A good example is Helicia ferruginea.

Ferruginea 2: [fer-u-jin-ee] From Ferrugineus, which is Latin for rusty iron coloured. It refers to the colour of sludge or oil slicks, which has a rusty iron colour. This group of bacteria which create oily slimes and rusty brown sludges in slow moving anaerobic waters where iron is in high concentrations in the soil. A good example is the bacteria of Gallionella ferruginea, Gallionella filamenta, Sphaeotilus natans and Leptothrix discophora which will form an oily biofilm on the surface and a rusty coloured sludge within the water by precipitating iron.

Ferruginea 3: [fe-ru-gi-nee] From Ferrūginus, which is Latin for iron. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on red iron oxide clays. A good example is Eucalyptus ferruginea.

Ferrugineus: [fer-u-jin-ee-um] From Ferrugineus, which is Latin for rusty iron coloured. It refers to leaf hairs or other physical properties of a plant which have a rusty iron colour. A good example is Aceratium ferrugineus.

Ferrugineus: [fer-u-jin-ee-us] From Ferrugineus, which Latin for rusty iron coloured. It refers to leaf hairs or other physical properties of a plant which have a rusty iron colour. A good example is Ozothamnus ferrugineus.

Ferruginiflora: [fer-ru-ji-ni-flor-a] From Ferrugineus, which is Latin for rusty iron coloured and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flower’s rachises and petioles which have deep rusty iron coloured hairs. A good example is Buckinghamia ferruginiflora.

Ferruginifloris: [fer-u-ji-ni-flor-is] From Ferrugineus, which is Latin for rusty iron coloured and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flower’s rachises, petioles and sepals which have deep rusty iron coloured hairs. A good example is Elaeocarpus ferruginifloris.

Ferruginiflorus: [fer-ru-ji-ni-flor-os] From Ferrugineus, which is Latin for rusty iron coloured and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flower’s rachises and petioles which have deep rusty iron coloured hairs. A good example is Elaeocarpus ferruginiflorus.

Ferruginipes: [fer-ru-ji-ni-pes] From Ferrugineus, which is Latin for rusty iron coloured and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to the flower’s rachises, bracts and glumes which are a deep rusty iron colour. A good example is Harperia ferruginipes.

Fertile: [fer-tahyl] From Fertilis, which is Latin for to be able to bear offspring. It refers to plants, which are able to reproduce sexually. A good example is one of the world’s rarest plants Banksia prionophylla.

Fertilization: [fer-ti-lahy-zei-shon] From Fertilis, which is Latin for to be able to bear offspring. It refers to when the male nucleus of the pollen unites with the female nucleus in the ovule or when the sperm reaches the egg in ferns.

Fervens: [fer-venz] From Fervēns, which is Latin for red hot, boiling, burning or inflamed. It refers to plants, which grow in very hot environments. A good example is Solanum fervens which grows in deciduous back dunes in the far north of Cape York Peninsular which has a very hot climate. Warning: The fruit has not been tested to ensure its edibility and some Solanum species are toxic both in the short term or long term.

Festivum: [fes-ti-vum] From Festivum, which is Latin for festive, bright or gay. It refers to plants, which are rather vibrant. A good example is Phebalium festivum.

Festuca: [fes-tyoo-ku] From Fescue, which is Latin for stalks or straw. It refers to small clump grasses, which have a rather tough and weedy appearance. A good example is Festuca asperula.

Festucacea: [fes-tyoo-ka-see-a] From Fescue, which is Latin for stalks or straw. It refers to small clump grasses, which have a rather tough and weedy appearance. A good example is Conostylis festucacea.

Festucella: [fes-tyoo-sel-la] From Fescue, which is Latin for stalks or straw and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to small clump grasses, which have a more dainty appearance. A good example was Festucella eriopoda, which is now known as Hookerochloa eriopoda.

Fetid: [fe-tid] From Fetidus, which is Latin for having an offensive odour. It usually It refers to the flowers but can be any organ on a plant, which has a bad smell. A good example is the fruit of Morinda citrifolia which stinks like vomit or the fly attracting feces smell of the fungus Aseroe rubra.

Fetida: [fe-ti-da] From Fetidus, which is Latin for having an offensive odour. It usually refers to the flowers but can be any organ on a plant, which has a bad smell. A good example was Plectranthus fetida which is now known asColeus fetida.

Feuilleea: [fe-yoo-il-leea] From Fescue, which is Latin for stalks or straw. It refers to small clump grasses, which have a rather tough and weedy appearance. A good example is Conostylis festucacea.

Feurnrohrii: [fe-yoo-roh-ri-ahy] Is named in honour of Feurnhr. A good example was Feuilleea distachya, which is now known as Paraserianthes lophantha.

Fialaris: [fi-al-ar-is] From Filum, which is Latin for a thread and Arium, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to small clump grasses which have a more delicate appearance. A good example is Fialaris umbellata, which is now known as Myrsine urceolata.

Fibonacci Phyllotaxis: [fi-bon-a-si, fahyl-lo-tahk-sis] It refers to a fundamental type of leaf arrangement expressed as a fraction in which each succeeding fraction is the sum of the two previous numerators and the sum of the two previous denominator, i.e., 1/2, 1/3, 2/5, 3/8, 5/13, 8/21, _/__ etc. The numerator represents the number of turns or spirals around a stem before one leaf is directly above another or one anther or style is directly above another. The denominator represents the number of leaves in the turns or spirals before one is directly above the other again. 2/5 phyllotaxy would mean two twists and five leaves before one leaf is directly above the other or an angle of divergence of 144 between succeeding leaves on the stem (2/5 of 360 ). It is named in honour of Leonardo Fibonacci; born c. 1170, Pisa?—died after 1240, who was a medieval Italian mathematician.

Fibonacci Sequence: [fi-bon-a-see, see-kwens] Is a fundamental type of leaf arrangement expressed as a fraction in which each succeeding fraction is the sum of the two previous numerators and the sum of the two previous denominators, i.e., 1/2, 1/3, 2/5, 3/8, 5/13, 8/21, _/__ etc. The numerator represents the number of turns or spirals around a stem before one leaf is directly above another or one anther or style is directly above another. The denominator represents the number of leaves in the turns or spirals before one is directly above the other again. 2/5 phyllotaxy would mean two twists and five leaves before one leaf is directly above the other or an angle of divergence of 144 between succeeding leaves on the stem (2* 360/5=144). It is named in honour of Leonardo Fibonacci; born c. 1170, Pisa?—died after 1240, who was a medieval Italian mathematician.

Left – Fibonacci Sequence andi Mellis
Right – Despite the styles being unopened on this Banksia
plagiocarpa, they appear to be above each other. In fact they form a spiral around the peduncle, as indicated by the red arrow.

Fibrata: [fi-bra-ta] From Fibratus, which is Latin for hair like streaks. It refers to mycillium, which are very fine and silky. A good example is Lomandra fibrata.

Fibrillosa: [fi-bri-loh-sa] From Fibratus, which is Latin for hair like streaks. It refers to mycillium, which are very fine and silky. A good example is Inocybe fibrillosa.

Fibrillose: [fi-bri-lohs] From Fibratus, which is Latin for hair like streaks. It refers to a description of very fine, hair like roots on a plant. A good example is the partial veil on Cortinarius archeri.

Fibrosa: [fahy-broh-sa] From Fibratus, which is Latin for hair like streaks. It refers to the fibrous trunks of trees especially those in the Eucalyptus genus. A good example is the hard fibrous bark on Eucalyptus fibrosa.

Fibrosum: [fahy-broh-sum] From Fibratus, which is Latin for hair like streaks. It refers to the trunks of trees, which are more fibrous than other species in the genus. A good example is Syzygium fibrosum.

Fibrous: [fahy-brohs] From Fibratus, which is Latin for hair like streaks. It refers to plants where the root system has many fine roots and not a tap root. A good example is Banksia integrifolia.

Fibulifera: [fi-byoo-li-fer-a] From Fibula, which is Latin for a pin, clasp or bolt and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers structures or organs, which resembles the fibula bone because of its resemblance to the tongue of a clasp. A good example is the slimmer lateral stems which run adjacent to the main stem resembling the Fibula bone Sida fibulifera.

Ficifolia: [fi-si-foh-li-a] From Fici, which is Latin for a fig and Folia which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble those of the Ficus genus. A good example is Coymbia ficifolia.

Ficifolium: [fi-si-foh-li-um] From Fici, which is Latin for a fig and Folia which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble those of the Ficus genus. A good example is Chenopodium ficifolium.

Ficifolius: [fi-si-foh-li-us] From Fici, which is Latin for a fig and Folia which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble those of the Ficus genus. A good example is Mallotus ficifolius.

Ficinia: [fi-sin-i-a] Is named in honour of Heinrich David August Ficinis; 1782-1857, who was a German botanist. A good example is Ficinia nodosa.

Ficivorus: [fi-si-vor-us] From Ficus, which is Latin for a fig and Vorous which is Latin for devour or to eat. It refers to parasitic plants, which prefer Fig trees to parasitize. A good example was Loranthus ficivorus, which is now known as Amyema artensis.

Ficoides: [fi-koi-deez] From Ficus, which is for the Mediterranean fig tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to any structure or organ, which resembles a fig or fig tree. The meaning here is unclear as the name is also used erroneously when discussing Acacia ficoides.

Ficulneoides: [fi-kul-ne-oi-deez] From Fīculneum, which is Latin for a fig tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to any structure or organ, which resembles a fig or fig tree. A good example is the leaves on Hibiscus ficulneoides, which is now known as Abelmoschus manihot subsp. tetraphyllus.

Ficulneus: [fahy-kul-ne-us] From Fīculneum, which is Latin for a fig tree. It refers to any structure or organ, which resembles fig tree. A good example is the leaves on Hibiscus ficulneus.

Ficus: [fahy-kus] From Ficus, which is Latin for the Mediterranean fig tree. It refers to Australian trees, which are related to the European commercial fig trees. A good example is Ficus coronata.

Fid: [fid] From Findere, which is Latin for to divide or split. It usually It refers to stigmas, which branch twice (bifid) or three times (trifid). A good example is Zieria bifida.

Fiddlehead: [fi-del-hed] From Fithele, which is Old English or Videl which is Dutch for the scroll on a fiddle and Hafod which is Old English for a head. It refers to the unwound fronds (coziers) on ferns, which resemble the scroll on a violin or fiddle. A good example is Calochlaena dubia.

Cyathea cooperi Calochnaena dubia

Fieldia: [feel-di-a] Is named in honour of Barron Field; 1786-1846, who was a German botanist. A good example is Fieldia australis.

Filaginoides: [fi-la-ji-noi-deez] From Filum, which is Greek for a course thread and Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the fine connecting conduit between the anther and its attachment to the rest of the flower. A good example is Phyllocalymma filaginoides, which is now known as Angianthus micropodioides.

Filament: [fi-la-ment] From Filum, which is Greek for a course thread. It refers to the fine connecting conduit between the anther and its attachment to the rest of the flower. A good example is Melaleuca pearsonii.

Filaments on Cassia brewsteri.

Filamenta: [fi-la-men-ta] From Filum, which is Greek or a course thread. It refers to the group of bacteria which form thread like strands. They create oily slimes and rusty brown sludges in slow moving anaerobic waters where iron is in high concentrations in the soil. A good example is the bacteria of Gallionella filamenta, Sphaeotilus natans and Leptothrix discophora which will form an oily biofilm on the surface and a rusty coloured sludge within the water by precipitating iron.

Filamentosa: [fi-la-men-toh-sa] From Filum, which is Greek for a course thread. It refers to anthers, which have prominent filaments. A good example is Acacia filamentosa.

Filamentose: [fi-la-men-tohs] From Filum, which is Greek for a course thread. It refers a description of a courser connecting conduit between the anther and its attachment to the rest of the flower.

Filamentosum: [fi-ah-men-toh-sum] From Filum, which is Greek for a course thread. It refers to having many connecting conduit between the anther and its attachment to the rest of the flower. A good example is Racosperma filamentosum, which is now known as Acacia filamentosa.

Filamentosus: [fi-la-men-toh-sus] From Filum, which is Greek for a course thread. It refers to having many connecting conduit between the anther and its attachment to the rest of the flower. A good example is Nipaecoccus filamentosus.

Filantherous: [fi-lan-ther-us] From Filum, which is Greek for a course thread and ántha/ánthos, which are Greek for the male reproductive organ on a flower or the flower. It refers to stamens, which have distinct anthers and filaments with or without a thecal appendage.

Filicaule: [fi-li-kor-le] From Filum, which is Greek for a thread and Kaulos, which is Greek for a stick, stem or small branch. It refers to filaments, which stand erect but are extremely fine and thread like. A good example is the filaments on the moss Papillaria filicaule.

Filicaulis: [fi-li-kor-lis] From Filum, which is Greek for a thread and Kaulos, which is Greek for a stick, stem or small branch. It refers to filaments, which stand erect but are extremely fine and thread like. A good example is the filaments on Juncus filicaulis.

Filices: [fi-li-seez] From Filices/filix, which is Latin for a fern. It refers to the general non sexual differences in ferns whereas males are referred to as Filices-mas, while females are referred to as Filices-femina. A good example is the filaments on Athyrium filix-femina.

Filices-femina: [fi-li-seez, fe-mi-na] From Filices/filix, which is Latin for a fern and Femina, which is Latin for a woman or a wife. It refers to ferns which have sexual differences, in this case a female form. A good example is the filaments on Athyrium filix-femina

Filices-mas: [fi-li-seez, mas] From Filices/filix, which is Latin for a fern and Mās, which is Latin for a man or a husband. It refers to ferns which have sexual differences, in this case the male form.

Filicifolia: [fi-li-si-foh-li-a] From Filices/filix, which is Latin for a fern and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a plants leaves resembling the pinnae of a fern. A good example is the leaflets on Acacia filicifolia.

Filicifolium: [fi-li-si-foh-li-um] From Filices/filix, which is Latin for a fern and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a plants leaves resembling the pinnae of a fern. A good example is the leaflets on Racosperma filicifolium , which is now known as Acacia filicifolia.

Filicinus: [fi-li-si-nus] From Filices/filix, which is Latin for a fern and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a plants leaves, which resemble the pinnae of a fern. A good example is the leaflets on Sauropus filicinus.

filicologist: [fi-li-kol-o-jist] From Filices/filix, which is Latin for a fern, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who studies ferns.

Filicology: [fi-li-kol-o-jee] From Filices/filix, which is Latin or a fern and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the science which studies ferns.

Filicula: [fi-li-si-kyoo-la] From Filices/filix, which is Latin for a fern and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants which belong to the fern family. A good example is the leaflets on Trichomanes filicula, which is now known as Crepidomanes bipunctatum.

Filiculoides: [fil-i-kyoo-loi-deez] From Filices/filix, which is Latin for a fern and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which belong to the fern family. A good example is Azolla filiculoides.

Filidens: [fi-li-denz] From Filum, which is Latin or a thread or a thin cord and Densa which is Latin for crowded or dense. It refers to male flowers, which are extremely dense at the end of the thin articulated branchlets. A good example is Allocasuarina filidens.

Filiferus: [fi-li-fer-us] From Filum, which is Greek for a thread and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin or to bear. It usually It refers to a description of a structure which bears filament like organs like the cottony coverings of mealy bugs. A good example is the leaves on Xylococcus filiferus.

Filifolia: [fi-li-foh-li-a] From Filum, which is Latin for a thread or a thin cord and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are thread like. A good example is the leaves on Petrophile filiifolia.

Filifolium: [fi-li-foh-li-um] From Filum, which is Latin for a thread or a thin cord and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are very fine. A good example is Diodontium filifolium.

Filifolius: [fi-li-foh-li-us] From Filum, which is Latin for a thread or a thin cord and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are very fine. A good example is Eriostemon filifolius.

Filiforme: [fi-li-form] From Filum, which is Latin for a thread or a thin cord and Forme which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to a structure or organ, which is thread like. A good example is the culms on Lepidosperma filiforme.

Filiformis: [fi-li-for-mis] From Filum, which is Latin for a thread or a thin cord and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to a structure or organ, which is thread like. A good example was Eucalyptus filiformis, which is now known as Eucalyptus polybractea.

Fililoba: [fi-li-loh-ba] From Filum, which is Latin for a thread or a thin cord and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to structures or organs, which are ear like and very narrow to almost thread like. A good example is the leaf lobes on Banksia fililoba.

Fililobum: [fi-li-loh-bum] From Filum, which is Latin for a thread or a thin cord and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to lobes on the calyxes which are somewhat narrow and thread like. A good example is Teucrium fililobum.

Filipendula: [fi-li-pen-dyoo-la] From Filum, which is Latin for a thread or a thin cord and Pendulous, which is Greek for to hang down. It refers to the long thin awns which hang downwards. A good example is Hyparrhenia filipendula.

Filipendulinus: [fi-li-pen-dyoo-li-nus] From Filum, which is Latin for a thread or a thin cord and Pendulous, which is Greek for to hang down. It refers to the long thin awns, which hang downwards. A good example was Andropogon filipendulinus, which is now known as Hyparrhenia filipendula.

Filipes: [fi-li-pes] From Filum, which is Latin for a thread or a thin cord. It refers to the culms being very fine or thread like. A good example is Chrysopogon filipes.

Filix: [fi-liks] From Filices/filix, which is Latin for a fern. It refers to the general non sexual differences in ferns whereas male ferns are referred to as Filices-mas, while female ferns are referred to as Filices-femina. A good example is the fronds on Athyrium filix-femina.

Filsonii: [fi-li-so-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Rex Bertram Filson; 1930-1930, who was an Australian carpenter who worked in Antarctica as a carpenter 1961-63 and later studied botany, a seed collector, lichenologist and finally as a senior botanist. A good example is Portulaca filsonii.

Filum: [fi-lum] From Filum, which is Latin for a thread or a thin cord. It refers to the leaves being thin almost acicular or the fine cord (flagella) in which the pseudo seeds hang and are attached to the spike. A good example is Gahnia filum.

Fimbria: [fim-bri-a] From Fimbriātum, which is Latin for a fringe. It refers to the margins of a structure or organ, which has a fringe. A good example is the phyllodes on Prasophyllum fimbria.

Fimbriata: [fim-bri-a-ta] From Fimbriāta, which is Latin for a fringe. It refers to the margins of a structure or organ, which has a fringe. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia fimbriata.

Fimbriate: [fim-bri-eit] From Fimbriātum, which is Latin for a fringe. It refers to the description of the margins of an organ, which has a dense fringe. A good example is the fimbriate new growth on Eremaea fimbriata.

Fimbriatum: [fim-bri-a-tum] From Fimbriātum, which is Latin for a fringe. It refers to the margins of a structure or organ, which has a fringe. A good example is the corolla lobes on Artanema fimbriatum.

Fimbriatus: [fim-bri-a-tuhs] From Fimbriātum, which is Latin for a fringe. It refers to the margins of a structure or organ, which has a fringe. A good example is the corolla lobes on Leucopogon fimbriatus.

Fimbrilabium: [fim-bri-la-bi-um] From Fimbriātum, which Latin for a fringe and Labellum which is Latin for a modified lower petal on orchids. It refers to labellum which have a fringe along the margins. A good example is Durabacium fimbrilabium, which is now known as Dendrobium discolor.

Fimbrilepis: [fim-bri-lepis] From Fimbriātum, which is Latin for a fringe and Lepis, which is Latin for scaly. It refers to the margins of the scale like petals which have a dense long fringe. A good example is Verticordia fimbrilepis.

Fimbriolata: [fim-bri-o-la-ta] From Fimbriātum, which is Latin for a fringe. It refers to the margins of a structure or organ, which has a sparse fringe. A good example is the glumes on Maireana fimbriolata.

Fimbriolate: [fim-bri-o-leit] From Fimbriātum, which is Latin for a fringe. It refers to the margins of a structure or organ, which have a sparse fringe. A good example is the glumes on Bulbostylis humilis.

Fimbripetala: [fim-bri-pe-ta-la] From Fimbriātum, which is Latin for a fringe and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators. It refers to petals which have a fringe. A good example is Verticordia fimbripetala, which is now known as Verticordia huegelii.

Fimbrisepala: [fim-bri-se-pa-la] From Fimbriātum, which is Latin for a fringe. It refers to the margins of a structure or organ, which have a sparse fringe. A good example is the glumes on Micromyrtus fimbrisepala.

Fimbristylis: [fim-bri-sti-lis] From Fimbriātum, which is Latin for a fringe and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column or the female reproductive organ on a flower. It refers to the styles, which have a sparse ciliate fringe. A good example is Fimbristylis nutans.

Fimbristyloides: [fim-bri-stahy-loi-deez] From Fimbriātum, which is Latin for a fringe, Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column or the female reproductive organ on a flower and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plant styles, which have a sparse ciliate fringe which typically resembles the Fymbristylis genus. A good example is Fimbristylis fimbristyloides.

Finalis: [fin-a-lis] From Fīnālis, which is Latin for bordering on the edge or at the margin. It refers to organs usually the leaves, which have a special feature. A good example is Tragia finalis which has toothed or at times are fringed on basal lobes.

Findlayi: [fin-lei-ahy] Is named in honour of James Findlay; 1819-1905, who was an Austrian collector of plants for Ferdinand von Mueller. A good example is Bertya findlayi.

Finlaysonia: [fin-lei-so-ni-a] Is named in honour of Finlayson. A good example is Finlaysonia obovate.

Finlaysoniana: [fin-lei-son-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Finllayson. A good example is the sundew Drosera finlaysoniana.

Finniganensis: [fin-ni-ga-nen-sis] From Finnigan, which is Latin for Finnigan and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to where the plants were originally discovered in far north east Queensland. A good example is Thelychiton finniganensis.

Fioria: [fi-or-i-a] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which herald spring with an abundance of flowers or spring time flowering. A good example is Fioria vittifolia.

Firmiana: [fer-mi-a-na] Is named in honour of Karl Joseph von Firmian; 1716-1782, who was an Austrian nobleman. It refers to he being a collector of fine artwork and the flowers reiterating the beauty of fine artwork. A good example is Firmiana papuana.

Firmis: [fer-mis] From Firmus, which is Latin for firm and strong. It refers to the plants, which are more robust than other species in the genus. A good example is Juncus firmis which is a spelling error for Juncus firmus in some publications.

Firmum: [fer-mum] From Firmus, which is Latin for firm and strong. It refers to the plants, which are more robust than other species in the genus. A good example is Homalospermum firmum.

Firmus: [fer-mus] From Firmus, which is Latin for firm and strong. It refers to the plants, which are more robust than other species in the genus. A good example is Juncus firmus.

Fisschii: [fis-chi-ahy] Is named in honour of Paul Fisch; 1908 – 1962 who was an Australian orchardist and naturalist. A good example is Pterostylis fischii.

Fissifolia: [fi-si-foh-li-a] From Fissum, which are Latin for a split, crack or fissure and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves, which have a deep cut or appearing to have a deep cut in them. A good example is Hakea lorea var. fissifolia.

Fissifolium: [fi-si-foh-li-um] From Fissum, which are Latin for a split, crack or fissure and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves, which have a deep cut or appearing to have a deep cut in them. A good example is the exotic pasture grass Axonopus fissifolium.

Fissifolius: [fi-si-foh-li-us] From Fissum, which are Latin for a split, crack or fissure and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves, which have a deep cut or appearing to have a deep cut in them. A good example is Orites excelsus var. fissifolius.

Fissilobum: [fi-si-loh-bum] From Fissum, which are Latin for a split, crack or fissure and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for an ear lobe. It refers to structure or organ, which has lobes, often resembling an ear. A good example is the exotic pasture grass Stylidium fissifolius.

Fissimontana: [fi-si-mon-tan-a] From Fissum, which are Latin for a split, crack or fissure and Montanum, which is Latin for a mountain. It refers to plants, which are found around Broken Hill; on fissured rocks, where the type specimen was found. A good example is Swainsona fissimontana.

Fissistigma: [fis-si-stig-ma] From Fissum, which are Latin for a split, crack or fissure and Stigmus, which is Latin for a stigma. It refers to plants, which have a separate stigma on each of the two carpels. A good example is Meliodora leichhardtii which was known as Fissistigma leichhardtii.

Fissistipula: [fis-si-sti-pyoo-la] From Fissum, which are Latin for a split, crack or fissure and Stipulus, which is Latin for a stipule. It refers to stipules, which split in two or stipule like leaves being in pairs. A good example is the moss Lophocolea fissistipula.

Fissistipulus: [fi-si-sti-pyoo-lus] From Fissum, which are Latin for a split, crack or fissure and Stipulus, which is Latin for a stipule. It refers to stipules, which split in two or stipule like leaves being in pairs. A good example is the leaves on Chiloscyphus fissistipulus which is now known as Chiloscyphus semiteres.

Fissivalve: [fis-si-va-lv] From Fissum, which is Latin for a cleft or and Valvae, which is Latin for the leaf of a door. It refers to capsules, which have valves that open that are similar to those on a clam. A good example is Haloxanthium fissivalve.

Fissivalvis: [fi-si-val-vis] From Fissum, which is Latin for a split, crack or fissure and valvus which is Latin for a door leaf. It refers to fruits, which split open similar to a door swinging opening. A good example is Atriplex fissivalvis.

Fissurata: [fi-zher-a-ta] From Fissum, which are Latin for a split, crack or fissure. It refers to barks, which have large cracks. A good example is the cracked bark on Melaleuca fissuratum.

Fissuratum: [fi-zher-a-tum] From Fissum, which are Latin for a split, crack or fissure. It refers to barks, which have large cracks. A good example is the cracked bark on Melaleuca fissuratum.

Fissured: [fi-zherd] From Fissum, which are Latin for a split, crack or fissure. It refers to the barks, which have large vertical cracks. A good example is the cracked bark on Capparis mitchellii.

Fistula: [fis-tyoo-la] From Fistula, which is old English or Fistula which is Latin for a hollow tube. It refers to reeds, which have hollow culms. A good example is the hollow culms of Phragmites australis.

Fistulina: [fis-tyoo-li-na] From Fistula, which is old English or Fistula, which is Latin for a hollow tube. It refers to fungi, which have rather long hollow cavites between the apex of the stalk and the underside of the pileus. A good example is Fistulinella mollis.

Fistulinella: [fis-tyoo-li-nel-la] From Fistula, which is old English or Fistula, which is Latin for a hollow tube and Ella, which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. It refers to fungi, which have a hollow cavity between the apex of the stalk and the underside of the pileus. A good example is Fistulinella mollis.

Fistulosa: [fis-tyoo-loh-sa] From Fistula, which is old English or Fistula which is Latin for a hollow tube. It refers to reeds which have hollow culms. A good example is the hollow flower stems on Ipomoea fistulosa or the frond stipes on Schizaea fistulosa.

Fistulose: [fis-tyoo-lose] From Fistulam, which is old English or Fistula which is Latin for a hollow tube. It refers to organs, which are hollow.

Fistulosum: [fis-tyoo-loh-sum] From Fistula, which is old English or Fistula which is Latin for a hollow tube. It refers to reeds, which have hollow culms. A good example was Acrostitchum fistulosum which is now known as Schizaea fistulosa.

Fistulosus: [fis-tyoo-loh-sus] From Fistula, which is old English or Fistula which is Latin for a hollow tube. It refers to reeds, which have hollow culms. A good example is Asphodelus fistulosus.

Fitzalania: [fit-za-lah-ni-a] Is named in honour of Eugene Fitzalan; 1830-1911, who was an Irish born Australian whocollected manynew speciemens. From Brisbane north especially around the Burdiken District in Queensland. A good example isFitzalania heteropetala.

Fitzalanii: [fit-za-lah-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Eugene Fitzalan; 1830-1911, who was an Irish born Australian whocollected many new speciemens from Brisbane, north especially around the Burdiken District in Queensland. A good example is Ficus fitzalanii, which is now known as Ficus opposita.

Fitzgeraldia: [fits-je-ral-di-a] Is named in honour of Fitzgerald but which Fitzgerald cannot be substantiated. A good example is Fitzgeraldia mitrastigma, which is now known as Cananga odorata.

Fitzgeraldiana: [fits-je-ral-di-a-na] Is named in honour of Fitzgerald but which Fitzgerald cannot be substantiated. A good example is Fitzgeraldia mitrastigma, which is now known as Cananga odorata.

Fitzgeraldianus: [fits-je-ral-di-e-nus] Is named in honour of William Vincent Fitzgerald; 1867-1929, who was an Australian botanist in Western Australia naming 5 new genus and sepecializing in the Acacia and Eucalyptus genus. A good example is Oberonia fitzgeraldiana.

Fitzgeraldii 1: [fits-je-ral-di-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Robert D. Fitzgerald; 1830-1892, who was an Irish born Australian botanist who preferred to study Australian orchids but I have been unable to substantiated it. A good example is Microstrobos fitzgeraldii.

Fitzgeraldii 2: [fits-je-ral-di-ahy] Is probably named in honour of William Vincent Fitzgerald; 1867-1929, who was an Australian botanist in Western Australia naming 5 new genre and 210 new species mainly in the Acacia genus and Eucalyptus genus but I have been unable to substantiated it. A good example is Acacia fitzgeraldii, which is now known as Acacia xerophila.

Fitzlanii: [fits-lan-i-ahy] Is named in honour of Eugene Fitzalan; 1830-1911, who was an Irish born Australian who collected many new speciemens from Brisbane north, especially around the Burdiken District in Queensland. A good example is Psychotria fitzalanii.

Fitzroyensis: [fits-roi-en-sis] From Fitzroy, which is Latinized for the Fitzroy River and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first dicovered along the Fitzroy River in Western Australia. A good example is Psychotria fitzalanii.

Fitzwillia: [fits-wil-li-a] Is named in honour of one of the Earl Fitzwilliam, but which one cannot be established. She/he also had an Oncidium orchid named in his honour. A good example is Fitzwillia axilliflora.

Fiveashianus: [fahyv-a-shi-a-nus] I am really drawing at straws on this one but maybe from Five which is old English for five, Asiānós, which is Ancient Greek or Asiānus which is Latin for Asia and Ianus which is Latin for of or from. It there for may refer to the fungus which was first discoverd in five Asian countries almost simultaneously. A good example is the filmy ferns fronds on Cortinarius fiveashianus.

Flabellata: [fla-bel-la-ta] From Flabellum, which is Latin for a fan shape. It refers to leaves or branches, which have a fan shape. A good example is the filmy ferns fronds on Sebdenia flabellata.

Flabellate: [fla-bel-leit] From Flabellum, which is Latin for a fan shape. It refers to leaves or branches, which have a fan shape.

Flabellatum: [fla-bel-l-tum] From Flabellum, which is Latin for a fan shape. It refers to leaves, branches or fronds, which have a fan shape. A good example is the fronds of the filmy fern Hymenophyllum flabellatum.

Flabellatus: [fla-bel-la-tus] From Flabellum, which is Latin for a fan shape. It refers to leaves or branches, which have a fan shape. A good example is the pinnules on Hymenophyllum flabellatus.

Flabellifolia: [fla-bel-li-foh-li-a] From Flabellum, which is Latin for a fan shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which have a distinct fan shape shape. A good example is Hakea flabellifolia.

Flabellifolium: [fla-bel-li-foh-li-um] From Flabellum, which is Latin for a fan shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which have a fan shape. A good example is the leaves on Asplenium flabellifolium.

Flabellifolius: [fla-bel-li-foh-li-us] From Flabellum, which is Latin for a fan shape and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which have a fan shape. A good example is the leaves on Adenanthos flabellifolius.

Flabelliform: [fla-bel-li-form] From Flabellum, which is Latin for a fan shape and Forme which is Latin for to take the shape of or form of. It refers to leaves or branches, which have a fan shape. A good example is the leaves on Livistona australis.

Flabelliformis: [fla-bel-li-for-mis] From Flabellum, which is Latin for a fan shape and Forme which is Latin for to take the shape of or form of. It refers to leaves or branches, which have a fan shape. A good example is the shape of the seeds on Tectcornia flabelliformis.

Flabellulata: [fla-bel-yoo-la-ta] From Flabellum, which is Latin for a fan shape. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or pinnules, which are fan shaped or ar at times the overall shape of a tree. A good example is the pinnules on Lindsaea flabellulata, which is now known as Lindsaea media.

Flaccid: [flas-sid] From Flaccidus, which is Latin for limp or flabby. It refers to leaves or branchlets, which are semi weepy to weepy due to the lack of water uptake. A good example is the stem and leaves on the pumpkin below.

Goodia grandiflora Pumpkin, Cucurbita argyrosperma.

Flaccida: [flas-si-da] From Flaccidus, which is Latin for limp or flabby. It refers to the leaves semi arching to arching. A good example is Luzula flaccida.

Flaccidum: [flas-si-dum] From Flaccidum, which is Latin for limp or flabby. It refers to leaves, which arch downwards. A good example is the leaves on Crinum flaccidum.

Flaccidus: [flas-si-dus] From Flaccidum, which is Latin for limp or flabby. It refers to leaves, which arch downwards. A good example is the leaves on Cyperus flaccidus.

Flacortia: [fla-kor-ti-a] Is named in honour of Etienne de Flacourt; 1607-1660, who was a French east Indian Company director and studied the Elephant bird prior to its extinction. A good example is Flacortia territoralis.

Flacourtia: [fla-kor-ti-a] Is named in honour of Etienne de Flacourt; 1607-1660, whowas a French east Indian Company director and studied the Elephant bird prior to its extinction. A good example is Flacourtia cataphracta.

Flagella: [fla-jel-la] From Flagrum, which is Latin for a whip or lash. It refers to structures or organs, which are whip like extension. A good example is the flagella on the seeds of Gahnia aspera.

Flagellaria: [fla-jel-lar-a] From Flagrum, which is Latin for a whip or lash. It refers to structures or organs, which are whip like extension. A good example is the apex of the leaves on Flagellaria indica.

Flagellaris: [fla-jel-lar-is] From Flagrum, which is Latin for a whip or lash. It refers to structures or organs, which are whip like extension A good example is the apex of the leaves on Tephrosia flagellaris.

Flagellarus: [fla-jel-lar-us] From Flagrum, which is Latin for a whip or lash. It refers to structures or organs, which are whip like extension A good example is the apex of the leaves on Sticherus flagellarus.

Flagellifera: [fla-jel-li-fer-a] From Flagrum, which is Latin for a whip or lash and Ferae/Ferārum which is Latin for to bear. It refers to plants, which bear a long whip like appendage or an extended spadix that tapers towards the apex. A good example is the runner buds on Goodenia flagellifera, which is now known as Goodenia glabra.

Flagelliferum: [fla-jel-li-fer-um] From Flagrum, which is Latin for a whip or lash and Ferae/Ferārum which is Latin for to bear. It refers to plants, which bear a long whip like appendage or an extended spadix that tapers towards the apex. A good example is the long thread like growth on Stigeoclonium flagelliferum.

Flagelliforme: [fla-je-lli-form] From Flagrum, which is Latin for a whip or lash and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to appendages or a spadix tapering towards the apex which have a long whip like extension. A good example is the spadix on Typhonium flagelliforme.

Flagelliformis: [fla-jel-li-for-mis] From Flagrum, which is Latin for a whip or lash and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to an appendage, which has a having a whip like extension. A good example is the flowering and fruiting rachises on Cupaniopsis flagelliformis and the long flagelliforme stems and leaves on Acacia flagelliformis.

Flammeum: [flam-mee-um] From Flammare, which is Latin for fiery red. It refers to the colour of the flowers, which are flame red. A good example is Alloxylon flammeum.

Flange: [flanj] From Flaunche, which is early English or Flanche, male and Flanc female, which is French for an appendage that is at right angles to the main organ. It refers to an appendage, which is at right angles to the main structure or organ. A good example is the flange on the seed capsules on Grevillea martinii.

Flat: [flat] From Platýs, which is Greek for flat or level. It refers to a leaf or leaflet’s margin, which is not rolled upwards or downwards however the cross-section of the leaf, leaflet or pinnule may have a “U” shape or a “V” shape but the lamina and margins are flat. Flat: The leaf, leaflet or pinnule’s margin is not roll upwards or downwards. Note that in cross-section, the leaf may have a “U” shaped or a “V” shaped but the lamina and margins are flat.

Flava: [fla-va] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow. It usually refers to the colour of the bracts or flowers, which are brilliant yellow. A good example is Pimelea flava.

Flavelifolium: [fla-ve-li-foh-li-um] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow. It refers to the flowers, which are brilliant deep yellow. A good example is Asplenium flavelifolium.

Flaveria: [flah-ver-i-a] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow. It usually It refers to flowers which are brilliant deep yellow. A good example is Hypericum gramineum.

Flavescens: [fla-ve-senz] From Flavum, which is Latin for turning or becoming yellow. It refers to the colour of the stems, leaves or more often the flowers, which turn yellowish or yellow-ochre following anthesis. A good example is Leptospermum flavescens.

Flavescent: [fla-ve-sent] From Flavum, which is Latin for turning or becoming yellow. It refers to the colour of the stems, leaves or more often the flowers, which turn yellowish or yellow-ochre following anthesis.

Flavicarinata: [fla-vi-kar-i-na-ta] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow and incarnates, which is Latin for flesh coloured to crimson. It refers to the colour of the standard and wings, which are being deep crimson and the colour of the keels being yellow. A good example is Swainsona flavicarinata.

Flaviculmis: [fla-vi-kul-mis] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow and kálamos which is Ancient Greek or Culmus/Culmōrum which is Latin for the stems on grasses, reeds and rushes. It refers to the culms, which are yellowish to yellowish-green in colour. A good example is Schoenus flaviculmis, which is now known as Schoenus brevisetis.

Flavida: [fla-vi-da] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow. It refers to stems, leaves or more often the flowers, which have a yellow or yellowish colour. A good example is colour of the buds on Eucalyptus flavida.

Flavidiflora: [fla-vi-di-flor-ah] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have a yellowish to bright yellow colour. A good example is Adenanthos flavidiflora, which is now known as Adenanthos flavidiflorus.

Flavidum: [flh-vi-dum] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow. It refers to stamens or flowers, which are a yellow or yellowish colour. A good example is Paspalidium flavidum.

Flavidus: [fla-vi-dus] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow. It refers to stems, leaves or more often the flowers, which have a yellow or yellowish colour. A good example is the flowers on Anigozanthus flavidus.

Flaviflora: [fla-vi-flor-a] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have a yellowish to bright yellow colour. A good example is Logania flaviflora.

Flaviflorum: [fla-vi-flor-um] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have a yellowish to bright yellow colour. A good example is Haemodorum flaviflorum.

Flaviflorus: [fla-vi-flor-us] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have a yellowish to bright yellow colour. A good example is Hibiscus flaviflorus, which is now known as Azanza thespesioides.

Flavifloris: [fla-vi-flor-is] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow and Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which have a yellowish to bright yellow colour. A good example is Hibiscus flavifloris which is one of the two popular Chinese Hibiscus, grown in many gardens with the other being Hibiscus sinensis.

Flavior: [fla-vi-or] From Flāvior, which is Latin for yellower or more golden. It refers to structures or organs, which have a stronger, richer yellow or golden yellow colour. A good example is Acacia flavipila.

Flavipila: [fla-vi-pi-la] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow and Pilose, which is Latin for long wavy hairs. It refers to a structure or organ, which is covered in yellowish coloured pilose hairs. A good example is Acacia flavipila.

Flavipilum: [fla-vi-pi-lum] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow and pilosa, which is Latin for long wavy hairs. It refers to a structure or organ, which is covered in yellowish coloured pilose hairs. A good example was Racosperma flavipilum, which is now known as Acacia flavipila.

Flavissimum: [flah-vis-si-mum] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative. It refers to stems, leaves or more often the flowers, which have a deep, bright yellow or yellowish colour. A good example is the flowers on Gnaphalium flavissimum which are brighter yellow than other species in the genus.

Flavopurpurea: [fla-vo-per-per-ee-a] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow and Purpurea, which is Latin for purple. It refers to a structure or organ, which is distinctly yellow with purple markings. A good example is Diuris flavopurpurea.

Flavovirens: [fla-vo-vahy-renz] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow and Virens, which is Latin for green. It refers to a structure or organ, which is distinctly yellow-green in colour. A good example is the leaves on Apatophyllum flavovirens.

Flavum: [fla-vuh m] From Flavum, which is Latin for yellow. It refers to flowers, which turn from white to creamy yellow or yellow on ageing. A good example is the white flowers, which turn creamy yellow then to yellow after anthesis on Hymenosporum flavum.

Hymenosporum flavum

Fleckeri: [fle-ker-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Hugo Flecker; 1884-1957, who was an Australian medical practitioner and founder of the North Queensland naturalists club and Herbarium but I have been unable to substantiated it 100% but I have been unable to substantiated it. A good example is Acacia fleckeri.

Fleischeri: [flei-cher-i] Is probably named in honour of Franz Fleischer, who was a 19th century Swiss doctor and professor of natural science. A good example was Vappodes fleischeri, which is now known as Dendrobium x fleischeri.

Flemingia: [fle-min-ji-a] Is probably named in honour of James H. M. Fleming but I have been unable to substantiated it. A good example is Flemingia trifoliastrum.

Fleshy: [fle-shee] From Fleshy, which is early English for plump. It refers to plants, which have fruit, roots or leaves that are thick, tender and succulent. A good example is the leaves on Tectcornia flabelliformis.

Fletcheri: [flet-che-ahy] It is probably named in honour of Joseph James Fletcher; 1850-1926, who was a New Zealand born Australian who was director of the Linnean society of New South Wales or William Fletcher; 1924-1983, who was an Australian wild flower artist. A good example is Isopogon fletcheri.

Fleurya: [fler-ahy-a] From Flexus, which is Latin for bent. It refers to a structure or organ, which is bent. A good example is the horse shoe shaped anthers on Fleurya photiniphylla, which is now known as Dendrocnide photiniphylla.

Flexed: [fle-ks t] From Flexus, which is Latin for bent. It refers to a structure or organ, which is bent. A good example is the horse shoe shaped anthers on Cyphanthera albicans subsp. notabilis.

Flexicaule: [flek-si-kor-lee] From Flexus, which is Latin for bent and Caulis which is Latin for a trunk or stem. It refers to the stems bending upwards. A good example is Lepidium flexicaule.

Flexicaulis: [flek-si-kor-lis] From Flexus which is Latin for bent and Caulis which is Latin for a trunk or stem. It refers to stems, which is bent. A good example is the stems on Acacia salicina.

Flexifolia: [flek-si-foh-li-a] From Flexus, which is Latin for bent and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which curve in different directions and at different angles. A good example is the bow shaped leaves on Acacia flexifolia.

Flexifolium: [flek-si-foh-li-um] From Flexus, which is Latin for bent and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves curving in different directions and at different angles. A good example is the bow shaped leaves on Leucopogon flexifolius which is at times incorrectly referred to Leucopogon flexifolium.

Flexifolius: [flek-si-foh-li-us] From Flexus, which is Latin for bent and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which curve in different directions and at different angles. A good example is the bow shaped leaves on Leucopogon flexifolius.

Flexilis: [flek-sil-is] From Flexus, which is Latin for bent, torturous, winding. It refers to stems, which are very flexible. A good example is Pultenaea flexilis.

Flexuosa: [flek-syoo-o-sa] From Flexus, which is Latin for bent, torturous, winding. It refers to branches or more often the stems, which are twisted or weeping and bend even further in the wind. A good example is Grevillea flexuosa.

Flexuosiformis: [flek-syoo-o-si-for-mis] From Flexus, which is Latin for bent, torturous, winding and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to branches or more often stems, which are weeping and bend even further in the wind. A good example was Riumex flexuosiformis, which is now known as Rumex drummondi.

Flexuosissima: [flek-syoo-oh-sis-si-muh] From Flexus, which is Latin for bent, torturous, winding and Isssima, which is Latin for the most. It refers to branches and stems, which are extremely flexible, weepy and bend even further in the wind. A good example is the tortuous stems on Corynotheca flexuosissima.

Flexuosum: [flek-syoo-oh-sum] From Flexus, which is Latin for bent, torturous, winding. It refers to branches, which are very weepy and bend even further in the wind. A good example was Leptospermum flexuosum, which is now known as Agonis flexuosum.

Flexuosus: [flek-syoo-oh-sus] From Flexus, which is Latin for bent, torturous, winding. It refers to branches, which are very weepy and bend even further in the wind. A good example is Convolvulus flexuosus.

Flexuous: [flek-syoo-os] From Flexus, which is Latin for bent, torturous, winding. It refers to branches, which are weeping and bend even further in the wind. A good example is Agonis flexuous.

Flickingeria: [fli-kin-jer-i-a] Is probably named in honour of Edward A. Flickinger, who was an English publisher of garden journals. A good example is Flickingeria comata, which is now known as Flickingeria clementsii.

Flindersia: [flin-der-si-a] Is named in honour of Mathew Flinders; 1774-1814, who was a British born Australian explorer. A good example is Flindersia australe.

Flindersica: [flin-der-si-ka] From Flinders, which is Latinized for the Flinders Ranges. It refers to the restricted distribution of species to the northern section of the Flinders Ranges north east of Port Augusta in South Australia. A good example is Ixodia flindersica.

Flindersii: [flin-der-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Mathew Flinders; 1774-1814, who was a British born Australian explorer. A good example is Eucalyptus flindersii.

Flintii: [flin-ti-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Ernest Flint but I have been unable to substantiated it 100%. A good example is Flindersia australe.

Floating: [floh-ting] From Float, which is English for to remain on the surface of a liquid. It refers to plants or a segments of a plant, which grows on the surface of water. A good example is the floating fern Azolla filiculoides or the leaves on Nymphaea gigantea.

Floccosa: [flo-koh-sa] From Floccusa, which is Latin for woolly. It refers to a structure or organ, which bears dense, woolly, tufts of long, soft hairs. A good example is Astrotricha floccosa.

Floccose: [flo-kohs] From Floccusum, which is Latin for woolly. It refers to a structure or organ, which bears woolly tufts of long, soft hairs. A good example is Pityrodia verbascina.

Floccosum: [flo-koh-sum] From Floccusum, which is Latin for woolly. It refers to a physical organ, which bears woolly tufts of long, soft hairs. A good example is the woolly fungus; Epidermophyton floccosum.

Floccosus: [flo-koh-sus] From Floccusum, which is Latin for woolly. It refers to a physical organ, which bears woolly tufts of long, soft hairs. A good example is the woolly white fly and its larvae; Aleurothrixus floccosus, which can cover the entire lower surface of leaves and stems causing an unsightly and undesirable effects on the plant often leading to disease or viral infections.

Aleurothrixus floccosustps://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=4444+4444+0110+0740

Floccum: [flo-kum] From Floccosum which is Latin for woolly. It refers to a physical organ bearing woolly tufts of long, soft hairs. Epidermophyton floccosum. A good example is Epidermophyton floccum, which is an erroneous spelling the for woolly fungus; Epidermophyton floccosum.

Flocktoniae: [flok-toh-ni-e] Is named in honour of Margaret Lilian Flockton; 1861-1953, who was an English born Australian artist and the first female lithographic artist. Agood example Eucalyptus flocktoniae.

Floodii: [flu-di-ahy] Is probably named in honour of J. A. Flood who was an early expedition plant collector. A good example Stylidium floodii.

Floral Ray: [flo-ral, rei] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers and Radius which is Latin for to furnish with rays of lines radiating out from a central point. It refers to the usually colourful petal of the ray floret or false petals within a composite flower. A good example is found on the flowers of Actinotus helianthus or Xerochrysum bracteatum as seen below.

Floral Ray – Xerochrysum bracteatum

Florenta: [flo-ren-ta] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. A good example is Stemodia florulenta.

Floret 1: [flo-et] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to the individual inner flowers, which grow in clusters. A good example is the disc florets on Xerochrysum bracteatum.

Floret 2: [flo-et] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to the individual flowers of grasses, which grow in clusters. A good example is Themeda triandra.

Grass Floret.

Floribunda: [flo-ri-bun-da] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers and Bundus, which is Latin for abundant or plenty. It refers to plants, which bear flowers that are in prolific numbers when in flower or plants, which are more floriferous than other species in the genus. A good example is Boronia floribunda.

Floribundum: [flo-ri-bun-dum] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers and Bundus, which is Latin for abundant or plenty. It refers to flowers, which are born in great abundance. A good example is Myoporum floribundum.

Floribundus: [flo-ri-bun-dus] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers and Bundus, which is Latin for abundant or plenty. It refers to flowers, which appear in a great abundance. A good example is Disoon floribundus, which is now known as Myoporum floribundum.

Florida: [flo-ri-da] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which are very floriferous. A good example was Eucalyptus florida, which is now known as Angophora floribunda.

Floridum: [flo-ri-dum] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which are very flowery. A good example was Leptospermum floridum, which is now known as Pericalymma ellipticum var. floridum.

Floridus: [flo-ri-dus] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which are very floriferous. A good example is the exotic All Spice Calycanthus floridus.

Florifera: [flo-ri-fer-a] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear flowers. It refers to plants, which bear floriferously. A good example is Prostanthera florifera.

Floriferum: [flo-ri-fer-um] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear flowers. It refers to plants, which bear floriferously. A good example is Chamelaucium floriferum.

Floriferous: [flo-ri-fer-os] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to describing plants, which bear many flowers over a long period of time. A good example can be seen on Melaleuca viminalis, Leptospermum poligalifolium, Ceropetalum gummiferum, Acacai baileyana and many more magnificent Aussie native plants.

Floriforme: [flo-ri-form] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to a structure or organ other than a flower which resembles a flower. A good example is the outer layer of the pileus on Geastrum floriforme which folds back to form a flower shape.

Florigera: [flo-ri-jer-a] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers and Geras which is Latin for may you carry, may you bear; may you wear. It refers to plants, which are very florifous. A good example is Hakea florigera, which is now known as Hakea leucoptera subsp. leucoptera.

Floripendula: [flo-ri-pen-dyoo-la] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers and Pendulī/Pendulō, which is Latin for to bend down or be pendulant. It refers to flowers, which bends or arch downwards. A good example is Grevillea floripendula.

Florist: [flo-rist] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a grower, wholesaler or retailer of flowers. A good example was my great grandfather David Mellis and some of his lineage before and after him who were Florists, nurseryman and professional grafters for the stone fruit and Pome industry.

Florulenta: [flo-yoo-len-ta] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to being flowery. A good example is Hakea florulenta.

Florulentus: [flo-yoo-len-tus] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to being flowery. A good example is Leucopogon florulentus.

Floscopa: [flo-skoh-pa] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers and Scopa which is Latin for a cup. It refers to the shape of the flower heads looking a little like a vase. A good example is Floscopa scandens.

Flosculosa: [flo-skyoo-loh-sa] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman for the Goddess of spring and flowers and Culōs, which is a Latin suffix that is added to a noun to form a diminutive of that noun. It refers to flowers, which appear rather feeble compared to other species in the genus. A good example was Germainia flosculosa, which is now known as Germainia capitata.

Flotophilous: [flo-to-fi-lus] From Photos, which is Ancient Greek for light and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek or Philos, which is Latin for to be loved or loving. It refers to plants, which seek bright sunlight. A good example is the leaves on Nymphea gigantea.

Flounced: [flouncd] From Flunsa, which is Scandinavian for a wrinkle or to be pleated on one edge. It refers to a leaf or flower’s petal that has one edge attached while the other margin is free and is unduLating, ruffled or crinkled. A good example is the corolla lobes on Tabernaemontana pandacaqui.

Flower: [flour-er] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to the reproductive structures and organs within the class Magnoliophyta. A good example can be seen in any flowering plant including Rhodasphera rhodanthema.

Flower bud: [flour-er, buhd] From Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers and Budde, which is Middle English for to be wrapped up or enclosed. It refers to flowers, which are well wrapped up in the sepals and or calyxes. A good example can be seen within the buds of Hibiscus diversifolia.

Floydia: [floi-di-a] Is named in honour of a good friend of mine and everyone at the Friends of the North Coast Botanic Gardens, Alexander Geoffrey Floyd; April 1 1926 -20.., who is an exceptionally talented man on rainforest species of Australia and who gives his time freely to help all budding volunteers and young aspiring botanists. He has been recognized with two genre named after him along with six species. A good example is Floydia praealta.

Floydii: [floi-di-ahy] Is named in honour of a good friend of mine and everyone at the Friends of the North Coast Botanic Gardens, Alexander Geoffrey Floyd; April 1 1926 -20.., who is an exceptionally talented man on rainforest species of Australia and who gives his time freely to help all budding volunteers and young aspiring botanists. He has been recognized with two genre named after him along with six species. A good example is Acacia floydii.

Flueckigeri: [floo-ki-jer-i] Is named in honour of Friedrich August Flueck(ig)er; 1828-1894, who was a Swiss Pharmacist and botanist. A good example is Tapeinosperma flueckigeri.

Flueggea: [floo-jee-a] Is named in honour of Johannes Fluegge; 1775-1816, who was a German cryptogrammic botanist and established the first Botanic Gardens in Hamburg. A good example is Flueggea leucopyrus.

Fluitans: [floo-tanz] From Fluito, which is Ancient Greek for floating. It refers to any physical structure, which floats in a liquid or breaks the water surface. A good example is Amphibromus fluitans.

Fluminalis: [floo-min-al-lis] From Fluminis, which is Latin for of the river. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in or near moving water. A good example of a plant usually found near moving water is Wahlenbergia fluminalis.

Fluminense: [floo-min-ens] From Flūmen/Flūminis, which is Latin for a stream or torrent and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in or near moving water. A good example of a plant usually found near moving water is Stylidium fluminense.

Fluorine: [floo-rahyn] From Fluo which is Latin for flow. Symbol F, Atomic Number 9.

Flushing Shoots: [flu-shing, shoots] From Flush, which are shoots that develop from mature terminal buds several times during a season. It refers to plants, in which all the shoots develop at the same time. A good example is the brilliant glossy maroon leaves on Cissus sterculiifolia which appear several times a year all at the same time.

Fagraeacea: [fah-gree-a-see-a] From Fragrantia, which is Latin for fragrant and Acea, which is Latin for a class or order. It refers to flowers, which belong to a class of plants that have a sweet scent. A good example is Fagraea fagraeacea.

Forensicologist: [fo-ren-zi-ko-lo-jist] From Forens, which is Latin for a forum, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who employs the use of science including botany and technology to investigate and establish facts in criminal case for the courts.

Fluctuans: [fluk-tyoo-anz] From Fluctuāns, which is Latin for surging, unduLating fluctuating, vacilLating. It refers to structures or organs, which have prominent variations even on the same plant. A good example is Enydra fluctuans.

Fluted: [floo-ted] From Flaut, later Flaujol/Flauja, which are Latin for longitudinal furrows or grooves. It usually It refers to the parallel, vertical furrows in a column like trunk. A good example is Blechnum fluviatile.

Fluvialis: [floo-vi-a-lis] From Fluvius, which is Latin for a stream or river. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in or near moving water. A good example is Olearia fluvialis which grows in moist undergrowth often adjacent to creeks or in riparian zones.

Fluviatile: [floo-vi-a-tahyl] From Fluvius, which is Latin for a stream or river. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in or near moving water. A good example is Blechnum fluviatile which grows in moist undergrowth often adjacent to creeks or in riparian zones.

Fluviatilis: [floo-vi-a-ti-lis] From Fluvius, which is Latin for a river. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in or near flowing water. A good example is the habitats of Melaleuca fluviatilis which grows in riparian zones and along seasonal streams and rivers.

Fockei: [fo-kee-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Fock; 1940-20.., who was a German professor of botany and plant physiologist who specialized in the Asclepiadaceous family. A good example is Juncus fockei.

Fodinalis: [fo-di-na-lis] From Fodinalis, which maybe Old English for freedom or not to be in bondage and Alis, which forms the adjective of the noun. Its reference is unclear. A good example is Acacia fodinalis.

Foecunda: [foh-kun-da] From Foecunda, which Latin for prolific or fruitful. It refers to a structure or organ that is rather prolific. A good example is Eucalyptus foecunda.

Foecundum: [foh-kun-dum] From Foecundum, which is Latin for prolific or fruitful. It refers to a structure or organ that is rather prolific. A good example is Peplidium foecundum.

Foecundus: [foh-kun-dus] From Foecundum, which is Latin for prolific or fruitful. It refers to the abundance of flowers and fruits produced in a season. A good example is one of the more abundant black centipedes in our garden known as Cormocephalus foecundus.

Foelscheana: [foh-el-shee-a-na] Is named in honour of Paul H. M. Foelsche; 1831-1914; who was a German police officer in the Northern Territory, collector of plants for Ferdinand von Mueller. He was a skilled photographer and was a cunning, devious and merciless with Aboriginals enjoying hunting them down and exterminating them. While Corymbia foelscheana is a good example it is a shame that he is given the recognition and honour under the circumstances.

Foelschei: [foh-el-shee-ahy] Is named in honour of Paul H. M. Foelsche; 1831-1914; who was a German police officer in the Northern Territory, collector of plants for Ferdinand von Mueller. He was a skilled photographer and was a cunning, devious and merciless with Aboriginals enjoying hunting them down and exterminating them. While Corymbia foelschei is a good example of the name, it is a shame that he has been given the recognition and honour under the circumstances.

Foeniculum: [foh-ni-kyoo-lum] From Foenum, which is Latin for hay and –Culum, which is Latin for little or a little. It refers to the horticultural herb Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare appearing like hay with a little scent in the fields. The word for Fennel goes back even further to the Ancient Greeks where it is called marathon (μάραθον), or marathos (μάραθος). It refers to the place of the famous Battle of Marathon, which literally literally means a plain with fennel. So to all you gardeners you can do a hop step and jump over your fennel plants, you can honestly say you complete a marathon every day without losing your breath, feeling exhausted or even tired. A good example is the herb Foeniculum vulgare.

Foeniculus: [foh-ni-kyoo-lus] From Foenum, which is Latin for hay and –Culum, which is Latin for little or a little. It refers to the horticultural herb Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare appearing like hay with a little scent in the fields. The word for Fennel goes back even further to the Ancient Greeks where it is called a marathon (μάραθον), or marathos (μάραθος). It refers to the place of the famous Battle of Marathon, which literally means a plain with fennel. So to all you gardeners; you can do a hop step and jump over or around your fennel plants, and honestly say you complete a marathon every day without losing your breath, feeling exhausted or even tired. An example is the common two spine aphid Dysaphis foeniculus, which have have been originally discovered on fennel plants.

Foenisecii: [foh-ni-se-si-ahy] Is probably named in honour of José de Fonseca, who was a Spanish botanical engraver. A good example is Panaeolina foenisecii.

Foertherianum: [foh-er-ther-i-a-num] From Foerth, which is Latin for maybe Islands, Islets, coral coves or similar position and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to where the plants originate from. A good example is Heliotropium foertherianum.

Foetida: [foh-ti/tee-da] From Foetidus, which is Latin for a rotting type of smell. It refers to plants, which smell rather bad usually in order to attract specific pollinators. A good example is the fruits on the vomit tree Morinda citrifolia, the leaves on Cryptocaria foetida or the fruiting bodies of the beautifully beneficial Phallus multicolor, Aseroe rubra and Clathrus ruber fungi.

Foetidissimus: [foh-ti/tee-dis-si-mus] From Foetidus, which is Latin for a stinking and Issima which is Latin for the superlative. It refers to plants, which are the smelliest or most putrid. A good example is the fruits on Morinda citrifolia and Cryptocaria foetida.

Foetidus: [foh-ti/tee-dus] From Foetidus, which is Latin for a stinking. It refers to plants, which smell rather bad usually in order to attract specific pollinators. A good example was Plectranthus foetidus, which is now known asColeus foetida.

Foleaceous/Foliaceous: [fo-lee-a-see-os] From Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have copious numbers of leaves, phyllodes or fronds. A good example is Pleurocarpaea denticulata.

Photos top Acacia alata, lower Casuarina equisetifolia.

Foliata: [fo-li-a-ta] From Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which are rather leafy. A good example is Pterostylis foliata which is rather leafy compared to other species in the genus.

Foliate: [fo-li-eit] From Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a description of plants having leaves.

Foliatum: [fo-li-ei-tum] From Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a description of plants, which are very leafy. A good example is Heliotropium foliatum.

Foliatus: [fo-li-ei-tus] From Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a description of plants, which are very leafy. A good example is Schoenus foliatus, which is now known as Schoenus maschalinus.

Foliferous: [fo-li-fer-os] From Folium, which is Latin for foliage and Ferus, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to bearing leaves or leaf like structures. A good example is Ajuga australis.

Foliiporus: [fo-li-por-us] From Folium, which is Latin for foliage and Póros, which is Ancient Greek for pores or passage ways. It refers to fungi which have leaf like pileus with large pores or long straight gills. A good example is Phylloporus foliiporus.

Foliolate: [fo-li-o-leit] From Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to describing leaflets usually as bifoliate or trifoliate. A good example is the trifoliate leaves on Kennedia rubicunda.

Foliolosa: [fo-li-o-loh-sa] From Folium, which is Latin for having small leaves. It refers to foliage as being much smaller when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Pultenaea foliolosa

Foliolosum: [fo-li-o-loh-sum] From Folium, which is Latin for having small leaves. It refers to the leaflets being much smaller when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Gompholobium foliolosum.

Foliosa: [fo-li-oh-suh] From Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which are very leafy. A good example is Bossiaea foliosa.

Foliosissima: [fo-li-oh-si-si-ma] From Folium, which is Latin for foliage and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to plants, which are extremely leafy. A good example is Banksia foliosissima.

Foliosum: [fo-li-oh-sum] From Folium, which is Latin for to have small leaves. It refers to a leaves, which are much smaller than other species in the genus. A good example is Lepidium foliosum.

Follicle: [fol-li-kl] From Folliculus, which is Latin for a small bag. It refers to a dry seed pod which consists of a single carpel and splits along a single suture. A good example is Banksia robor.

Follicularis: [fo-lik-yoo-lar-is] From Folliculus, which is Latin for a small bag. It refers to fruiting pods, which consists of a single carpel thus they have only one seed and splits along a single suture. A good example is Cephalotus follicularis.

Font hills: [font, hilz] From Font Hills, which is Latinized for the district along the Mitchel River, north west of Cairns in far north east Queensland. It refers to the area or district where the first plants were discovered. A good example is Plectranthus sp. Font Hills.

Fontanea: [fon-ta-nee-a] Is named in Honour of Constant Aristide Fontaine; 1818-1900, who was a French pharmacology professor, professor of chemistry and toxicology at Toulon. In 1870 in a European medical science doctoral thesis Édouard Marie Heckel first named this genus in honour of his supervisor. France. Dedication : “Le genre Fontainea est dédié à M. C. Fontaine professeur à l’école de médecine et de pharmacie navale, pharmacien en chef de la marine, mon premier et très-savant maitre.”  One species, Fontainea oraria, the coast fontainea, is known only from 10 living plants growing on private property near Lennox Head in northern New South Wales, Australia. Its status is critically endangered. A good example is Montia fontana subsp. fontana.

Fontanesii: [fon-ta-ne-si-ahy] Is named in honour of René Louiche Desfontaines; 1750–1833, who was an exceptional French botanist who excelled in the science of nomenclature of the Mediterranean area and northern Africa. He named over 300 new genre and collected a 1480 specimen herbarium which he donated to the Paris Herbarium upon his death. A good example is Verticordia fontanesii, which is now known as Verticordia plumosa.

Fontanum: [fon-ai-num] From Fontana, which is Latin for fountains or natural springs. It refers to a plants, which prefer to grow in slow moving water most of the year. A good example is Eryngium fontanum.

Fontinalis: [fon-ti-na-lis] From Fontana, which is Latin for fountains or natural springs. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow along ephemeral creeks or rills. A good example is Dissocarpus fontinalis.

Forbesii: [for-be-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Henry Ogg Forbes; 1851-1932, who was a Scottish scientist, explorer and collector of natural science species including flora and reptiles. He worked in far north Queensland and New Guinea. A good example is Melodinus forbesii

Fordeana: [for-dee-a-na] Is named in honour of Helena Forde; 1830-1910, who was a collector and amateur naturalist. A good example is Poa fordeana.

Fordhamii: [ford-ha-mi-ahy] Is named in honour of Fred Fordham; 1890-1978, who was an avid Australian orchid collector and associate of Heinrich Bernard Ruppius Rupp. A good example is Corybas fordhamii.

Fordiana: [for-di-a-na] Is named in honour of Charles Ford; 1844-1927, who was a British botanist who collected and studied in China. A good example is Goodenia fordiana.

Fordianum: [for-di-a-num] Is named in honour of Ford. A good example is Argyrotegium fordianum.

Fordii: [for-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Charles Ford; 1844-1927, who was a British botanist who collected and studied in China. A good example is Indagator fordii.

Forest: [fo-rest] From Forest, which is Latin for an unenclosed woodland. It refers to an area of land which has a 3 or 4 tier plant growth.

Formanii: [for-ma-ni-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Forman but which Forman cannot be substantiated. A good example is Eucalyptus formanii.

Formicifera: [for-mi-si-fer-a] From Formica, which is Latin for an ant and Fera which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which mimic ants in order to attract ants to perform the acts need for cross pollination. A good example is Chiloglottis formicifera.

Formiciferis: [for-mi-si-fer-is] From Formica, which is Latin for an ant and Fera which is Latin for to bear or bearing.

Formidabilis: [f0r-mi-da-bi-lis] From Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of and Dabalis which is Latin for not clear. A good example is Acacia formidabilis.

Formosa: [for-moh-sa] From Formosa, which is Latin for beautiful or vivacous. It refers to the beauty of the species, which can be bold or dainty.Two good examples are the beautiful new growth and delicately tinged flowers of Melaleuca formosa and and the bold coloured flowers on Swainsona formosa.

Formosum: [for-moh-sum] From Formosum, which is Latin for beautiful or vivacious. It refers to the species being the most beautiful in the genus. A good example is the fronds on Adiantum formosum.

Formosus: [for-moh-sus] From Formosus, which is Latin for beautiful or vivacious. It refers to the species being very beautiful. A good example is the overall beauty of the new growth and deep red and black flowers of Swainsona formosus.

Fornicata: [for-ni-kei-ta] From Fornicātum, which is Latin for to consort with prostitutes or Fornix, which is Latin for a vault or basement in reference to a brothel. It refers to a description in which the majority of the plant remains beneath the surface of the soil. A good example is Epipactis fornicata.

Fornicatum: [for-ni-kei-tum] From Fornicātum, which is Latin for to consort with prostitutes or Fornix which is Latin for a vault or basement in reference to a brothel. It refers to ovaries and flowers, which arch up then downwards. A good example is the ovary which arches upwards while the flower bud arches downwards on Sphaerolobium fornicatum.

Fornicatus 1: [for-ni-kei-tus] From Fornicātum, which is Latin for to consort with prostitutes or Fornix which is Latin for a vault or basement in reference to a brothel. It refers to a description of a structure or organ, which lives beneath the ground. A good example are the fungus Physarum species.

Fornicatus 2: [for-ni-kei-tus] From Fornicātum, which is Latin for to consort with prostitutes or Fornix which is Latin for a vault or basement in reference to a brothel. It refers to plants, which prefer habitats that are on the basement floor of forests. A good example is the tiny forest, ground orchid Acianthus fornicatus.

Forresterae: [fo-res-ter-ee] Is named in honour of Johanne Reindhold Forster or his son George Forster; 1729-1798& 1754-1794, who were German/Scottish anthropologists and ethnologists who sailed with Captain Cook on his second journey. A good example is Eucalyptus forresterae.

Forrestiana: [fo-res-ti-ei-na] Is named in honour of George Forrest; 1873-1932, who was a Scottish botanist in Tibet and China. A good example is Eucalyptus forrestiana.

Forrestii: [fo-res-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of George Forrest; 1873-1932, who was a Scottish botanist who collected over 2000 new species in Tibet and China and has around 60 species named in his honour. A good example is Isotropis forrestii.

Forskalii: [fors-kah-li-lahy] Is named in honour of George Forrest; 1732-1763, who was a Swede Naturalist and civil libertarian who is best known for his views on freedom. He was exiled for his views like “..… it is also an important right in a free society to be freely allowed to contribute to society’s well-being. However, if that is to occur, it must be possible for society’s state of affairs to become known to everyone, and it must be possible for everyone to speak his mind freely about it. Where this is lacking, liberty is not worth its name” and “Before 1766 you were allowed to print everything that was expressly lawful to print; after 1766 you were allowed to print anything that was not expressly forbidden.” His work in foreign countries had strict conditions that all persons had to have “…..great respect for the locals.” A good example is Themeda forskalii, which is now known as Themeda triandra.

Forstera: [for-ster-a] Is named in honour of Johanne Reindhold Forster,1729-1798 and his son George Forster; 1754-1794, who were German/Scottish anthropologists and ethnologists who sailed with Captain Cook on his second journey. A good example is Forstera bellidifolia.

Forsteri: [for-ster-i] Is probably named in honour of the German naturalists Johann Reinhold Forster; 1729-1798, and his son, Johann Georg Adam Forster; 1754-1794 who were Polish explorers and botanical artists. A good example is Psydrax forsteri.

Forsteropsis: [for-ster-op-sis] Is named in honour of the German naturalists Johann Reinhold Forster; 1729-1798, and his son, Johann Georg Adam Forster;1754-1794 who were Polish explorers and botanical artists and Opsis which is Ancient Greek for resembling the prefix. It refers to plants, which closely resemble the Forstea genus. A good example is the garden daisy Forsteropsis preissii , which is now known as Stylidium preissii.

Forsythia: [for-sahy-thee-a] Is probably named in honour of William Forsyth; 1737-1804, who was a collector of plants, worked at the Kennsington Royal Botanic Gardens. A good example is Lepidosperma forsythia.

Forsythiana: [for-sahy-thee-a-na] Is named in honour of William Forsyth; 1864-1910, who was a collector of plants, worked at the Sydney Botanic Gardens and later as the overseer of Centenial Park. A good example is Pultenaea forsythiana.

Forsythii: [for-sahy-thee-ahy] Is named in honour of William Forsyth; 1864-1910, who was a collector of plants, worked at the Sydney Botanic Gardens and later as the overseer of Centenial Park. A good example is Alectryon forsythii.

Forte: [fawr-te] Originally from Forctis then to Fortis, which are Old Latin for brave or strong and resilient. It refer to plants, which look strong and resilient in their habitats. A good example is Syzygium forte.

Forthiana: [for-thee-a-na] Is named in honour of Forth. A good example is Eucalyptus forthiana which is now defunct as it was found to be a natural hybrid between Eucalyptus moluccana and Eucalyptus siderophloia.

Fortis: [for-tis] From Fortis, which is Old Latin for to rise, high or a hill. It refer to plants, which grow on hills or unduLating rises. A good example is Grevillea juniperina subsp. fortis.

Fortunae-hibernae: [for-tyoo-nee, hahy-ber-ee] Is named in honour of Robert Fortune; 1812–1880, who was a Scottish botanist, plant hunter and traveler who is best known for thieving tea plants from China on behalf of the British East India Company and Hibernia which is Latin for winter. It refers to many of the plants he thieved perished in the European winter that followed the thefts. A good example is Rytidosperma fortunae-hibernae.

Forsythiana: [fao-sahy-thee-a-na] Is named in honour of William Forsyth; 1864-1910, who was a collector of plants, worked at the Sydney Botanic Gardens and later as the overseer of Centennial Park. A good example is Pultenaea forsythiana.

Fosteri: [fo-ster-ahy] Is named in honour of Cyril W. Foster; 18..-1933, who was a British botanist who collected in Africa. A good example is the garden daisy Arctotis fosteri.

Fosteriana: [fo-ster-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Cyril W. Foster; 18..-1933, who was a British botanist who collected in Africa. A good example is the garden daisy Decaisnina forsteriana.

Fothergillii: [fo-ther-gil-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Forthergill; 1712-1781, who was a physician, philanthropist and collector of North American plants that he kept in his private botanical garden at West Ham Park in England. A good example is Callitris fothergillii.

Fothiana: [fo-thi-a-na] Is named in honour of Forth. A good example is Eucalyptus forthiana which is now defunct as it was found to be a natural hybrid between Eucalyptus moluccana and Eucalyptus siderophloia.

Fovea: [fo-vee-a] From Fovea, which is Latin for pitted. From Fovea, which is Latin for a snare or pitfall. It refers to the common dull brown beetle extensively found throughout Australia.

Foveolata: [fo-vee-o/oh-la-ta] From Fovea, which is Latin for a snare or pitfall. It usually refers to seeds, pods or other organs which are distinctly pitted on the surface. A good example is Utricularia foveolata.

Foveolatum: [fa-vee-o-la-tum] ] From Fovea, which is Latin for a snare or pitfall. It usually refers to seeds, pods or other organs which are distinctly pitted on the surface. A good example is the seeds on Dysoxylum foveolatum.

Foveolatus: [fo-vee-o-la-tus] From Fovea, which is Latin for a snare or pitfall. It usually refers to seeds, pods or other organs which are distinctly pitted on the surface. A good example is the deeply pitted seeds on Elaeocarpus foveolatus.

Fracta: [frak-ta] From Fractus, which is Latin for broken. It refers to structures or organs, which appear to be broken. A good example is the bark on Eucalyptus fracta which breaks off in strips but remains attached to the trunk for an extended period.

Fractiflexa: [frak-ti-flek-sa] From Fractus, which is Latin for broken and Flexuosa which is Latin for flexible. It refers to culms or stems, which bend to the point of almost breaking. A good example is Hibbertia fractiflexa.

Fractiflexus: [frak-ti-flek-sus] From Fractus, which is Latin for broken and Flexuosa, which is Latin for flexable. It refers to culms or stems, which bend to the point of almost breaking. A good example is Thysanotus fractiflexus.

Frageria: [fra-jer-i-a] From Fragrum, which is Latin for a strawberry. It refers to plants, which are related to the commercial strawberry. A good example is the domestic alpine strawberry Frageria vesca var. vesca.

Fragile: [fra-jahyl] From Fragilis, which is Latin for brittle. It refers to stems or leaves which are brittle. A good example is Iseilema fragile.

Fragilipes: [fra-ji-li-pes] From Fragilis, which is Latin for brittle. It refers to the pileus and stipule which are rather brittle. A good example is the stems on Cortinarius fragilipes.

Fragilis: [fra-ji-lis] From Fragilis, which is Latin for brittle. It refers to a structure or organ, which is fragile or easily broken. A good example is the stipes on Cystopteris fragilis.

Fragillima: [fra-jil-li-ma] From Fragilis, which is Latin for brittle. It refers to a structure or organ, which is fragile or easily broken. A good example is the stipes on Cheilanthes fragillima.

Fragosa: [fra-go-sa] From Fragrant, which is Latin for scent or fragrance. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a fragrance. A good example is the flowers on Euphrasia fragosa.

Fragosea: [fra-go-se-a] From Fragrant, which is Latin for scent or fragrance. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a fragrance. A good example is the flowers on Azorella fragosea.

Fragoseum: [fra-go-se-um] From Fragrum, which is Latin for a strawberry and Roseum which is Latin for rosy in colour. It refers to the very small flowers and ripe fruits, which have a rose coloured tinge. A good example is Schizeilema fragoseum.

Fragrans: [frei-granz] From Fragrantia, which is Latin for scented or fragrant. It refers to plants usually the flowers or at times the leaves, which are fragrant. A good example is Xanthophyllum fragrans.

Fragrantissima: [frei-gran-tis-si-ma] From Fragrant, which is Latin for perfumed and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative. It refers to flowers, or fruits which are extremely or the most fragrant species in the genus. A good example is the flowers on Fragrantissima laurifolium.

Fragrantissimus: [frei-gran-tis-si-mus] From Fragrant, which is Latin for perfumed and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative. It refers to flowers, or fruits which are extremely or the most fragrant species in the genus. A good example is the flowers on Coleus fragrantissimus.

Francisiana: [fran-si-si-a-na] Is named in honour of Francisbut which Francis cannot be substantiated. A good example is Franciella tularensis.

Francisiella: [fra-si-si-el-la] Is named in honour of Francisbut which Francis cannot be substantiated and Ella which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form but it cannot be 100% substantiated and Ella which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. A good example is Franciella tularensis.

Francisii: [fra-si-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Francis but which Francis cannot be substantiated. A good example is Syzygium francisii.

Francisodéndron: [frahn-si-so-den-dron] Is named in honour of Francisco and Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree. A good example is Francisodéndron laurifolium.

Frankenia: [fran-ke-nei-a] Is named in honour of Johann Frankenius; 1590-1661, who was a Swedish professor of botany and anatomy. A good example is Frankenia gracilis.

Franklandia: [frank-lan-di-a] Is named in honour of Thomas Franklin; 1750-1831, who was an English botanist specializing in marine plants. A good example is Franklandia fucifolia.

Frankliniae: [frank-lin-i-ee] Is named in honour of Thomas Franklin; 1750-1831, who was an English botanist specializing in marine plants. A good example is Acradenia frankliniae.

Franklinii: [frank-lin-i-ahy] Is named in honour of Thomas Franklin; 1750-1831, who was an English botanist specializing in marine plants. A good example is Dacrydium franklinii , which is now known as Lagarostrobos franklinii.

Fraseranum: [frei-zer-a-num] Is named in honour of Charles Fraser; 1787-1831, who was an Australian botanist and horticulturalist who was sent to Brisbane to collect vegetable products of the land. A good example is Dysoxylum fraseranum.

Fraseri: [frei-zer-ahy] Is named in honour of Charles Fraser; 1787-1831, who was an Australian botanist and horticulturalist who was sent to Brisbane to collect vegetable products of the land. A good example is Leptopteris fraseri.

Fraseriana: [frei-zer-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Charles Fraser; 1787-1831, who was an Australian botanist and horticulturalist who was sent to Brisbane to collect vegetable products of the land. A good example is Hartighsea fraseriana, which is now known as Dysoxylum fraserianum.

Fraserianum: [frei-zer-i-an-um] Is named in honour of Charles Fraser; 1787-1831, who was an Australian botanist and horticulturalist who was sent to Brisbane to collect vegetable products of the land. A good example is Dysoxylum fraserianum.

Fraserianus: [frei-zer-ahy] Is named in honour of Charles Fraser; 1788-1831, who was a Scottish born Australian and was the first superintendent of the National (New South Wales Botanic Gardens) and plant collector. A good example is Cymophyllus fraserianus.

Fraternus: [fra-ter-nus] From Fraxnus, which is Latin for an ash tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves resembling those of the European Ash. This is presently an unresolved name awaiting further research to determine which genus, species or sub species or variety it should be allocated to. A good example is Leucopogon fraternus.

Fraxinifolia: [frak-si-ni-foh-li-a] From Fraxnus, which is Latin for an ash tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble those of the European Ash. A good example is Lomatia fraxinifolia.

Fraxinifolium: [frak-si-ni-foh-li-um] From Fraxnus, which is Latin for an ash tree and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble those of the European Ash. A good example is Acrostichum fraxinifolium, which is now known as Acrostichum speciosum.

Fraxinoides: [frahk-sin-oi-deez] From Fraxnus, which is Latin for an ash tree and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the leaves, which resemble those of the European Ash. A good example is the leaves of Eucalyptus fraxinoides.

Fredwoodii: [fred-woo-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Fred Wood. This speciesis presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to which species name should be allocated. A good example is Kennedia fredwoodii.

Free: [free] From Freo, which is Old English for not joined or united. It refers to like organs not being united and are separated from one another. My apologise to all the Freo supporters but it’s not about the Freo Dockers. A good example is the free anthers on Corymbia curtissii.

Free-adnate: [free, ad-neit] From Freo, which is Old English for not joined or united. It refers to where the Hypanthium is fused with the ovary and has a free limb around or above the ovary.

Free-central: [free, sen-tral] Is where the placenta along the central axis in a compound ovary is free, without a septa.

Freelingii: [free-lin-jee-ahy] Is named in honour of Major-General Sir Arthur Henry Freeling, 1820-1885, who was the 5th Barronet of Ford and a surveyor general of South Australia. A good example is Eremophila freelingii.

Frenchii: [fren-chi-ahy] Is named in honour of Charles French Snr.; 1840-1933, who was an English born Australian entomologist, naturalist and botanist who categorized all the known orchids from Australia at the time. A good example is Prasophyllum frenchii.

Frenela: [fre-nel-la] From Frēnulum, which is Latin for a small fold or ridge of tissue which supports or checks the motion of the part to which it is attached. A good example is found on the fruiting valves of Frenela crassivalvis, which is now known as Callitris gracilis.

Freycinet: [frei-si-net] Is named in honour of Louis de Freycinet; 1779-1842, who was a French navigator. The Freycinet National Park in Tasmania has been named after him.

Freycinetia: [frei-si-ne-ti-a] Is named in honour of Louis de Freycinet; 1779-1842, who was a French navigator geographer and naturalist. A good example is Freycinetia excelsa.

Friable: [frahy-abl] From Friabilis, which is Latin for to crumble and Able, which is Latin for being capable of achieving. It refers to a soil that crumbles when rubbed between the fingers.

Fribrillosa: [fri-bril-loh-sa] From Fibrillosa, which is Latin for hair like appendages. It refers to the underside of structures or organs usually on lichens or fungi which have hair like appendages. A good example is found on the fruiting valves of Xerotes fribrillosa, which is now known as Lomandra leucocephala

Friderici-augusta: [fri-der-i-see- or-gus-ta] Is named in honour of Friderici-Augusta. A good example is Basileophyta friderici-augusta.

Fresiana: [frahy-si-a-na] From Friese, which is Latinized from a, local vernacular name for the plants in New Guinee and Ana/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in New Guinee. A good example is Amyema friesiana.

Frigenscens [fri-jen-sens] From Frigida, which is Latin for cold or stiff. It refers to grass habitats, which are at higher altitudes where it is very cold in the winter. A good example is Loranthus friesianua, which is now known as Amyema friesiana.

Frigida: [fri-ji-da] From Frigida, which is Latin for cold or stiff. It refers to grass habitats, which are at higher altitudes where it is very cold in the winter. A good example is Chionochloa frigida.

Frigidum: [fri-ji-dum] From Frigida, which is Latin for cold or stiff. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in habitats, that are at higher altitudes where it is very cold in the winter. A good example is the alpine Lichen Stigmidium frigidum.

Frigidus: [fri-ji-dus] From Frigida, which is Latin for cold or stiff. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in habitats, that are at higher altitudes where it is very cold in the winter. A good example is the Lichen Lichen frigidus.

Fringe: [frinj] From Fimbriātum, which is Latin for a fringe. It refers to a margin of a leaf, petal, sepal, tepal or lip, which has a fringe. A good example is leaves of Acacia fimbrata.

Froebelia: [froh-bel-i-a] Is named in honour of Froebel. A good example was Froebelia fasciculiflora, which is now known as Acrotriche fasciculiflora.

Froggattii: [fro-gat-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Walter Wilson Froggatt; 1858-1937, who was an Australian born entomologist and keen plant collector. A good example is Pseuduvaria froggattii.

Frondosa: [fron-doh-ah] From Frōns, which is Latin for a large type of leaf usually found on ferns. It refers to a leaves, which resemble fronds. A good example is Nematolepis frondosa.

Frondosum: [fron-doh-sum] From Frond/frons, which is Latin for the leaf of ferns or palms. It refers to being leafy or fern like. A good example is Phebalium frondosum, which has somewhat ferny like foliage.

Frondosus: [fron-doh-sus] From Frond/frons, which is Latin for the leaf of ferns or palms. It refers to being leafy or fern like. A good example is the Mexican tree Myrocarpus frondosa which is sometimes grown as an ornamental and has ferny like foliage.

Fronds: [fron dz] From Frond/frons, which is Latin for the leaf of ferns or palms. It refers to the modified leaves of ferns and some palms. A good example is Pteris umbrosa or Cyathea leichardtiana.

Blechnum neohollandicum Cyathea australis

Frostii: [fros-tee-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Charles Frost but which Charles Frost cannot be substantiated. A good example is Olearia frostii.

Fruit: [froot] From Fructus, which is Latin for a fruit. It refers to any capsule, follicle, berry, aggregate, drupe, pod, etc. that contains a seed or seeds. A typical fruit is made up of several parts including the Exocarpos, mesocarp, endocarp, and seeds. See pictures under fruits at top.

Fruiticosa: [froo-ti-koh-sa] From Fruticōsum, which is Latin for shrubby or bushy. It refers to shrubs, which are very bushy. A good example is the liverwort Frullania cyparioides.

Fruitologist: [froo-tol-o-jist] From Fructus, which is Latin for a fruit, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to person who studies the cultivation of fruits, the storing of fruit and/or the processing of fruits.

Fruitology: [froo-to-lojee] From Fructus, which is Latin for a fruit and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to branch of botany that deals with the cultivation of fruits, the storing of fruit and/or the processing of fruits.

Frullania: [frool-la-ni-a] From Frullare, which is Latin for to blend. It refers to structures or organs, which blend into each other. A good example is the liverwort Frullania cyparioides.

Frumentacea: [fru-men-ta-see-a] From Frument, which is Latin for pertaining to a grain or bearing grain like seeds and Aceae, which is Latin for a family. It refers to a seeds which resemble those of grasses. A good example was Acacia frumentacea, which is now known as Acacia murrayana.

Frutcose: [frut-kohs] From Fructose, which is Greek/Latin for a type sugar derived from fruits. It refers to sugars, which are found in most fruits like plums, apples and berries. A good example is the sugars found in Rubra parviflora.

Frutescens: [froo– tes-sens] From Fruticāns, which is Latin for a fruit. It refers to any capsule, follicle, berry, aggregate, drupe, pod, etc. that contains a seed or seeds. A typical fruit is made up of several parts including the Exocarpos, mesocarp, endocarp and seeds. A good example is Baeckea frutescens.

Frutetorum: [froo-te-tor-um] From Fruticāns, which is Latin for bushy shrubs Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or to reside at. It refers to shrub, which habits with many other shrubs. A good example is Microtis frutetorum.

Fruticans: [froo-ti-kanz] From Fruticāns, which is Latin for bushy shrubs Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or to reside at. It refers to shrubs, which habit with many other shrubs. A good example is Nypa fruticans.

Fruticetorum: [froo-ti-se-tor-um] From Fructus, which is Latin for bushy shrubs From Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or to reside at. It refers to shrubs, which habit with many other shrubs. A good example was Eucalyptus fruticetorum, which is now known as Eucalyptus cajuputea.

Fruticola: [froo-ti-koh-la] From Fruticāns which is Latin for bushy shrubs  From Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for to dwell or to reside at. It refers to shrubs which habits with many other shrubs. A good example is Fruticicola radicans.

Fruticosa: [froo-ti-koh-sa] From Fruticāns, which is Latin for bushy shrubs. It refers to the shrubs, which are very bushy. A good example is Westringea fruticosa.

Fruticosum: [froo-ti-koh-sum] From Fruticāns, which is Latin for bushy shrubs. It refers to shrubs, which are very bushy. A good example is Lamprolobium fruticosum.

Fruticosus: [fruhk-ti-koh-sus] From Fruticāns, which is Latin for a bushy shrub and Causa which is Latin for a condition. It refers to plants, which, which are bushy. A good example is Plectranthus fruticosus.

Fruticulosa: [froo-ti-kyoo-loh-sa] From Fruticāns, which is Latin for bushy shrubs and Losum which is Latin for somewhat. It refers to shrubs, which are somewhat shrubby. A good example is Xanthosia fruticulosa.

Fruticulosum: [froo-ti-kyoo-loh-sum] From Fruticāns, which is Latin for bushy shrubs and Losum which is Latin for somewhat. It refers to shrubs, which are somewhat shrubby. A good example was Lepidium fruticulosum, which is now known as Lepidium foliosum.

Fryxellii: [frahy-sel-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Fryxell. A good example is Hibiscus fryxellii.

Fucata: [fuh-ka-ta] From Fucatus, which is Latin for painted or dyed. It refers to a structure or organ, which appears to be painted. A good example is Gardenia fucata where the flowers have a solid cream painted appearance.

Fuchsia: [fyoo-sha] Is named in honour of Leonhard Fuchs; 1501-1566, who was a German botanist. A good example is the exotic horticultural plant, Fuchsia campii.

Fucifolia: [fyoo-see-foh-li-a] From Fucatus, which is Latin for painted or dyed and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which have a solid coloured appearance as though they have been painted. A good example is Franklandia fucifolia where the new leaves are tannish-red to deep red and the flowers are naturally crimson coloured.

Fuciforme: [fyoo-si-form] From Phûkos, which is Ancient Greek or Fūcī, which is Latin for a seaweed and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to structures or organs, which have an appearance or form of seaweeds. A good example is the red thread fungus Corticium fuciforme, which is now known as Laetisaria fuciformis.

Fuciformis: [fyoo-si-for-mis] From Phûkos, which is Ancient Greek or Fūcī, which is Latin for a seaweed and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to structures or organs, which have an appearance or form like seaweeds. A good example is the jelly fungus Tremella fuciformis.

Fucosus: [fyoo-koh-sus] From Fucosus, which is Latin for painted or dyed. It refers to the leaves, which have a solid coloured appearance as though they have been painted. A good example is Cyperus fucosus.

Fuernrohrii: [fu-ern-roh-ri-ahy] Is named in honour of Fuernrohr. A good example is Phyllanthus fuernrohrii.

Fugacious: [fyoo-gei-shos] From Fugac, which is Latin for to flee or fleet of foot. It refers to flowers, which pass quickly often lasting only several hours or one day. A good example is Hibiscus tiliaceae.

Fugax: [fyoo-gaks] From Fugac, which is Latin for to flee or fleet of foot. It refers to flowers, which pass quickly often lasting only several hours or one day. A good example is Moraea fugax.

Fugosia: [fyoo-gos-i-a] From Fugac, which is Latin for to flee or fleet of foot. It refers to flowers, which pass quickly often lasting only several hours or one day. A good example was Fugosia thespesioides, which is now known as Hibiscus thespesioides and Hibiscus tiliaceus.

Fuhreri: [fyoo-re-rahy] Is named in honour of Bruce Alexander Fuher; 1930-2…, who is Australia’s for most mycologist Photographer, illustrator and mycologist. The flowers of Hygrocybe fuhreri.

Fuirena: [foo-re-na] Is named in honour of Jorgen Fuiren; 1581-1628, who was a Danish physician and botanist. A good example is Fuirena umbellata.

Fulgens: [ful-jenz] From Fulgens, which is Latin for bright and shinny. It refers to flowers, which are bright and shiny. A good example is the brilliant scarlet red flowers on Melaleuca fulgens.

Fulgida: [ful-ji-da] From Fulgens, which is Latin for bright and shiny. It refers to flowers, which are bright and shiny. A good example is the brilliant scarlet red flowers on Eucalyptus fulgida, which is now known as Eucalyptus georgei subsp. fulgida.

Fulgidum: [ful-ji-dum] From Fulgens, which is Latin for bright and shiny. It refers to a structure or organ, which is glossy. A good example is the seed heads and culms on Panicum fulgidum, which is now known as Panicum simile.

Fuliginea: [fu-li-ji-ni-a] From Fuliginea, which is Latin for sooty black. It refers to a the trunks which are sooty black in colour. A good example is Acacia aneura var. fuliginea.

Fuligineosquamosa: [fu-li-ji-nee-o-skwar-moh-sa] From Fulinginosa, which is Latin for sooty black and Squamosa which is Latin for scaly. It refers to a structure or organ, which has sooty black scales. A good example is often seen on the pileus of various fungi including Hygrocybe fuligineosquamosa.

Fuligo: [foo-li-goh] From Fūlīgō or later Furvus, which is Latin for dark, dusky, gloomy, swarthy or black. It refers to structures or organs, which are much deeper in colour than other species in the genus or have a rather gloomy past. A good example is the slime mould Fuligo septica, which was first documented in America but is a world wide species. The yellow pigment is known as fuligorubin A and is thought to be involved in photoreception within the process of energy conversion during its life cycle. Its name is in relation of its appearance of resembling war bile or vomit. The species is inedible but not toxic in small quantities however it is known to trigger episodes of ‘asthma’ and ‘allergic rhinitis’ in susceptible people. It has also been reported in association with corticosteroids used for patients with SARS-CoV-2 virus infection. Slime moulds are now being considered as a new kingdom known as Prtistos.

Fuligo septica at various stages of growth.

Fulinginosa: [foo-lin-ji-no-sa] From Fulinginosa, which is Latin for sooty black. It refers to the sooty black hairs over the green and black flowers. A good example is the black Kangaroo paw Macropidia fulinginosa.

Fullagarii: [fool-la-gar-i-ahy] Is named in honour of James P. Fullagarii, who collected many type species on Lord Howe Island. A good example is Blechnum fullagarii.

Fulva: [fool-va] From Fulvidus which is Latin for reddish-yellow or reddish-brown. It refers to the colour of a structure or organ on a plant. A good example is Parsonsia fulva.

Fulvescens: [fool-ve-senz] From Fulvidus, which is Latin for reddish-yellow or reddish-brown. It refers to the colour of a structure or organ on a plant. A good example is the lichen Pannaria fulvescens.

Fulvidum: [fool-vi-dum] From Fulvidus, which is Latin for reddish-yellow or reddish-brown. It refers to the reddish-yellow to reddish-brown colour found on many fungi. A good example is the colour of the disc florets and the rays on the ray florets after pollination on Coronidium fulvidum.

Fulvidus: [fool-vi-dus] From Fulvidus, which is Latin for reddish-yellow or reddish-brown. It refers to the reddish-yellow to reddish-brown colour found on many fungi. A good example is the colour of the pileus and hymenium on Panus fulvidus.

Fulvum: [fool-vum] From Fulvu, which is Latin for tawny-yellow or yellowish. It refers to the colour of the dried spikes and seed heads. A good example of the colour is found on the straw of Rytidospermua fulvum.

Fulvus: [fool-vus] From Fulvu, which is Latin for tawny-yellow or yellowish. It refers to the colour of the dried spikes and seed heads. A good example of the colour is found on the straw of Cyperus fulvus.

Fumana: [foo-ma-na From Fulvu/Fumosa, which is Latin for smoky-grey or dull washed out grey. It refers to the colour of the dried spikes and seed heads. A good example is Rinzia fumana.

Fumida: [foo-mee-duh] From Fulvu/Fumosa, which is Latin for smoky-grey or dull washed out grey. It refers to the colour of the dried spikes and seed heads. A good example is Digitaria fumida.

Fumosa: [foo-moh-sa] From Fulva/Fumosa, which is Latin for smoky or dull and washed out. It refers to the pileus which is smoky or dull in colour. A good example is Armillaria fumosa.

Funaria: [foo-nar-i-a] From Fūnāria, which is Latin for a rope or cord. It refers to the seta which are longer and more string like than other genre in the family. A good example was Funaria acaulis, which is now known as Entosthodon radians.

Fungi: [fun-gi/gahy] From Spongos, which is Ancient GreeK or much later Fungus which is Latin for a mushroom. It refers to the plural of any of a diverse group of Eukaryotic single celled or multinucleate organisms that live by decomposing matter and absorbing the organic material in which they grow on. They comprise the mushroom, moulds, mildews, rusts, and yeasts. It has been estimated that there are around 25,000  species of the various orders of fungi in Australia of which fewer than 5,000 species of the larger mushrooms have been listed. Of these just 6% have been adequately researched to the point of being named at this stage. A good example is the toxic fungi Amanita of which  Amanita muscaria is a good representative.

Two common fungi left Amanita farinacea, right Aseroe rubra

Fungus: [fun-gus] From Spongos, which is Ancient Greek or much later Fungus, which is Latin for a mushroom. It refers to the singular of any one of a diverse group of Eukaryotic single celled or multinucleate organisms that live by decomposing matter and absorbing the organic material in which they grow on. They comprise the mushroom, moulds, mildews, rusts, and yeasts. A good example is Ramaria zippelii.

Fuirena: [foo-re-na] Is named in honour of George Furien; 17.., who was a Danish physician and botanist. A good example is Fuirena incrassata.

Fungiforme: [fun-ji-form] From Spongos, which is Ancient Greek or Fungus which is Latin for a mushroom and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. The reference is unclear to the author. A good example is Piper fungiforme.

Fungologist: [fun-gol-o-jist] From Spongos, which is Ancient Greek or Fungus which is Latin for a mushroom, Ology, which is Greek to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to a person who scientifically studies any group of fungi.

Fungology: [fun-go-lo-jee] From Spongos, which is Ancient Greek or Fungus which is Latin for a mushroom and Ology, which is Greek to study. It refers to the science of studying any group of fungi.

Fungosa: [fun-ji-fawrm] From Spongos, which is Ancient Greek or Fungus which is Latin for a mushroom. It refers to plants, which are typical fungi which have a symbiotic relationship with other plants. A good example is Balanophora fungosa.

Funicle: [fun-ikl] From Funiculus, which is Latin fora cord. It refers to the appendage, which grows out from the seed’s hilum and attaches the seed to the pericarp. They are readilly seen on the seeds of Acacias. The funicle is equivalent to plant’s umbilical cord in animals. A good example is the seed’s white funicle on Acacia fimbriata.

Funicularis: [fun-i-kyoo-lahr-is] From Funiculus which is Latin fora cord. It refers to the appendage that grows out from the seed’s hilum and attaches the seed to the pericarp. They are readily seen on the seeds of Acacias. The funicle is a plant’s umbilical cord. A good example is Grevillea obliquistigma subsp. fasicularis.

Funiculus 1: [fuhn-i-kyoo-lus] From Funiculus, which is Latin for a cord. It refers to the appendage, which grows out from the seed’s hilum and attaches the seed to the pericarp. They are readily seen on the seeds of Acacias. The funicle is equivalent to plant’s umbilical cord in animals. A good example of a large funiculus can be seen on Acacia maitlandii or Abrus pectorius.

Funiculus on Abrus prectorius seeds.

Funiculus 2: [fuhn-i-kyoo-lus] From Funiculus, which is Latin for a cord. It refers to an appendage, which attaches the spore case to the wall of a fungi. The funicle which is made from different lengths of twisted hypha is responsible for ejecting the basidia from the peridium. A good example is the funiculus on Cyathus striata.

Funiculus on Cyathus striata spores.
Funiculus attached to spores ejected by Cyathus striata.

Funnelform: [fu-el-form] From Fundibulum, which is Latin for to pour in and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape of or form of. It refers to the shape of a flower. Which has a funnel shape or form. A good example is the flowers on Ipomoea pres-capre.

Furcata: [fur-ka-ta] From Furcata, which is Latin for a small two pronged fork. It refers to the leaf-stems, which are very deeply divided like a fork. It usually refers to branches in a tree or at times the peduncles on a flower which are forked. A good example is the flower’s on Diplatia furcata.

Furcate: [fur-keit] From Furcatus, which is Latin for a small two pronged fork. It refers to leaf-stems, which are very deeply divided like a fork. A good example is the seaweed Polysiphonia abscissoides.

Furcatum: [fur-ka-tum] From Furcatum, which is Latin for a small two pronged fork. It refers to leaf-stems, which are very deeply divided like a fork. A good example is Asplenium furcatum, which is now known as Asplenium aethiopicum.

Furcatus: [fur-ka-tus] From Furcatus, which is Latin for a small two pronged fork. It refers to leaf-stems which are very deeply divided like a fork. A good example was the pondweed Potamogeton ochreatus which is now known as Potamogeton furcatus.

Furcellata: [fur-sel-la-ta] From Furcatus, which is Latin for a small two pronged fork and Cēlātum, which is Latin for hidden, covered up or concealed. It refers to leaf-stems, which are deeply divided like a two pronged fork and concealed along the stems or foliage. A good example is the blending of the forked leaves on Jacksonia furcellata.

Furcellatum: [fur-sel-la-tum] From Furcatus, which is Latin for a small two pronged fork and Cēlātum, which is Latin for hidden, covered up or concealed. It refers to leaf-stems, which are deeply divided like a two pronged fork and concealed along the stems or foliage. A good example was Gompholobium furcellatum, which is now known as Jacksonia furcellata.

Furcifera: [fer-si-fer-a] From Furcatus, which is Latin for a small two pronged fork and Ferae/Ferārum, which are Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which fork regularly. A good example was Acacia furcifera which is now known as Acacia paradoxa subsp. furcifera.

Furcilla: [fer-sil-la] From Furcatus, which is Latin for a small two pronged fork and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to a structure or organ, which has forks. A good example was Furcilla bidwillii, which is now known as Araucaria bidwillii.

Furcillata: [fer-sil-la-ta] From Furcatus, which is Latin for a small two pronged fork and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to a structure or organ, which has forks. A good example was Pterostylis furcillata.

Furculifolia: [fer-ku-li-foh-li-a] From Furcatus, which is Latin for a small two pronged fork and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which divide similar to a two pronged fork or the wish bone in a bird. A good example was Nymphoides furculifolia.

Furfuracea: [fur-fur-a-see-a] From Furfurācea, which is Latin for a mealy of scurfy and Acea, which is Latin for a family. It refers to structures or organs, which have the appearance of bran, husks of grain or usually the scaly infection of the skin like many eczemas or the scaly surfaces of many stems. A good example is Zieria furfuracea.

Eczema – A form of furfuracea

Furfuraceum: [fur-fur-a-see-um] From Furfurāceum, which is Latin for a mealy of scurfy and Acea, which is Latin for a family. It refers to structures or organs, which have the appearance of bran, husks of grain or usually the scaly infection of the skin like many eczemas. A good example is the stems on Solanum furfuraceum.

Furrow: [fuh-roh] From Furwe, which is old English for a groove. It refers to a groove or narrow trench usually longitudinal on the trunk, branches, fruits or seeds. A good example is the stems and articles on Allocasuarina distyla.

Furtiva: [fer-ti-va] From Furtīvus, which is Latin for taken, done or used secretively. It may refer to plants, which grow unnoticed in their habitat. This is presently an unresolved name awaiting further investigation or research to determine which genus, species or sub species or variety it should be placed in. A good example is Leptomeria furtiva.

Fusanus: [foo-sa-nus] From Fusion, which is Latinized for an area in south western Western Australia and Anus/Ensis which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were originally discovered in the far south western corner of western Australia. A good example is the smoky white lemmas with a deeper dusky brown caryopsis on Fusanus emarginatus, which is now known as Daviesia emarginata.

Fusca: [fus-ka] From Fuscus, which is Latin for a deep or pale grey-brown to reddish-brown colour or dusky brown. It refers to structures or organs or the soil preference of plants, which are grey-brown to reddish-brown in colour. A good example is the smoky white lemmas with a deeper dusky brown caryopsis on Diplachne fusca.

Fuscata: [fus-ka-ta] From Fuscus, which is Latin for a deep or pale grey-brown to reddish-brown colour or dusky brown. It refers to structures or organs or the soil preference of plants, which are grey-brown to reddish-brown in colour. A good example is Pultenaea fuscata, which is now known as Pultenaea vestita.

Fuscatus: [fus-ka-tus] From Fuscus, which is Latin for a deep or pale grey-brown to reddish-brown colour or dusky brown. It refers to structures or organs or the soil preference of plants, which are grey-brown to reddish-brown in colour. A good example is Petalochilus fuscatus.

Fuscina: [fus-si-na] From Fuscus, which is Latin for a deep or pale grey-brown to reddish-brown colour or dusky brown. It refers to structures or organs or the soil preference of plants, which are grey-brown to reddish-brown in colour. A good example is Habenaria fuscina.

Fuscobractea: [fus-ko-brak-tee-a] From Fuscus, which is Latin for a deep or pale grey-brown to reddish-brown colour or dusky brown and Bractea, which is Latin for a thin metal plate. It refers to the specialized leaves behind the flower buds, which are deep or pale grey-brown to reddish-brown colour or dusky brown in colour. A good example is the deep reddish-brown bracts on Banksia fuscobractea.

Fuscobrunneus: [fus-ko-bru-ne-us] From Fuscus, which is Latin for a deep or pale grey-brown to reddish-brown colour or dusky brown and Brunneus, which is Latin for brown. It refers to structures or organs brown in colour. A good example is the deep reddish-brown bracts on Tylopilus fuscobrunneus.

Fuscolutea: [fus-ko-loo-te-a] From Fuscus, which is Latin for a deep or pale grey-brown to reddish-brown colour or dusky brown and Lutea, which is Latin for yellow. It refers to structures or organs usually the flowers, which are pale yellow with pale grey-brown to reddish-brown markings. A good example is Grevillea fuscolutea.

Fuscopilosa: [fus-ko-pi-lo-sa] From Fuscus, which is Latin for a deep or pale grey-brown to reddish-brown colour or dusky brown and Pilosa, which is Latin for long, soft wavy or at times matted hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in grey-brown to reddish-brown pilose hairs. A good example is the deep reddish-brown sheaths on Ctenopteris fuscopilosa.

Fuscopilosum: [fus-ko-pi-lo-sum] From Fuscus, which is Latin for a deep or pale grey-brown to reddish-brown colour or dusky brown and Pilosa, which is Latin for long, soft wavy or at times matted hairs. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in grey-brown to reddish-brown pilose hairs. A good example is the deep reddish-brown sheaths on Polypodium fuscopilosum, which is now known as Prosaptia fuscopilosa.

Fuscovaginatus: [fus-ko-va-jin-ahy-tus] From Fuscus, which is Latin for a deep or pale grey-brown to reddish-brown colour or dusky brown and Vagina, which is Latin for the vaginal sheath. It refers to sheaths, which are deep grey-brown to reddish-brown in colour. A good example is the deep reddish-brown sheaths on Cyperus vaginatus.

Fuscoviolacea: [fus-ko-vahy-o-la-see-a] From Fuscus, which is Latin for a deep or pale grey-brown, reddish-brown or dusky-brown and Viola, which is Latinized from the  French for violet. It refers to flowers, which are deep violet and reddish-brown in colour. A good example is Viola fuscoviolacea.

Fuscoviride: [fus-ko-vi-ri-de] From Fuscus, which is Latin for a deep or pale grey-brown, reddish-brown or dusky-brown and Viridus which is Latin for green. It refers to flowers, which are lime green and Reddish-brown in colour. A good example is Prasophyllum fuscoviride.

Fuscum: [fu-skum] From Fuscus, which is Latin for a deep or pale grey-brown to reddish-brown colour or dusky brown. It refers to flowers or other organs, which are deep or pale grey-brown to reddish-brown colour or dusky brown in colour. A good example is the colour of the flowers on Prasophyllum fuscum.

Fusiform: [foo-si-form] From Fusus, which is Latin for a spindle and Forme which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. Itusually It refers to capsules or at times buds or other organs, which are swollen in the middle and taper at each end like a spindle. A good example is the fusiform capsules on Parsonsia rotata.

Fusiforme: [foo-si-form] From Fusus, which is Latin for a spindle and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. Itusually It refers to capsules or at times the buds or other organs, which are swollen in the middle and taper at each end like a spindle. A good example is the fusiform capsules on Dendrobium fusiforme, which is now known as Thelychiton jonesii subsp. jonesii.

Fusiformis: [foo-si-for-mis] From Fusus, which is Latin for a spindle and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to the shape of capsules or at times buds or other organs, which are swollen in the middle and taper at each end like a spindle. A good example is the fusiform buds on Eucalyptus fusiformis.

“Ga – Gy”

Gaeijera: [gahy-jeer-a] Is named in honour of J. D. Geijer; 1708-1756, who was a Swedish botanist. A good example is Gaeijera parviflora.

Gabrielae: [ga-bri-e-le] Is named in honour of Joseph Gabriel; 1847-1922, who a Western Australian naturalist. A good example is the exotic garden plant Anigozanthos gabrielae.

Gadgarrense: [gad-gar-rens] From Gadgar, which is Latinized for the local Aboriginal vernacular of an area on the Atherton Tablelands in far north Queensland and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on the Atherton Tablelands. A good example is Bulbophyllum gadgarrense.

Gadgarrensis: [gad-gar-ren-sis] From Gadgar, which is Latinized for the local Aboriginal vernacular of an area on the Atherton Tablelands in far north Queensland and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered on the Atherton Tablelands. A good example is Oxysepala gadgarrensis, which is now known as Bulbophyllum gadgarrense.

Gaertnera: [gart-neer-a] Is named in honour of Joseph Gaertner; 1732-1791, who was a German botanist. A good example is Gaertnera australiana.

Gaertneri: [gart-ne-rahy] Is named in honour of Joseph Gaertner; 1732-1791, who was a German botanist. A good example is the exotic garden plant Asteromyrtus gaertneri, which is now known as Asteromyrtus angustifolia.

Gageoides: [ga-je-oi-deez] Is named in honour of Sir Thomas Gage, 7th Baronet; 1781-1820, who was an English botanist, From A, junior branch of the Gage family of Firle and studied the flora of Ireland and Portugal and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Gagea or Gageana genus. A good example is Thysanotus gageoides.

Gahnia: [gar-nee-a] Is named in honour of Dr. Henry Gahn who was a Swedish botanist and friend of Karl Linnaeus. A good example is Gahnia aspera.

Gaiadéndron: [gahy-a-den-dron] From Gaia, which is Ancient Greek for the goddess of the earth and Déndron, which is Ancient Greek for a tree. It refers to Gaia’s ability to show concerns for the stability of Earth’s natural systems and Philosophize that the concept that living organisms will improve their environment to developed the largest of living things to the smallest. A good example is Gaiadéndron ligustrinum, which is now known as Atkinsonia ligustrina.

Gaimardia: [gahy-mar-di-a] Is named in honour of Joseph Paul Gaimard; 1793-1858, who was a French physician and zoologist.

Galactia: [gah-lak-ti-a] From Galactos, which is Ancient Greek for milk. It refers to some species in the genus which produce white latex which is rare amongst members of the Fabaceae family. A good example is Galactia tenuiflora var. lucida.

Galactites: [ga-lak-ti-teez] From Galactos, which is Ancient Greek for milk. It refers to some species in the genus which produce white latex which is rare amongst members of the Fabaceae family. A good example is Lechenaultia galactites.

Galactoxyla: [ga-lak-tok-sahy-la] From Galactos, which is Ancient Greek for milk and Xylon, which is Ancient Greek for wood. It refers to the colour of the timber which is pale. A good example was Bassia galactoxyla, which is now known as Palaquium galactoxylum.

Galactoxylon: [ga-lak-tok-sahy-lon] From Galactos, which is Ancient Greek for milk and Xylon, which is Ancient Greek for wood. It refers to the colour of the timber which is pale. A good example is Galactoxylon pierrei which is now known Palaquium pierrei.

Galactoxylum: [ga-lak-tok-sahy-lum] From Galactos, which is Greek for milk and Xylon, which is Ancient Greek for wood. It refers to the colour of the timber, which is pale. A good example is Palaquium galactoxylum.

Galeatum: [ga-lee-a-tum] From Galeātum, which is Classical Latin for helmeted. It refers to plants, which have an organ that is the shape of a helmet. A good example is the Verticordia galeata.

Galbina: [gal-bi-na] From Galbinum, which is Ancient Greek for greenish-yellow. It refers to stems and or the flower centers, especially on white flowers, that are greenish-yellow. A good example is Mitrasacme galbina.

Galbraithiae: [gal-brei-thee-e] Is named in honour of Jean Galbraith; 1906–1999, who was an Australian botanist, horticulturalist and writer of children’s books and poetry. A good example is Boronia galbraithiae.

Galbraithiana: [gal-brei-thee-a-na] Is named in honour of Jean Galbraith; 1906–1999, who was an Australian botanist, horticulturalist and writer of children’s books and poetry. A good example is Dampiera galbraithiana.

Galbulimima: [gal-byoo-li-mi-ma] From Galbulus, which is Latin for somewhat greenish-yellow and Albula, which is Latin for somewhat whitish. It refers to flowers, which are whitish at the center and becoming yellowish to greenish-yellow as the near the apexes of the petals. A good example is the flowers on Galbulimima baccata.

Galea: [ga-lee-a] From Galeatus, which is Latin for a helmet. It refers to the calyx or corolla, which resemble a helmet. A good example is found in the flower shapes of Pterostylis coccina.

Galeata: [ga-lee-a ta] From Galeatus, which is Latin for a helmet. It refers to the shape of an aril, which covers the seeds. A good example is found on Acacia galeata.

Galeate: [ga-lee-eit] From Galeatus, which is Latin for a helmet. It refers to the shape of an aril, which covers the seeds somewhat resembling a helmet. A good example is Eremophila maculata.

Galeatum: [ga-lee–tum] From Galeatus, which is Latin for a helmet. It refers to calyxes or corollas which have a covered hood resembling a hat or helmet. A good example is Conospermum galeatum.

Galega: [gah-le-ga] From Galactos, which is Ancient Greek for milk. It refers to foliages which were extensively used as cow and goat fodder to improve the milk quality. A good example was Galega colutea, which is now known as Indigofera colutea.

Galegiifolia: [ga-le-gi-foh-li-a] From Galactos, which is Ancient Greek for milk and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the fact that the foliage was extensively used as cow and goat fodder to improve the milk quality. A good example is Colutea galegiifolia, which is now known as Swainsona galegifolia.

Galenia: [ga-le-ni-a] Is named in honour of Claudius Galenus; 130-200AD, who was a Greek physician and psychologist whose influence reigned until the renaissance. A good example is the exotic weed Galenia pubescens.

Galeola: [ga-le-o-la] From Galeatus, which is Latin for a small cap usually made from an animal skin. It refers to the root caps which resemble an animal skin in colour. A good example is the large saphrophytic orchid Galeola foliata, which is now known as Pseudovanilla foliata.

Galericulata: [ga-ler-i-kyoo-la-ta] From Galeatus, which is Latin for a small cap usually made from an animal skin. It refers to sepals which resemble an animal skin covering the buds. A good example is the leaves on Zaleya galericulata.

Galericulatum: [ga-ler-i-kyoo-la-tum] From Galeatus, which is Latin for a small cap usually made from an animal skin. It refers to sepals which resemble an animal skin covering the buds. A good example is the leaves on Trianthema galericulatum, which is now known as Zaleya galericulata.

Galericulatus: [ga-ler-i-kyoo-la-tus] From Galeatus, which is Latin for a small cap usually made from an animal skin. It refers to sepals which resemble an animal skin covering the buds. A good example is the fungus Agaricus galericulatus which is now known as Mycena galericulata.

Galerina: [ga-ler-i-na] From Galeatus, which is Latin for a small cap usually made from an animal skin. It refers to the colour of the pileus, which is a tan colour. A good example is the fungus Galerina patagonica.

Galioides: [ga-li-oi-deez] From Galactos, which is Ancient Greek for milk and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants, which resemble the Galium genus. A good example is Oldenlandia galioides.

Galium: [ga-li-um] From Galactos, which is Ancient Greek for milk. It refers to the foliage from Galium verum, whichwas used to curdle milk and is still used as a natural colouring to colour cheese. A good example of an Australian species is Gallium binifolium.

Gallery Forest: [ga-ler-ee, fo-rest] From Galleria, which is Latin or Galilaea, which is Ancient Greek for a corridor of greater importance and Foris, which is Latin for outside. It refers to where the vegetation varies from the rest of the vegetation in a forest because of soil, moisture or other slight geographical difference. A good example of a local Gallery forest species is Myrsine benthamiana.

Gallionella: [ga-li-o-nel-la] From Gallus, which is Latin for chicken and Ella, which is Latin for a young girl or the feminine form. It refers to the type specie, which was discovered in chicken feces. This group of bacteria will create oily slimes and rusty brown sludges in slow moving anaerobic waters where iron is in high concentrations in the soil. A good example is the bacteria of Gallionella filamenta, Sphaeotilus natans and Leptothrix discophora which will form an oily biofilm on the surface and a rusty coloured sludge within the water by precipitating iron.

Gamelythrum: [ga-me-lahy-thrum] From Gamos, which is Ancient Greek for to marry and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ of a flower or the flower. A good example was Gamelythrum denudatum, which is now known as Amphipogon turbinatus.

Gametophyte: [ga-me-to-fahyt] From Gamos, which is Ancient Greek for to marry and Phyton, which is Ancient Greek for a plant. It refers to organisms which display an alternation of generations as part of their life cycle which include plants and certain algae.

Gamophylla: [ga-mo-fahyl-la] From Gamos, which is Ancient Greek for to marry and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves which are joined at the base as if united as one. A good example is Eucalyptus gamophylla.

Gamozygis: [ga-mo-zahy-jis] From Gamos, which is Ancient Greek for to marry and Syzygos, which is Ancient Greek for to be joined. It refers to the new immature leaves, which appear to be opposite and joined until they grow out. A good example is Gamozygis flexuosa, which is now known as Agonis flexuosa.

Gangetica: [gan-je-ti-ka] From Ganges, which is Latinized for the Ganges River and environs and Aticum, which is a form of Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered along the Ganges River in India. A good example is the lichen Riccia gangetica.

Gangeticum: [gan-jen-ti-kum] From Ganges, which is Latinized for the Ganges River and environs and Aticum, which is a form of Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered along the Ganges River in India. A good example Desmodium gangeticum.

Ganglia: [gang-li-a] From Ganglion, which is Ancient Greek or Ganglia, which is Latin for a swelling or tumor under the skin. It refers to bulbous structures consisting of neuron cell bodies and supporting or glial cells that act as local processors for interconnected neurons. It is basically an arthropods nervous system.

Ganophyllum: [ga-no-fahyl-lum] From Ganos, which is Ancient Greek for bright and shinny and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves, which are somewhat more glossy than the leaves or flowers. A good example is Ganophyllum falcatum.

Ganoderma: [ga-no-der-ma] From Ganos, which is Ancient Greek for beauty bright and shinny and Derma, which is Ancient Greek for the skin. It refers to the surfaces of structures or organs, which are shinny or glossy. A good example is Ganoderma australe.

Ganopoda: [ga-no-poh-da] From Ganos, which is Ancient Greek for bright and shinny and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek for a foot or feet. It refers to the pedicels or petioles, which are rather shinny and attractive. A good example is Alexgeorgea ganopoda.

Garcinia: [gar-si-ni-a] Is named after Dr. Laurent Garcin; 1683-1791, who was a French Botanist who discovered several new species notably from the Middle East. A good example is the exotic weed Garcinea warrenii.

Gardenea: [gar-de-ne-a] Is named in honour of Alexander Garden; 1730-1791, who was an American born Botanist who discovered several new species. A good example is Gardenea psidioides.

Gardineri: [gar-di-ner-ahy] Is named in honour of E. Gardiner of Nepal or G. Gardiner of Brazil but which Gardiner cannot be substantiated. A good example is Armpelocissus gardineri.

Gardneria: [gard-ner-i-a] Is named in honour of E Gardiner of Nepal or G Gardiner of Brazil but which Gardiner cannot be substantiated. A good example was Gardneria fragraecea, which is now known as Fragraecea fragraecea.

Gariwerdensis: [ga-ri-wer-den-sis] From Gariwerd, which is Latinized from the local Djab Wurrung and the Jardwadjali traditional owners of the land which is now a sacred place and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Grampians National Park in western Victoria. Agood example is Grevillea gariwerdensis.

Garlandii: [gar-lan-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Garland but which Garland cannot be substantiated. A good example is Senicio garlandii.

Garnotia: [gar-no-ti-a] Is named in honour of Prosper Garnot; 1794-1838, who was a French marine assistant surgeon with an insatiable appetite for botany and zoology. A good example is Garnotia stricta.

Garrawayae: [gar-ra-wei-ee] From Garraway, which is Latinized for Garraway’s Hill in the Iron Range National Park. It refers to where the type species was found. A good example is Brachychiton garrawayae.

Garrawayi: [gar-rah-wei-i] From Garraway, which is Latinized for Garraway’s Hill in the Iron Range National Park. It refers to where the type species was found. A good example is Citrus garrawayi.

Garrettii: [ga-re-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Garrett but which garrett cannot be substantiated. A good example is Garnotia stricta.

Garuga: [gar-oo-ga] From Garuga, which is Latinized for the Indonesian name for the type species. A good example is  Garuga floribunda.

Gascoynensis [gas-koi-nen-sis] From Garraway, which is Latinized for the Gascoyn district and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Gascoyn basin between Onslow and Carnarvon in central western Western Australia. A good example is Myriocephalus gascoynensis.

Gasoul: [ga-sol] From Gasoul, which maybe Latinized From A, local New Guinee vernacular for the plants, which were found there. A good example is Gasoul aitonis, which is now known as Crepidomanes saxifragoides.

Gasstroemi: [gas-stroh-mi] Is named in honour of Gasstroem. A good example is Diasperus gasstroemi, which is now known as Phyllanthus gunnii.

Gasteenii: [ga-stee-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of J. Gasteen, who was an Australian plant collector. A good example is Coix gasteenii.

Gastonia: [ga-sto-ni-a] Is named in honour of Jean Baptise Gaston; 1608-1660, Duke of Orleans, the third son of Henry IV of France who was a patron of botany. A good example is Gastonia spectabilis.

Gastrodia: [gah-stroh-di-a] From Gaster, which is Ancient Greek for a belly. It refers to the shape of the flowers resembling an old pot belly stove or a beer gut. A good example is Gastrodia sesamoides.

Gastrolobium: [ga-str-loh-bi-um] From Gaster, which is Ancient Greek for a belly and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for a pod. It refers to turgid organs, which have the shape of an old pot belly stove or beer gut. Most of the species contain the poison monoflouroacetic acid commonly known as 1080. A good example is Gastrolobium acutum.

Gastrosiphon: [ga-stro-sahy-fon] From Gaster, which is Ancient Greek for a belly and Siphon, which is Ancient Greek for a pipe or tube. It refers to roots, which resemble long thin tubes. A good example is Gastrosiphon scutellifera.

Gatesii: [geit-si-ahy] Is named in honour of gates but which Gates cannot be substantiated. A good example is Leiocarpa gatesii.

Gaudichaudiana: [gor-di-chor-di-a-na] Is named in honour of Charles Gaudichaud Beaupre; 1789-1645, who was a French Botanist who named several Australian genera. A good example is Carex gaudichaudiana.

Gaudichaudianum: [gor-di-chor-di-a-num] Is named in honour of Charles Gaudichaud Beaupre; 1789-1645, who was a French Botanist who named several Australian genera. A good example is Dysoxylum gaudichaudianum.

Gaudichaudii: [gor-di-chor-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Charles Gaudichaud Beaupre; 1789-1645, who was a French Botanist who named several Australian genera. A good example is Plantago gaudichaudii.

Gaudium-solis: [gor-di-um, so-lis] From Gēthéō, which is Ancient Greek or later Gaudium, which is Latin for I take pleasure or to rejoice and Sōlum, which is Latin for alone, solitude, solitary or uninhabited. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in solitude. As a matter of intereset Gaudium often coupled with solis is the start of all British diplomas and bachelor degree celebrations. A good example is Tephrosia gaudium-solis.

Gaultheria: [gorl-ther-i-a] Is named in honour of Dr. Hugues Jean Gaulthier; 1708-1756, who was a Canadian Botanist and physician. A good example is Gaultheria appressa.

Gausa: [gor-sa] From Gausos, which is Ancient Greek for to bend or bent. It refers to the spike/s being bent. A good example is  the spike on Setaria gausa , which is now known as Paspalidium gausum.

Gausum: [gor-sum] From Gausosm which is Ancient Greek for to bend or bent. It refers to spike/s which are crooked or bent. A good example is the spike on Paspalidium gausum.

Gawlerensis: [gor-ler-en-sis] From Gawler, which is Latinized for the Gawler district north of Adelaide and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered around the Gawler district in South Australia. A good example is the spike on Senecio gawlerensis.

Gazania: [ga-zei-ni-uh] From Gausos, which is Greek for to bend or bent. It refers to the spike/s, which are crooked or bent. A good example is the spike on Paspalidium gausum.

Geastrum: [jee-strum] From Geos, which is Ancient Greek for the earth and Astron, which is Ancient Greek for a star. It refers to a fungi, which the outer peridium dries and splits into star like segments and thus are stars of the Earth. A good example is the fungus Geastrum pectinatum.

Thanks to the European free swap nature group. http: //www.freenatureimages.eu

Geeingwa: [jee-ing-war] From Geeingwa, which is Latinized from the local aboriginal language. Its meaning or reference is unclear. A good example is Borreria geeingwa.

Geijericola: [gei-jer-i-koh-la] From Geijeri which is unknown and Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. A good example is Korthalsella rubra subsp. geijericola.

Geissois: [geis-so-is] From Geisson, which is Ancient Greek for a tile. It refers to the way the seeds, which overlap each other like roof tiles. A good example is Geissois benthamiana.

Geissoloma: [geis-so-loh-ma] From Geisson, which is Ancient Greek for a tile and Loma, which is Latin for a hairy edge. It refers to corolla lobes which overlap each other like roof tiles and have hairy margins. A good example is Brachyloma geissoloma.

Geitonogamy: [geit-no-gah-mee] From Geiton, which is Ancient Greek for a neighbour and Gamy which is Ancient Greek for to marry or marrying. It refers to the fertilization of one flower by another on the same plant. A good example is Citrus australasica.

Geitonogamous: [geit-o-noh-gah-mus] From Geiton, which is Ancient Greek for a neighbour and Gamy, which is Ancient Greek for marrying. It refers to the description of plants, which are fertilized by different flowers on the same plant. A good example is Hibiscus trionum.

Geitoplesium: [geit-o-ple-si-um] From Geiton, which is Ancient Greek for a neighbour and Plesion which is Ancient Greek for near. It refers to plants, which are very closely related to the Luzuriaga genus. A good example is Geitplesium cymosum

Gelasina: [je-la-si-na] From Gelasina, which is Latin for a dimple. It refers to seeds, which have distinct depressions that resembles a dimple. A good example is Acacia gelasina.

Gelasinum: [je-la-si-num] From Gelasina, which is Latin for a dimple. It refers to seeds, which have distinct depressions that resembles a dimple. A good example was Racosperma gelasinum, which is now known as Acacia gelasina.

Gelatinous: [je-la-ti-nos] From GeLatine, which is Latin for frozen or almost frozen. It refers to physical propertys which are jellylike, soft and quivery. A good example is the edible jelly fungi which is being studied for cholesterol and anti-coagulant properties Auricularia auricula-judae.

Gelatinum: [je-la-ti-num] From GeLatin, which is Latin for frozen or almost frozen. It refers to physical propertys, which are jellylike, soft and quivery. A good example is the algae, Betaphycus geLatinum, which is now known as Betaphycus geLatinus.

Gelatinus: [je-la-ti-nus] From GeLatin, which is Latin for frozen or almost frozen. It refers to a physical property being jellylike, soft and quivery. A good example is the edible jelly fungi which is being studied for anti-cholesterol and anti-coagulant properties Betaphycus geLatinus.

Geleznowia: [je-lez-no/noh-wi-a] Is named in honour of Nicholai Zheleznov; 1816-1877, who was a Russian horticulturalist, agriculturalist and botanist. A good example is Geleznowia verrucosa.

Geleznowii: [jel-ez-no/noh-wi-ahy] Is named in honour of Nicholai Zheleznov; 1816-1877, who was a Russian horticulturalist, agriculturalist and botanist. A good example was Eriostemon geleznowii, which is now known as Geleznowia verrucosa.

Gelibia: [ge-li-bi-a] Maybe from Gelidum, which is Latin for frosty, icy, iced water or chilly. Often the foliage has an icicle or frosty appearance. A good example is Gelibia elegans, which is now known as Polyscias elegans.

Gelida: [je-li/lee-da] From Gelidum, which is Latin for frosty, icy, iced water or chilly. It refers to the plants, which prefer cold habitats where snow and ice exist for several months of the year. A good example is Lobelia gelida.

Gelidum: [ge-li/lee-dum] From Gelidum, which is Latin for frosty, icy, iced water or chilly. It refers to plants, which prefer cold habitats where snow and ice exist for several months of the year or at times have a snow white organs. A good example is the white colour of the lactic acid bacteria Leuconostoc gelidum.

Gelidus: [ge-li/lee-dus] From Gelidum, which is Latin for frosty, icy, iced water or chilly. It refers to plants, which prefer cold habitats where snow and ice exist for several months of the year or at times have a snow white organs. A good example is Leucopogon gelidus.

Gemella: [ge-mel-a] From Gemini/Gemellus/Gemellī, which are Latin for twins or to be arranged in pairs. It refers to fruits, which are normally found in pairs. A good example is Merremia gemella.

Gemellus: [ge-mel-lus] From Gemini/Gemellus/Gemellī, which are Latin for twins or to be arranged in pairs. It refers to flowers, or fruits which are normally found in pairs. A good example is Convolvulus gemellus, which is now known as Carchesium gemellum.

Gemina: [je-min-a] From Gemini/Gemellus/Gemellī, which are twins or to be arranged in pairs. It refers to flowers, or fruits develop in pairs or rarely in threes. A good example is Acacia gemina.

Geminata: [je-min-a-ta] From Gemini/Gemellus/Gemellī, which are Latin for twins or to be arranged in pairs. It refers to flowers, or fruits, which develop in pairs or rarely in threes. A good example is Diospyros geminata.

Geminatum: [je-min-a-tum] From Gemini/Gemellus/Gemellī, which are Latin for twins or to be arranged in pairs. It refers to two leaflets, which develop From A, common point. A good example is Racosperma geminum, which is now known as Acacia gemina.

Geminatus: [je-min-a-tus] From Gemini/Gemellus/Gemellī, which are Latin for twins or to be arranged in pairs. It refers to two leaflets, which develop From A, common point. A good example is Plectranthus geminatus.

Geminifolia: [je-min-i-foh-li-a] From Gemini/Gemellus/Gemellī, which are Latin for twins or to be arranged in pairs and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which fork into two identical lobes or leaflets. A good example is Asperula geminifolia.

Geminifolium: [je-min-i-foh-li-um] From Gemini/Gemellus/Gemellī, which are Latin for twins or to be arranged in pairs and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which fork into two identical lobes or leaflets. A good example is Galium geminifolium, which is now known as Asperula gemella.

Gemma: [jem-ma] From Gemma, which is Latin for a bud. It refers to an aggregation of cells, which fall from the mother plant and are capable of growing into a new plant. A good example is the Byrophyte Bryrocrumea andersorii or the lily Remusatia vivipara.

Gemmae: [jem-mee] From Gemma, which is Latin for a bud. It refers to an aggregation of cells, which fall from the mother plant and are capable of growing into a new plant. A good example is the Byrophyte Bryrocrumea andersorii or the lily Remusatia vivipara.

Gemmata: [je-ma-ta] From Gemma, which is Latin for a bud. It refers to the reproduction by budding, where an aggregation of cells which fall from the mother plant and are capable of growing into a new plant. A good example is the Byrophyte Cyanicula gemmata.

Gemmation: [je-ma-shon] From Gemma, which is Latin for a bud. It refers to the reproduction by budding, where an aggregation of cells which fall from the mother plant and are capable of growing into a new plant. A good example is the Byrophyte Sphagnum cristatum.

Gemmifera: [jem-mi-fer-a] From Gemma, which is Latin for a bud and Ferra, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to the large number of buds and shoots which appear from the trunk. A good example is Pandanus gemmifer.

Gemmiferus: [jem-mi-fer-us] From Gemma, which is Latin for a bud and Ferra, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to the large number of buds and shoots which appear from the trunk. A good example is Pandanus gemmiferus, which is now known as Pandanus gemmifer.

Gene: [jeen] From Gen which is German for the basic physical unit of heredity.

Gene Pool: [jeen, pool] From Gen which is German for the basic physical unit of heredity and pool combining to the sum of a population’s genetic material at a given time, which includes the stock of all the various genes in a breeding population.

Genethylloides: [je-ne-thahyl-loi-deez] From Genethliacum, which is Latin for the nativity and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. Its reference is unclear. A very good example is Lhotskya genethylloides, which is now known as Calytrix alpestris.

Genetic: [je-ne-tik] From Gene which is German for the basic physical unit of heredity. It refers to the study of genes, heredity, and the variation in living organisms.

Geneticologist: [je-ne-ti-kol-o-jist] From Gene, which is German for the basic physical unit of heredity, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist, which is Ancient Greek for a person. It refers to person who studies genes, heredity, and the variation in living organisms.

Geneticology: [je-ne-ti-kol-o-jee] From Gene, which is German for the basic physical unit of heredity and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the study of genes, heredity, and the variation in living organisms.

Genets: [je-nets] From Gene which is German for the basic physical unit of heredity. A group of genetically identical individual plants, (Dicotyledons, monocotyledons, ferns, fungi, bacteria etc.) which have grown in a given location, all originating from asexual reproduction of a single ancestor; a group of ramets. A good example is Viola betonicifolia which are self pollinated.

Genetyllis: [je-ne-tahyl-lis] From Geniculatus, which is Latin for knotted or a knee. It refers joints, which are similar to a bent knee. A very good example was which is now known as Darwinia vestita Genetyllis vestita, which is now known as Darwinia vestita.

Geniculata: [je-ni-kyoo-la-ta] From Geniculatus, which is Latin for knotted or a knee. It refers culms, which have one or more joints. Avery good example is the awns on Austrodanthonia geniculata.

Geniculate: [je-ni-kyoo-leit] From Geniculatus, which is Latin for knotted or a knee. It refers to stems, which bend at each node like a bent knee. A good example is the stems on Acacia macrademia.

Geniculatum: [je-ni-kyoo-lei-tum] From Geniculatus, which is Latin for knotted or a knee. It refers to joints, which are similar to a bent knee. A good example is the rhizomes on Blechnum geniculatum.

Geniculatus: [je-ni-kyoo-lei-tus] From Geniculatus, which is Latin for knotted or a knee. It refers to culms which are bent at the leaf nodes. A good example is the stems on Alopecurus geniculatus.

Geniculosa: [je-ni-kyoo-loh-sa] From Geniculatus, which is Latin for knotted or a knee. It refers to joints which resemble  bent knees. A good example is the rhizomes on Mitrasacme geniculosa.

Geniostema: [je-ni-o-stei-ma] From Genion, which is Greek for a beard and Stoma, which is Ancient Greek for a mouth. It refers to corollas which open or lobes which are distinctly hirtellous to hirsute. A good example is Geniostema huttonii.

Genistifolia: [je-nis-ti-foh-li-a] From Genista, which is Latin for a broom and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to stems and leaves, which are like a broom. A good example is Acacia genistifolia.

Genistifolium: [je-nis-ti-foh-li-um] From Genista, which is Latin for a broom and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to stems and leaves which are like a broom. A good example is Racosperma genistifolium, which is now known as Acacia genistifolia.

Genistoides: : [je-nis-ti-oi-deez] From Genista which is Latin for a broom and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to stems and leaves, which resemble the Genista genus. A good example was Acacia genistoides, which is now known as Acacia tetragonophylla.

Genoplesium: [je-no-ple-si-um] From Genosm which is Ancient Greek for a race and Plesion which is Ancient Greek for to be near to. It refers to plants, which are closely related to the Prasophyllum genus. A good example is Genoplesium rufum.

Genosiris: [je-no-si-ris] From Genosm which is Ancient Greek for a race and Îrism which is Ancient Greek or Īrism which is Latin for the goddess of rainbows. It refers to a race of plants, which have bright colourful flowers. A good example is Genosiris eriostephana, which is now known as Patersonia limbata.

Genre: [jen-ru] From Génosn which is Ancient Greek or Genus which is Latin for a major subdivision of a race or stock. It refers to a group of plants or animals, which have similar characteristics below the rank of a family or subfamily and above the rank of a species. A good example is Plectranthus diversa.

Gentiana: [jen-ti-a-na] Is probably named in honour of King Gentiusin Ancient Greece; who ruled 181–168 BC and was the last Illyrian king of the Ardiaean State being conquered by the Romans. He ordered the roots of the yellow Gentian for medicinal used against the plague and Alla which is Ancient Greek for to be smaller. The name was given to the original species Getiana lute by Pliny. A good example is Gentiana wissmannii.

Gentianella: [jen-ti-a-nel-la] Is named in honour of King Gentius of Illyria and Ella which is Latin for formative. The name was given by Pliny to the original species Gentiana lutea. A good example is Gentianella barringtonensis.

Genuflexa: [je-nyoo-flek-sa] From Genu, which is Latin for to be born of and Flexus which is Latin for bending. It refers to plants, which are born with easily bent or flexible stems. A good example is Goodenia genuflexa which now appears to be known as Anthotium junciforme.

Genuina: [je-nui-na] From Genuīnum, which is Latin for inate, natural, native or genuine or authentic. It often refers to plants, which are genuinely related to the species by showing all the normal characteristics of the species. A good example is Acacia alata var. genuina.

Genuinum: [je-nui-num] From Genuīnum, which is Latin for inate, natural, native or genuine or authentic. It often refers to plants, which are genuinely related to the species by showing all the normal characteristics of the species. A good example is Lythrum salicari var. genuinum.

Genus: [jee-nuh s] From Génos, which is Ancient Greek or Genus which is Latin for a major subdivision of a race or stock. It refers to a group of plants or animals, which have similar characteristics below the rank of a family or subfamily and above the rank of a species.

Coleus graveolens

Geocarpa: [jee-oh-kar-pa] From Geos which is Ancient Greek for the soil or earth and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which mature beneath the surface of the ground. A good example is Aracis hypogaea.

Geocarpum: [jee-oh-kar-pum] From Geos which is Ancient Greek for the soil or earth and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits which mature beneath the surface of the ground. A good example is Macrotyloma geocarpum.

Geocarpus: [jee-oh-kar-pus] From Geos which is Ancient Greek for the soil or earth and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits which mature beneath the surface of the ground. A good example is the fruits on Eleocharis caespitosissima.

Geococcus: [jee-o-ko-kus] From Geos, which is Ancient Greek for the soil or earth and Kokkos, which is Ancient Greek for a type of dried capsule. It refers to fruits, which are lowered and buried underground. A good example is Geococcus pusillus.

Geodorum: [jee-o-dor-um] From Geos, which is Ancient Greek for the soil or ground and Dorum, which is Ancient Greek for a gift. It refers to flowers, which are a beautiful gift from the soil. A good example is Geodorum densiflora.

Geoffreyi: [je-free-ahy] Is named in honour of Geoffrey. A good example Austrostipa geoffreyi.

Geoflorous: [jee-oh-flor-us] From Geos, which is Ancient Greek for the soil or earth and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which form below the ground. A good example is Crypripedium fargesii.

Geophila: [jee-oh-fi-la] From Geos, which is Ancient Greek for the soil or earth and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for to be loved or loving. It refers to the plants love of the earth thus crawling all over it. A good example is Geophila repens.

Georgeana: [jor-jee-a-na] Is named in honour of George but which George cannot be substantiated. A good example Macarthuria georgeana.

Georgeantha: [jawr-jee-an-tha] Is named in honour of George but which George cannot be substantiated and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. A good example is Georgeantha hexandra.

Georgei: [jor-jee-ahy] Is named in honour of George but which Gould cannot be substantiated. A good example is Maireana georgei.

Georgensis: [jor-jen-sis] From George which is Latinized for Georgetown and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered near Georgetown at the base of Cape York Peninsular. A good example Acacia georgensis.

Georgense: [jor-jens] From George which is Latinized for Georgetown and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered near Georgetown in Tasmania. A good example was Racosperma georgense, which is now known as Acacia georgensis.

Georgianus: [jor-ji-nus] From George which is Latinized for Georgetown and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered near Georgetown in Tasmania. A good example Senecio georgianus.

Georginae: [jor-jin-nee] Is named in honour of George but which Gould cannot be substantiated. A good example Acacia georginae.

Geraldtonensis: [je-ral-ton-en-sis] From Geraldton, which is Latinized for the district of Geraldton on the west coast of Western Australia and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Geraldton district. A good example is Diplolaena geraldtonensis.

Geraniifolia: [jer-a-ni-foh-li-a] From Geranion, which is Ancient Greek for a crane’s bill and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves, which resemble those of the exotic Geranium genus. A good example is Hydrocotyle geraniifolia.

Geraniifolium: [jer-a-ni-foh-li-um] From Geranion, which is Ancient Greek for a crane’s bill and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves, which resemble those of the exotic Geranium genus. A good example is Platyloma geraniifolium, which is now known as Doryopteris concolor.

Geraniifolius: [jer-a-ni-foh-li-us] From Geranion, which is Ancient Greek for a crane’s bill and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to the leaves, which resemble those of the exotic Geranium genus. A good example is Hibiscus geraniifolius, which is now known Alyogyne sp. Southern Coast.

Geranioides: [je-ra-ni-oi-deez] From Geranion, which is Ancient Greek for a crane’s bill and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the plants which resemble those of the exotic Geranium genus. A good example is Hibiscus geranioides.

Geraniospermum: [je-ra-ni-o-sper-mum] From Geranion, which is Ancient Greek for a crane’s bill and Spérma, which is Ancient Greek for a seed. It refers to the seeds, which resemble those of the exotic Geranium genus. A good example is Geraniospermum rodneyanum, which is now known as Geranium homeanum.

Geranium: [je-rei-ni-um] From Geranion, which is Ancient Greek for a crane’s bill. It refers to the flowers, which look similar to acrane’s bill. A good example is Geranium solanderi subsp. solanderi.

Germainia: [jer-man-i-a] Is probably named in honour of Germain de St. Pierre; 1815-1882, who was a botanist and author. A good example is the popular exotic dwarf Azalea known as Germainia truncatiglumis.

Germen: [jer-men] From Germen/Germine, which is Latin for to give birth a sprout or bud up. It refers to seeds, which are at the stage of germinating. A good example is any seed about to germinate. A good example is the herb Germen Chamomile, Matricaria chamomilla.

Germinate: [jer-mi-neit] From Germinātum, which is Latin for the process of sprouting, giving birth or budding up. It refers to seeds, which are at the stage of germinating. A good example is any seed about to germinate.

Germ pore: [jerm, por] From Germinātum, which is Latin for the process of sprouting, giving birth or budding up and Póros, which is Greek for a passage. It refers to spores in a region of the cell wall, which are able to germinate prior to dispersal.

Gertrudiae: [ger-troo-di-ee] Is probably named in honour of Gertrude Victoria Onions; who was an Australian pharmacist and wife of Oswald Hewlett Sargent a keen naturalist and native orchid fancier. A good example is Caladenia gertrudae.

Geum: [jee-um] From Geum, which is Ancient Greek for to have a pleasant flavour. It refers to aromatic roots, which are found on some species. A good example is Geum urbanum.

Gevuina: [je-voo-i-na] From Gevuina, which is Latinized from the local Peruvian word for the type species. A good example is Gevuina bleasdalei.

Ghaeri: [gee-ri] Is named in honour of Ghaer. A good example is Scirpodéndron ghaeri.

Ghaesembilla: [Gei-sem-bil-la] From Buembilla, which is Latinized for a local name of the plant in the south east Asian region. The exact location cannot been substantiated. A good native example is Antidesma ghaesembilla.

Gheisbreghtii: [gheis-breg-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Auguste Boniface Gheisbreght; 1810-1893, who was a Belgian botanist who devoted a great deal of time studying the Cactaceae family in Mexico. A good example was Goniopteris gheisbreghtii, which is now known as Pronephrium asperu.

Gibba: [gi-ba] From Gibbosum, which is Latin for to be swollen on one side. It refers to bladders, which swell on one side when an insects is trapped. A good example is Utricularia gibba.

Gibberagee: [gi-ber-a-jee] From Gibberagee, which is Latinized from the local aboriginal word for the State Forest in north eastern NSW. A good example is Melichrus sp. Gibberagee.

Gibberula: [gi-ber-yoo-la] From Gibba/Gibbosus, which is Latin for to be swollen on one side. It refers to the base of the calyx, which has a distinct swelling on one side. A good example is Amyema gibberula.

Gibberulosus: [gi-ber-yoo-loh-sus] From Gibbosum, which is Latin for to be swollen on one side. It refers to the base of the calyx, which has a distinct swelling on one side. This is a spelling error for gibberulus. A good example is Loranthus gibberulosus, which is now known as Amyema gibberula.

Gibberulus: [gi-ber-u-lus] From Gibbosum, which is Latin for to be swollen on one side. It refers to the base of the calyx which has a distinct swelling on one side. A good example is Loranthus gibberulus, which is now known as Amyema gibberula.

Gibbifolia: [gi-bi-foh-li-a] From Gibbosum, which is Latin for to be swollen on one side and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which have a distinct blob like, swellings on one side of the vein. A good example is Erimophila gibbifolia.

Gibbonsii: [gi-bon-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Philip Norman Gibbons; 1942-20.., who was an Australian botanist. A good example is the flowers on Actinotus gibbonsii.

Gibbosa: [gi-bo-sa] From Gibba/Gibbosus, which is Latin for swollen on one side. It refers to the flowers or fruits, which have a distinct convex shape or swelling on one side. A good example is the flowers on Hakea gibbosa.

Gibbose: [gi-bohs] From Gibbum, which is Latin for swollen on one side. It refers to a structure or organ, which have a distinct convex shape or swelling on one side.

Gibbosifolia: [gi-bo-si-foh-li-a] From Gibbum, which is Latin for swollen on one side and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a description of leaves, which have a distinct convex shape or swelling on one side. A good example was Eremophila gibbosifolia, which is now known as Eremophila gibbifolia.

Gibbosum: [gib-boh-sum] From Gibbosus, which is Latin for swollen on one side. It refers to a structure or organ, which have a distinct convex shape or swelling on one side. A good example is the flowers on Racosperma gibbosum, which is now known as Acacia gibbosa.

Gibbosus: [gib-boh-sus] From Gibbosus, which is Latin for swollen on one side. It refers to a structure or organ, which have a distinct convex shape or swelling on one side. A good example is the flowers on Leucopogon gibbosus.

Gibbum: [gib-bum] From Gibbum, which is Latin for swollen on one side. It refers to a structure or organ, which have a distinct convex shape or swelling on one side. A good example is Blechnum gibbum.

Gibbsiae: [gib-si-ee] Is named in honour of Lilian Suzette Gibbs; 1870-1925, who was a remarkable female English botanist and plant collector in some of the most remote and hostile environments on the planet. A good example is Garcinia gibbsiae.

Gibosa: [gi-bo-sa] From Gibbum, which is Latin for swollen on one side. It refers to a structure or organ, which have a distinct convex shape or swelling on one side. A good example is the flowers on Eremophila gibosa.

Gibsonii: [gib-so-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Alfred Gibson; 1851-1874, who was an explorer and perished on the Giles expedition. A good example is Haloragodéndron gibsonii.

Gigantangion: [jahy-gan-tan-ji-on] From Giganteus, which is Latin for enormous or very large and probably Angulāris, which is Latin for angle. It refers to structures or organs, which has many very prominent angles. A good example is Eucalyptus gigantangion which has very large hypanthium on the fruit and very prominent longitudinal ribs.

Gigantea: [jahy-gan-tee-a] From Giganteus, which is Latin for enormous or very large. It refers to plant, structures or organs usually the flowers, which are exceptionally large compared to other species in the genus. A good example is the overall status of Nymphea gigantea or Mucana gigantea subsp. gigantea.

Gigantica: [jahy-gan-ti-ka] From Giganteuss which is Latin for enormous or very large. It refers to the description of physical organs, which are much larger than other species in the genus. A good example is  the flowers on Fasciola gigantic.

Giganticum: [jahy-gan-ti-kum] From Giganteuss which is Latin for enormous or very large. It refers to the description of physical organs, which are much larger than other species in the genus. A good example is the flowers on Eriocaulon giganticum.

Gigas: [gi-gas] From Giganteus, which is Latin for enormous or very large. It refers to physical organ, which are of giant proportions compared to other species in the genus. A good example is the grass Caustis gigas.

Gilberta: [gil-ber-ta] Is probably named in honour of Dr. Lionel Arthur Gilbert; 1924-2015, who was an Australian botanist, teacher, collector and botanic gardens historian. A good example is Gilberta tenuifolia.

Gilbertiana: [gil-ber-ti-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Dr. Lionel Arthur Gilbert; 1924-2015, who was an Australian botanist, teacher, collector and botanic gardens historian. A good example is Thomasia gilbertiana, which is now known as Thomasia triphylla.

Gilbertii: [gil-ber-ti-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Dr. Lionel Arthur Gilbert; 1924-2015, who was an Australian botanist, teacher, collector and botanic gardens historian. A good example is Acacia gilbertii.

Gilbertensis: [gil-ber-ti-en-sis] From Gilbert, which is Latinized for the Gilbert River and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered along the Gilbert River at the southern end of Cape York Peninsular. A example is the flowers on Corymbia gilbertensis.

Gilesia: [gi-le-si-a] Is named in honour of Ernest Giles; 1835-1897, who led 3 expeditions across Western Australian deserts. A good example is Gilesia biniflora.

Gilesiia: [gi-le-si-la] Is possibly named in honour of John Gillies; who was a Scottish physician and botanist who collected and studied in South Africa. A good example is Urochloa gilesiia.

Gilesiana: [gi-le-si-a-na] Is possibly named in honour of John Gillies; who was a Scottish physician and botanist who collected and studied in South Africa. A good example is Acacia gillesiana.

Gilesii: [gi-le-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Giles; but which Giles is not exactly known as the father and two sons listed apparently had plants named in their honour. These include: Alfred Giles; 1847-1931, who was an English born Australian Explorer, drover, pastoralist and plant collector, Christopher Giles (Senior); 1802-1884, Pastoralist collected plants and father of both Christopher (Jnr.) and Alfred Giles, Christopher Giles (Junior); 1841-1917, who was an Australian surveyor, telegraph stationmaster at Charlotte Waters in the Northern Territory, explorer and plant collector for both Ferdinand von Mueller and Bentham. Other Gile’s include Henry Murray Giles, who collected between 1898-1910 was a Zoo keeper, William Giles; 1901-1972, Naturalist and William Ernest Powell Giles, 1835-1897, who was an English born Australian Explorer and warden’s clerk. A good example is Prostanthera gilesii

Gilgiana: [gil-ji-a-na] From Gilgi, which is Latinized for presumably a district in southern Western Australia and Ana/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Gilgai district in far south western, coastal Western Australia. A good example is the flowers on Hibbertia gilgiana which is now known as Hibbertia pilosa.

Gillbeea: [gil-bee-a] Is named in honour Dr. William Gillbee; 17??-1821, who was. A good example is Gillbeea adenopetala.

Gilleniae: [gil-len-i-ee] Is named in honour Francis James Gillen; 1855-1912, who was an early Australian anthropologist, ethnologist and the first postmaster at Alice Springs to whom Mt Gillen in the MacDonnell Ranges were also named.The type specimen was collected from Mount Gillen. A good example is Trachymene gilleniae.

Gillenii: [gil-len-ee-ahy] Is named in honour Francis James Gillen; 1855-1912, who was an early Australian anthropologist, ethnologist and the first postmaster at Alice Springs to whom Mt Gillen in the MacDonnell Ranges were also named.The type specimen was colledted from Mount Gillen. A good example is Eucalyptus gillenii.

Gilliesiae: [gil-li-es-i-ee] Is probably named in honour of Ernest Giles; 1851-1929, who was a conservationist and collector from South Australia. A good example is Spermacoce gilliesiae.

Gillii: [gi-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Ernest Giles; 1851-1929, who was a conservationist and collector from South Australia. A good example is Acacia gillii.

Gillivraei: [gi-li-vrei-ahy] Is named in honour of John MacGillivray; 1821-1867, who was a Scottish born Australian naturalist. A good example is Cochlospermum gillivraei.

Gilmourii: [gi-mor-i-ahy] Is named in honour of Gilmour. A good example is Pomaderris gilmourii var.gilmourii.

Gilruthia: [gil-ru-thi-a] Is named in honour of Dr. John Gilruth; 1871-1937, who was a Scotish born Australian Veterinary pathologist and Northern Territory Administrator. A good example is Gilruthia osbornii.

Gilruthiana: [gil-ru-thi-a-na] Is named in honour of Dr. John Gilruth; 1871-1937, who was a Scotish born Australian Veterinary pathologist and Northern Territory Administrator. A good example is Pityrodia gilruthiana.

Gills: [gils] From Khelunē, which is Ancient Greek, later Gile from Middle English for a jaw or lips or the breathing organs of a fish. It refers to any organ that resembles the folds in lips or a fish’s breathing organ. A good example is the gills on many fungi like Russula aff. rosacea

White gills on Russula rosacea The Pinnacles NSW

Gilva: [gil-va] From Gilvum, which is Latin for dull yellow. It refers to leaves, which have a dull yellowish-green colour. A good example is Bauhinia gilva.

Gilvum: [gil-vum] From Gilvum, which is Latin for dull yellow. It refers to leaves, which are a dull yellowish-green colour. A good example is Lysiphyllum gilvum.

Gingidia: [jin-ji-di-a] From Gingidia, which is Latinized from the Syrian word for a local species that is a member of the carrot family. It refers superficially to the two plants looking the same. A good example is Gingidia montana.

Gingidium: [jin-ji-di-um] From Gingidia which is Latinized from the Syrian word for a local species which is a member of the carrot family. It refers superficially to the two plants looking the same. A good example was Gingidium simplicifolium, which is now known as Aciphylla glacialis.

Gittinii: [ji-ti-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Clifford Halliday Gittins; 1904–1995, who was an Australian engineer and amateur botanist who collected specimens from many out of the way locations. A good example is Acacia gittinsii.

Gittinsii: [ji-tin-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Clifford Halliday Gittens; 1904-1995, who was an Australian engineer who collected plants from many isolated locations and was apparently very meticulous in his locations, pressing and observations. A good example is Eucalyptus gittinsii.

Giulianettii: [ji-u-li-a-net-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Giulianett. A good example is Dendrobium giulianettii, which is now known as Durabaculum mirbelianum.

Giuriatii: [ji-u-ri-a-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Giuriat. A good example is Stackhousia giuriatii, which is now known as Stackhousia monogyna.

Glab: [glab] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which are very smooth.

Glabella: [gla-bel-la] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which are hairless and very smooth. A good example is the stems on Cassytha glabella.

Glabellum: [glah-bel-lum] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which are hairless and very smooth. A good example is the stems on Heliotropium glabellum.

Glabellus: [glah-bel-lus] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which are hairless and very smooth. A good example is the stems on Leucopogon glabellus.

Glaber: [gla-ber] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to a structure or organ, which has no hairs or scales. A good example is the stems and leaves on Elachanthus glaber.

Glaberrima: [glah-ber-ri-ma] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to a structure or organ, which has no hairs or scales and is very smooth to touch. A good example is the leaves and spikes on Helmholtzia glaberrima.

Glaberrimum: [gla-ber-ri-mum] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which have no hairs or scales. A good example is the leaves and spikes on Jasminum aemulum var. glaberrimum, which is now known as Jasminum elongatum.

Glaberrimus: [gla-ber-ri-mus] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which have no hairs or scales. A good example is the leaves and spikes on Orthothylax glaberrimus, which is now known as Helmholtzia glaberrima.

Glabra: [gla-bra] From Glabra, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which have no hairs or scales thus are smooth and glabrous. A good example is the flowers on Correa glabra.

Glabrata: [gla-bra-ta] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs which have no hairs or scales. A good example is the leaves, spikes and flowers on Patersonia glabrata.

Glabrate: [gla-breit] From Glabrum which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which have no hairs or scales. A good example is the stems and leaves on Carpobrotus glaucescens.

Glabratum: [gla-bra-tum] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which have no hairs or scales. This is presently an unresolved name awaiting further research to determine which genus, species or sub species or variety it should be allocated to. A good example is the leaves, spikes and flowers on Gastrolobium glabratum.

Glabratus: [gla-bra-tus] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which have no hairs or scales. This is presently an unresolved name awaiting further research to determine which genus, species or sub species or variety it should be allocated to. A good example is the leaves, spikes and flowers on Leucopogon glabratus.

Glabrescencs: [gla-bre-sens] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which have no hairs or scales and are very smooth. A good example is the culms on Juncus usitatus.

Glabrescent: [gla-bre-sent] From Glabrum which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which are hairless and scabrousless. A good example isthe stems, leaves and buds on Eucalyptus melliodora.

Glabriflora: [gla-bri-flor-a] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are smooth, hairless and scabrousless. A good example is the stems, leaves and flowers on Helicia glabriflora.

Glabriflorum: [gla-bri-flor-um] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are hairless and very smooth. A good example is the stems, leaves and flowers on Brachystelma glabriflorum.

Glabriflorus: [gla-bri-flor-us] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is Roman the goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are hairless and very smooth. A good example is the stems, leaves and flower buds on Coleus glabriflorus.

Glabrifolia: [gla-bri-foh-li-a] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth and Folium, which is Latin foliage. It refers to leaves, which are hairless and very smooth. A good example is the stems and leaves on Zieria arborescens subsp. glabrifolia.

Glabrifolium: [gla-bri-foh-li-um] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth and Folium, which is Latin foliage. It refers to leaves, which are hairless and very smooth. A good example is the stems and leaves on Stylidium glabrifolium.

Glabrifolius: [gla-bri-foh-li-us] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth and Folium, which is Latin foliage. It refers to leaves, which are hairless and very smooth. A good example is the stems and leaves on Ranunculus glabrifolius.

Glabrilimba: [glah-bri-lim-ba] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth and Limbātum, which is Latin edge or to border on. It refers to margins usually the leaves, which are hairless and very smooth. A good example is Grevillea preissii subsp. glabrilimba.

Glabripetala: [gla-bri-pe-tei-la] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth and Petánnumi, which is Ancient Greek for to spread out or later Pétalon/Pétalos, which is Ancient Greek for thin metal leaf. It refers to specialized usually coloured leaves, which surround the ovaries and aid in the attraction of pollinators. It refers to the petals which are smoother, hairless and smoother than other species in the genus. A good example is the stems and leaves on Thomasia glabripetala.

Glabrisepala: [gla-bri-se-pa-la] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum, which is Latin for the specialized leaves behind a bud that often are cupular, the sepals. It refers to sepals which are glabrous. A good example is Hibbertia glabrisepala.

Glabrisepalum: [gla-bri-se-pa-lum] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth and Sképē, which is Ancient Greek or Sepalum, which is Latin for the specialized leaves behind a bud that often are cupular, the sepals. It refers to sepals which are glabrous. A good example is the stems, leaves, spikes and buds on Spyridium eriocephalum var. glabrisepalum.

Glabristyla: [gla-bri-stahy-la] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth and Stŷlos, which is Ancient Greek for a column. It refers to the female reproductive organ between the ovary and stigma on a flower, which is smooth, without hairs and without scales. A good example is Austrosteenisia glabristyla.

Glabristyla: [gla-bri-stahy-a] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth and Minusculus, which is Latin for rather small. It refers to a structure, but more often an organ, which is much smaller than that found on other species in the genus. A good example is Austrosteenisia glabristyla.

Glabrous: [gla-bros] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which are hairless and very smooth. It refers to structures or organs, which have no scales or hairs. A good example is on Pandorea jasminoides.

Glabrum: [gla-brum] From Glabrum, which is Latin for glabrous or smooth and hairless. It refers to structures and organs, which have no scales or hairs. A good example Clerodendrum longiflorum var. glabrum.

Glacialis: [glei-si-a-lis] From Glacialis, which is Latin for very cold and icy as in a glacier. It refers to habitats or environments which are very cold by Australian standards. A good example is Plantago glacialis.

Glacilima: [gla-si-li-ma] From Gracilima which is Latin for very slender and graceful. It refers to growth habitats of stems, which are very slender and graceful. A good example is Aotus glacillima.

Gladiata: [gla-di-a-ta] From Gladius, which is Latin for sword like. It refers to the leaves resembling a sword. A good example is the long slightly curved leaves on Conostylis gladiata.

Gladiatum: [gla-di-a-tum] From Gladius, which is Latin for sword like. It refers to a leaves, which resemble a sword in form. A good example is the long slightly curved leaves on Lepidosperma gladiatum

Gladiformis: [gla-di-for-mis] From Gladius, which is Latin for a sword and Forme which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to a leaves, which take the shape of a sword. A good example is Acacia gladiformis.

Gladiolata: [gla-di-o-lei-ta] From Gladius, which is Latin for a sword. It refers to leaves, which take the shape of a sword. A good example is Arachnorchis gladiolata.

Gland: [gland] From Gland which is Latin for a Gland/Glāns. It refers to a group of cells making an organ that produce a secretion. A good example is the glands on Acacia binervata.

Gland on phylode of Acacia binervata.

Glandless: [gland-les] From Gland, which is Latin for a Gland/Glāns. It refers to plants their structures or organs, which do not produce glands. A good example is the seeds on Gossypium sturtianum.

Glandulaceus: [glan-dyoo-la-see-us] From Gland/Glāns, which is Latin for a gland. It refers to a specialized group of cells, which make an organ that produces a secretion. A good example is the glands on the leaves of Exocarpos glandulaceus.

Glandular: [glahn-dyoo-lar] From Gland/Glāns, which is Latin for a gland. It refers to a specialized group of cells, which make an organ produce a secretion. A good example is the glands on the leaves of Drosera spathulata.

Glandular & hirsute hairs on Passiflora foetida Glandular hairs on Drosera spatulata

Glandulicarpa: [glan-dyoo-li-kar-pa] From Gland/Glāns, which is Latin for a gland and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the glandular hairs on the fruits. A good example is the glands on the pods of Acacia glandulicarpa.

Glandulicarpum: [glan-dyoo-li-kar-pum] From Gland/Glāns, which is Latin for a gland and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to the glandular hairs on the fruits. A good example is the glands on the pods of Racosperma glandulicarpum, which is now known as Acacia glandulicarpa.

Glandulifera: [glan-dyoo-li-fer-a] From Gland/Glāns, which is Latin for a gland and Ferra, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which have numerous glands. A good example is the indusium on Hypolepis glandulifera.

Glanduliferum: [glan-dyoo-li-fer-um] From Gland/Glāns, which is Latin for a gland and Ferra, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which have numerous glands. A good example is the indusium on Stylidium glanduliferum.

Glanduliferus: [glan-dyoo-li-fer-us] From Gland/Glāns, which is Latin for a gland and Ferra, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which have numerous glands. A good example is the indusium on Cyperus congestus var. glanduliferus.

Glanduligera: [glan-dyoo-li-jer-a] From Gland/Glāns, which is Latin for a gland and Gera, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to plants, which have numerous glands. A good example is the sundew Drosera glanduligera.

Glandulosa: [glan-dyoo-loh-sa] From Gland/Glāns, which is Latin for a gland. It refers to a group of cells, which make an organ that produce a secretion and bearing numerous glands. A good example is Millotia greevesii subsp. glandulosa.

Glandulosum: [glan-dyoo-loh-sum] From Gland/Glāns, which is Latin for a gland. It refers to a group of cells, which make a large organ that produce a secretion. A good example is Phebalium glandulosum subsp. glandulosum

Glandulosus: [glan-dyoo-loh-sus] From Gland/Glāns, which are Latin for a gland. It refers to a group of cells, which make a large organ that produce a secretion. A good example is Anopterus glandulosus.

Glands (Involucre): [glazn, in-vo-loo-kruh] From Gland/Glāns, which is Latin for an acorn or beechmast and Invoculum, which is Latin for a collection of rosette bracts subtending a flower cluster or umbels espcially in the Compositaceae family. It refers to nuts, which are subtended by a dry cupulate or dry involucre. A good example is the culturally important walnut Juglans regia.

Glareae: [glair-e-ee] From Glārea, which is Latin for to stick to, to smear or to spread out. It refers to plants, which have a tendancy to spread out more than other plants in the genus or have sticky glands which often smear the surrounding flora. A good example is the spreading habit of Panicum glareae which is more consitant with its new transferred genus of Digitaria brownii.

Glareicola: [glair-ei-koh-la] From Clārus, which is Latin for clear and bright Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or reside at. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in the open, exposed places often with additional reflective sunlight. A good example is Allocasuarina glareicola.

Glareosum: [glair-oh-sum] From Clārus,which is Latin for clear and bright. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow in the open, exposed places often with additional reflective sunlight. A good example is Desmodium glareosum.

Glasshousiensis: [glas-hour-si-en-sis] From Glasshouse, which is Latinized for the Glasshouse Mountains and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered from the Glasshouse Mountains district in south eastern Queensland. A good example was Eriostemon glasshousiensis, which is now known as Philotheca myoporoides subsp. leichhardtii.

Glauca: [glor-ka] From Glaucous which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering. It refers to the stems leaves or fruits, which have a blueish to greyish powdered layer over the surface. A good example is Allocasuarina glauca.

Glaucescens: [glor-kes-senz] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering. It refers to the stems leaves or fruits, which have a blueish powdered layer over the surface. A good example is Carpobrotus glaucescens.

Glaucescent: [glor-kes-sent] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering. It refers to the description of stems leaves or fruits, which have a slightly blueish powdered layer over the surface. A good example is the leaves on Eucalyptus cadens.

Glaucifolia: [glor-ki-foh-li-a] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. A good example is Tasmannia glaucifolia.

Glaucifolium: [glor-ki-foh-li-um] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are somewhat bluish or have a greyish-white powdery covering usually on the lower lamina. A good example is Stylidium angustifolium subsp. glaucifolium.

Glaucifolius: [glor-si-foh-li-us] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are somewhat bluish or have a greyish-white powdery covering usually on the lower lamina. A good example is Leucopogon glaucifolius.

Glaucina: [glu-si-na] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering. A good example is Eucalyptus glaucina.

Glaucinus: [gls-si-nus] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering. A good example is Cyperus glaucinus, which is now known as Cyperus conicus var. glaucinus.

Glauciphylla: [glor-ki-fahy-la] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are covered in a blueish-grey, powdery film. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia glaucophylla.

Glaucissima: [glor-kis/cis-si-ma] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or the most. It refers to a structure or organ, which has the most blueish film or covering. A good example is Eucalyptus calycogona subsp. glaucissima.

Glaucissimum: [glor-kis/cis-si-mum] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or the most. It refers to a structure or organ, which has the most blueish film or covering. A good example was Racosperma glaucissimum, which is now known as Acacia glaucissima.

Glauco-caeruleus: [glor-ko, kar-oo-lee-us] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering and Caeruleus, which is Latin for a deep blue colour. It refers to a description of a structure having a deep blue colour with a glaucous film. A good example at times is the flowers on Dianella caerulea.

Glaucocaesia: [glor-ko-see-si-a] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering and Caessia, which is Latin for pale blue. It refers to a structure or organ, which has the most blueish film or covering. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia glaucocaesia.

Glaucocaesium: [glor-ko-see-si-um] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering and Caessia, which is Latin for pale blue. It refers to a structure or organ, which has the most blueish film or covering. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia glaucocaesium, which is now known as Acacia glaucocaesia.

Glaucocalyx: [glor-ko-ka-liks] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering  and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are covered in a blueish, powdery film. A good example is the fruiting petioles on Melaleuca glaucocalyx, which is now known as Melaleuca bracteata.

Glaucocarpa: [glor-ko-kar-pa] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering  and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are covered in a blueish, powdery film. A good example is the fruiting petioles on Cryptocarya glaucocarpa.

Glaucocarpum: [glor-ko-kar-pum] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering  and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are covered in a blueish, powdery film. A good example is the pods on Racosperma glaucarpum , which is now known as  Acacia glaucocarpa.

Glaucocarpus: [glor-ko-kahr-pus] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are covered in a blueish-grey, powdery film.

Glaucophylla: [glawr-ko-fahyl-la] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are covered in a blueish-grey, powdery film. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia glaucophylla.

Glaucoptera: [glor-ko-te-ra] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering and Pteron which is Ancient Greek for a wing. It refers to the phyllodes, which resemble bluish-green wings. A good example is the stems and phyllodes on Acacia glaucoptera.

Glaucous: [glor-kos] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a white or pale blue look, film or covering. A good example is the lower laminas on the fronds on Gleichenia glaucescens.

Glaucoviolacea: [glor-ko-vahy-o-la-see-a] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish-white powdery covering and Violacea which is Latin for deep purple or violet. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a white or pale blue look, film or covering over a violet background. A good example is the lower laminas on the fronds on Justicia glaucoviolacea, which is now known as Rostellularia adscendens subsp. glaucoviolaceas.

Glaucula: [glor-ku-la] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a greenish-blue look, film or covering. A good example is Dillwynia glaucula.

Glaucum: [glor-kum] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a greenish-blue look, film or covering. A good example is Zygophyllum glaucum.

Glaucus: [glor-kus] From Glaucous, which is Latin for a filmy blueish or greyish white powdery covering. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a greenish-blue look, film or covering. A good example is Ricinocarpos glaucus.

Glaziovii: [gla-zi-o-vi-ahy] Is named in honour of Auguste François Marie Glaziou; 1828-1906, who was a French engineer turned botanist and plant collector in Brazil. A good example is Manihot glaziovii.

Gleba: [glee-ba] From Glēba/Glaeba, which is Latin for a clump or lump of something. It refers to the jelly like substance that fungi especially jelly fungi grow from.

Physarum paniceum’s gleba is within the wood, in which the fruiting bodies grow from

Gleba: [glee-ba] From Glēba/Glaeba, which is Latin for a clump or lump of something. It refers to the restricted area the plants are found in and the type of soil they are restricted to in that area. A good example is Hibbertia glebosa.

Glebosa: [gle-bo-sa] From Glebosus, which is Latin for a clod of earth. It may refer to the restricted area the plants are found in and the type of soil they are restricted to in that area. A good example is Hibbertia glebosa.

Glebosum: [gle-bo-sum] From Glebosus, which is Latin for a clod of earth. It may refer to the restricted area the plants are found in and the type of soil they are restricted to in that area. A good example is Calicium glebosum.

Gleichenia: [glei-chee-ni-a] Is named in honour of Baron von Gleichen; 1717-1783, who was a German botanist. He discovered the method of staining microorganisms with blue indigo or carmine. A good example is Gleichenia microphylla.

Glinus: [glin-us] From Glinos, which is Ancient Greek for a plant with sweet sap. It refers to some of the species, which have a sweet, maple like sap. A good example is Glinus oppositifolium.

Glischrocaryon: [glis-kro-kar-i-on] From Gliskhro, which is Greek for gluey or sticky and Karyon, which is Ancient Greek for a nut. It refers to the nuts, which feel like they are covered in a sticky glue. A good example is Glischrocaryon behrii.

Globiceps: [glo-bi-seps] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe and Képhalos, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to plants, which have globe like heads of flowers. A good example is the flower heads on Cladium globiceps, which is now known as Baumea rubiginosa

Globifer: [glo-bi-fer] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe and Ferae/Ferārum, for to bear. It refers to plants usually the flowers, which resemble an old style light globe. A good example is the flower heads on Schoenus globifer.

Globifera: [glo-bi-fer-a] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe and Ferae/Ferārum, for to bear. It refers to plants usually the flowers, which resemble an old style light globe. A good example is the leaves Hyalochlamys globifera.

Globiferum: [glo-bi-fer-um] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe and Ferae/Ferārum, for to bear. It refers to plants usually the flowers, which resemble an old style light globe. A good example is the pileus on the fungus Lignydium globiferum.

Globiflora: [glo-bi-flor-a] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which bear globular flowers or flower heads. A good example of globular heads is found on Dicrastylis globiflora.

Globoid: [glo-boid] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe. It refers to plants, which bear a structure or organ that takes the shape or form of an old style light globe. A good example is the buds on Eucalyptus socialis.

Globoidea: [glo-boi-de-a] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe. It refers to plants, which bear a structure or organ, which takes the shape or form of an old style light globe. A good example is the gum nuts on Eucalyptus globoidea.

Globoideum: [glo-boi-de-um] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe. It refers to plants, which bear a structure or organ that takes the shape or form of an old style light globe. A good example is the seeds on Paspalidium globoideum.

Globosa: [glo-bo-sa] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe. It refers to plants, which bear a structure or organ that takes the shape or form of an old style light globe. A good example is the flowers on Craspedia globosa.

Globose: [glo-bohs] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe. It refers to plants, which bear a structure or organ that takes the shape or form of an old style light globe. A good example is the ovaries on Anigozanthos flavida.

Globosum: [glo-boh-sum] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe. It refers to plants, which bear a structure or organ that takes the shape or form of an old style light globe. An example is the fruiting heads on Lepidosperma globosum.

Globular: [glo-byoo-la] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe. It refers to plants, which bear a structure or organ that takes the shape or form of an old style light globe. A good example is the globular flower heads on Acacia fimbriata.

Globularis: [glo-byoo-lar-is] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe. It refers to plants, which bear a structure or organ that is somewhat shaped or formed of an old style light globe. A good example is the fruits on Euonymus globularis.

Globulifera: [glo-byoo-li-fer-a] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe and Fera which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to flowers, which resemble an old style light globe. A good example is the leaves Acacia globulifera.

Globuliferum: [glo-byoo-li-fer-um] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe and Fera which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to flowers, which resemble an old style light globe. A good example is the fungus Physarum globuliferum.

Globuliferus: [glo-byoo-li-fer-us] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe and Fera which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to flowers, which resemble an old style light globe. A good example is the fungus Sphaerocarpus globuliferus.

Globulifloris: [glo-byoo-li-flo-ris] From Globoideus/Globulus which is Latin for a globe and Phúllon, which is Ancient Greek or Flōris which is Latin for a flower or Flōs which was the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which resemble an old style light globe. A good example is the leaves Pterocaulon globulifloris.

Globuliforme: [glo-byoo-li-form] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe. It refers to plants, which bear a structure or organ that takes the shape or form of an old style light globe. A good example is the leaves Bulbophyllum globuliforme.

Globuliformis: [glo-byoo-li-for-mis] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe. It refers to plants, which bear a structure or organ that takes the shape or form of an old style light globe. A good example is Cortinarius globuliformis.

Globulosa: [glo-byoo-loh-sa] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe. It refers to plants, which bear a structure or organ that takes the shape or form of an old style light globe. A good example is the flower buds on Cryptandra globulosa.

Globulosus: [glo-byoo-loh-sus] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe. It refers to plants, which bear a structure or organ that takes the shape or form of an old style light globe. A good example is the flower buds on Eucalyptus globulosus.

Globulus: [glo-byoo-lus] From Globoideus/Globulus, which is Latin for a globe. It refers to plants, which bear a structure or organ that takes the shape or form of an old style light globe. A good example is the flower buds on Eucalyptus globulus.

Glochidiata: [glo-ki-di-a-ta] From Glochidium, which is Latin for the barb on an arrow or fishing hook. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a small barbed bristles. A good example is Hydrocotyle glochidiata.

Glochidiate: [glo-ki-di-eit] From Glochidium which is Latin for the barb on an arrow or fishing hook. It refers to the description of barbs as is seen with the small barbed bristles on a prickly pear. Good examples are seen on the exotic weed, prickly pear Opuntia stricta.

Opuntia tuna – saxifraga-Jan van der Straaten http://www.freenatureimages.eu/

Glochidiatum: [glo-ki-di-a-tum] From Glochidium, which is Latin for the barb on an arrow or fishing hook. It refers to a structure or organ, which has small barbed bristles. A good example is Neosciadium glochidiatum.

Glochidiatus: [glo-ki-di-a-tus] From Glochidium, which is Latin for the barb on an arrow or fishing hook. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a barb. A good example is the barbs on the leaves or seeds of Daucus glochidiatus.

Glochidion: [glo-ki-di-on] From Glochidium, which is Latin for the barb on an arrow or fishing hook. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a barb. A good example is the barbs on the stigma of Glochidion ferdinandi.

Gloeophylla: [glo-ee-oh-fahyl-la] Maybe from Gloed, which is German for to glow and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to a leaves which have a glow about them without being highly glossy. A good example is Goodenia gloeophylla.

Gloeophyllum: [glo-ee-oh-fahy-luhm] Maybe from Gloed, which is German for to glow and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to a leaves which have a glow about them without being highly glossy. A good example is Gloeophyllum striatum, which are like bract fungus hat have an aura about them.

Gloeotricha: [glo-ee-oh-trahy-ka] From Gloeo, which is Latin for gloss and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to an organ, which is covered in glossy hairs. A good example is Acacia gloeotricha.

Gloeotrichum: [glo-ee-oh-trahy-kum] From Gloeo, which is Latin for gloss and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for hairy. It refers to an organ, which is covered in glossy hairs. A good example was Racosperma gloeotrichum, which is now known as Acacia gloeotricha.

Gloephylla: [glo-ee-frahyl-la] Maybe from Gloed, which is German for to glow and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to a leaves, which have a glow about them without being highly glossy. This is a spelling error seen in some earlier writings for Gloeophylla. A good example is Goodenia gloeophylla.

Glomerata: [glo-mer-a-ta] From Glometatus, which is Latin for to be gathered into making a ball. It refers to the individual flowers resembling small balls which have been gathered together. A good example is Dactylis glomerata.

Glomerate: [glo-mer-eit] From Glometatus, which is Latin for to be gathered into making a ball. It refers to individual flowers, which resemble balls that have been gathered together. A good example is the flower buds forming a mass of little balls on Melaleuca glomerata. In this species compared with most species in the genus which have cylindrical flower heads.

Glomeratum: [glo-mer-a-tum] From Glometatus, which is Latin for to be gathered into making a ball. It refers to individual flowers, which resemble balls being gathered together. A good example is the terminal leaves of Myriophyllum glomeratum which resemble little floating balls on the water’s surface.

Glomeratus: [glo-mer-a-tus] From Glometatus, which is Latin for to be gathered into making a ball. It refers to individual flowers, which resemble balls being gathered together. A good example is the flower heads on Senecio glomeratus.

Glomericassis: [glo-mer-i-kas-sis] From Glometatus, which is Latin for to be gathered into making a ball and Cassis which is French for the blackcurrant. It refers to flower heads, which resemble balls of blackcurrants. A good example is Eucalyptus glomericassis.

Glomerifolia: [glo-mer-i-foh-li-a] From Glometatus, which is Latin for to be gathered into making a ball and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble very small balls gathered together along the stems. A good example is Maireana glomerifolia.

Glomerosa: [glo-mer-o-sa] From Glometatus, which is Latin for to be gathered into making a ball. It refers to flower heads, which resemble balls gathered together in a head. A good example is Eucalyptus glomerosa.

Glomerulate: [glo-mer-yoo-leit] From Glometatus, which is Latin for to be gathered into making a ball. It refers to individual flowers, which are tightly packed together on short stalks. A good example is the flower buds forming a mass of little balls on Melaleuca nodosa. In this species compared with most species in the genus which have cylindrical flower heads.

Glomerulatus: [glo-mer-yoo-lei-tus] From Glometatus, which is Latin for to be gathered into making a ball. It refers to individual flowers, which are tightly packed together on short stalks. A good example is the flower buds form a cluster to make a small ball in Erythrocarpus glomerulatus.

Glomerule: [glo-mer-yool] From Glometatus, which is Latin for to be gathered into making a ball. It refers to flowers, or spores which are in small ball like clusters. A good example is the flowers on Pycnosorus globosus.

Glomerulosa: [glo-mer-yoo-loh-sa] From Glometatus, which is Latin for to be gathered into making a ball. It refers to flowers, or spores which are in small ball like clusters. A good example is the flowers on Astartea glomerulosa.

Glomulifera: [glo-myoo-li-fer-a] From Glometatus, which is Latin for to be gathered into making a ball and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to the individual a plant flowers, which are gathered together like little balls. A good example is the flower buds and fruits on Syncarpia glomulifera.

Glomuliferum: [glo-yoo-li-fer-um] From Glometatus, which is Latin for to be gathered into making a ball and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to the individual a plant flowers, which are gathered together like little balls. A good example is the flower buds and fruits on Atriplex glomuliferum, which is now known as Dysphania glomulifera subsp. glomulifera.

Gloria-medii: [glor-i-ahy] From Glōria/Glōriae, which is Latin for glorious and Med, which is named in honour of Med. The background may have reference to the discoverer of the Gloria-med stockings however I cannot find any definite link linking the two together. A good example is Ricinocarpos gloria-medii.

Gloriosa: [glawr-i-o-sa] From Glōria/Glōriae, which is Latin for glorious. It refers to plant’s flowers, which are very beautiful or can only be described as absolutely glorious. A good example is the flowers on the exotic horticultural lily Gloriosa supurba or the beautiful blue flowering native Wahlenbergia gloriosa.

Glossadenia: [glos-sa-de-ni-uh] From Glôssa, which  is Ancient Greek for a tongue and Adenia, which is Ancient Greek for a gland. It refers to flowers, which have a gland/s on the tongue like anther appendages. A good example is Grevillea glossadenia.

Glossantha: [glos-san-tha] From Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have a tongue like appendage. A good example is the keel petals that protrude further than other species in the genus or later thepersistant style on the pods on Daviesia glossantha, which is now known as Daviesia glossosema.

Glossanthus: [glos-san-thus] From Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs of a flower or the flower. It refers to flowers, which have a tongue like appendage. A good example is Erymophyllum glossanthus.

Glossocardia: [glos-so-kar-di-a] From Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue and Kardia, which is Ancient Greek for the heart. It refers to a tongue like appendage or ray florets which resemble a tongue. A good example is the labellum on Glossocardia bidens.

Glossocarpum: [glos-so-kar-pum] From Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit which vaguely resemble a tongue. It refers to fruits which resemble a tongue. A good example is Glossocarya calcicola.

Glossocarya: [glos-so-kar-ee-a] From Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue and Káryon, which is Ancient Greek for a nut. It refers to a tongue like appendage at the base of the fruits or nuts. A good example is Glossocarya coriacea and the Chinese walnut Glossocarya calcicola. The native species are under review so may be assigned to a new genus as the flowers differ somewhat to the south east Asian walnuts.

Glossodia: [glos-so-di-a] From Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue. It refers to a tongue like appendage at the base of the labellum. A good example is the labellum on Glossodia major.

Glossodiphylla: [glos-so-di-fahyl-la] From Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to leaves which resemble a tongue. A good example is Caladenia glossodiphylla, which is now known as Caladenia drummondii.

Glossogyne: [glos-so-jahyn] From Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue and Gyne which is Ancient Greek for a female. It refers to tepals surrounding the prominent style which resembles the labia lobes of a woman. A good example is the exotic herb Glossogyne tenuifolia which may have horticultural value in Australia as it is presently being studied for its antioxidant properties.

Glossophylla: [glos-so-fahyl-la] From Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to a leaves, which somewhat resemble a tongue. A good example is Cassinia glossophylla, which is now known as Ozothamnus leptophyllus.

Glossosema: [glos-so-se-ma] From Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue and Sema, which is Ancient Greek for a standard or sign. It refers to the standard petal on some Fabaceae species, which somewhat resemble a tongue. A good example is Daviesia glossosema.

Glossostigma: [glos-so-stig-ma] From Glôssa, which is Ancient Greek for a tongue and Stigma, which is Ancient Greek for the female receptive reproductive organ – the stigma. It refers to stigmas, which are tongue like. A good example is Glossostigma elatinoides.

Glumaceous: [gloo-ma-see-os] From Gluma, which is Latin for a glume. It refers to the bracts, which resemble glumes. A good example is the bracts on Bambusa arnhemica.

Glumaceum: [gloo-ma-see-um] From Gluma, which is Latin for a glume. It refers to the bracts, which resemble glumes. A good example is Conospermum glumaceum.

Glume: [gloom] From Gluma. which is Latin for a glume. It refers to one or two chaff like spikes, which surround grass seeds. The lowest pair on a spike is called the glumes. A good example is the large glumes on Ischaemum australe.

Glutescens: [gloo-tes-senz] From Glūtinōsus, which is Latin for sticky. It refers to any structure or organ, which feels or looks as if it has semi sticky liquid or glue like substance covering it. A good example is the overall stickiness of the plants Olearia glutescens.

Glutinosa: [gloo-ti-noh-sa] From Glūtinōsus, which is Latin for sticky. It refers to any structure or organ, which feels or looks as if it has semi sticky liquid or glue like substance covering it. A good example is Litsea glutinosa.

Glutinosissima: [gloo-ti-noh-sis-si-ma] From Glūtinōsus, which is Latin for a sticky and Issima which is Greek/Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to a semi resinous substance which is very sticky and gluey. A good example is the resins from the trunk of Acacia glutinosissima.

Glutinosissimum: [gloo-ti-noh-sis-si-mum] From Glūtinōsus which is Latin for a sticky and Issima which is Greek/Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to a semi resinous substance which is extremely sticky and gluey. A good example is the resins from the trunk of Racosperma glutinosissimum, which is now known as Acacia glutinosissima.

Glutinosum: [gloo-ti-no-sum] From Glūtinōsus which is Latin for sticky. It refers to a semi sticky liquid or glue like substance. A good example is the sticky hairs on Hyalosperma glutinosum subsp. glutinosum.

Glutinosus: [gloo-ti-no-sus] From Glūtinōsus which is Latin for sticky. It refers to a semi sticky liquid or glue like substance. A good example is the sticky hairs on Rhynchostemon glutinosus.

Glutinous: [gloo-ti-nos] From Glūtinōsus, which is Latin for sticky. It refers to any structure or organ, which feels or looks as if it has a semi sticky liquid or glue like substance covering it. A good example is found on the leaf hairs of Drosera bipinnate.

Glyceria: [glahy-ser-i-a] From Glykys, which is Ancient Greek for sweet tasting. It refers to grains, which have a sweet taste. A good example is Glyceria australis.

Glycine: [glahy-seen] From Glykys, which is Ancient Greek for sweet tasting. It refers to roots or leaves, which have a sweet taste. A good example is the roots on Glycine microphylla.

Glycinifolia: [glahy-sin-i-foh-li-a] From Glykys, which is Ancient Greek for sweet tasting and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which have a sweet taste. A good example is the roots on Dillwynia glycinifolia, which is now known as Chorizema glycinifolium.

Glycinifolium: [glahy-sin-i-foh-li-um] From Glykys, which is Ancient Greek for sweet tasting and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which have a sweet taste. A good example is the leaves on Chorizema glycinifolium.

Glycinoides: [glahy-si-noi-deez] From Glykys, which is Ancient Greek for sweet tasting and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the roots and/or leaves, which have a sweet taste similar to sarsaparilla. A good example is the roots from Clematis glycinoides.

Glyciphylla: [glahy-si-fahyll-la] From Glykys, which is Ancient Greek for sweet tasting and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the leaves, which have a sweet tatse that resembles sarsparilla. A good example is leaves on Smilax glyciphylla which tastes very similar to sarsaparilla.

Glycocystis: [glahy-ko-sis-tis] From Glykys which is Ancient Greek for sweet, Osmos which is Ancient Greek for a scent and Kystis which is Ancient Greek for a bladder. It refers to the flowers and probably the fruits which have a sweet scent. A good example is Glycocystis beckeri.

Glycorchis: [glahy-kor-kis] From Glykys, which is Ancient Greek for sweet and órchis, which is Ancient Greek for testicles. It refers to Orchids which have a sweet scent. A good example is Glycorchis saccharatai.

Glycosmis: [glahy-kos-mis] From Glykys, which is Ancient Greek for sweet and Osmos, which is Ancient Greek for a smell. It refers to a structure or organ, which has a sweet fruity scent. A good example is Glycosmis trifoliate.

Glycyrrhiza: [glahy-sahy-rahy-za] From Glykys, which is Ancient Greek for sweet tasting and Rrhyza which is Ancient Greek for a root. It refers to the roots, which have a sweet taste. A good example is Glycyrrhiza acanthocarpa.

Glyptodon: [glahy-to-don] From Glyptos, which is Ancient Greek for carved. It refers to an extinct group of animals known as the Glyptodon thus the orchids have a somewhat similar appearance. A good example is Drakaea glyptodon.

Gmelina: [j-me-li-na] Is named in honour of Johan Georg Gmelin; 1709-1755, who was a German botanist. A good example is Gmelia leichhardtii.

Gnaphalioides: [na-fa-li-oi-deez] From Gnaphallion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Gnaphalium genus in that the leaves are soft and covered in floccose woolly type hairs which was used for stuffing pillows. A good example is Leucopogon gnaphalioides.

Gnaphalium: [na-fa-li-um] From Gnaphallion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly. It refers to a leaves, which are soft and covered in floccose wool which use to be used for stuffing pillows. A good example is Gnaphalium polycaulon.

Gnaphalodes: [na-fa-lo/loh-deez] From Gnaphallion, which is Ancient Greek for woolly and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have soft woolly structures or organs that resemble the Gnaphalium genus. A good example was Gnaphalodes condensata, which is now known as Actinobole condensatum.

Gneorifolia: [ne-o-ri-foh-li-a] From Knēorum, which is Ancient Greek for the daphne in the Cneorum genus and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to an error in the spelling for Eucalyptus cneorifolia which has leaves similar to the European Daphne. A good example is Eucalyptus gneorifolia, which is now known as Eucalyptus cneorifolia.

Gnephosioides: [ne-fo-si-oi-deez] From Gnophos which is Ancient Greek for darkness or a whirlwind and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Genphosis genus where the stems and small branches bend upwards and outwards similar to an image one would have of the effects of stems and branches caught up in updraft of a whirlwind. A good example is Gnephosis gnephosioides.

Gnephosis: [ne-fo-sis] From Gnophos, which is Ancient Greek for darkness or a whirlwind. It refers to plants, branches bending upwards and outwards similar to an image one would have of the effects of stems and branches caught up in updraft of a whirlwind. A good example is Gnephosis tenuissima.

Gnidiifolia: [ni-di-i-ahy-foh-li-a] From Gnidus/Knidus, which is Greek from the Carian vernacular in Asia minor for Gnidus which is a local plant growing there and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble the leaves of the Ginidus genus of Asia minor. Gnidiifolium is an illegitimate spelling; often seen in some old literature, for Gnidieafolium. A good example was Melaleuca gnidiifolia, which is now known as Melaleuca thymifolia.

Gnidiifolium: [ni-di-i-ahy-foh-li-um] From Gnidus/Knidus, which is Greek from the Carian vernacular in Asia minor for Gnidus which is a local plant growing there and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which resemble the leaves of the Ginidus genus of Asia minor. A good example was Leptospermum gnidiifolium, which is now known as Leptospermum trinervium.

Gnidioides: [ni-di-oi-deez] From Gnidus, which is Greek from the Carian language in Asia minor for the Gnidus, which is a local plant growing there and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Ginidus genus of Asia minor. A good example is Budawangia gnidioides.

Gnidium: [ni-di-um] From Gnidus/Knidus, which is Greek from the Carian vernacular in Asia minor for Gnidus, which is a local plant growing there. It refers to plants, which resemble the Ginidus genus of Asia minor. A good example is Acacia gnidium.

Goadbyella: [goh-bahy-el-la] Is named after Colonel Goadby; 1862-1944, who was botanical orchid collector in Western Australia and Ella which is Latin for the feminine form. A good example is Goadbyella gracilis, which is now known as Microtis alba.

Goadbyi: [gohd-bahy-i] Is named after Colonel Goadby; 1862-1944, who was botanical orchid collector in Western Australia and Ella which is Greek/Latin for the feminine form. A good example is Acacia goadbyella.

Goezeana: [goh-ze-a-na] Maybe Latinised from the local indigenous name for the area around Cairns of Goez and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. A good example is Uvaria goezeana, which is now known as Desmos goezeanus

Goezeanus: [goh-ze-a-nus] Maybe Latinised from the local indigenous name for the area around Cairns of Goez and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. A good example is Desmos goezeanus.

Gogli Apparatus: [go-li, a-par-a-tus] Is named after the discoverer of The Gogli Apparatus Camillo Gogli, 1843-1926, who was an Italian nerve specialist and Nobel winner.

Gogo: [go-go] From Gogonos, which is Ancient Greek for an angle. It refers to seed pods which have many angles in that they twist and turn a lot. A good example was Adenanthera gogo, which is now known as Entada rheedii.

Goldiei: [gol-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Goldi. A good example was Dendrobium goldiei, which is now known as Vappodes superbiens.

Goldsackii: [gold-sak-ki-ahy] Is named in honour of Vale Harold Goldsack; 1908-1989 who was an India born Australian who dedicated his life to the study of epiphytic orchids and the encouragement of others in their observations and love. A good example is Prasophyllum goldsackii.

Goldsworthii: [goldz-wor-thi-ahy] Is named in honour of Goldsworth. A good example is Hibiscus goldsworthii.

Gomotriche: [gom-mo-trahy-ke] From Gómphos, which is Ancient Greek for a pin, a bolt or nail and Trichos, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refer to sepals, petals or tepals, which are covered in stiff pin like hairs. A good example was Gomotriche tomentose, which is now known as Ptilotus obovatus var. obovatus.

Gomphandra: [gom-fan-dra] From Gómphos, which is Ancient Greek for a pin, a bolt or nail and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a male. It refers to flower’, which have six stamens, that resemble pins or bolts. A good example is Gomphandra australiana.

Gomphia: [gom-fi-a] From Gómphos, which is Ancient Greek for a pin, a bolt or nail. It refers to flower stamens, which resemble pins or bolt. A good example was Gomphia australiana, which is now known as Brackenridgea australiana.

Gomphocarpum: [gom-fo-kar-pum] From Gómphos, which is Ancient Greek for a pin, a bolt or nail and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to carples, which are long and narrow somewhat like a pin or a bolt. A good example was Chorizema gomphocarpum, which is now known as Chorizema parviflorum.

Gomphocarpus: [gom-fo-kar-pus] From Gómphos, which is Ancient Greek for a pin, a bolt or nail and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to carples, which are long and narrow somewhat like a pin or a bolt. A good example is Gomphocarpus cancellatus.

Gomphocephala: [gom-foh-ke/se-far-la] From Gómphos, which is Ancient Greek for a pin, a bolt or nail and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads, which are attached directly to stout pin like petiolules. A good example is Eucalyptus gomphocephala.

Gompholobiodes: [gom-fo-loh-bi-oi-deez] From Gómphos, which is Ancient Greek for a pin, a bolt or nail, Lobos which is Ancient Greek for a pod or capsule and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Gompholobium genus in that they have stout pin like petiolules. A good example is Burtonia gompholobioides, which is now known as Gompholobium gompholobioides.

Gompholobium: [gom-fo-loh-bi-um] From Gómphos, which is Ancient Greek for a pin, a bolt or nail and Lobos, which is Ancient Greek for a pod or capsule. It refers to pods, which have strong, stout pedicles. A good example is Gompholobium virgatum.

Gomphrena: [gom-free-na] From Gomphaena, which is Ancient Latin name for Amaranth. It refers to plants, especially the flowers, which resemble the Amaranthus genus. A good example is Gomphrena brachystylis.

Gomphrenoides: [gom-fre-noi-deez] From Gomphaena, which is Ancient Latin name for Amaranth and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, especially the flowers, which resemble the Amaranthus genus. A good example is Ptilotus gomphrenoides.

Gonglyocarpa: [gong-lay-oh-kar-pa] From Gongylos, which is Greek for round and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which are almost perfectly orbicular. A good example is Eucalyptus gongylocarpa.

Gongronema: [gong-ro-nee-ma] From Gongo, which is Latinized for a flat bell shaped instrument and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. s which is Ancient Greek for a thread. It refers to flowers, which resemble a small flat like bell that hang on a relatively long thread like petiole. A good example was Gongronema micradenia, which is now known as Marsdenia micradenia.

Goniantha: [gon-i-ahn-tha] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and ántha/ánthos, which are Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs in a flower or the flower. It refers to the hypanthium which has many longitudinal, broad, rounded ribs. A good example is Eucalyptus goniantha.

Goniocalyx: [gon-i-oh-kal-iks] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and Kalyx, which is Ancient Greek for a calyx. It may refer to calyptras, which are at different angles. A good example is Eucalyptus goniocalyx.

Goniocarpa: [gon-i-oh-kar-pa] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for fruit. It refers to fruits which have several angles. A good example is Sida goniocarpa.

Goniocarpus: [gon-i-oh-kar-pus] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for fruit. It refers to fruits which have several angles. A good example is Goniocarpus trifidus, which is now known as Myriophyllum trifidum.

Goniophlebium: [gon-i-oh-fle-bi-um] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and Phleps, which is Ancient Greek for a vein. It refers to veins, which are rather fine and bend frequently along their length. A good example is Goniophlebium percussum.

Goniopteris: [gon-i-oh-te-ris] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and Pteris, which is Ancient Greek for a fern. It refers to ferns, in which the pinnaea are often bent or crooked. A good example is Goniopteris gheisbreghtii, which is now known as Pronephrium asperum.

Goniothalamus: [gon-i-oh-thal-a-mus] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and thalamus, which is Ancient Greek for a couch or inner room. It refers to carpels, which are completely surrounded by the petals which are bent at different angles. A good example is Goniothalamus australis.

Goniotriche:[gon-i-oh-trahy-ke] From Gónos, which is Ancient Greek for a bend or knee and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to hairs, which have a distinct bend near the base or apex. A good example is Goniotriche tomentosa, which is now known as Ptilotus obovatus.

Gonocarpa: [gon-o-kar-pa] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have several corners or angles. A good example is Gonocarpus humilis.

Gonocarpum: [gon-o-kar-pum] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have several corners or angles. A good example was Racosperma gonocarpum which is now known as Acacia gonocarpa.

Gonocarpus: [gon-o-kar-pus] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which have several corners or angles. A good example is Gonocarpus humilis.

Gonoclada: [gon-o-kla-da] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a branch. It refers to branches which have distinct angles. A good example is Gossia gonoclada.

Gonocladum: [gon-o-klah-dum] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and Klados, which is Ancient Greek for a branch. It refers to branches which have angles. A good example is Racosperma gonocladum, which is now known as Acacia gonoclada.

Gonocormus: [gon-o-kor-mus] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and Kormos, which is Ancient Greek for a stump, trunk or log. It refers to stumps, trunks or logs which have some distinct angles. A good example is Gonocormus digitatus, which is now known as Crepidomanes saxifragoides.

Gonophylla: [go-no-fahyl-la] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to a leaves, which are bent and have a triangular rib. A good example is Acacia gonophylla.

Gonophyllum: [go-no-fahyl-lum] From Gōnía, which is Ancient Greek for an angle and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to a leaves, which are bent and have a triangular rib. A good example is Racosperma gonophyllum, which is now known as Acacia gonophylla.

Goodenia: [goo-dee-ni-a] Is named in honour of Dr. Goodenough; 1743-1827, who wrote on sea weeds and coastal sedges. A good example is Goodenia hederacaea subsp. hederacaea.

Goodeniacea: [goo-dee-ni-a-se-a] Is named in honour of Dr. Goodenough; 1743-1827, who wrote on sea weeds and coastal sedges. A good example is Goodenia goodeniacea.

Goodeniaceum: [goo-dee-ni-a-se-um] Is named in honour of Dr. Goodenough; 1743-1827, who wrote on sea weeds and coastal sedges. A good example was Catospermum goodeniaceum, which is now known as Goodenia goodeniacea.

Goodia: [goo-di-a] Is named in honour of Peter Good; 17..-1803, who was a collector of plants from India, Pacific Islands and accompanied Robert brown to Australia. A good example is Goodia lotifolia.

Goodii: [goo-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Peter Good; 17..-1803, who was a collector of plants from India, Pacific Islands and accompanied Robert brown to Australia. A good example is Grevillea goodii.

Goodspeedii: [good-spee-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Goodspeed. A good example is Nicotiana goodspeedii

Goodwinii: [good-wi-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Goodwinn. A good example is Eremophila goodwinii.

Goodyera: [good-ye-ra] Is named in honour of John Goodyer; 1592-1664, who was an English botanist who worked extensively on Elms. A good example is Goodyera rubicunda var. rubicunda.

Goodyeri: [good-ye-ri] Is named in honour of John Goodyer; 1592-1664, who was an English botanist who worked extensively on Elms. A good example is the Lord Howe island birds nest Asplenium goudeyi.

Goonooensis: [goo-noo-en-sis] From Goonoo Goonoo, which is Latinized for the local aboriginal vernacular for place of good water and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to the first discovery of the plants from the district. A good example is Diuris goonooensis.

Gordoniana: [gor-don-i-a-na] Is named in honour of Gordon; 1592-1664, who was an Australian collector. A good example is Grevillea gordoniana.

Gordonii: [gor-do-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Gordon; 1592-1664, who first bought the plant to the attention of botanists. A good example is Acacia gordonii.

Gossampinus: [gos-sam-pi-nus] From Gosypium which is Latinized from the name Plinny gave to the cotton bush. It refers to structures or other organs, which are surrounded by long cottony threads. A good example is Gossampinus heptaphylla, which is now known as Adansonia gregorii.

Gossia: [gos-si-a] Is named in honour of Wayne Keith Goss; 1951-2014, who was the Queensland Premier, who contributed extensively to conservation and arts in the state. A good example is Gossia fragrantissima.

Gossypina [gos-si-pi-na] From Gossúpion/Kárpasos, which is Ancient Greek for a cotton fabric. It refers structures or organs, which are covered in cottony like hairs. A good example is Rhodanthe gossypina.

Gossypioides: [gos-si-pi-oi-deez] From Gossúpion/Kárpasos, which is Ancient Greek for a cotton fabric. It refers structures or organs, which are covered in cottony like hairs. A good example is the seeds on Hibiscus gossypioides, which is now known as Gossypium sturtianum.

Gossypium: [gos-si-pi-um] From Gossúpion/Kárpasos, which is Ancient Greek for a cotton fabric. It refers structures or organs, which are covered in cottony like hairs. A good example is the seeds on Gossypium sturtianum subsp. sturtianum.

Gouania: [gee-a-na] Is named in honour of Antoine Gouan; 1733-1821, who was a professor of Botany and assisted in disseminating the Linnean system into French. A good example is Gouania australiana.

Gouldii: [gool-di-ahy] Is named in honour of Gould but which Gould is unsubstantiated. A good example is Dendrobium gouldii.

Goyderi: [goi-der-ahy] Is named in honour of Goyder. A good example is Hibbertia goyderi.

Gracilicaule: [gra-si-li-kor-li] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and kaulos which is Ancient Greek for a stem or branch. It refers to stems or pseudo bulbs which are slender and graceful. A good example is the east coast orchid Dendrobium gracilcaule which is now known as Thelychiton gracilicaulis.

Gracilcaulis: [gra-si-li-kor-lis] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and kaulos, which is Ancient Greek for a stem or branch. It refers to the stems or pseudobulbs, which are slender and graceful. A good example is the east coast orchid Thelychiton gracilicaulis.

Gracile: [gra-seel] From Kilentia, which is Ancient Greek for slim or slender or Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful. It refers to flower spikes, which are rather slender and graceful. A good example is Lophatherum gracile.

Gracilenta: [gra-si-len-ta] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and kilentia, which is Ancient Greek for slim or slender. It refers to the overall structure of the plants, which are rather slender and graceful. A good example is Wahlenbergia gracilenta.

Gracilentum: [gra-si-len-tum] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Lenta, which is Ancient Greek for slim or slender. It refers to the overall structure of plants, which are slender and graceful. A good example is the exotic garden herb and seed plant Racosperma gracilentum, which is now known as Acacia gracilenta.

Gracilentus: [gra-si-len-tus] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Lenta, which is Ancient Greek for slim or slender. It refers to the overall structure of plants, which are slender and graceful. A good example is the exotic garden herb and seed plant Amaranthus gracilentus.

Gracilescens: [grah-si-les-sens] From Kilentia, which is Ancient Greek for slim or slender or Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful. It refers to the plants, which are verging on slenderness and gracefulness. A good example is Helichrysum gracilescens which is presently listed as an unresolved name awaiting further investigation as to its real or correct classification.

Graciliceps: [gra-si-li-seps] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to flower heads, which have a slender and somewhat graceful. A good example was Ptilanthelium graciliceps, which is now known as Mesomelaena graciliceps.

Gracilicuspis: [gra-si-li-kus-pis] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Cuspis, which is Latin for a lip on a cup. It refers to fruits, which have a slender lip around the edge. A good example is the east coast orchid Sclerolaena gracilicuspis.

Graciliflora: [gra-si-li-flor-a] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are gracefully slender. A good example was Calyptrostegia graciliflora, which is now known as Pimelea sylvestris.

Gracilifloris: [gra-si-li-flor-is] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are gracefully slender. A good example was Lasianthus gracilifloris, which is now known as Ixora baileyana.

Graciliflorum: [gra-si-li-flor-um] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are gracefully slender. A good example was Canthium graciliflorum, which is now known as Psydrax graciliflora.

Gracilifolia: [gra-si-li-foh-li-a] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves or phyllodes which are gracefully slender. A good example is Acacia gracifolia.

Gracilifolium: [gra-si-li-foh-li-um] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves and phyllodes which are gracefully slender. A good example was Racosperma gracilifolia which is now known as Acacia gracilifolia.

Graciliflora: [gra-si-li-flor-a] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are gracefully slender. A good example is Psydrax graciliflora.

Graciliflorum: [gra-si-li-flor-um] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are gracefully slender. A good example was Canthium graciliflorum, which is now known as Psydrax graciliflora.

Graciliflorus: [gra-si-li-flor-us] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which are gracefully slender. A good example was Lasianthus graciliflorus, which is now known as Ixora baileyana.

Graciliformis: [gra-si-li-for-mis] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which are gracefully slender. A good example is Acacia graciliformis.

Gracilior: [gra-si-li-or] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender. It refers to plants, which have an overall slender and graceful appearance. A good example is Chordifex gracilior.

Gracilipes: [gra-si-li-pes] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Pous/Podion, which is Ancient Greek or Pedi, which is Latin for a foot or feet. It refers to plants which have very slender and graceful looking petioles or peduncles. A good example is Aristida gracilipes.

Gracilis: [gra-si-lis] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Us, which is Greek/Latin for the degree. It refers to plants, which are the more graceful and have more slender stems than other species in the genus. A good example is Leucopogon lanceolatus var. gracilis.

Gracillima: [gra-sil-li-ma] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful. It refers to plants especially the stems, which are more slender and graceful than other species in the genus. A good example is Muehlenbeckia gracillima.

Gracillimum: [gra-sil-li-mum] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Um, which is Greek/Latin for the degree. It refers to plants, which are the more graceful and having more slender stems than other species in the genus. A good example is Empodisma gracillimum.

Gracillimus: [gra-sil-li-mus] From Gracilis, which is Latin for slender and graceful and Um, which is Greek/Latin for the degree. It refers to plants, which are the more graceful and have more slender stems than other species in the genus. A good example is Petalochilus gracillimus.

Graffeana: [graf-fe-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Robert Graff; 1841-1914; who was an Australian plant illustrator and lithographer. A good example was Scleria graeffeana, which is now known as Scleria polycarpa.

Graffiana: [grah-fi-ei-na] Is probably named in honour of Robert Graff; 1841-1914; who was an Australian plant illustrator and lithographer. A good example was Acacia graffiana, which is now known as Acacia hemiteles.

Graft: [graft/grarft] From Graphion, which is Greek for to write, Graphien, Graffe which is Latin for a hunting knife, Graffe, which is Old English or Craffe which is French for a hunting knife. They all refer to the slant edge of the knife or taper point of a pencil which resembles the original cleft grafts. It is a method of asexual plant propagation using the roots, stock; of one tree and the crown, scion; of another. A good example is Corymbia citriodora as the stock; with Corymbia ficifolia as the scion.

Grahamia: [grei-ha-mi-a] Is named in honour of Graham but am unable to confirm which Graham. A good example is Grahamia australiana.

Grahamiana: [grei-ha-mi-a-na] Is named in honour of Graham but am unable to confirm which Graham. A good example is Crotalaria grahamiana.

Grahamii: [grei-hah-mi-ahy] Is named in honour of Graham but but I cannot substantiate which Graham. A good example is Ehretia grahamii.

Grain: [grein] From Grānum which is Latin for a small hard grass seed. It refers to the seeds of grasses, sedges and certain herbs. A good example is the aboriginal east coast grass used as food Themeda triandra or another seed source in central Australia Amaranthus macrocarpus.

Grallata: [gral-la-ta] From Gralla which is Latin for producing an abundance of stilt roots. It refers to plants, which produce many roots from the nodes on the culms, trunks or stems. A good example is Romnalda grallata.

Graminea: [gra-mi-nni-a From Gramine, which is Latin for a grass like. It refers to plants, which produce grains resembling some cereals and/or the leaves resembling some grasses. A good example is the leaves on Murdannia graminea.

Gramineum: [gra-mi-ne-um] From Gramine, which is Latin for a grass like. It refers to plants, which produce grains resembling some cereals and/or the leaves resembling some grasses. A good example is Hypericum gramineum.

Gramineus: [gra-mi-ne-us] From Gramine, which is Latin for a grass like. It refers to plants, which produce grains resembling some cereals and/or the leaves resembling some grasses. A good example is the exotic garden plant Acorus gramineus var. variegatus.

Graminicolor: [gra-mi-ni-co-lor] From Gramine, which is Latin for a grass like, Krôma, which is Ancient Greek, Colores, which is Greek or Colōr, which is Latin for the intensity that light is reflected by an object, usually determined visually by measurement of hue, saturation, and brightness of the reflected light as a measurement of the chroma. It refers to fungi, which have various hues of greens similar to grasses. A good example is Hygrocybe graminicolor.

Graminifolia: [gra-mi-ni-foh-li-a] From Gramine, which is Latin for grass like and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves which resemble many grasses. A good example is Isoetopsis graminifolia.

Graminifolium: [grah-mi-ni-foh-li-um] From Gramine, which is Latin for grass like and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to plants, which have leaves which resemble many grasses. A good example is the beautiful native trigger plant Stylidium graminifolium.

Graminologist: [gra-min-ol-o-jist] From Gramine, which is Latin for a grass like, Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study and Ist which is Ancient Greek for a person. It usually It refers to a person who studies grasses, sedges and reeds.

Graminology: [gra-min-ol-o-jee] From Gramine which is Latin for a grass like and Ology, which is Ancient Greek for to study. It refers to the branch of botany, which deals with the scientific study of grasses, sedges and reeds.

Grammata: [gra-ma-ta] From Gramine, which is Latin for a grass like. It refers to plants, which have grass like leaves or the habitat is amongst grasses below tree lines. A good example is the orchid Simpliglottis grammata.

Grammatocarpa: [gra-ma-to-kar-pa] From Gramine, which is Latin for a grass like and Karpós, which is Ancient Greek for a Fruit. It refers to fruits, which resemble the seeds of many grasses. A good example is Hydrocotyle grammatocarpa.

Grammatophylla: [gra-ma-to-fahyl-la] From Gramine, which is Latin for a grass like and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to plants, which produce leaves that resemble the leaves of grasses. A good example is Grevillea grammatophylla.

Grammatophyllus: [gram-ma-to-fahyl-lus] From Gramma/Grammati which is Latin for a line and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to a leaves, which are generally long straight and linear. A good example is the sporangia on Hakea grammatophylla.

Grammitis: [gra-mi-tis] From Gramma/Grammati, which is Latin for a line. It refers to sporangium, which are produced in straight lines. A good example is the sporangia on Grammitis billardierei.

Grammosolen: [gram-mo-so-len] From Gramma/Grammati, which is Latin for a line and Sōlḗn, which is Ancient Greek for a pipe or cradle for a broken limb. It refers to structures or organs, which resemble pipes or limb cradles From A, distance. A good example is the seeds on Grammosolen truncatus.

Grampiana: [gram-pi-ei-nuh] From Grampians, which is Latinized for the Grampians in south western Victoria. It refers to plants which are restricted to the sandstone Ridges in the Grampians. A good example is Allocasuarina grampiana.

Grampianum: [grahm-pi-a-num] From Grampians, which is Latinized for the Grampians in south western Victoria. It refers to plants which are restricted to the sandstone Ridges in the Grampians. A good example is Helipterum albicans f. grampianum, which is now known as Leucochrysum albicans subsp. tricolor.

Granadensis: [gran-den-sis] From Granada, which is Latin for New Granada Columbia and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered and recognized from New Granada Columbia. A good example is Nertera granadensis.

Granatum: [gra-na-tum] From Granada, which is Latin for New Granada Columbia and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered and recognized from New Granada Columbia. A good example is the horticultural pomegranate, Punca granatum.

Grandibracteata: [gran-di-brak-te-a-ta] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and Bracteus, which is Latin for a specialized leaf at or near the base of a flower. It refers to flowers, which have rather large bracts. This is presently an unresolved name awaiting further research to determine which genus, species or sub species or variety it should be allocated to. A good example is Baeckea grandibracteata.

Grandibractea: [gran-di-brak-tee-a] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and Bractea, which is Latin for a specialized leaf at or near the base of a flower. It refers to flowers, which have rather large bracts. A good example is the flowers on the hemiparasitic plant Diplatia grandibractea.

Grandibracteus: [gran-di-brak-te-us] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and Bracteus, which is Latin for a specialized leaf at or near the base of a flower. It refers to flowers, which have rather large bracts. This is presently an unresolved name awaiting further research to determine which genus, species or sub species or variety it should be allocated to.A good example is Loranthus grandibracteus.

Grandiceps: [gran-di-seps] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek for a head. It refers to the flowers, which have rather large heads. A good example is the exotic horticulturally grown Protea grandiceps.

Grandiflora: [gran-di-flor-a] From Grandis which is Latin for large and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which produce larger flowers than most other species in the genus. A good example is Blandiflora grandiflora.

Grandifloris: [gran-di-flo-ris] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which produce many large flowers. A good example is Lophostemon grandifloris subsp. riparius

Grandiflorum: [gran-di-flo-rum] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which produce larger flowers than most other species in the genus. A good example is Archidendron grandiflorum.

Grandiflorus: [gran-di-flo-rus] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess of spring and flowers. It refers to plants, which produce larger flowers than most other species in the genus. A good example is Calochilus grandiflorus.

Grandifolia: [gran-di-foh-li-a] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which are much larger than other species in the genus. A good example is Acacia grandifolia.

Grandifolium: [gran-di-foh-li-um] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which are much larger than other species in the genus. A good example is Leptospermum grandifolium.

Grandifolius: [gran-di-foh-li-us] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, phyllodes or fronds which are much larger than other species in the genus. A good example is Cajanus grandifolius.

Grandimesense: [gran-di-me-sens] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for originating from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered and only come from the Big tableland area in far north eastern Queensland near Black Mountain National Park. A good example is Bulbophyllum grandimesense.

Grandis: [gran-dis] From Grandis which is Latin for large and spectacular. It refers to plants, which are rather larger and more spectacular than other species in the genus. A good example is Eucalyptus grandis.

Grandisepala: [gran-di-se-pa-la] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and spectacular and Sképēs, which is Ancient Greek or Sepala, which is Latin for a sepal. It refers to flowers, which have much larger and sepals than other species in the genus. A good example is Boronia grandisepala.

Grandisepalus: [gran-di-se-pa-lus] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and spectacular and Sképēs, which is Ancient Greek or Sepala, which is Latin for a sepal. It refers to flowers, which have much larger and sepals than other species in the genus. A good example Phyllanthus grandisepalus, which is now known as Phyllanthus carpentariae.

Grandispiculata: [gran-di-spi-kyoo-la-ta] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and spectacular and Spicata, which is Latin for a point. It refers to spikelets, which are much larger than other species in the genus have. A good example was Setaria grandispiculata, which is now known as Paspalidium grandispiculatum.

Grandispiculatum: [gran-di-spi-kyoo-la-tum] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and spectacular and Spicatum, which is Latin for a point. It refers to spikelets, which are much larger than other spikelet or spikes when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Paspalidium grandispiculatum.

Grandispiculatus: [gran-di-spi-kyoo-lea-tus] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and spectacular and Spicatum, which is Latin for a point. It refers to spikelets, which are much larger than other spikelet or spikes when compared to other species in the genus. A good example was Andropogon annulatus var. grandispiculatus, which is now known asDichanthium fecundum.

Grandissima: [gran-dis-si-ma] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to plants, which are very grandiose especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Ratonia grandissima, which is now known as Mischocarpus grandissimus.

Grandissimus: [gran-di-sis-mus] From Grandis, which is Latin for large and spectacular and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to a structure or an organ, which is very large and spectacular. A good example is Mischocarpus grandissimus.

Grandiuscula: [gran-di-u-skyoo-la] From Grandis which is Latin for large and Uscula which is Latin for rather or somewhat. It refers to plants, which are somewhat less than grandiose or grand. A good example is Hypolaena grandiuscula.

Grandiusculum: [gran-di-u-skyoo-lum] From Grandis which is Latin for large and Uscula, which is Latin for rather or somewhat. It refers to plants, which are somewhat less than grandiose or grand. A good example is Teucrium grandiusculum.

Grandiusculus: [gran-di-u-skyoo-lus] From Grandis which is Latin for large and Uscula, which is Latin for rather or somewhat. It refers to plants, which are somewhat less than grandiose or grand. A good example is the small desert shrub Leucopogon grandiusculus.

Graniformis: [grah-ni-for-mis] From Granitica, which is Latin for granite based rocks and Forme, which is Latin for to take the shape or form of. It refers to plants, which resemble the large grains of mica, feldspar or silicon crystals of granite. A good example was the small pink fungus Trichia graniformis, which is now known as Arcyria denudata.

Granitica: [grah-ni-ti-ka] From Granitica which is Latin for types of intrusive based rocks that decompompose down into rather course silica sands. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on granitic sands or between Granite boulders. A good example is Acacia granitica which usually only grows on granite. The exception being the area north of Grafton where it grows on decomposed sandstone over sandstone and is forming impenetrable barriers on land degraded by human activity.

Graniticola: [gra-ni-ti-koh-la] From Granitica, which is Latin for granite based rocks Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on decomposed granitic sands and pebbly soils. A good example is Epacris graniticola.

Graniticum: [gra-ni-ti-kum] From Granitica, which is Latin for a type of intrusive based rocks. It refers to plants, which prefer growing on granitic soils. A good example was Racosperma graniticum, which is now known as Acacia granitica which usually only grows on granite. The exception being the area north of Grafton where it grows on decomposed sandstone over sandstone and is forming impenetrable barriers on land degraded by human activity.

Graniticus: [gra-ni-ti-kus] From Granitica, which is Latin for a type of intrusive based rocks. It refers to plants, which prefer growing on granitic soils. A good example is Calothamnus graniticus, which usually only grows on decomposed granite.

Granitora: [gra-ni-tor-a] From Granitora, which is Latin for grainy like granite based rock. It refers to plants, which prefer course, decomposed granitic sands and rocks. A good example is Caladenia granitora.

Grantalius: [gran-ta-li-us] From Granitora, which is Latin for grainy like granite based rocks and Alliós which is Ancient Greek or Aliud/Aliās which is Latin for assume or to conceal ones identity. It refers to plants which are difficult to assign to a specific name or are hidden well amongst the leaf litter of forest growing on course sands like decomposed granites. A good example is Cortinarius grantalius.

Granular 1: [gran-yoo-lar] From Grānum, which is Latin for resembling beads or grain. It refers to spikes, which have small seeds in a row characteristic of grasses, sedges and certain herbs. A good example is Panicum effusum.

Granular 2: [gran-yoo-lar] From Grānum, which is Latin for resembling beads or grain. It refers to structures or organs, which are grainy. A good example is the stems and leaves on Zieria smithii.

Granularis: [gran-yoo-lar-is] From Grānum, which is Latin for resembling beads or grain. It refers to structures or organs, which have a grainy or scaly surface. A good example is the culms and leaves on Hackelochloa granularis.

Granulata: [gran-yoo-la-ta] From Grānums, which is Latin for resembling beads or grain. It refers to structures, which have a grainy, somewhat tuberculate or lumpy surface. A good example is Zieria granulata.

Granulate: [grah-nyoo-leit] From Grānum which is Latin for resembling beads or grain. It refers to surfaces. which have a grainy, somewhat tuberculate or lumpy texture. To be granular.

Granulatum: [grahn-yoo-l-tum] From Grānum, which is Latin for grains, resembling beads or grain. It refers to structures or organs, which are very grainy, somewhat tuberculate or lumpy texture. A good example is the spots on the flowers, which appear grainy on Oncosporum granulatum, which is now known as Marianthus granulatus.

Granulatus: [gran-yoo-la-tus] From Grānum, which is Latin for grains, resembling beads. It refers to structures or organs, which are somewhat tuberculate or lumpy texture. A good example is the spots on the flowers, which appear grainy on Marianthus granulatus.

Granulifera: [gran-yoo-li-fer-a] From Grānum, which is Latin for grains, resembling beads and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are somewhat tuberculate or lumpy surface. A good example is Grevillea granulifera.

Granuliferum: [gran-yoo-li-fer-um] From Grānum, which is Latin for grains, resembling beads and Ferae/Ferārum, which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to structures or organs, which are somewhat tuberculate or lumpy surface. A good example is the fungus Didymium granuliferum.

Granulosa: [gra-nyoo-loh-sa] From Grānum, which is Latin for resembling beads. It refers to structures or organs, which are somewhat tuberculate or lumpy texture. A good example is the dwarf lichen Trapeliopsis.

Granulosum: [gra-nyoo-loh-sum] From Grānum, which is Latin for resembling beads. It refers to structures or organs, which are somewhat tuberculate or lumpy texture. A good example is the moss, which does not have stems and appears like small, tuberculate lumps or beads on the surface Acaulon granulosum.

Granulose: [gra-nyoo-lohs] From Grānum, which is Latin for resembling beads. It refers to having a grainy, somewhat tuberculate or lumpy texture.

Graphina 1: [gra-fi-na] From Graphikós, which is Ancient Greek or Graphicus, which is Latin for to paint or to draw. It refers to lichens, which appear to have been painted on the rocks or trunks or at times branches of trees. A good example is Graphina brachyspora.

Graphina 2: [gra-fi-na] From Graphikós, which is Ancient Greek or Graphicus which is Latin for to paint or draw. It refers to barks, which appear to have been drawn or scribbled on. A good example is Eucalyptus racemosa.

Graphis: [gra-fis] From Graphikós, which is Ancient Greek or Graphicus, which is Latin for to paint or to draw. It refers to lichens, which appear to have been painted on the rocks or trunks or at times branches of trees. A good example is Graphis centrifuga.

Graphitinum: [gra-fi-ti-num] From Graphikós, which is Ancient Greek or Graphicus, which is Latin for to paint or draw. It refers to some species leaves, which have markings that appear to be painted on. A good example is Eriocaulon graphitinum.

Graphorkis: [gra-for-kis] From Graphikós, which is Ancient Greek or Graphicus, which is Latin for to paint or draw and órchis, which is Ancient Greek for testicles. It refers to small orchids, which have an appearance as though they have been painted. A good example was Graphorkis fitzalanii, which is now known as Eulophia bicallosa or Graphorkis holtzei, which is now known as Pachystoma pubescens.

Graptophyllum: [grap-to-fahyl-lum] From Graphion, which is Ancient Greek for to write and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to some species, which have leaves with markings that appear to be scribbled on probably on most occasions due to the presence of leaf minor. A good example is Graptophyllum excelsum.

Grasbyi: [graz-bee-ahy] Is named in honour of William Catton Grasby; 1859-1930, who was an Australian educator, agricultural journalist and conservationist. A good example is Acacia grasbyi.

Grastidium: [gras-ti-di-um] From Gastḗr, which is Ancient Greek for a paunch belly. It refers to the mid section, which is rather plump while the sepals and lateral petals are rather slim. A good example is Grastidium baileyi.

Gratiae: [gra-ti-ee] From Grātia, which is Latin for the grace of God or Grātiōsum which is Latin for pleasing and agreeable. It refers to the overall grace of these mallee type Eucalyptus. A good example was Eucalyptus gratiae, which is now known as Eucalyptus loxophleba subsp. gratiae.

Gratiola: [gra-ti-oh-la] From Grātia, which is Latin for the grace of God or Grātiōsum which is Latin for pleasing and agreeable. It refers to the medicinal qualities of an ancient plant given this name. A good example is Gratiola peruviana.

Gratioloides: [gra-ti-oh-loi-deez] From Grātia, which is Latin for the grace of God or Grātiōsum which is Latin for pleasing and agreeable and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the species resembling the Gratiola genus. A good example is ELatine gratioloides.

Gratissima: [gra-tis-si-ma] From Grātia, which is Latin for the grace of God or Grātiōsum which is Latin for pleasing and agreeable and Issima, which is Latin for the superlative or very. It refers to plants, or a structure on the plant which are very cracious. A good example is Limnophila gratissima, which is now known as Limnophila aromatica.

Gratus: [gra-tus] From Grātus which is Latin for attractive, pleasing or gratious to the eye. It refers to plants, which are rather pleasing or have an overall appeal both in the garden and in their natural habitat. A good example is Plectranthus gratus.

Gratwickia: [grat-wi-ki-ah] Is named in honour of William Howard Gratwick; 1863-1926, who was a South Australain telegraph operator and plant collector. He collected the Halo type in 1925 at strangeway’s Bridge in south Australia. A good example is Gratwickia monochaeta.

Graveolens: [gra-vee-oh-lenz] From Barús or later Grāvis which are Ancient Greek for heavy and Olēns, which is Ancient Greek for to emit an odour. It refers to plants, which usually have a rather pleasing or an unusual heavey scent or odour  often that cannot be explained. That is a personal trait. A good example was Plectranthus graveolens which is now known as Coleus graveolens.

Gravesii: [gra-ve-si-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Robert Graves; 1796–1853, who was an eminent Irish surgeon after whom Graves’ disease is named, a keen horticulturalist and philanthropist. A good example is Flindersia gravesii.

Gravis: [gra-vis] From Gravis, which is Latin for heavy as per an odour. It refers to the strong scent or smell from the leaves of many species. A good example is Olearia gravis.

Grayi: [grei-ahy] Is named in honour of Asa Gray; 1810-1890, who was an American who is considered to be America’s greatest botanist and supporter of Darwin. A good example is  Phyllanthera grayi.

Greasy: [gree-zee] From Grease, which is Old English for to be slick, oily or slippery to touch. It refers to the plants leaves having a greasy or oily appearance. A good example is the surface of the water where the bacteria thrives Gallionella ferrigunea bacteria thrive.

Greeniana: [gree-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Green but which Green cannot be substantiated. A good example is Eucalyptus greeniana.

Greevesia: [gree-ve-si-a] Is named in honour of Greeves. A good example is Greevesa cleisocalyx, which is now known as Pavonia hastata.

Greevesii: [gree-ve-si-ahy] Is named in honour of Greeves. A good example is Millotia greevesii subsp. greevesii.

Gregaria: [gre-gar-i-a] From Grex, which is Ancient Greek and later Gregārium, which is Latin for a flock, herd or mob. It refers to plants, which naturally grow in dense clusters often dominating a habitat. A good example is Diuris gregaria.

Gregarium: [gre-gar-i-um] From Grex, which is Ancient Greek and later Gregārium, which is Latin for a flock, herd or mob. It refers to plants, which naturally grow in dense clusters often dominating a habitat. A good example is Leptospermum gregarium.

Gregiflorus: [gre-gi-flor-us] From Grex, which is Ancient Greek and later Gregārium, which is Latin for a herd or mob and Flōris, which is Latin for a flower or Flōs, which is the Roman goddess for spring and flowers. It refers to flowers, which naturally grow in dense clusters especially when compared to other species in the genus. A good example is Juncus gregiflorus.

Gregoriensis: [gre-gor-i-en-sis] From Gregory, which is named in honour of Augustus Charles Gregory; 1819-1905, who was an English born Australian surveyor, explorer and life member of the Queensland assembly and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Gregory National Park which is now also known as the Judbarra National Park in the north west of the Northern Territory. A good example is Eucalyptus gregoriensis.

Gregorii: [gre-gor-i-ahy] Is named in honour of Sir Augustus Charles Gregory; 1819-1905, who was an English born Australian surveyor, explorer in northern Australia and life member of the Queensland assembly. A good example is Adansonia gregorii.

Gregsoniana: [gre-gor-i-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Edward Jesse Gregson; 1837-1919, who was an English born Australian Agricultural Superintendent and keen plant collector. A good example is Eucalyptus gregsoniana.

Gregsonii: [greg-son-i-ahy] Is probably named in honour of Edward Jesse Gregson; 1837-1919, who was an English born Australian Agricultural Superintendent. A good example is Cryptocarya gregsonii.

Grevillea: [gre-vil-li-a] Is named in honour of Charles Francis Greville; 1749-1809, who was a British expert botanist on Algae, a foundation member of the London Horticultural Society and a collector of rare plants. A good example is Grevillea robusta.

Grevillei: [gre-vil-li-ahy] Is named in honour of Charles Francis Greville; 1749-1809, who was a British expert botanist on Algae, a foundation member of the London Horticultural Society and a collector of rare plants. A good example is Correa grevillei.

Grevillensis: [gre-vil-len-sis] From Greville, which is Latinized from the Queensland mountain, Mount Greville and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to the type specimen coming from Mount Greville district. (There may have been some confusion with the specie naming as AVH does not show any sightings of the plant from Mount Grevillea. The closest being from the northern slopes of Mount Maroon to the west of Mount Tamborine some 80 kilometers away as the crow filies.) A good example is Arundinella grevillensis.

Grevilleodes: [gre-vil-le-oh-deez] Is named in honour of C. F. Greville; 1749-1809, who was a British expert botanist on Algae, a foundation member of the London Horticultural Society and a collector of rare plants and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble some taller fine leaf Greviilea in growth habit. A good example is the overall shape of Allocasuarina grevilleoides from a visible distance to several tall Grevillea species.

Grewia: [groo-i-a] Is named in honour of Nehemiah Grew; 1641-1712, who was an English botanical artist who dared to suggest that plants had sexual differences noted that stamens, filaments and anthers were male and Pistils, styles and stigmas were female. A good example is Grewia latifolia.

Grewiifolia: [groo-i-foh-li-a] Is named in honour of Nehemiah Grew; 1641-1712, who was an English botanical artist who dared to suggest that plants had sexual differences noted that stamens, filaments and anthers were male and Pistils, styles and stigmas were female and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. A good example is Casearia grewiifolia.

Greyana: [grei-a-na] Is named in honour of George Grey; 1812-1898, who was a Portugese born son of British parents, explorer and creator of the horrific “Aboriginal Witnesses Act” despite having his own life saved by the good deeds of Aborigines in Western Australia. A good example is Swainsonia greyana.

Grieveana: [gree-ve-a-na] Is named in honour of Brian J. Grieve; 1907-1997 who was an Australian professor who studied ecophysiology, mycology, bacterial viral plant infections worked on the rehabilitation of mine sites. A good example is the sundew Melaleuca grieveana.

Grievei: [gree-ve-ahy] Is named in honour of Brian J. Grieve; 1907-1997 who was an Australian professor who studied ecophysiology, mycology, bacterial viral plant infections worked on the rehabilitation of mine sites. A good example is the sundew Drosera grievei.

Griffinianus: [grif-fin-ni–us] Is named in honour of Edward Arnold Griffin; 1953-20.., who is an Australian botanist and ecologist. A good example is Schoenus griffinianus.

Griffithianum: [grif-fi-thi–num] Is named in honour of William Griffith; 1810-1845 who was an Englishman doctor and naturalist, who collected and studied the flora of northern India and Myanmar. A good example is Parinari griffithianum, which is now known as Maranthes corymbosa.

Griffithii: [grif-fi-thi-ahy] ] Is named in honour of William Griffith; 1810-1845 who was an Englishman doctor and naturalist, who collected and studied the flora of northern India and Myanmar. A good example is Comesperma griffinii.

Griffithsii: [grif-fith-si-ahy] Is named in honour of John Moore Griffiths, who was a good friend of botanist J. H. Maiden. A good example is Eucalyptus griffithsii.

Grimwadeanum: [grim-wo-de-a-num] Is named in honour of Wifred Russel Grimwade; 1879-1955, who was was a chemist and partner and research director in Felton, Grimwade & Co, which later went on to become Drug Houses of Australia. He was a very keen botanist who served as the official botanical adviser to the Army Department during World War II. Grimwade was also a philanthropist who donated large sums of money to numerous scientific and heritage organisations and was heavily involved in the advancement of science research in Australia. A good example was Prasophyllum grimwadeanum, which is now known as Prasophyllum giganteum.

Grisea: [gri-se-a] From Griseus/Grizeus, which is Latin for a pale blueish or pale pearly-grey. It refers to stems or branchlets which are pale blueish-grey or pale pearly-grey in colour. A good example is Acacia grisea.

Griseum: [gri-se-um] From Griseus/Grizeus which is Latin for a pale blueish or pale pearly-grey. It refers to structures or organs, which are pale blueish-grey or pale pearly-grey in colour. A good example is the phyllodes on Acacia griseum, which is now known as Acacia grisea.

Griseus: [gri-se-us] From Griseus/Grizeus which is Latin for a pale blueish or pale pearly-grey. It refers to structures or organs, which are pale blueish-grey or pale pearly-grey in colour. A good example is Ptilotus obovatus var. griseus.

Grisella: [gri-sel-la] From Griseus/Grizeus, which is Latin for a blueish or pale pearly-grey. It refers to stalks and pileus, which are blueish or pale pearly-grey in colour. A good example is the pileus and stalk on Amanita grisella.

Griseoramosa: [gri-se-oh-ra-mo-sa] From Griseus/Grizeus, which is Latin for a pale blueish or pale pearly-grey and ramosa which is Latin for a stem or branch. It refers to stems or branchlets, which are pale blueish-grey or pale pearly-grey in colour. A good example is the branched stalks and pileus on Hygrocybe griseoramosa which are often various hues of blueish-grey to pale pearly-grey in colour.

Groeneri: [groh-ner-ahy] Is named in honour of Groener, who may have been a collector or friend of Ferdinand von Mueller as it was Mueller who named the type specimen. A good example is Scaevola groeneri, which is now known as Scaevola myrtifolia.

Gronophyllum: [gro-no-fahyl-lum] From Gronos, which is Ancient Greek for eaten out and Phullon/Phýllon, which are Ancient Greek for a leaf. It refers to the hollow appearance of the leaves some of which have been hollowed out by certain larvae. A good example was Gronophyllum ramsayi, which is now known as Hydriastele ramsayi.

Grossa: [gros-suh] From Grossus, which is Latin for large. It refers to the size of this species compared to other species in the genus. A good example Amanita grossa.

Grosseserrata: [gros-se-ser-a-ta] From Grossus which is Latin for large and Serratatus which is Latin for a saw edge. It usually refers to the leaf margins or at times another organ’s margins, which have large serrations like a saw’s toothed edge. A good example Veronica grosseserrata.

Grossidentata: [gros-si-den-ta-ta] From Grossus, which is Latin for large and Dentātus, which is Latin for a tooth or teeth. It refers to a leaves, which have very large teeth when compared to other species in the genus. A good example Lindernia grossidentata.

Grossifolia: [gros-si-foh-li-a] From Grossus, which is Latin for large and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to a leaves, which are rather large when compared to other species in the genus. A good example Eucalyptus grossifolia.

Grossularia: [gros-syoo-lar-i-a] From Grossus, which is Latin which is thick or Grosseile which is French for a gooseberry. It refers to fruits, which resemble thick skinned gooseberries. A good example is the old name for the horticultural fruit Ribus grossularia, which is now known as Ribus uva-crispa.

Grossulariifolia: [gros-syoo-lar-i-foh-li-a] From Grossus, which is Latin for thick or Grosseile which is French for a gooseberry and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble thick leaves of the gooseberries. A good example is Hibbertia grossulariifolia.

Grossulariifolius: [gros-syoo-lar-i-foh-li-us] From Grossus, which is Latin for thick or Grosseile which is French for a gooseberry and Folium, which is Latin for foliage. It refers to leaves, which resemble thick leaves of the gooseberries. A good example was Hibiscus grossulariifolius, which is now known as Alyogyne sp. Southern Coast.

Grossum: [gros-sum] From Grossus, which is Latin for thick. It refers to leaves and or culms, which are very thick or broad. A good example is the leaves and flowering culms on Microsorum grossum.

Grossus: [gros-sus] From Grossus, which is Latin for large. It refers to leaves and or culms, which are very thick or broad. A good example is the leaves and flowering culms on Actinoscirpus grossus.

Groveana: [gro-ve-a-na] Is named in honour of the Rev. C. H. Grove, who collected the type speciemen. A good example is Melaleuca groveana.

Growth habits: [groh-th, ha-bits] From Grow, which is Old English for to increase in size and Abit, which is Old French and Latin for I hold, I keep or partake in. It refers to the form of growth or general appearance of a variety or species of plant. A typical example of a small shrub with Thyme like leaves is Melaleuca thymifolia.

Gryans: [grahy-anz] Maybe from Grúllos, which is Ancient Greek or Gryllid, later to /Gryllī, which is Latin for a performer in a traditional Egyptian dance, a comic figure or caricature. It therefore may refer to leaves that appear to dance in the breeze. A good example of dancing leaves would be found on Desmodium gyrans.

Grylloana: [grahy-lo-a-na] Maybe from Grúllos, which is Ancient Greek or Gryllus/Gryllī, which are Latin for a performer in a traditional Egyptian dance, a comic figure or caricature. It may refer to insects which are known as crickets and may refer to plants, which are a favourite haunt or food source of many crickets. A good example Prostanthera grylloana.

Gryllus: [grahyl-lus] From Grúllos, which is Ancient Greek or Gryllid later to /Gryllī, which is Latin for a performer in a traditional Egyptian dance, a comic figure or caricature. It may refer to insects which are known as crickets and may refer to plants, which are a favourite haunt or food source of many crickets. A good example was Andropogon gryllus, which is now known as Chrysopogon grylluss.

Guajava: [gwar-va] From Guayaba, which is Latinized from the Spanish for any of the numerous tropical and subtropical American trees or shrubs bearing large, yellow, round to pear-shaped fruits. It refers to fruits, which belong to the genus Psidium. A good example is the yellow guava, Psidium guajava.

Guentheri: [goo-en-ther-ahy] Is named in honour of Guenther. A good example was Banksia guentheri, which is now known as Banksia spinulosa var. collina.

Guerinae: [goo-ri-nee] Is named in honour of Miss Jane Guerin, 1846-1890, who collected extensively for Mueller in and around the Geraldton and Murchison River areas of Western Australia. A good example is the yellow daisy Myriocephalus guerinae.

Gueriniana: [goo-ri-ni-a-na] Is named in honour of Miss Jane Guerin, 1846-1890, who collected extensively for Mueller in and around the Geraldton and Murchison River areas of Western Australia. A good example is the fern Lindsaea gueriniana.

Guettarda: [goo-tar-da] Is named in honour of Jean-Étienne Guittard; 1715-1786, who was a French naturalist and mineralogist who avidly defended Linnaeus system of classification against detractors and studied the effects of erosion. A good example is the beach Gardenia, Guettarda speciosa.

Guettardia: [goo-tar-di-a] Is named in honour of Jean-Étienne Guittard; 1715-1786, who was a French naturalist and mineralogist who avidly defended Linnaeus system of classification against detractors and studied the effects of erosion. A good example is found in fossils like Guettardia stellulata.

Guichenotia: [Gwee-che-no-ti-a] Is named in honour of honours Antoine Guichenot 1783-1867, who was a French gardener and later gardener’s boy on the 1801–1803 French scientific voyage to Australia under Nicolas Baudin. Guichenot was poorly educated, with poor literacy skills and little knowledge of plants, yet he worked tirelessly, collecting more plant specimens than the officially appointed botanist, Jean Baptiste Leschenault de la Tour. Despite his poor literacy, he labelled the specimens with much more useful annotations than the official party for future reference. A good example is Guichenotia sarotes and Guichenotia macrantha..

Guilandina: [gwee-lan-di-na] Is named in honour of Melchior Guilandino; 1520?-1…, who was an Italian herbalist. A good example is Guilandina bonduc, which is also known as Caesalpinia bonduc.

Guilfoylei: [gwee-foi-le-ahy] Is named in honour of William Robert Guilfoyl; 1783-1786, who was an English born Australian the director of the Melbourne Botanic Gardens. A good example is Polyscias guilfoylei or Cordyline fruiticosa var. guilfoylei.

Guilfoylia: [gwee-foi-li-a] Is named in honour of William Robert Guilfoyl; 1783-1786, who was an English born Australian the director of the Melbourne Botanic Gardens. A good example is Guilfoylia Monostylis.

Guinetii: [gwee-ne-ti-ahy] Is named in honour of Guinet. A good example is Acacia guinetii.

Guioa: [goi-a] Is named in honour of Jose Guio; 17..-18.., who was a painter of flowers from the Sesse and Mocino Expeditions and later was a book illustrator of plants. A good example is Guioa semiglauca.

Gularis: [gu-lar-is] From Gularis, which is Latin for a throat. It refers to the black throated honeyeater which is common in backyards throughout its range. A good example is Melithreptus gularis.

Gulielmi: [gul-li-el-mi] Is named in honour of Gulielm. A good example was Frenela gulielmi, which is now known as Callitris gulielmi.

Gullickii: [gul-li-ki-ahy] Is named in honour of Gullick. A good example is Eucalyptus gullickii.

Gulliveri: [gu-li-ver-ahy] Is named in honour of Thomas Allen Gulliver jnr.; 1847-1931, who was a collector of plants and curator of the Townsville Queens Botanic Garden. A good example is Heterachne gulliver.

Gulubia: [gul-u-bi-a] From Gulubia which is Latinized for the Indonesian vernacular for this palm tree. A good example was Gulubia costata, which is now known as Hydriastele costata.

Gumira: [gu-mi-ra] From Gumira which is probably Latinized from the village of Gumira in Zimbabee but the actual meaning is still unclear. The Australian species have all been transferred to the Premna genus. A good example was Gumira limbata, which is now known as Premna limbata.

Gummifera: [gu-mi-fer-a] From Kómmi, which is Ancient Greek, Cummi, which is Old Latin or much later for Gummi which is Latin for a sweet resin from trees or a resin used as a glue and Ferum which is Latin for to bear or bearing. It refers to trees or shrubs, which have copious quantities of one of the type resins mentioned above. A good example is Corymbia gummifera.

Gummiferum: [gum-i-fer-um] From Gummi which is Latin for gum or glue and Ferum, which is Latin for to bear. It refers to the trees or shrubs, which have copious quantities of resin. A good example is Ceropetalum gummiferum.

Gunnera: [gun-ner-a] Is named in honour of Johan Gunnerus; 1718-1773, who was a Norwegian bishop and botanist. A good example is the exotic with extremely large leaves from Brazil on Gunnera manicata and the tiny New Zealand leaf species Gunnera monoica.

Gunnessia: [gun-nes-si-a] Is named in honour of Gunn but which Gunn cannot be substantiated. A good example is the monotypic specie of Gunnessia pepo.

Gunnia: [gun-ni-a] Is named in honour of Ronald Campbell Gunn; 1808-1881, who was a South African born British botanist who collected and settled in Tasmania. A good example is Gunnia septifraga.

Gunniana: [gun-ni-a-na] Is probably named in honour of Ronald Campbell Gunn; 1808-1881, who was a South African born British botanist who collected and settled in Tasmania. A good example is Deyeuxia gunniana.

Gunnianum: [guh-ni-a-num] Is probably named in honour of Ronald Campbell Gunn; 1808-1881, who was a South African born Tasmanian collector of plants and botanist. A good example is Epilobium gunnianum.

Gunnianus: [gu-ni-a-nus] Is named in honour of Ronald Campbell Gunn; 1808-1881, who was an early Tasmanian collector of plants and botanist. A good example is Ranunculus gunnianus.

Gunnii: [gu-ni-ahy] Is named in honour of Ronald Campbell Gunn; 1808-1881, who was a South African born Tasmanian collector of plants and botanist. A good example is Eucalyptus gunnii.

Gunniopsis [gu-ni-op-sis] Is named in honour of Ronald Campbell Gunn; 1808-1881, who was a South African born Tasmanian collector of plants and botanist and ópsis, which is Ancient Greek for an aspect that is alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which resemble the Gunnia genus. (I was unable to find any direct references to this particular genus and as the other references to Gunnare specific names and with the genus Gunnesia I have no direct evidence to which Gunn it was named. So by deduction it only left Gunnia as the main genre possibility.) A good example is Gunniopsis intermedia.

Guringalia: [Gu-rin-ga-li-a] From Guringai, which is Latinized for the Aboriginal people based around Sydney. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the Guringai tribal territory. A good example is Guringalia dimorpha.

Gurulumundensis: [Gu-ru-lu-mun-den-sis] From Gurulumdi which is Latinized from the vernacular of the Aboriginal word for low hills and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered near Gurulumdi in southern central Queensland. A good example is Calytrix gurulmundensis.

Gustafsenii: [gus-taf-se-ni-ahy] Is honour of Gustafsen. A good example is Halgania gustafsenii.

Gustaviodes: [gus-ta-vi-oi-deez] Is honour of King Gustav the third of Sweden and Eîdos/Oides, which is Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to the similarity of the type specimen to the genus Gustavea. A good example is Syzygium gustaviodes.

Guthreieana: [guth-rei-e-a-nu] Is named in honour of Christine Guthrie; 1953–20.. , Secretary and Treasurer of the Grevillea Study Group of the Australian Native Plants Society, and Editor of its Newsletter. A good example is Grevillea guthrieana.

Guttata: [gu-tei-ta] From Guttāta, which is Latin for spotted or speckled. It refers to leaves or phyllodes, which are covered in small glandular dots. A good example is Acacia guttata.

Guttation: [gu-tei-shon] From gutta, which is Latin for a drop of liquid. It refers to the process by which plants excrete excess water through drops from their leaves. For some fungi this is so common that it is a reliable identification feature, while for others it is virtually unknown. Most guttating mushrooms produce clear droplets, often more viscid than water. Plants have hydathodes at the end of the veins, through which this excess water is lost in the form of droplets. It takes place mostly in small plants.

Guttatum: [gu-tei-tum] From Guttātum, which is Latin for spotted. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in small glandular dots. A good example is Stylidium guttatum.

Guttule: [gu-tyool] From Guttātum, which is Latin for spotted. It refers to structures or organs, which have a small oil-like drop visible through a microscope within a fungal spore. A good example is the spores on Morchella australiana.

Guymeri: [gahy-mer-i] Is named in honour of Gordon Paul Guymer; 1953-20.., who was an Australian botanist. It refers to structures or organs, which are covered in small glandular dots. A good example is Acacia guymeri.

Gým: [jim] From Gumnós or more often in botany Gýmnnos which are Ancient Greek for naked or bare. It refers to any plant, whose seeds are not enclosed by an ovary.

Gýmnadenioides: [jim-na-den-i-oi-deez] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare, Adena/Adenos, which is Ancient Greek for a gland or glandular and Eîdos/Oides, which are Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which have glands that are glabrous similar to other closely related species. A good example is Microtis gymnadenioides, which is now known as Microtis pulchella.

Gýmnagathis: [jim-na-ga-this] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and Agathos, which is Ancient Greek for a ball of thread. It refers to the fruiting capsules, where the seeds are generally bare or with a few loose threads. A good example is Gymnagathis teretifolia, which is now known as Melaleuca teretifolia.

Gýmnanthera: [jim-nan-ther-a] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and ántha/ánthos, which are  Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organs on a flower or the flower. It refers to all parts of flowers, which are totally naked or glabrous. A good example is Gymnanthera oblonga.

Gýmnelaea: [jim-ne-la-ee] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked threads and Ella which is Ancient Greek for a femine form or lady like. It usually refers to filaments, which are fine, glabrous and exposed once the petals dehist. A good example is Gymnelaea ligustrina, which is now known as Notelaea ligustrina.

Gýmnema: [jim-ne-ma] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and Nêma, which is Ancient Greek or Nēma, which is Latin for a thread. It refers to the seeds, which often hang by a thread. A good example is Gymnema sylvestre.

Gýmnocaulos: [jim-no-kor-los] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and klados, which is Ancient Greek or Caulis which is Latin for a stem or branch. It refers to stems and branches, which are glabrous. A good example is Cyperus gymnocaulos.

Gýmnocephala: [jim-no-ke/se-fei-la] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Cephalos, which is Latin for a head. It refers to flower heads, which are glabrous despite the rest of the plant that maybe covered in hairs.A good example is Stawellia gymnocephala.

Gýmnocephalum: [jim-no-ke/se-fa-lum] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Cephalos, which is Latin for a head. It refers to flower heads, which are glabrous despite the rest of the plant that maybe covered in hairs. A good example is Gnaphalium gymnocephalum.

Gýmnocephalus: [jim-no-ke/se-fa-lus] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bareand Kephalḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Cephalos, which is Latin for a head. It refers to flower heads, which are glabrous despite the rest of the plant that maybe covered in hairs. A good example was Euchiton gymnocephalus, which is now known as Euchiton japonicus.

Gýmnochaeta: [jim-no-chee-ta] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and Chaeta, which is Ancient Greek for a bristle. It refers to awns, which are glabrous. A good example was Gymnochaeta drummondii, which is now known as Schoenus submicrostachyus.

Gýmnoclada: [jim-no-kla-da]From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and klados, which is Ancient Greek or Caulis, which is Latin for a stem or branch. It refers to the stems and branches, which are glabrous. A good example is Wahlenbergia gymnoclada.

Gýmnocymes: [jim-no-sahymz] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and kûma, which is Ancient Greek for any type of swelling. It refers to the prominence of the pileus, which resembles a large swollen head. A good example is Gymnomyces wirrabarensis.

Gýmnogramma: [jim-no-gram-ma] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and Gramma which is Ancient Greek for a written line. It refers to organs, which have longitudinal lines or faint ribs. A good example is the sporangia on the fern Gymnogramma leptophylla, which is now known as Anogramma leptophylla.

Gýmnogyne: [jim-no-jahyn] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and and Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus which is Latin for a woman. It refers to seeds in the ovaries which are glabrous. A good example was Gymnogyne cotuloides, which is now known as Cotula gymnogyne.

Gýmnopetala: [jim-no-pe-ta-la] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bareand Petalon, which is Ancient Greek for a petal. It refers to the prominence of the petals on the flowers. A good example is Boronia barkeriana subsp. gymnopetala.

Gýmnopilus: [jim-no-pi-lus] From Pîlos, which is Ancient Greek for a felt cap or Pīleus which is Latin for a skullcap. It refers to fungi fruiting bodies, which are glabrous. A good example is Gymnopilus tyallus.

Gýmnorhiza: [jim-no-rahy-za] From Gýmnos, which is Greek for naked or bare and Rhiza, which is Ancient Greek for a root or rhizome. It refers to the roots or rhizomes, which are free of hairs and scales or glabrous. A good example is Bruguiera gymnorhiza.

Gýmnoschoenus: [jim-no-shoo-nus] From Gýmnos, which is Greek for naked or bare and Schoinos, which is Ancient Greek for the flower bearing culm of a rush. It refers to the long flowering culms, which are totally naked or glabrous. A good example is Gýmnoschoenus sphaerocephalus.

Gýmnosperm: [jim-no-sperm] From Gýmnos, which is Greek for naked or bare and Spermum, which is Ancient Greek for seed. It refers to the seeds, which are unenclosed in an ovary and usually found in woody cones. A good example is Callitris glaucophylla.

A native gymnosperm is Callitris endelicheri.

Gýmnosperma: [jim-no-sperma] From Gýmnos, which is Greek for naked or bare and Spermum, which is Ancient Greek for seed. It refers to the seeds, which are unenclosed in an ovary and usually found in woody cones. A good example is the moss Trichia gymnosperma that has woody looking sporangia.

Gýmnosporia: [jim-no-spor-i-a] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and Spore, which is Ancient Greek for a germ cell and/or seed. It refers to seeds or spores, which are not enclosed in an ovary as is the case of fern spore and other byrophytes. A good example is Gýmnosporia inermis.

Gýmnostachys: [jim-no-sta-shis] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and Stákhus, which is Ancient Greek or later Stachys which is Latin for a spike. It refers to spikes, which do not have a spathe. A good example is Gýmnostachys anceps.

Gýmnostoma: [jim-no-stoh-ma] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and Stoma, which is Ancient Greek for a mouth. It refers to the stomata or pores, which are glabrous. A good example is Gýmnostoma australianum.

Gýmnostyles: [jim-no-stahy-les] From Gýmnos, which is Ancient Greek for naked or bare and Stízō, which is Ancient Greek or Stylus, which is Latin for a column. It refers to the styles on flowers, which are glabrous. A good example was Gýmnostyles anthemifolia, which is now known as Soliva anthemifolia.

Gýmnoteles: [jim-no-te-les] From Gýmnos, which is Greek for naked or bare and Télos/Téleios/Teleîn which are Greek for afar or a distance. It refers to plants, which are easily seen From A, distance. A good example is Eucalyptus gymnoteles.

Gympiense: [jim-pi-ens] From Gimpi Gimpi, which is Latinized from the local Kabi Aboriginal vernacular for the  Gympie district and refers the Stinging Tree Dendrochnide excelsa and Anum/Ensis, which is Latin for to originate from. It refers to plants, which were first discovered in the rainforests surrounding Gympie in south eastern Queensland. A good example is Solanum gympiense.

Gýnaecandrous: [gahynee-kan-dros] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. They are imperfect flowers where the pistillate flowers and staminate flowers are born on different spikelets but from the same spike, raceme or cluster. The male flowers are usually born basically while the female flowers are usually born apically. They differ from Androgynous in that the male and female flowers are produced randomly on the same spike or raceme. A good example is the flowers on Carex inversa.

nagamous: [gahy-na-ga-mos] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Gamos which is Ancient Greek for to marry. It refers to a description of an inflorescence which has pistillate flowers inside or above and neuter flowers outside or below.

nandrial: [gahy-nan-dri-al] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to where the stamens and carpels, which are fused together. A good example is to be found on Cymbidium sauve.

nandriris: [gahy-nan-dri-ris] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman, Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Îris, which is Ancient Greek or Īris, which is Latin for any of plants, which belong to the Iraceae family. It refers to the stamens and pistils, which are united. A good example is Gynandriris setifolia, which is now known as Moraea setifolia.

nandropis: [gahy-nan-dro-pis] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman, Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man and Opsis, which is Ancient Greek for to have a similar look or appearance. It refers to plants, which look very similar to the Gynandra in that the stamens and pistils which are united are difficult to separate the sexes. A good example was Gynandropsis cleomoides, which is now known as Cleome cleomoides.

nandrous: [gahy-nan-dros] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to stamens, which are attached to the ovary, style or rarely the underside of the stigma. A good example is the stamens being attached to the style on Hibiscus splendens.

natrix: [jahy/gahy-na-triks] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Thrix, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to the ovaries being hairy. A good example is Gynatrix pulchella.

necandrous: [jahy/gahy-ne-kan-dros] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Andros, which is Ancient Greek for a man. It refers to inflorescence of pistillate flowers, which are found inside or above and staminate or outside or below, as in spikes. A good example is Carex fascicularis.

nehermaphroditic: [jahy/gahy-ne-her-ma-fro-di-tik] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Hermaphroditica which is Ancient Greek for a hermaphrodite. It refers to plants, which bear both female, pistillate flowers and bisexual, hermaphroditic flowers on the same plant. A good example is Carex archeri.

nobasic: [ji-noh-ba-sik] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Base which is Ancient Greek for a base or level starting point. It refers to the elevation of the receptacle of a flower bearing gynoecium or having it based in a central position. A good example is Gmelina leichhardtii.

Gýnochthodes: [ji-noh-ch-thoh-deez] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Kalyx, which is Ancient Greek for a cup and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to flowers, which resemble a deep cup or mug. A good example is Gynochthodes australiensis.

Gýnodioecious: [ji-noh-dahy-ee-shos] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Dioeciously, which is Ancient Greek for bearing either male or female flowers on the same plant. It refers to plants, which have both perfect flowers and some pistillate flowers on the same plant. A good example is table herb Rosmarinus officinalis and the native Ptilotus like Ptilotus macrocephalus.

Gýnoecious: [ji-no-e-se-os] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Oikia/Oikos, which is Ancient Greek for a house. It refers to a plant, which may have only female flowers or both male and female flowers. A good example is the native cucumber Sicyos australis.

Gýnoecium: [ji-noh-e-si-um] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman. It refers to a description of the female organs of a flower which includes the ovary, style and stigma. (Antonym androecium) A good example is the commercial Pawpaw where the plants have either female flowers or male flowers Carica papaya.

Gýnomonoecious: [ji-no-mo-no-e-si-os] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Monoecious which is Ancient Greek for bearing either male or female flowers. It refers to plants, which have both perfect flowers and some hermaphroditic flowers on the same plant.

Gýnophore: [ji-no-for] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Phoron which is Ancient Greek for a type of stalk. It refers to an elongated extension of a pedicel or rarely the style above the other floral parts. A good example is the style and stigma on Passiflora aurantia.

Gýnopogon: [ji-no-poh-gon] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Pogon, which is Ancient Greek for a beard. It refers to the ovary, style or stigma, which are covered in hairs. A good example was Gynopogon illicifolium, which is now known as Alyxia illicifolia.

Gýnostemial: [ji-no-ste-mi-al] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus which is Latin for a woman and Stemium, which is Ancient Greek for a type of stalk. It refers to where the stamens refuse along the column with the carpels stigma and style. A good example is the old name for the column on orchids such as Cymbidium sauve.

nura: [ji-nyoo-ra] From Gýnos/Gunḗ, which is Ancient Greek or Gynus, which is Latin for a woman and Oura, which is Ancient Greek for a tail. It refers to the style’s apexes, which have a short tail. A good example is the daisy Gynura drymophila var. drymophila.

psicola: [jip-si-koh-la] From Gypsos which is Ancient Greek for gypsum From Kola, which is Ancient Greek or Cola, which is Latin for to dwell or to reside at. It refers to plants, which prefer to grow on chalky, calcareous soils or limestone soils or at times skeletal soils over limestone. A good example is Goodenia gypsicola

psophila: [jip-so-fi-la] From Gypsos, which is Ancient Greek for gypsum and Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved. It refers to a genus in general which much prefers to grow on chalky, calcareous soils or limestone soils or at times skeletal soils over limestone. A good example is the daisy Gypsophila tubulosa.

Gypsophiloides: [jip-so-fi-loi-deez] From Gypsos, which is Ancient Greek for gypsum, Phílos, which is Ancient Greek for loving or to be loved and Eîdos/Oides, which is Ancient Greek for alike or similar to. It refers to plants, which prefers chalky, calcareous soils or limestone soils or at times skeletal soils over limestone environments like the Gysophila genus. A good example was Stylidium gypsophiloides, which is now known as Stylidium divaricatum.

ridia: [ji-ri-di-a] From Gyro, which is Ancient Greek for revolving around or turning. It refers to fruiting bodies, which have margins that twist and turn. A good example is Graphina gyridia.

rocarpus: [jahy/gahy-roh-kar-pus] From Gyro, which is Ancient Greek for revolving around or turning and Carpus which is Ancient Greek for a fruit. It refers to fruits, which a long single wing and act like a helicopter as they float on the breeze. A good example is Gyrocarpus americanus.

Gýrostemon: [jahy/gahy-roh-stei-mon] From Gyro, which is Ancient Greek for revolving around or turning and Stamon, which is Ancient Greek for the male reproductive organ in the flowers or the flower. It refers to the stamens which remain attached to the outside of the fruits. A good example is Gyrostemon thesioides.

Gýnotricha: [jahy/gahy-noh-trahy-ka] From and Gyro, which is Ancient Greek for revolving around or turning and Tricha, which is Ancient Greek for a hair. It refers to hairs, which are curly. A good example is Gnephosis gynotricha.

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